US2063915A - Traveling crane - Google Patents

Traveling crane Download PDF

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US2063915A
US2063915A US756858A US75685834A US2063915A US 2063915 A US2063915 A US 2063915A US 756858 A US756858 A US 756858A US 75685834 A US75685834 A US 75685834A US 2063915 A US2063915 A US 2063915A
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frame
carriage
driving
crane
drums
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US756858A
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Benjamin F Fitch
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Motor Terminals Co
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Motor Terminals Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C7/00Runways, tracks or trackways for trolleys or cranes
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C2700/00Cranes
    • B66C2700/01General aspects of mobile cranes, overhead travelling cranes, gantry cranes, loading bridges, cranes for building ships on slipways, cranes for foundries or cranes for public works
    • B66C2700/012Trolleys or runways

Description

Dec. 15, 1936. B. F. FITCH TRAVELING CRANE Filed Dec. 1.0, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet l mm figy mm 6 Flrq. 1
Dec. 15, 1936. B FlTcH 2,063,915
I TRAVELING CRANE Filed Dec. 10, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR ATTO RNEYS' Dec. 15, 1936. B. F. FITCH TRAVELING CRANE- Filed Dec. 10, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR W ATTORNEYS Dec. 15, 1936. B F H 2,063,915,
TRAVELING CRANE Filed Dec. 10, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 @@w@ a ma 391M, fgzm/ Patented Dec. 15, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TRAVELING CRANE Application December 10, 1934, Serial No. 756,858
12 Claims.
This invention relates to a traveling crane adapted to lift and transport demountable automobile bodies or containers with their loads, to effect the transference between different vehicles or between a vehicle and a station platform or support. The traveling frame of the crane may be mounted to move transversely on a bridge carried by elevated supports or may be on top of a gantry, as desired. In either case I have provided four cables depending from winding drums and adapted to be secured at four corners of a rectangle directly to the container or to a cradle which may be attached to such container, and I provide means by which two of said cables may be shifted laterally as a unit with reference to the other two, so that the area served by the cables may be effectively registered with a truck which need not stand in exact parallelism with the crane.
The present application is a continuation in part of my application Ser. No. 723,112, filed April 30th, 1934. Among the objects stated in that parent case is the provision of transmission mechanism between the raising motor and the cable drums in the form of standard driving axle construction of automobile trucks. Such mechanism is underslung from the crane frame so that it may be lowered intact for repairs whenever necessary. Such features being also shown in this case, reference is made to the parent application for claims thereon.
The invention of the present application is concerned particularly with provisions for power operated weaving, that is, shifting the cables which support one end of the body toward one side or the other of the frame to enable the proper engagement with the body not accurately aligned with the frame, or to deposit the lowered body on a truck frame not so aligned. In prior applications of mine I have effected this weaving by shifting sheaves over which cables depend. By the present invention I am enabled to effect the result more directly by shifting the cable drums themselves, and this enables the cables at both the fixed and shifting ends of the frame to depend directly from the cable drums to a suitable suspended cradle which may engage a demountable body.
The raising and weaving mechanism I have provided, and which is included in this invention, is powerful and at the same time compact, and requires comparatively small space, so that it may be mounted almost entirely within the confines of the crane frame itself. The raising, weaving and trolleying mechanisms are all of a selflocking nature, thus avoiding necessity of brakes of any sort. The crane frame carrying such mechanisms may be mounted on. any suitable support, either stationary or part of the traveling crane bridge, or at the top of a gantry, as desired.
The details of my invention will become apparent from the description about to be given of a preferred embodiment thereof, illustrated in the drawings hereof.
In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a crane embodying my invention, this view showing the lifting members attached'to a demountable body which is suspended thereby above the trailer of a highway truck; Fig. 2 is a plan of the construction of the part shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a plan on a larger scale, of the crane proper; Figs. 4 and 5 are vertical longitudinal sections of the crane in the planes indicated by the lines 4-4 and 55 respectively on Fig. 3; Fig. 6 is a detail in vertical section of one of the four cable drums, as indicated, for instance, by the line 66 on Fig. 3; Fig. '7 is a fragmentary elevation of a portion of the weaving mechanism, the location being indicated by the line !---1 on Fig. 3; Fig. 8 is a vertical section through the worm reduction gearing for operating one of the cable drum units, as indicated by the correspondingly numbered line in Fig. 3; Fig. 9 is a vertical section through the worm reduction gear of the weaving mechanism as indicated by the line 9-9 on Fig. 3; Fig. 10 is a vertical section through the worm reduction gear of the mechanism for propelling the crane frame, as indicated by the line |0I0 on Figs. 3 and 5.
As shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the mechanism of my crane is carried by a traveling, rectangular, horizontal frame II], which carries supporting wheels 20 riding on suitable supported rails 5. The rectangular frame work of the crane, as shown in Fig. 3, comprises two side members ll, l2, and two end members l3, l4, and four intermediate members l5, l6, l1 and I8, parallel with the end members. Between each end member and the adjacent cross member are wheels 20, supported by bearings on such members and adapted to ride on the guide rails 5 of the bridge. There are four of these wheels, one substantially in each corner of the rectangle forming the frame work.
Two of the wheels 20, one on each track 5, furnish the driving means for the frame across the bridge. A motor 2|, supported by frame bars 22, drives a worm 23 meshing with a worm wheel 24 (Fig. 10) in a casing 29 on a long shaft 25, ex-
tending across the bridge. At each end of the shaft 25, which is journalled in the frame I9, are pinions 26. These pinions engage internal gears 2'! in the corresponding wheels 29 to drive the wheels as the motor 2| is electrically excited. The longitudinal transmission shaft 25, which is preferably made of separate aligned connected sections extends through the various frame members, and if desired may have bearings mounted thereon and suitable couplings 28 allowing sufficient flexibility to prevent binding.
Two of the raising cables 3!, 32, are mounted on winding drums 35, which are rotated, but do not shift axially, while the other two cables 33, 34 are mounted on similar drums 36, which, to effect the weaving of this invention, as hereinafter described, may be shifted axially. I will describe first the means for supporting and operating the drums 35, shown near the bottom of Fig. 3, and near the right-hand end of Fig. 5.
The cable drums and the housings 59 which carry them and contain their driving axles, are mounted between the frame beams I5 and I6, and thus stand close to the supporting wheels 29. This construction reduces the bending moment of the crane frame and allows the frame to be made of lighter construction than otherwise. The peculiar construction of the transmission mechanism to the cable drum, which, as heretofore explained, is of standard automobile con struction and suspended by the frame members, and which is claimed in my parent application, is here shown in Figs. 3, 4, 6 and 8. In those figures 59 indicates a hollow housing which has an enlarged central portion of approximately spherical form 5|, and lateral extending tubular portions 52. These tubular portions are approximately square, as shown in Fig. 4, and mounted between a pair of clamping plates and 56 and held by vertical bolts 51 passing through these clamping plates and through another plate 58, which rests on top of short frame beams 59, extending between the frame beams I5 and I6 and rigidly connected to them. Thus, the housing is effectively suspended from the crane frame and lies partially in the space between transverse members I5 and I6.
Within the center portion of the housing BI is a suitable worm wheel 69 (Fig. 8) rigidly connected with the two aligned driving axles 6| (Fig. 6) which are connected at their ends, as hereinafter described, to the cable drums 35. The driving mechanism, hereinafter described. operates a worm 64 within the housing below the worm wheel, with which it meshes. On the outer end of each axle BI is a head 65, which is bolted to a sleeve 66, surrounding the housing 52 and journalled thereon by means of interposed roller bearings 6'! and 68, the bearing space being closed by a grease washer 69 after the manner of the standard mounting and connection of the hub of an automobile driving wheel.
The cable drum 35 is a hollow member havin on its exterior an annular region bounded by circula-r ribs II and 12 for the reception of various turns of the cable. Beyond this cable region the drum extends as a sleeve 15 terminating in an outward flange 16. This flange is bolted to an annular flange TI, formed on the exterior of the hub sleeve 66. At its other end the cable drum has an end wall 78, with a central hub 79, in which is rigidly mounted a stub shaft 89. This shaft extends into a roller bearing 8I, mounted in a cage 82 which, by means of a flange 83, is bolted to the web of a short channel beam 85,
which has its ends rigidly secured to the cross beams I5 and I6 of the crane frame.
The arrangement for supporting and driving the cable drums at the weaving end of the crane which is shown near the top of Fig. 3 and near the left-hand of Fig. 4, is identical with that described, except that the housing and drums, instead of being mounted on the rigid frame, are mounted on a shiftable carriage 90, composed of a pair of main beams 9I, end beams 92, and intermediate beams 93. The intermediate beams 93 correspond to the beams 59, which support the housing 59 at the other end, and carry corresponding plates and bolts 96 by which the housing I99 is suspended. The winding drums 36 at this end are journalled on the housing and connected to the drive shafts, and the end supporting studs are journalled in roller bearings in the cage 98, secured to the end beams 92 in the manner heretofore described.
The carriage 90, in which the drums 36 and their driving mechanism within the housing I99 are mounted, is provided with four laterally projecting studs on which are supporting wheels I I9, which track on rails III and H2, rigidly supported on the frame beams I! and I8. To shift the cradle one way or the other, as desired, I provide a motor I29, the armature shaft I2I of which is connected by a suitable coupling with a worm I22, meshing with a worm wheel I23 (Fig. 9), journalled in a housing I 24 secured to the frame beam IT. The worm wheel is on a shaft I25, which carries a crank I26 (Fig. '7) having a roller I21 on its crank pin, which lies between a pair of vertical gibs I28 secured to the side member 9| of the carriage.
It results from the construction described that when the motor I29 is energized the moving crank pin travels in the space between the gibs I28 after the manner of a scotch yoke and thus shifts the carriage 99 in one direction or the other. This shifting, if allowed to continue for a complete rotation of the shaft I25, would move the carriage to the limit in one direction and then reverse it and move it to the limit in the other direction, and accordingly, it is not necessary to have a reversing motor, as I can obtain a shift in either direction by allowing the carriage to move first in the other direction and then return.
However, as the movement of the carriage is comparatively slow, it is entirely feasible to provide a reversing motor and actuate it in one direction or the other according to the direction of shift desired for the carriage.
The worm I93, which drives the worm wheel I92 (Fig. 4) at the weaving end is in the same horizontal plane as the worm 64 at the fixed end. Both these worms are driven simultaneously by a common motor. However, the connection to the carriage worm employs an extensible universal shaft to enable the drive to be effected for any position of the carriage. The mechanism for driving these two worms will now be described.
Extending longitudinally of the crane frame in a central region are parallel beams I39, spaced apart. Beneath the region between these beams is suitably suspended a housing I32, having a central chamber and extending sleeves I33 similar to that heretofore described but preferably of smaller construction. Each of the sleeves I33 is embraced by plates through which pass bolts I34, securing the housing to brackets I35, depending from the frame beams I39. Within the housing I32 is a driving worm I49 connected by a suitable coupling with the armature shaft MI of a motor I44, supported by frame beams I45 leading from the adjacent beam I30 to the side beam I2.
Within the housing I32 is a worm wheel I50 (Fig. 4) meshing with the worm I40 and rigid with two aligned axles, one of which extends out of the housing and is suitably coupled as at II to the worm 64. The axle at the other end extends within a suitably supported bearing mem ber I52 and terminates in one member of a gimbal joint I53 connecting it to a universal shaft I55. This shaft is tubular and slidably receives a splined extension I56 of a shaft I51, which is connected by a gimbal joint I58 with the worm I03. The telescoping universal shaft accordingly maintains continuous driving connection between the axle in the housing I32 and the worm I03 of the weaving unit. Accordingly, when the motor I44 is energized the rotation is simultaneously transmitted to all four of the cable drums, operating them to the same extent to wind the cables in or out, and thus raise or lower the body while maintaining it level. This action is entirely independent of the weaving, which may take place during the raising or lowering of the load.
The four depending cables 3i, 32, 33, 34, may, if desired, be directly connected to the load, as, for instance, to the lift hooks a at the eaves of the demountable body A in Fig. 1, or I may employ a rectangular floating cradle I60 (Figs. 1 and 5) having depending loops or shackles I61, which may engage such lift hooks, the cables being connected to this cradle. The cradle shown has sheaves I63, Which may be journalled about the same bolts I64 which carry the shackles, the cables extending in bights about these sheaves. As shown, the upper ends of the cables 3| and 32 are attached to hooks I65, secured to the cross frame beam I5, while the corresponding reaches of the cables 33 and 34 are attached to hooks I66 secured to the carriage beam 9|.
It will be understood from the description given that the body, notwithstanding its heavy load, may be readily raised by a comparatively light motor, and the weaving of such body is likewise effected by a light motor through the worm reduction gearing. Similarly a light motor may effect the propulsion of the crane. It will be noticed that all of the worm gears are encased in suitable housings to enable them to be packed in grease; rolling bearings of standard construction are employed throughout; suitable means are provided for making adjustments from time to time in the mesh of the gears.
I claim:
1. The combination, in a hoist, of a rigid frame adapted to span and ride on spaced tracks, a cable drum mounted thereon, a movable carriage on the frame, a cable drum mounted on the carriage, common means for simultaneously supplying power to the two drums, and power means for shifting the carriage.
2. The combination of a substantially rigid horizontal frame, a pair of cable drums mounted therein, driving mechanism for said drums, a movable carriage on the frame within the horizontal limits of the frame, a pair of cable drums mounted in the carriage, mechanism for moving the carriage axially of its drums, and four cables anchored to the four drums and depending therefrom.
3. In a crane, the combination of a substantially rigid frame, a drum and driving gearing therefor suspended from the frame, a carriage on the frame within the limits of its rigid portions, another drum and driving gearing mounted on the carriage, means for operating the said driving gearing, and power mechanism for shifting the carriage.
4. In a traveling crane, the combination of a frame, an automobile-driving-axle type housing fixedly suspended from the frame, a carriage movable on the frame, another automobile-driving-axle type housing fixedly suspended from the carriage, reduction gearing and lateral shafts in the respective housings, raising drums mounted on both ends of each of the housings connected to the respective shafts, a raising motor and transmission mechanism between said motor and the two reduction gearings.
5. The combination of a frame having mutually rigid spaced sides and ends, a self-contained unit mounted on the frame, said unit comprising, a hollow beam, a pair of cable drums supported on the beam and mechanism in the hollow beam for driving said drums, a carriage on the frame and. shiftable with respect to said sides and ends, another self-contained unit comprising, a hollow beam mounted on the carriage, a pair of cable drums mounted on the beam, and mechanism in the beam for driving the drums, four cables depending from the four drums, and means for shifting the carriage.
6. The combination of a frame the parts of which are mutually rigid, a pair of cable drums in fixed position thereon, mechanism for driving the same mounted on the frame, a shiftable carriage mounted on the frame and supported thereby, a pair of cable drums and mechanism for driving the same mounted on the carriage, power mechanism mounted on the frame and coupled with both of said driving mechanisms, cables wound about said drums, and means for shifting the carriage.
7. The combination of an overhead traveling frame having horizontally spaced mutually rigid parallel ends, a carriage removably mounted thereon between said ends, a rigid housing suspended on the underside of the carriage, reduction gearing and a driving shaft within the housing, a raising drum connected with the shaft and supported in part by the housing, and coacting mechanisms mounted on the crane frame and carriage for moving the carriage.
8. In a traveling crane, the combination of a frame, a carriage movably mounted thereon, at raising drum mounted in the carriage, said carriage having an upright guideway, on one side thereof, a crank on the crane frame beside the carriage and having a pin occupying the guideway, and a motor on the crane frame for actuating the crank to reciprocate the carriage.
9. The combination of a crane frame having spaced mutually rigid ends, a movable carriage mounted on the frame and wholly supported thereby between said ends, a pair of winding drums on the carriage, driving mechanism in the carriage connected with the winding drums, a motor on the frame, oscillatory mechanism driven by the motor and connected with the carriage to reciprocate the carriage, and a lifting motor on the crane frame connected with the driving mechanism on the carriage.
10. An overhead hoist comprising a generally rectangular frame having rigidly connected opposite side and end members, a pair of self-contained hoisting units each including a pair of cable-winding members, driving shafting therefor, a common housing containing and supporting the shafting, and driving gearing in the housing for operating said shafting; movable means on the frame for supporting the housing of one of said units for movement parallel to the axes of the winding members thereof, a power unit on the frame located between said hoisting units, and driving means connecting the same with the respective driving gearings of the units, said driving means including flexible extensible means to maintain the driving connection to the movable hoisting unit.
11. An overhead hoist comprising a frame having spaced side frame members and means rigidly connecting said members, two hoisting units each including a pair of cable actuating members and driving means interconnecting the actuating members of each pair, a support between the frame members for one of said units, said support being fixed relative to the frame members, a carriage between the frame members supporting the other unit, a trackway on the said connecting means of the frame for supporting the carriage, power means for operating the driving means of said units, and separate power means for shifting the carriage.
12. An overhead hoist comprising a substantially rigid horizontal frame, two parallel hoisting units located within the horizontal limits of the frame, a rigid support on the frame for one unit, a carriage movably mounted on the frame for supporting the other unit, a driving motor and a common driving means therefrom to both said units for operating them simultaneously, said means including a flexible driving connection to the carriage supported unit, a separate motor and reduction gearing therefor supported on the frame and disposed adjacent the carriage, and a reciprocating device connecting the gearing with the carriage for moving one unit with reference to the other.
BENJAMIN F. FITCH.
US756858A 1934-12-10 1934-12-10 Traveling crane Expired - Lifetime US2063915A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1219198B (en) * 1961-07-26 1966-06-16 Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg Ag Device for rotating a load suspended from three load hooks around a vertical axis
US3671069A (en) * 1970-07-15 1972-06-20 Fruehaul Corp Cargo container lifting and spacing apparatus
US3945675A (en) * 1974-05-30 1976-03-23 Nippon Kokan Kabushiki Kaisha Block loader

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE1219198B (en) * 1961-07-26 1966-06-16 Maschf Augsburg Nuernberg Ag Device for rotating a load suspended from three load hooks around a vertical axis
US3671069A (en) * 1970-07-15 1972-06-20 Fruehaul Corp Cargo container lifting and spacing apparatus
US3945675A (en) * 1974-05-30 1976-03-23 Nippon Kokan Kabushiki Kaisha Block loader

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