US2063486A - Tabulating machine - Google Patents

Tabulating machine Download PDF

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US2063486A
US2063486A US663472A US66347233A US2063486A US 2063486 A US2063486 A US 2063486A US 663472 A US663472 A US 663472A US 66347233 A US66347233 A US 66347233A US 2063486 A US2063486 A US 2063486A
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card
brushes
brush
drum
cam
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US663472A
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Fred M Carroll
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International Business Machines Corp
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International Business Machines Corp
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Priority to US663472A priority Critical patent/US2063486A/en
Priority claimed from US75556834 external-priority patent/US2063487A/en
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06KRECOGNITION OF DATA; PRESENTATION OF DATA; RECORD CARRIERS; HANDLING RECORD CARRIERS
    • G06K13/00Conveying record carriers from one station to another, e.g. from stack to punching mechanism
    • G06K13/02Conveying record carriers from one station to another, e.g. from stack to punching mechanism the record carrier having longitudinal dimension comparable with transverse dimension, e.g. punched card
    • G06K13/07Transporting of cards between stations
    • G06K13/073Transporting of cards between stations with continuous movement

Description

Dec. 8` i936. F. M CARRQLL 2,063,486

' TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 50, i955 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIGA.

lul lumwmmlmim Dec. 8, 1936. F. lM. CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 30, 1933 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIGA.

msfffs//f INVENTOR ATTORNEY Dec, S9 E936. F, M CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 50, 1933 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 ec. 8, 936. F, M- CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE `ATTORNEY 8, 1936. F. M. CARROLL 2,063,435

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 30, 1935 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 Dec. s, 1936. F* M, CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 50, 1953 sheets-sheet 6 FIGIO i A will l |20 Ill 4 1ru v kvm" -Lm |34 ,h :1: lupi Il l w i l I Uf uu Dele. 8, 1936. F. M. CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed Maron 30, 1953 9 sheets-sheet 7 TTORNEY Dec. 8, 1936. F M CARRQLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 50, 1933 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR ATTORNEY Dec. 8, 1936. M, CARROLL 2,063,486

TABULATING MACHINE Filed March 30, 1953 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 `)/ENTOR B27/42% ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 8, 1936 PATENT OFFICE TABULATING MACHINE Fred `M. Carroll, YonkerspN. Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to International Business Machines Corporation poration of New York New York, N. Y., a co1'- Application March 3o, 1933, serial No. 663,472

20 Claims.

This invention relates to accounting machines and more particularly relates to perforated re'cord controlled machines adapted to print numerals, alphabetical characters, special identifying characters, etc.

My invention is particularly adaptable for use in connection with continuously rotating printing drums such, for instance, as are disclosed in my prior U. S. Patents No. 1,516,079 issued November 18, 1924 and No. 1,623,163 issued April 5, 1927. Such printers utilize a continuously rotating printing drum which carries printing characters adapted to be called into operation as they successively pass a printing platen. By using this construction much higher printing speeds were obtainedthan previously were possible. However, when such a structure was employed for printing alphabetical characters, numerals, etc., it was found that the drum was so large as to entail an almost prohibitive cost of manufacture. Also, due to its unwieldy size, operating diiculties were encountered.

In order to reduce the size of the printing drum it was proposed in my prior U. S. Patent No. 1,726,539 issued Sept. 3, 1929, to provide the necessary printing capacity by mounting a pluralityof types, one below the other, on each pivoted type carrier, and to cause a relative movement of the platen to select one of the printing characters on the type carriers. This resulted in a smaller printing drum having many advantages over the prior construction but required three rotations of the drum for a single card feed cycle.

It is proposed in the instant invention to develop a still greater speed, particularly on operations wherein numerals only are to be analyzed and printed.

To this end one of the objects of this invention is to provide in a machine of the type indicated a dual control for a card sensing mechanism whereby the number of printing-cycles is materially reduced when analyzing control cards bearing only numeral designating perforations.

' 45 Another object is to provide a manual control to change the machine from an alphabet and numeral analyzer to a straight numeral analyzer.

A further object is to provide a novel card picker having a plurality of picker knives adapted to operate on the card at diierent times.

Still another object is to provide a dual cardv feed operating mechanism.

Another object is to provide novel mechanism whereby automatic control of the machine is 55 effected between certain sets of brushes at one operation and between certain other sets of brushes on another operation.

A further object is to provide novel mechanism to render sensing brushes effective from a plurality of sources. 5

Another object of the present invention is to provide a "novel card stripping and stacking device.

Still a further object is to provide a novel brush support whereby the brushes may be re- .10 moved readily from the machine.

'I'he invention may be clearly. understood from the following detailed description which should be read in connection with the drawings which accompany and form a part of the specification. 15

In said drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in left elevation of the card feeding and sensing mechanism. This view is indicated by lines l-I, Fig. 9.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view of the zone I 2o brush operating mechanism'.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 3--3, Fig. 9 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows. y

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view showing a comparison of the zoning arrangement with the cycles of the printingdrum.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken laterallyl through the card drum and sensing mechanisms substantially on line 5 5, Fig. 9. 30

Fig. 6 is a detail view of the card picker showing the picker by dot and dash lines in its actuated position, and by full lines in its normal position.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail view showing the 35 details of construction of the brush holders and of card drum.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view of the device for stripping the cards from the card drum.

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal sectional View taken 4'0 substantially on line 9-9 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 10 is a sectional view taken on line lli-II, Fig. 7, showing the brushes for sensing zone I.

Fig. 10a isa detail view showing the method of mounting the brushes in the brush holder.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged detail view of the clutch mechanism for controlling alphabetical brush operating cam assembly.

Fig. 12 is a detail view in frontelevation showing the drum shaft and clutch mechanism.

Fig. 13 is a detail sectional view ofthe clutch for driving either the alphabet cams or the numerical cams. ,The section isindicated in Figure 12 by line 13H-I 3.

vtion (Fig. 1)

Fig. 14 is a disjoined view of the brush operating cams and their followers.

Fig. 15 is an enlarged detail view of the cam plates for operating the card grippers.

Fig. 16 is a conventional illustration of a fragment of the printing mechanism and a partial circuit diagram.

General description Described in general terms, the invention includes a rotatable card drum having a plurality of card positions about its periphery. A card picker is provided to pick cards one by one from the bottom of a stack and move said cards into cooperative relation with gripping devices located adjacent the several card positions on the drum, as said card positions are rotated successively past the card chute leading from the picker.

Shortly before the cards arrive opposite the card chute the grippers release the cards which are then fed into a. stacker by novel mechanism provided for that purpose.

During the course of travel of the cards from the chute leading from the picker to the point where they are finally -released by their grippers,` they are carried successively' past a plurality of sensing stations. These sensing stations and brushes are, reading in a counterclockwise direc- (lst) the automatic control brushes,

(2nd) the zone A brushes (3rd) zone B brushes (4th) zone C brushes and (5th) the zone D.

brushes. The card first passes the automatic control brushes the purpose of which brushes is to compare the card with the preceding card in order to effect av total printing operation upon the occurrence of a change in group numbers. The next or zone A brushes are adapted, on alphabetical operation, to read the perforations in zone A (Fig. 4) to control the printing mechanism on its first cycle to print the alphabetical characters in zone A. Similarly zones B, C and D on alphabetical operations control the printer to print the characters represented severally therein. However, on straight numerical operations the zone brushes B, C and D are not used and the numerals, which in alphabetical operations are read by the zone D brushes, are now, on

numerical operations, read by the zone A brushes.

The mechanism for operating and for controlling the operation of the brushes for the several zones will be described in detail late The analyzing mechanism, the card picker and card feed mechanisms are all mounted between a pair of frames I0 and II (Figs. 9, 10 and 12) suitably supported in the machine proper (not shown herein). The machine is adapted to be driven'from a main drive shaft I2 winch in turn may be driven by any suitable device preferably by an electric motor of suitable design.

The feed drum The card feed drum for carrying th`e cards successively past the several sensing stations includes a pair-of vend members I3 and I4 (Figs. 9 and 10) in the form of wheels which members are secured to anges I5 and I6 on a hub or axle I1 rotatably supported on a shaft I8 which in turn is rotatably mounted in the frames I0 and II. A series of arcuate card plates I9 are spaced around the peripheries of, and secured to the wheels I3 and I4 there being six plates I9 provided in the instant case. Associated with the leading edge .of each of'the plates I3 is a' pair of card grippers 20 (see Figs. 5, '1, 8. 9, and 15) mounted on shafts 2l pivotally supported in the plates I9 and 'held in place by retaining clips 22 secured to the inner surface of the plates I9 (Fig. 7). The grippers 20 are normally urged in a clockwise direction, to 'grip the cards, by springs 23 surrounding spring pilots 24 pivotally supported by projections 25 on the inner sides of their respective plates I9. The springs 23 are compressed between retainers 26 and arms 21 secured to the grippers 20, through holes in which arms 2-I the free ends of the spring pilots 24 project.

Each of the grippers 20 is opened twice at each complete rotation of the card feed drum, first to receive the card and second to release the card after having carried said card successively past the several sensing stations. The opening of the grippers is effected against the tension of the spring 23 by cam plates 28 and 29 secured to the lnnerside of the frame III (Figs. 9 and 15). As the card drum rotates an arm 30 secured to the shaft 2| wipes by the cam plate 28 rocking the arm 30, shaft 2I and gripper 20 secured on that particular shaft 2I, counterclockwise thus opening the gripper to receive the card advanced thereinto by the picker (to be described later). Continued rotation of the drum carries the arm 30 away from the cam plate 28 whereupon the spring 23 acts to rock the grippers clockwise to securely grip the card. After the card is carried past all of the sensing brushes or stations the gripper arm 30 engages the cam plate 28 thus again opening the grippers as above set forth, this time, however, for the purpose of releasing the card, which is then fed into areceptacle by means to be later described.

The card drum is operated from the main drive shaft I2 by Va gear 36 (Figs. 5, 9 and 12) secured to said shaft. The gear 36 meshes with an intermediate gear 31 which in turn meshes with a large gear 38 secured to the flange I6 of the drum. The rotation of the drive shaft I2 and the arrangement of the gears 38, 31 and 38 arc such that the card drum makes `one complete rotation while the printing drum (to be described later) makes six cycles or rotations. Stated otherwise the card drum carries a card past a given set of brushes in synchronism with and while the printing drum is making one rotation.

The rotation of the card drum does not vary. and when the machine is set for straight numerical operations a card is fed by the every card position on the drum, however, when the machine is set to analyze alphabetical 'cards the timing of the picker is changed (as is fully brought out later) to feed a card to every third card position on the card drum. 'Ihe reason for the above will be pointed out later.

' The card picker .of the hopper 39 includes a picker knife 4I and a feed knife 42 (Figs. 5 and 6) secured on the right hand end and left hand end (as viewed in Fig. 6) respectivelyof a slide 43. The slide ls mounted in grooves 44 in a frame 45 suitably supported in the side frames I0 and II. The slide is adapted to be reciprocated first 'toward the left (Fig. 6) and then back by a pair of arms 46 (only one of which is shown herein) secured on a shalt 4l card picker to free ends of the arms 46 are bifurcated and embrace studs 48 pivotally mounted in the slide 43. Springs 49 (Fig. 5) resiliently hold the slide 43 and the arms 46 in their retracted positions in which they appear in Figure 5.

'I'he shaft 41 may be operated from two sources, both of which are driven from the main drive shaft |-2. On those operations wherein alphabetical data are being analyzed the picker shaft 41 is operated by a cam 5| (Figs. land 9) secured to a hub 52 which in turn is secured on the shaft i8. A gear 53 :secured to thecam 5| and to the hub 52 meshes with an intermediate gear 54 on a shaft 55, and the gear 54 meshes with a gear 56 freely mounted on the drive shaft |2.

On operations which analyze numericalA data the picker mechanism is operated by a cam 51 on the shaft |2. The cam 5| cooperates with a roller carried by one arm of a lever 58 pivoted on a stud mounted betweenthe frame i0 and a plate 59. A link 6i) connects the other arm of the lever 58 to an arm 66 secured to the shaft 41. Likewise the cam 51 cooperates with a roller carried on one arm of a lever 61 pivoted on a stud projecting from the plate 5 9. A link 68 connects the other arm of the lever 61 to an arm' 69 secured on the shaft 41. Obviously, rotation of the cam 5| will rock the lever 58 first clockwise and due to the link 60 rock the arm 66, shaft 41 and arms 46- (Fig. 5) counterclockwise to advance the picker slide 43against the tension of thesprings 49, which, after the cam 5| has passed the roller of lever 58 restores the picker slide 43 and its operating mechanism to normal positions. Likewise the cam 51 rocks the lever 61 counterclockwise and due to the coupling 68 rocks the arm 69, shaft 41 and arms 46 counterclockwise to actuate the picker slide.

The cam 51 and the gear 56 are freely mounted on the shaft i2 but either one may be operatively coupled to said shaft by manually sliding a clutch member 10 (Figs. 9, 12 and 13) either toward the right or left into engagement with the desired member. .'Ihe clutch member 10 may be operated by a hand lever 1| (Fig. 1) secured to the end of a shaft 12 mounted in brackets 13 and 14 secured to the frame I6. An arm 15 (Fig. 12) secured to the opposite end of the shaft 12 carries a roller 16 projecting into an annular groove in the periphery of the clutch member 10. Rotation of the shaft 12 in a clockwise direction (Fig. 12) will engage the clutch with the cam 51 and counterclockwise rotation of the shaft will engage said clutch with the gear 56. In actual practice the clutch has no neutral position being actually engaged with either the cam 51 or the gear 55.

Therclutch 10 may be operated automatically from the machine by means of a link 11 (Figs. 1 and l2). This link is connected to a lever 18 pivoted on a stud projecting from the bracket 14 (Fig. 1) which lever 18 at its upper end is operatively connected to the arm 15. 'Ihe means for operating the link 11 to control the clutch 10 has no bearing on the instant invention for which reason description thereof is omitted from this specification.

It was stated above that when the machine is operated to analyzel numerical data only, the card drum I4 (Fig. 5) makes one rotation to six printing drum cycles, that is, a printing cycle occurs as each of the card plates |9 passes a given set of brushes. For this reason the slide 43 is operated to feed a card out of the hopper 39 as each gripper 20 passes the guides 40. A description `will now 3 be given of the operation of the card picker on such operations.

The main drive shaft l2, and consequently the cam 51 (Fig. 1) when clutched thereto makes one complete counterclockwise rotation for each printing cycle, which rotation of the cam 51 cor-` responds to' the passage of each card position of the card drum past the card guides 40. VAi:

each rotation the cam 51 operates the card picker knife and card feed knife in the following de scribed manner: When a stack of cards is placed in the hopper 39, itmay be noted by an examination of Figures 5 and 6 that the feed knife 42 in itsextreme right hand position Vrests a short distance to the left of the right hand edge of the bottom' card, consequently the first stroke of the feed knife 42 is idle. However, as the picker knife 4| nears the end of its leftward travel, it picks up the v bottom card and advances it a short distance to the position indicated at 4|b (Fig. 6) which is` slightly in advance of the fully retracted position of the feed knife 42. At this point the leading edge of the card has entered the card throat 50 which is just wide enough to laccommodate a single card. i

The slide 43 is then restored toward theright to its fully retracted'position and, as the knife 42 nears this position, it passes the right hand edge of the bottom card which immediately drops into position in front of the feed knife, and when the slide 43 again'is shifted toward the left, the knife 42, now having a ilrrn grip on the card, thrusts said card through the throat 5l and guides I4|! where it is seized by the passing gripper 20 and drawn out of the guides 40 by the rotating card drum.

When the cam 51 has advanced the knives 4| and'42 to the positions indicated at 4| a and 42a. respectively, a dwell on the cam 51 causes the slide 43.to stop momentarily. At this point the knife 4| is about to start the next card and since .the preceding card still is in the throat 50 dam-- (Fig. 6) and during the brief dwell of theknives 4| and 42 the continuously rotating card drum draws the card out of the throat 50 and guides 40. The cam 51 (Fig. 1) now advances the slide 43 and the knives 4| and 42 to the positions indicated'at 4Ib and 42h, the movement of the knife 42 from 42a to 42b being idle whereas the knife 4| picks up the next card from the bottom of the stack and advances this card to position 4|b. Thle cam 51 now restores the slide at one continuous movement to its fully retracted position.

When the machine is operated to analyze a1- -is firmly grasped by the gripper 26 as at 26h the slide 43 are operated by the cam 5| (Fig. 1).

Prior to such operations, the clutch 16 (Fig. 9) is shifted out of engagement with the cam 51 and into engagement with. the gear 55 which, asv

set forth above, drives the cam 5| through gears 54 and 53. 'Ihe ratio of the gears 55 and 53 is such that the gear 56 lmakes three rotations while the gear 53 and consequently the cam 5| makes one rotation. 'I'he shaft l2 makesv six rotations while the card drum-makes one rotation. It is obvious, therefore, that the gear 53 and thel caml `5| make two rotations while the card drum makes one rotation. VIt follows that end of a cycle in its per 28 and -As hereinbefore stated, the gripper 28 releases picker and card feed mechanism, when operated by the cam I will feed two cards at each rotation' of the card drum. This card feed differs from the numerical feed rst described in that the-feed for alphabetical cards is divided into two strokes of the slide 48. The first stroke starts the card, after which the slide 48 is fully retracted. The second stroke of the slidevfeeds the card out of the hopper where it is seized by the passing gripper 28 whereupon the slide -48 again is fully restored.

This is necessary due to the timing of other elements of the machine and the necessity of bringing the picker and feed slide to rest at the fully retracted position, also it is desirable, when the picker mechanism is stopped at the end of a cycle, that there be no cardin the started position which would be possible if a card were started -by a slight additional movement of the picker slide 48 following a feeding movement as is the case when operating the picker slide by the cam 51.

These two separate movements are effected by the cam 5| (Fig. 1) which is provided with two lobes 18 and 88. The lobe 18 which extends radially a greater distance from the center than does` the lobe 88, rst operates the lever 58 and through the linkage 88- rocks the shaft 41 counterclockwise to shift the slide 48 at one stroke to its extreme leftward position. This carries the picker knife 4| to its position 4Ib starting the bottom card of the stack. As soon as the lobe ,18 has passed the roller carried by the lever 88, the springs 48 (Fig. 5) rock the arms 48 clockwise to fully retract the slide 48.

At the proper time the vlobe 88 (Fig. 1) acting on the lever 58 rocksthe arms 48 (Fig. 5) again counterclockwise to advance the slide 48 to the position indicated at Maf-42a (Fig. 6l at which point the card is fully gripped by the gripper 28 and drawn out ing` card drum. The springs 48 again restore the slide n as soon as melone su has passed beneath the roller on the lever 58. The cam; 5| making two rotations to one rotation of the card druml again operates the picker mechanism to feed 'another card to the gripper 28 diametrically opposite the one to previouslyl receive a card.

The card stacker After a card has been carried past the several sensing stations it is released by the gripstacked in .a receptacle 8| (Fig. 5).

the card at the proper time under the influence of the arm 88 (Fig. l5) striking the cam 28'. Shortly after the leading edge of the. card passes the last sensing station it encounters spring pressed rollers 82. These rollers are mounted on a shaft 88 rotatably carried by arms 84 (only one being shown) which arms are pivotally supported on brackets 85 (see also Fig. 12).

The brackets 85 are secured to the inner sides of the frames I8 and II respectively. Springs (not shown) urge the arms 84 counterclockwise (Fig. 5) to press the rollers 82 resiliently against the; plates I9 to retain, and feed the card after it has been released by the gripper 28.

When the card has reached approximately the position in which it is illustrated by dot and dash lines in Fig. 8 the gripper 28 is operated to release it whereupon the resilience of the card causesit to assume its normal flat shape. Since the card is still held between the plate I8 and roller 82 the leading edge of the card springs of the guides 48 by the rotat-l downwardly where it rests on a plurality of rollers 88 secured on a shaft 81. The card is shown in this position in full lines in Fig. 8. As the card springs downwardly the leading edge thereof enters a longitudinal opening 88 in a roller 88 mounted on a shaft 88 suitably supported in the frames |8 and II. Continued rotation of the drum I4 thrusts the card further into the opening 88.. The rollers 88 and 88 constantly rotate,

the roller 88 clockwise and the roller 88 Icounterclockwise, the latter being so timed as to present the opening 88 to each card as said card is released by its gripper.

The rollers 88 and 88 are driven from a shaft 8| which in turn is driven from the main body of the machine (not shown). A gear 88 fast on the shaft 8| meshes with a gear 81 fast on the shaft 81, and the gear 81 meshes with a gear 88 fast to the roller 88.

As the roller 88 advances, the wall of the opening 88 comes into contact with the card and thrusts the leading edge thereof between the rollers 88 and 88. These rollers now feed the card past a guide bar l88 and between the feed roller 88 and spring urged tension rollersl |88 mounted on a rod |8| carried between a pair of pivoted arms |82. The arms |82 lare pivotally supported on studs projecting inwardly from the frames |8 and II. Springs |88 serve to press the rollers |88 constantly against the rollers 88. The feed rollers 88 now feed the card downwardly to the right (Fig. 5) of a pair of stacker arms |84 secured on a shaft |85 supported in the frames I8 and II. Also secured to the shaft |88 is an arm |88 carrying at its free end a roller |81 cooperating with a cam |88 secured on the shaft 8|.

The shaft 8| and consequently the cam |88 make l six rotations while the card drum makes one rotation and the cam |88 is timed to rock the arm |88, shaft |85 and stacker arms |84 clockwise (Fig. 5) to press each card onto the stack as it is fed downwardly by the rollers 88. As the card is pressed against the left hand end of the sta'ck (Fig. 5) it wipes by spring-pressed retaining hooks |88 mounted on studs II8 projecting inwardly from the frames I8 and II. As the card passes the hooks |88, springs llirestore said hooks to their effective positions wherein said hooks prevent retrograde movement of the card when the stacker arms |84 are retracted by the springs III.

The sensing brushes Described in general terms the sensing brushes include a plurality of groups of brushes (five groups in the instant case) each group extending the length. and comprising a sufficient number of individual brushes to sense each column of the well known Hollerith card. The brush groups are arranged concentrically about the card drum and each individual card is carried by each group of brushes successively as the drum rotates.

The groups of brushes according to their purposes are hereinafter referred to as follows, considered counterclockwise (Fig. 5) beginning at the group nearest the card hopper 88. The automatic control brushes II8, zone A" brushes I|4. zone B" brushes II5, zone C brushes II8 and the zone D" l1 or numerical brushes. The purposes of these brushes are as follows: The auto- I the occurrence of a group change. In addition to the above function the zone A brushes 1 ceeding cards and to control the machine upon 2,063,486 serve to read off data from zone A of an 1alpha.-

betical card. Similarly the v"zone B and C brushes II5 and |I6 respectively read-goff the alphabetical data from their corresponding zones. The zone D brushes |I1 function in connection with the automatic control brushes II3 on alphabetical operations to compare the group numbers on succeeding cards to determine when a group change occurs.

A detail description of the construction and method of mounting and operating the brushes will now be given. Since the brushes of each group are mounted in the same manner only one group will be described in detail.

Each of the groups of brushes are mounted in a rockable frame II8 (Figs. l, 3, 5, 7 and 10) including end plates |I9 and 20 joined by a tube 26, the plates II9 and I 20 being pivotally mounted on studs |21 in the sides of arcuate frames |28 and |29 which are, in turn, pivotally supported between the frames I0 and II. The frames |28 and |29 are normally concentric with the card drum but may be swung outwardly on their pivots |30 -and I3I respectively (Fig. 3) for the purpose of gaining access to the several groups of brushes II3 to II1, inclusive. Latches |32 and |33 (Fig. 1) are provided to latch the frames I 28 and aI-29, respectively, in their operating positions.

Each individual brush of a group is mounted in a segment' |34 -and all of the segments for each group are securely clamped between two bars |35 of insulation, which bars |35 are in turn held by bars |36 of metal or other suitable material secured together by screws |31 (FigQlOa). Clamped between the ends of the bars |35 are threaded sleeves |38 adapted to receive screws |39. These screws, when tightened, clamp the brush segments |34 longitudinally in the holders, the segments |34 being separated by thin strips |40 of insulation. A plate I4I is provided at each end of the group of brush segments to act as a bearing for the screws |39.

A comb |43 (Fig. 7) secured to the bar |36 opposite the sleeve |26 spaces the ends of the dielectric strips |40 which project beyond the segments |34 to properly space the brushes as near their ends as is practical.

When ythe frame |28 or |29 is swung-to its openedposition the brush unit may readily be inserted into or removed from the brush frame,

the plates I I 9 and |20 being provided with grooves |42 (see Fig. 10a) to receive the projecting ends of the sleeves |38 to guide and to properly locate the brush assembly in the frame.

The brush assembly is held in the brush frame by a shaft |44 (Fig. '7) rotatably mounted in projections |45 on the plates II9 `and |20. The bar I 36 adjacent this shaft carries a plurality of ,lugs |46 opposite each of which lugs the shaft |44 is'flattened as indicated at |41 (Fig. 7). When it is desired to remove or to insert 'a brush assembly the shaft I 44 is rotated until the attened portions are parallel with the bar |36 whereupon the lugs |46 may readily move past the shaft. After a brush holder.v has been inserted in its frame'the shaft |44 is given a partial turn, the end of said shaft being square to accommodate a wrench, thus securely clamping the holder in position.

The brush segments |34 for the automatic control brushes make contact with conductors |48 supported by an arcuate' bar |49 of insulation secured on the inner periphery ofy theI frame |28, there being a conductor |48 for each brush segment |34 in this group. 'Ihe segments |34 carrylng brushes I I4, II5, II6 and |I1 of like denominational order for the group or zones A, B, C and D contact common conductors |50 supported on dielectric blocks |56 secured on the inner periplf'iery of the frame |29. The conductors |48 and |50 are secured to the blocks |49 and |56, respectivelyyby bars |51 of insulating material secured to their respective frames |28 and |29 by screws or other suitable means, the bars I51Vex- -tending across all of, the conductors |48 and |56 (see Fig. 10).

'Ihe conductors |48 are connected to suitable wires which are formed into a`cable |58 secured to the frame |28, and the'conductors |50 likewise are connected to Wires formed into a cable |59 secured to the frame |29. The cables, |58 and |59 form a convenient means for connecting the conductors to the main tabulating machine. It is to be understood that the wire for each denominational order conductor |48 on the frame |28 is connected to the wire for the corresponding denominational order conductor |50 on the frame |29 (see Fig. 16). Near the left hand end (Fig.

10) each brush holder. carries a pair of brushes |60 which make contact with the plate I9 to one side of\the card thus supplying current to the plate I9, the circuit being completed when a brush Imerical operations and the other of said sets of cams functioning o'n operations when alphabetical data, or a combination of alphabetical and numerical data are to be read off from the cards. The cams for controlling the automatic control brushes and the zone A brushes for reading numerical data only will first be described.

It was stated above that the brushes for zones B, C and D are not used when tabulating cards bearing ri'umerical data only, and that all of the brushes are brought into use when alphabetical cards are to be tabulated. A separate cam is provided for each group of brushes but when-numerical cards are being run through the machine are not operated, consequently, these brushes are inactive and are held out of contact with the pressing plates .|9. shown partly in sectionand reading from right to left these cams areidentified as follows: I6| represents the cam which operates the automatic control brushes on numerical operations, |62 is the zone A brush operating cams for numerical operations, cam |63 operates the automatic control brushes on alphabetical operations, and cams |64, |65, |66v and |61 operate the zone A, B, C and D brushes respectively on alphabetical operations. It may be noted that the cams |6I and |62 are secured together and to a gear |68 having its hub journalled on the shaft I8. An in-termediate gear |69 freely mounted on the shaft 55 'the shaft I8 and which is adapted, at the proper time, to be'clutched to the hub 52 previously de 75- In Fig. 9 .these cams are scribed. These cams are driven only when the machine is set to work on alphabetical cards.

Since the automatic control brushes and the zone A brushes are used on both numerical and alphabetical operations, dual operating means is provided therefor.

The operating mechanisms for the automatic control brushes and for the zone A brushes are identical therefore' only the mechanism associated with the zone A brushes will be described. This mechanism' includes a rod |12 (Figs. 1, 3 and 9) secured against rotation in the sleeve |28 for the zone A brush -holder frame. An arm |18, secured on the left hand end o f the rod i12, has blocks |14 fast one on each side thereof. A spring |18 having onof its ends secured to the end of the arm |18 holds the blocks |14 against cam arms |18 and |11 pivoted on a rod |18 supported between the frame |28 and a bracket |18 secured to the side of said frame. 'I'he arm |18 carries a roller '|88 cooperating with the cam |82 and the arm |11 carries a roller |88 cooperating with the cam |84.

A short shaft |81 mounted in an extension |88 of the bracket |18 carries a pair yoi arms |88 connected to the cam arms |18 and |11 by links |88. A spring |8| stretched between an arm also fast on the shaft |81, and the bracket |88 urges the shaft |81 and arms |88 clockwise to press the rollers |88 and |88 against the peripheries of their respective cams |82 and |84.

If the machine is set to read numerical cards only and the clutch member is shifted toward the right (Fig. 9). and if a clutch (to be described later) between the cam 81 and the gear |18 is effective, the cams |8| and |82 will be rotated whereas the cams |88 to |81, inclusive, will be inactive. On such operations the zone A brushes as set forth above are used-to read oif numerical values from each card. -The cam |82, therefore. lowers the brushes for this position into contact with each plate I8 and raises said "brushesafter the 12th or last index position of thel card passes beneath the brushes. The gear |88 and the cams |8| and |82 receive two rotations for each rotation of the card drum, consequently, the configuration of the cam |82 is such that it lowers and then raises the brushes three times at each rotation (see Fig. 14).

` However,- when the machine is s et to analyze alphabetical cards the clutch member 18 is shifted into'engagementwith the gear 88 and the brushes are operated through the gear 88 and cams |88 to |81, inclusive, by means o'f a clutch between theihubs 82 and |1|. In this casethe cams |8| and |82 are idle. Since on such operations a card is fed'Y only to every` third gripper 28 it is necessary to lower the brushes as the card passes thereunder and to raise said brushes and.

hold them out of contact while the next 'suc-v ceeding two plates I8 The cam |84 (see Fig. 14) is designed to accomplish this result..

On numerical operations the automatic control Abrushes ||8 (Fig. 5)V are operated in synchronism with the zone A brushes ||4 to compare the group numbers on succeeding cards and' to control the machine in a well known manner when said numbers'do not correspond. For this reason the above description of the z'one A brush operating mechanism may also be applied to the automatic control brush operating mechanism.

0n numerical operations these brushes are operated by the cam |8| whereas the cam |83 which operates said brushes on alphabetical operations is inactive.

The zone B, C and D brushes operate on alphabetical operations only, consequently, the cams |85, |88 and |81, provided to operate these groups of brushes, are inactive on numerical operations. The operating mechanisms for the zone B, C and D brushes are identical excepting as to the timing of the cams |88, |88 and |81 for which reason only one of these structures will be described.

A rod |82 is fixed in the sleeves informing the frame plates I|8 and |28 (Fig. 1) for each of the zone B, C and D brush frames. Arms |88 secured on the outer ends of these rods carry rollers |84 (see also Figs. 1, 3 and 14) cooperating with the cams |88, |88 and i 81 associated with the zone B, C and D brush frames, respectively. 'v

Springs |88 constantly urge the brush frames and the arms |88 counterclockwise (Figs. 3 and 7) thus maintaining-the rollers |84 always in contact with their cams. When the cams |88 to |81 permit counterclockwise movement of their respective brush frames, the springs |88 effect such movements to bring the brushes into contact with the plates I8 of the card drumMthe counterclockwise movement of the brush frames being limited by projection |88 (Figs. 3 and 9) on the plates ||8 striking the inner periphery of the frame |28.

It will be borne in mind that oh alphabetical operations any numerals perforated on the cards are read of! by the zone D brushes ||1 instead of the zone A brushes ||4 as on numerical operations, also that on alphabetical operations the4 automatic control brushes ||8 operate inV conjunction with the zone D brushes to compare tliel group numbers on succeeding cards.

The brush cams |8| to |88, inclusive, do not rotate, however, until a card is actually approach,- ing the zone A brushes on either a numerical or an alphabetical operation. These cams are controlled by two brush cam clutches substantially the same in structure, one of these clutches being located interjacent the drive means and the cams |8| and |82, and the other brush cam clutch being located interjacent the drive means and the brush cams |83 to |81 inclusive. clutches are rendered effective to couple their respective groups of cains to the drive means by trolling cert/ain elements of the machine. Certain of these switch contacts are adapted to complete the circuit set up by the card lever |81 either to the numerical brush cam clutch indicated generally at 288 (Fig. 3) or to the alphabetical brush cam clutch indicated generally at 28| depending upon the position to which the lever 1| has been set.

As an examme, a 1s assuined that the' llever 1I has been set to the "numerical" position, the

-movement of the lever 1|, shaft 12 and the arm- 18 (Fig. l2) shifting the clutch member'18 toward the right (see also Fig. 9). This movement of the lever .1i also operates the contacts |88 (Fig. l) to direct the electrical impulse effected A under the control of the card lever |81 to Ithe These brush cam 'vent retrograde movement thereof.

positions are passing the card lever |91 the mag' clutch magnets 202 for the numerical brush cam clutch 200. When the magnets 202 are energized they attract their armature 203 freeing a tripping pawl 204 to the action of its spring 205, which spring rocks the pawl 204 counterclockwise to free a clutch dog 206, pivotally carried by a segmental plate 201 secured to the hub of the gear |10 and a plate 208 secured to plate 201 to the action of its spring 209 (Fig. 11). This spring immediately tends to rock the dog 206 to engage the nose thereof with a notch 2|0 in a disc 2|6 integral with the cam 51, but, since this cam has started to rotate, the notch has moved away from the nose of the dog, which nose, therefore, comes to rest on the periphery of the disc 2|6. When the cam 51 and disc 2|6 have completed one rotation the notch is again brought opposite the nose of the dog 206 whose spring 209 now enters said nose into the notch thus coupling the drive means to the gear |10, which, through the gear |69 drives the gear |68 and the cams |6| and |62. These cams, it will be remembered, operate the automatic control brushes and the zone A brushes on numerical operations.

The impulse to the magnets 202 is further under the control of cam contacts (not shown herein) and is of a very short duration. Shortly after the driving member 2 |6 starts to rotate the segmental plate 201 and the plate 208 a projection 2|1 on the plate 208 strikes a nger 2|8 integral with the tripper 204 clockwise about its pivot, whereupon the spring 205 restores the armature 203 to its normal position to hold the tripper 204 inthe path of the clutch dog 206. If the magnets 202 are not energized again before the clutch completes one rotation the tail of the dog 206 strikes the tripper thus disengaging the dog from the driving disc 2|6. The momentum -of the plate 201 carries it slightly past normal position whereupon a spring pressed retaining pawl 2|9 drops into a notch in said plate 201 to pre- The tail of the dog 206 and the pawll 2| 9 serve to aline the clutch member in` normal position.

When a series of cards are being passed through the machine the magnets 202 are energized as each card passes the card lever |91 (Fig. 5) effecting the removal of the tripper 204 from the path of the dog 206 before the dog strikes said tripper thus effecting a continuous rotation of the cams |6| and |62 as long as cards are being fed from the hopper 39 and until the last card has passed the card lever |91.

The clutch 20| for the cams |63 to |61, inclusive, differs only slightly from the clutch 200 just described. In this case the drive forms a part of the hub 52 for the gear 53 and cam 5| and the plate 208 carrying the clutch dog is carried on the hub |1| of the cams |63 to |61. Also the pawl 2| 9 cooperates with a notched member 220 carried between the hub I1| and the plate 208.

It will be remembered that on numerical op-l erations a card is fed to each card position on the card drum, and that the shaft I2 and gear |10 make one rotation each time a card passes a given set of brushes, consequently, after the last card passes the card lever |91 the magnets 202 are not again energized andthe clutch at once becomes ineffective. However, the gear 53 whose hub 52 drives the clutch 20| makes two4 rotations to one rotation of the card drum. It will also be remembered that on alphabetical operations a card is fed to every third position on the card drum. While the two intervening card nets 202 from the clutch 20| remain unenergized but the next card passes under the card lever |91 before the dog 206 arrives at normal position thus energizing the magnets and removing the tripper from the path of the-dog 206 and effecting a continuous rotation of the brush operating cams |63 to |61 so long as cards are passing under the card lever |91 on'alphabetical operations.

A number of card levers in additiony to the lever |91 are provided to variously control the ma-` chine., but, since these levers have'no bearing on the instant invention, they are not described herein.

Printing mechanism The printing mechanism with which the present invention isvadapted to be used is preferably of the'type disclosed in my prior Patents No. 1.726,539 issued Sept. 3, 1929, and No. 1,835,466 issued Dec. 8, 1931. 'I'he printing mechanism is illustrated in Fig. v16 and includes a constantly rotating drum 22| carrying a plurality of pivoted type carriers 222 upon each of which carriers is mounted a plurality of type 223 arranged one below the other.

A locking cam 224 is associated with each type carrier 222, the cams being operated by a train of gears (not shown) insynchronism with the drum 22| so that each cam makes one rotation for each rotation of the drum. lgach of the locking cams 224 is provided with a notch`225 which is timed to free the associated type carrier for operation at the printing position, but to lock the carrier against operation in all other positions of the drum.

The types are selected for printing by a call rnagnet 226 and, when called, are actuated by a finger 221 having a hooki228 at its end adapted to be lowered into the path of projections-229 on the type carriers 222. The hook 228 is normally held out of the path of the projections 229 by a compressed spring 230. A dog 23| pivotally carried by one arm of a lever 232 normally abuts against the end of the finger 221. The dog 23| is free to rotate about its pivot on the lever 232 but is normally urged in a clockwise ldirection against a suitable stop (not shown) by a spring 233.

Energization vof the magnet 226 attracts its armature 234 which thrusts a rod 235 toward the right (Fig. 16) rocking counterclockwise against the action of a spring 236a lever 231 normally hooked over the end of the other arm of the lever 232 thus freeing said lever 232 to the action of its spring 238 which immediately rocks the lever 232 clockwise, the dog 23| snapping beneath the end of the nger 221.

Shortly after this action occurs a projection 229 on vone of the type carriers comes into contact with a cam face 239 on the lever 232 and rocks this lever counterclockwise. The dog 23|, being at this time beneath the end of the finger 221, rocks this finger clockwise to interpose thehook 228 in the path of the projection 229 on the next succeeding type carrier 222 which is thus operated for printing. As the projection 229 continues to wipe by the cam face 239 the lever-232 is rocked further counterclockwise carrying the -dog 23| past the end of the linger 221 which is then rocked counterclockwise to its normally ineffective position. The latter part of the counterclockwise movement of the lever 232 carries the other arm thereof into position to be again latched by the lever 231 in which position the parts remain until the magnets 226 are again energized.

However, on numerical operations, it is not de- .Y

sired to shift the platen since the numerals may all be printed at a single rotation of the printing drum 22|. It will be recalled that the printing drum 22| makes six rotations or cycles while the card drum |4 makes one rotation but that on numerical operations a card Iis fed to each position on the card drum whereas on alphabetical operations a card is fed to every third position as the card drum, or, two per each rotation of said drum. The platen shifting means is operated through a clutch (not shown) which is under the control of one of the switches |99 (Fig. 1) so that when the lever 1| is set for numerical operations the clutch is rendered ineffective to operate the platen shifting means. s

When the lever 1| is shifted to control the machine to make alphabetical operations the platen control clutch is rendered effective to drive the platen shifting means.

The platen shifting meansis 'preferably ofy the type disclosed in my prior U. S. Patent No. 1,726,539, issued Sept, 3, 1929 to which reference may be had-*fora complete understanding thereof.

Operation A brief description of the operation ofthe machine on both numerical and alphabetical operations will now be given.

The operation of the machine when analyzing numerical data will be described first. To condition the' machine for such an operation the lever 1| is first set to -the numeral" position, thereby operating the control switches |99. One of these switches renders the platen shifting clutch ineffective while another of said switches directs-the impulses from the card lever |91 to the numerical brush cam clutch magnets 202. Other of the switches |99 otherwise prepare the machine for numerical operations. Setting the lever 1| tothe numeral position also throws vthe clutch member 10 into operative relation with the numerical card picker cam 51, which, upon energization of the clutch magnets 202 also drives the numerical brush cams I6| vand |62.

The cards which are to be run'through the machine are nowplaced in the hopper 39 and the machine is started by operating the usual start key (not shown). When the machine starts its operation the picker cam 51 operates the picker knife 4| and' the feed knife 42 to feed a card to each of the grippers `20 as they successively pass the guides 40, the cards being carried successively past the automatic control brushes and the zone A brushes. The cards are also carried past the zones B, C and D brush stations but these brushes are not operated on numerical operations.

The automatic control brushes do not function when the first card'passes this-station since the brush cam/clutch magnets to render this clutch effective to drive the numerical brushcams |6| and |62 until the leading card comes into contact with and operates the card lever |91. When this occurs the cams l6| and |62 operate ,the -automatic control brushes |'|3 and the zone A brushes .M 4 simul- -taneonslyv to bring these brushes into contact 202 are not' energized with the second and leading cards respectively. The card passes the zone A brushes in synchronism with the passage of the type carriers past the printing position, consequently, when a perforated. index point in the card passes beneath the brush I|4 (see Fig. 16) a circuit is established from line 246 through contacts 241, now closed by the synchronous impulse emitter 240, wire 249, brush |60 (see also Fig. 10) plate I9, brush ||4,' wire 250, contacts 25| now closed automatically by a cam operated lever 252. From the contacts the circuit leads through contacts 253 and wire 254 to the call magnets 226 to selectively operate ther type carriers in the manner set forth above. The circuit is completed to the other side of the line 255 by a wire, a fragment of which is shown at256v The automatic control brushes H3, as hereinbefore stated, are for the purpose of comparing the group number of acard with that of a preceding card. So long as these numbers are the same a group control circuit is set up to maintain the operation of the machine. If a change in group numbers occurs this group control circuit is opened and controls the machine to make a total printing operation in a manner well known in the art.

After the cards are sensed bythe 4zone A brushes they pass under the raised brushes at the zones B, C, and D stations. They are then released by their grippers 20 and fed into the receptacle 9| in the manner set forth above.

'I'he operation differs somewhat when analyzing alphabetical cards since such cards are sensed in zones and the platen is shifted at each cycle to effect printing from the types in all three positions on the type carriers.

The lever 1| is set to the alphabet position as a preliminary to the operation thus through the switches |99 conditioning the machine in general to perform operations whereon alphabet zoning and printing is accomplished.. Setting the lever 1| renders the platen shift clutch (not shown) effective to shift the platen at each cycle of the printing drum, and directs the impulses eifected by the card lever |91 to the alphabet brush cam clutch 20| to render said clutch ef-l fective when .a card passes beneath the card lever. Setting the lever 1| also shifts the clutch member 10 into operative relation with the gear 59 whereby the card picker caml 5| and, upon energization of the alphabet brush cam clutch magnets, the brush cams |63 to |61, inclusive will be operated. l

When the machine operates, and cards are fed 'to the grippers 20 the cards reachthe card lever |91'which closes the switch (not shown) to energize the alphabet. clutch magnets. 'I'his clutch becomes eifective at the proper time to pick up the brush cams |63l to |61, inclusive. cams are timed to successively operate the group A brushes, the group B brushes, the group C brushes, and then simultaenously operates the group D brushes and the automatic control brushes.

These A The commutator 263 rotates in synchronism with the card drum I4 so that the brush 264 contacts the contact 260 at the instant the 9 position on the card passes under the zone A brush I|4. The contact 26| comes under the brush 264 simultaneously with the arrival of the "8 hole in the card under the zone B brush I I5 and the contact 262 comes under the brush 264 at the same time the "7 index point on the card comes under the zone C brush IIB. The purpose of these zoning circuits is to effect the closing of contacts 25| in order to establish a circuit from the zone A, B, C and D brushes to the printer call magnets 226. Assuming that a card passing through the machine has a hole in the 9 index position and a hole in the 1 index position. 'I'he cam |64 operates to lower the zone A brushes as the 9 index point is passing thereunder; and there being a hole in this position, a circuit is established from the line 246, contacts 241, wire 249, brush |60, to the plate I9, thence through the brush I I4, wire 250, contacts 266, magnet 265, brush 264, contact 260, ring 268, brush 261 and wire 269 to line 255. This energizes the magnet 265 which attracts its armature 210 releasing a lever` 216 toy the action of its spring 211 which spring rocks said lever 216 clockwise opening contacts 266 and closing contacts 25|. The card continues its passage by the zone A brushes, and

as the 1 index point passes the brush I|4 a second impulse is made, this time through the contacts 25| (now closed), contacts 253, wire 254 to the printer magnets 226, which, being energized calls into action the proper one of the type carriers 222 from which to effect a printing of the letter H.

The card now passes successively beneath the zone B and Zone C brushes, but since these brushes are moved into contact with the card synchronously with the passage of the 8 and "7 index positions thereunder and since there are no perforations in these positions, there is no circuit established therethrough to again energize the magnet 265, the contacts 25| having been opened and the contacts 266 closed through the agency of a cam operated lever 218.

The card now passes under the zone D brushes .which on alphabetical operations read E numerals. It is to be understood that certain columns on the card are used for numerical data and certain other columns for alphabetical data, and that under the control of the usual plugging arrangement numerical and alphabetical data are never read from the same column. Simultaneously, with the passage of a card under the brushes for zone D, the next succeeding card passes beneath theV automatic control brushes ||3, the latter brushes serving, as on numerical operations, to compare the group numbers.

Should a hole occur in the 8 index position as the card passes the zone A brushes the con-V tion passes the brush ||4 the brush 264 will be in contact with the insulation interjacent the contacts 260 and 26| thus again no circuit will be'established.

However, as this card, bearing a -hole in the 8 index position and in the 1 position, comes beneath the zone B brushes, these brushes are lowered as the 8 position arrives thereunder..

This also coincides exactly with the passage of the contact 26| past the brush 264 thus establishing a circuit through the magnet 265 for the purpose above set forth.

Now when the 1 index position passes the zone B brushes a circuit is established to energize the printer magnet 226 thus calling the proper type carrier into action. The platen having been shifted one step at the end of the first cycle of the printing drum 22|, the lfposition on the card now causes a printing of the letter N (see Fig. 4).

Again, if the card bears a perforation in the 7 position and a perforation in the 1 position, said card passes the zone A and zone B brushes without setting up a circuit through the magnet 265, but the zone C brushes IIB are lowered exactly as the' 7 hole passes thereunder, and in synchronism with the passage of the contact 262 by the brush 264, thus energizing the magnet 265 to close the contacts 25|. Now when the 1 hole permits brush IIB to make contact therethrough, the platen having again shifted, the magnets 226 are energized to print the letter k from the proper type carrier 222.

Near the end of the third cycle of the printing drum the platen shifting means operates to restore the platen to its normal position.

The means for feeding the record material to receive the impressions from the types is not disclosed herein but is preferably of the type disclosed in U. S. Patent No. 1,516,079, issued Nov.

18, 1924 to F. M. Carroll. It may be noted here that the record material is advanced one step or line at the end of each numerical operation, comprising one rotation of the printing drum, and at the end of an alphabetical operation comprising three rotations of the printing drum. In this manner all of the data read from a single card is printed on one line on the record material.

While there has been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention as applied to a single modification, it will be understood that various omissions and substitutions and changesA in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a cyclic printing mechanism requirying a plurality of cycles when printing alphabetical characters and a single cycle when printing numerical characters, revoluble card carrying means having a plurality of card positions thereon, card feeding means, and means to operate the card feeding means according to the cyclic operation of the printing mechanism.

2. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a printing drum carrying a plurality of groups of type, said drum having cyclic rotations commensurate with the number ,of groups of type, a constantly rotating card carrying drum, means to feed cards to the carrying drum, and means to vary the number of cards fed to the carrying drum according to the cyclic rotations of the printingdrum.

3. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a rotatable card carrying drum having a plurality of card positions thereon, means to feed cards to said drum, means to control the feed means to successively feed a card to each position on the drum, and means to control the feed means to feed cards to certain positions only on said drum.

Cil

4. In a machine of the class described adapted to analyze record cards, the combination of a drum to carry cards past the sensing stations in a continuous uninterrupted movement, means to feed cards to said drum, a plurality of means to operate the feeding means, and manually adjustable means to determine which one of said operating means-is to function.

5. In a machine 'of the class described adapted to analyze record cards, the combination of a plurality of sets of perforation sensing brushes, means to carry the record cardspast the sensing brushes in a continuous uninterrupted movement, means to feed cards to the carrying means, and means controlled by the cards to render certain Vof the sensing brushes effective.

cessively past the sensing brushes in a continu-Y ous uninterrupted movement, means to feed cards to the carrying means, means to render certain of the sensing brushes effective at certain operations, and means to render all of the sensing brushes effective at other operations.

8. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plurality of sets of perforation sensing brushes, means to carry record cards successively past the sensing brushes in a continuous and uninterrupted movement, means to feed cards to the carrying means, means to operate bination of a plurality of brush'holders, data sensing brushes carried thereby, and means operable during the operation of the machine successively to bring the brushes into position by swinging the holders therefor.

10. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plurality of sets of perforation sensing brushes, a card carrying drum to carry record cards successively past the sensing brushes, and means to move the brushes into operative position successively and at different times during the passage of the card.

11. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a perforation sensing brush, a card carrying drum to carry cards past the sensingbrush, a plurality of means to swing the sensing brush into contact with the cards, means to -select the swinging means, and means controlled by the cards to render the selected swinging r, i l. operating means for sala brush, means to select means effective.

12. In a machine of the class described, the combination ofy a perforation sensing brush, a continuously rotating card carrying drum to carry cards past the sensing brush, a swinging frame for the brush, a plurality of normally inactive the operating means, and means to render the selected operating means active.

13. In a machine of the class described for analyzing record cards, the combination of a perforation sensing brush, a drum for carrying cards past the sensing brush, means to move certain o f the brushes simultaneously into contact with the cards, and other means to move the brushes into contact with the cards successively and at different times during the travel of the cards past said brushes.

14. In a machine of the class described for analyzing record cards, the combination of a drum to carry the cards, a plurality of sensing brushes spaced concentrically about the drum, said brushes being normally out of contact with the drum, individual means to rock each brush into contact with the card in timed relation with the passage of the card past each of said brushes.

15. In a machine of the class described including a main frame, a card carrying drum, an arcuate frame pivotally mounted in the main frame, a series of brush frames pivotally supported in the arcuate frame, and meansto latch the arcuate frame in position to bring the brush frames into concentric relation with the drum. y

16. In a machine o f the class described including a main frame, a card carrying drum, an arcuate frame having an open and a closed position, saidrframe being pivotally mounted in the main frame, aI series of brush frames pivotally supported in the arcuate frame, perforation sensing brushes removably mounted in the brush frames, said frames being arranged to bring the brushes into concentric relation with the drum when the arcuate frame is closed and to render the brushes accessible when said arcuate frame is open.

17. In a machine of the class described including a main frame, a card carrying drum, an arcuate frame pivotally mounted in the main frame, a series of brush frames pivotally mounted in the arcuate frame, perforation sensing brushes carried by said brush frames, and means to removably lock the brushes in their frames.

18. In a machine ofthe class described, the combination of a cyclic printing device, a continuously rotating card carrying drum, means to feed cards to the carrying drum, and manually settable means to vary. the cyclic operation of the printing means and to vary the number of cards fed to the carrying drum,

19. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plurality of sets of sensing brushes, means to carry record cards past the sets of brushes, means to feed cards to the carrying means, means to vary the number of cards fed to the carrying means, and means to render certain only or all of the brushes effective according to the number of cards fed to the carrying means.

20. In a machine of the class described, the combination of a plurality of sets of sensing brushes, a plurality of operating means for the sets of brushes, means to carry record cards past said brushes, means to feed cards to the carrying means, a plurality of operating means for said feeding means, and manipulative means to select the operating means for the brushes and to select the operating means for the feed means.

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2480981A (en) * 1944-08-30 1949-09-06 Remington Rand Inc Recording and computing machine
US2524029A (en) * 1946-07-27 1950-10-03 Ibm Pneumatic sensing device for reading perforated records repetitively
US2576152A (en) * 1946-07-22 1951-11-27 Standard Register Co Sheet delivery and assembly apparatus
US2723849A (en) * 1951-09-28 1955-11-15 Ibm Record transferring device
US2792223A (en) * 1953-12-31 1957-05-14 Ibm Device for handling and feeding tabulating cards
US2805620A (en) * 1951-12-15 1957-09-10 Rosen Leo Control means for high speed printing apparatus
US2951699A (en) * 1960-09-06 Record feeding devices
US3011703A (en) * 1955-10-07 1961-12-05 Sperry Rand Corp Record sensing means
US3039681A (en) * 1955-05-02 1962-06-19 Magnavox Co Card processing system

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2951699A (en) * 1960-09-06 Record feeding devices
US2480981A (en) * 1944-08-30 1949-09-06 Remington Rand Inc Recording and computing machine
US2576152A (en) * 1946-07-22 1951-11-27 Standard Register Co Sheet delivery and assembly apparatus
US2524029A (en) * 1946-07-27 1950-10-03 Ibm Pneumatic sensing device for reading perforated records repetitively
US2723849A (en) * 1951-09-28 1955-11-15 Ibm Record transferring device
US2805620A (en) * 1951-12-15 1957-09-10 Rosen Leo Control means for high speed printing apparatus
US2792223A (en) * 1953-12-31 1957-05-14 Ibm Device for handling and feeding tabulating cards
US3039681A (en) * 1955-05-02 1962-06-19 Magnavox Co Card processing system
US3011703A (en) * 1955-10-07 1961-12-05 Sperry Rand Corp Record sensing means

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