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US2053499A
US2053499A US23876A US2387635A US2053499A US 2053499 A US2053499 A US 2053499A US 23876 A US23876 A US 23876A US 2387635 A US2387635 A US 2387635A US 2053499 A US2053499 A US 2053499A
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Prior art keywords
conductor
contacts
travel
stop
transmission
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US23876A
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Frederick W Seybold
Harry I Lewis
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Harris Corp
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Harris Seybold Potter Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B26HAND CUTTING TOOLS; CUTTING; SEVERING
    • B26DCUTTING; DETAILS COMMON TO MACHINES FOR PERFORATING, PUNCHING, CUTTING-OUT, STAMPING-OUT OR SEVERING
    • B26D7/00Details of apparatus for cutting, cutting-out, stamping-out, punching, perforating, or severing by means other than cutting
    • B26D7/01Means for holding or positioning work
    • B26D7/015Means for holding or positioning work for sheet material or piles of sheets
    • B26D7/016Back gauges
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/654With work-constraining means on work conveyor [i.e., "work-carrier"]
    • Y10T83/6563With means to orient or position work carrier relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6566By indexing means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T83/00Cutting
    • Y10T83/647With means to convey work relative to tool station
    • Y10T83/6656Rectilinear movement only
    • Y10T83/6657Tool opposing pusher
    • Y10T83/666Screw actuated

Description

I Sept 8, 1936.
F. w. SEYBOLD ET AL,
AUTOMATI C SPACER Filed May 28, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTO firm/0r W 55 5040 443m [law/s Mmam ATTORNEYE Sept. 8,\1936. F. w. SEYBOLD ET AL AUTOMAT IC SPACER ATTORNEY/5'.
Sept. 8, 1936. F. w. SEYBOLD ET AL AUTOMATIC SPACER Filed May 28, 1935 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 0 NW4 3 E55 0 W w IWM A & m
Sept. 8, 1936- F. w. SEYBOLD ET AL.
AUTOMATIC SPACER Filed May 28, 1935 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 was am w i M Wm W W v1 mfi M Y Sept, 8, 1936- F. w. SEYBOLD ET AL AUTOMAT I C SPACER Filed May 28, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 52%4 Control am R6 0 mm E 0 F m E Z Z W M ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 8, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC SPACER Delaware Application May 28, 1935, Serial No. 23.876
24 Claim.
This invention relates to improvements in spacers, that is to say machines adapted to move either the work or the operating tool step by step through a plurality of predetermined operating positions. In the present instance the machine automatically comes to a stop at each operating point, and these points need not be spaced uniformly, but may be at varying distances apart. The invention is herein disclosed as embodied in a paper cutting machine resembling in some respects the paper cutting machine covered by Taylor Patent No. 1,901,677, dated March 14, 1933. It will be obvious however that in some of its aspects the present invention is capable of application to machines of widely diiferent design for purposes of a quite diiferent character.
One of the objects of the invention isthe provision of a novel means for mounting the stops which define or locate the points on the work where the desired operations are to be performed, the mounting being such that the set up of stops may be made entirely outside of the machine while the latter is being employed on a totally different job.
Another object is the provision of a stop carrier having a plurality of sets of stops, with its stops being movable as a whole to occupy any one of several different positions, thereby bringing into operative relation any one of a like number of sets of stops so as to determine 'or locate the stop positions of any one of several different series of cuts, whereby a sheet of paper or a stack of sheets may be cut into several sections according to a predetermined plan, and then each section out into a number of pieces, all without any new set up of the machine other than a movement of the stop carrier to a new position.
Another object is the provision of transmission mechanism with electrical control means governing the forward travel of the moving element of the machine, and hand operated reverse travel control means so arranged as to preclude the actuation of the electrical control means during reverse travel.
A further object is the provision of a hand control element moving angulariy to effect control for travel in one directionand longitudinally to effect control for' travel in the opposite direction.
A further object is the provision of means for automatically starting the traveling element forward at high speed after the machine has operated at a given station or point of operation in case the next station is positioned forward further than a predetermined distance, and to automatically start the travel forward in low speed in case the next operating position is less than the said predetermined distance, it being observed that where the forward travel is instituted at high speed the transmission is automatically shifted to low speed just before the cutting point is reached.
Still another object is the provision of a convenient wobble stick operation of the electrical control means for the transmission.
Other objects and features of novelty will appear as we proceed'with the description of that embodiment of the invention which, for the purposes of the present application, we have illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is aside elevation of a portion of a paper cutting machine showing the driving and transmission means with the back gauge at the forward end of its travel, part of the transmission case being broken away in order to more fully illustrate the invention.
Fig. 2 is an end view of that part of the machine which is shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a plan view, partly in horizontal section, showing the transmission together with the manual control means therefor. Fig. 4 is an elevational view, partly in vertical section, of a portion of the transmission control including the electromagnets for shifting the transmission to high speed and low speed, respectively.
Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view of a portion of the transmission together with the friction clutch therefor.
Fig. 6 is a side elevation of the machine on a smaller scale, showing a cable so connected as to move proportionately with the travel of the back gauge, this cable operating the traveling control unit which cooperates with the fixed stops for determining stop' positions.
Fig. '7 is a front elevation showing the traveling control unit and the stop carrier with stops mounted thereon for cooperation with the travelback gauge as soon as a given out has been completed.
Fig. 12 is a front elevational view of the-upper portion of the machine, with the stop carrier removed.
Fig. 13 is a plan view illustrating certain of the pulleys over which runs the cable that drives the traveling control unit.
Fig. 14 is a front elevation, partly ditic, showing the wobble stick control element with the push buttons arranged to be operated thereby.
Fig. 15 is a sideelevational view of the same.
Fig. 16 is a fragmental horizontal sectional view on a larger scale illustrating means for returning the transmission to neutral or stop position when the back gauge has reached a predetermined limit of forward travel.
Fig. 17 is a fragmental vertical sectional view taken substantially on the line |'||l of Fig. 3.
Fig. 18 is a detail elevational view on a larger scale looking in the direction of arrow l8, Fig. 3, and showing the automatic throw-off which operates when the back gauge in traveling rearwardly reaches a predetermined limit of motion in that direction.
Fig. 19 is a vertical sectional view on a larger scale of one of the main stops, taken substantially on the line |9|9 of Fig. '7.
Fig. 20 is a detail horizontal section taken substantially on the line 2020 of Fig. 7, and showing the contacts carried by the traveling control unit for cooperation with the stops, and
Fig. 21 is a wiring diagram of the electrical control for the transmission.
Referring to the drawings, the table of a paper cutting machine is indicated at 25. This table is adapted to support a stack of sheets to be cut, and the stack is adapted to be moved forward step by step in response to pushing movements imparted to the stack by a back gauge 26, which slides over the table, being impelled by a screw 21 which turns within a nut 28 that is attached to and depends from the back gauge 26. The screw 21 is caused to turn in one direction to induce forward travel of the back gauge, and in the opposite direction to cause rearward travel thereof. In the drawings, the vertically movable knife which performs the cutting operation is not illustrated, but its position lengthwise of the table is indicated by the wooden cutting strip 29 (Fig. 1) set into the table to receive the knife when it descends.
Across the front of the machine there is a rail 30 supported upon brackets 3|. A traveling control unit 32 slides on the rail 38, being moved along the length of the rail by a cable 33 or similar flexible element. This cable moves proportionately with the travelof the back gauge 26. One end thereof is connected to the back gauge by a clamp 34, from which it extends rearwardly to a pulley 35 carried by a bracket 36 on the machine frame. Thence the cable runs forwardly and upwardly to a pulley 31 mounted on a suitable bracket in theforward end of the machine frame. The cable is guided over the top of pulley 3'! into the groove of a horizontal pulley 38, which is the lower of two pulleys turning upon the same axis. The cable runs part way around pulley 38 and then over to the left of the machine and around a pulley 39 which is carried on an arm 48 projecting from one of the brackets 3|. From here the cable runs across the front of the machine parallel to rail 30. At the opposite side of the machine it extends around pulley 4|,
mounted on an arm-42, and thence back to the center of the forward end of the machine frame and part way around pulley 42, mounted coaxially with pulley 38. Leaving pulley 42 the cable is guided downwardly over a vertical pulley 43 and underneath a second vertical pulley 44, from which it runs rearwardly to a post 45 to which it is secured. This postis mounted upon and projects upwardly from the back gauge 26.. The fastening means at one or both ends of the cable isadjustable in order to properly tension the cable.
The traveling control unit 32 is provided with a pair of depending arms 46 and" having holes therethrough for the reception of a sleeve 48 which surrounds the cable 33. This sleeve has a threaded portion, as indicated in Fig. 7, upon which is mounted a knurled nut 49 arranged between the depending arms 46.and 41. The sleeve 48 is secured to the cable 33 by means of a set screw 50. A lock nut 5| is threaded onto one end of the sleeve 48. It will be apparent, therefore, that fine adjustments of the position of traveling unit 32 with respect to the cable may be obtained by loosening lock nut 5| and turning nut 49 to move the unit 32 with respect to the sleeve 48.
The traveling unit 32 also has a long depending arm 52 with a pointer 53 on its lower extremity running over a scale 54 carried by a bar 55 which is mounted on the lower ends of brackets 3|.
The brackets 3| also support the stop carrier 56. This important element of the machine is a steel bar having a plurality of faces, four in the illustrated case, although in accordance with some of its aspects the invention may embody a bar with a single face only. In each face there are two guide grooves 51 and 58. In its ends the stop carrier bar 56 has central cone-shaped cavities for the reception of smooth cone-shaped centers similar to the dead center of a lathe. Preferably both of these centers, numbered 59 and 60 in the drawings,,are threaded for longitudinal adjustment, not only for the purpose of making the bar 56 removable, but also for giving it longitudinal adjustability. The four-sided stop carrier 56 here shown is held in any one of its four different operative positions by a spring latch 6| pivotally mounted in one of the brackets 3| and provided with a finger 62 adapted to enter the groove 51 on the then lower face of the bar. When the latch 6| is depressed, obviously the stop carrier may be turned to any one of its other operative positions.
The main stops which are used with the stop carrier 56 are shown at 63, see especially Fig. 19. Each stop has a rear rib 64 for engagement with groove 58 of the stop carrier, and a separate dovetail clamping piece 59 slidable within the dovetail groove 51, this clamping piece being mounted on the stop by means of a screw 65 extending through a smooth opening in the stop. The upper end of the stop is recessed on its forward face. In the recess there is mounted an annular metal contact 66 which is carried upon a fiber washer 61, the
washer being supported in turn by a bolt 68 which is mounted in the stop. The contact 66 is thus completely insulated. To the rear of the stop, and supported upon this same bolt 68, there is an angular finger 69 which extends to the rear an appreciable distance. A nut 10 on the bolt 68 serves to lock these various parts in place.
Each of the stops 63 is provided with two threaded openings 1| spaced apart horizontally. An auxiliary stop 12 may be mounted upon stop 63 by means of a screw 13 extending through a slot in the auxiliary stop and threaded into one or the other of the holes H. The auxiliary stop is held against turning by a rib I4 projecting from its rear surface and fitting into a groove I5 formed across the front surface of stop 63. By loosening the screw 13, the operator is enabled to move the auxiliary stop 12 along until the desired point of adjustment is reached, when the screw is tightened down and the auxiliary stop thereby locked in position. At the rear of the auxiliary stop there is a recess in which is mounted. an annular metallic contact 16 surrounding and supported upon a bolt 11, from which it is insulated in the same manner as is the contact 66 on the main stop.
The main stops 63 are positioned along the length of the stop carrier 56 to define the positions of the main cuts, in other words cuts which are spaced apart more than the width of one of the stops 63. It will be understood that a considerable number of stops will be mounted on a given side of the stop carrier in actual practice, although in Fig. 7 of the drawings only three main stops are illustrated. It frequently happens that trims are to be taken out between the printed parts of a sheet, as for instance a sheet of labels, and in that case the trim cut may be spaced from the adjacent main cut a matter of only a small fraction of an inch. In such cases the auxiliary stops are used, which take care of all spacing less than the width of one stop 63.
When the back gauge 26 is moving forward the traveling unit 32 is thereby caused to move across the front end of the machine from right to left, or in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 10. The figures on gauge 54, as marked by the pointer 53, indicate the length of uncut sheet after a given out is made. As explained in the said Taylor Patent 1,901,677, it is desirable that the rate of movement of the back gauge be rapid throughout the greater part of its travel, but that in the interest of accuracy the back gauge should travel atlow speed just before each stop position is reached.
The traveling unit.0n the traveling control unit 32 there are two bell-crank levers I8 and I9 which are mounted to turn about a pivot bolt 80. Coil springs 8| and 82, respectively, tend to draw each of the vertical arms of these two levers toward the right. The movement of lever. 18 in this direction is limited by an adjustable stop 83, while lever 19 has an angular finger 84 at its upper end which normally engages and depresses a push button 85, and has its clockwise movement limited thereby. On the lower arm of bell-crank lever 18 there are mounted a pair of metallic contacts 86 and 81, while on the lower arm of lever 19 there are a pair of similar contacts 88 and 89. Each of these four contacts has a cylindrical hole therethrough which fits over a correspondingly shaped block of insulation 90, these two parts being keyed together to prevent relative rotation, as indicated in Fig. 20. The blocks 90 have annular flanges 9| which serve to space the contacts from the. arms of levers l8 and 19. The blocks 90 are supported upon the arms by bolts 92, and are prevented from turning by means of pins 93 which are caused to extend through holes in the levers and into holes in the blocks, and are held against longitudinal movement by the nuts on the bolts. Flexible leads 94, 95, 96 and 91 are soldered to the contacts 86, 81, 88 and 89, respectively.
It will be obvious that when the two contacts 86 and 81 rest upon a disc 66, engaging the same on opposite-sides of the center thereof, the leads 94 and 85 will be brought into electrical communication. Similarly, when the contacts 88 and 89 are both in engagement with a disc 16, electrical communication will be set up between the leads 96 and 91. In either case, as will be explained hereinafter, an electrical circuit will be completed which will throw the transmission into neutral, thereby stopping the travel of the back gauge. In the operation of the machine, as the traveling unit 82 approaches a stop position the lever 18 or 19. as the case may be, is rocked upon its pivot as the forward contact on the lever rides up and over the contact disc on the stop.
In setting up the stops for the cuts on a sheet of labels or the like, the work may be done on a separate set-up table as previously referred to, or if desired it may be done on the present machine. With the carrier bar 56 in one of its four angular positions, a sheet is placed upon the table against the back gauge. The gauge is moved forward until the first line of out comes directly under the knife of the machine. One of the steps 63 is then slid along carrier bar 56 until the disc 66 on the stop engages both of the contacts 86 and 81, when a signal lamp 98 will be energized. When this occurs the operator will know that the stop is correctly positioned for that cut, whereupon he will tighten the screw 65 to lock the stop in position. He then moves the back gauge forward until the next line of out comes directly beneath the knife, and proceeds in like manner to locate and lock a second main stop 63 in position.
The trim cuts are located on the carrier bar by auxiliary stops 12 which are applied to the proper main steps 63. The screw 13 in such case is left loose until the auxiliary stop is adjusted to such position that the contacts 88 and 89 both engage the disc 16 and cause the lighting of lamp 98, when the screw 13 is tightened down to lock the auxiliary stop in position. This procedure is continued until stops are set for all of the parallel cuts to be made in the sheet.
. Then a strip removed from the sheet by one of these cuts is placed on the table in a direction at right angles to its former direction, the carrier bar 56 is rotated through 90 and fixed in that position, and a set of stops is then adjusted on the front face of the bar to correspond with the .points of cut on the said strip. A
second strip removed from the original sheet,
is next placed on the table and the carrier bar 58 revolved to a. new position 90 from the previous one, whereupon a further set of stops is positioned upon the bar. In this manner it is possible by the use of a. four-sided carrier bar to define the cut positions for the original sheet and for three strips removed from the sheet.
The push button 85 supported at the top of the traveling unit 32 carries a disc 99 that is urged by. the push button spring toward engagement with contacts I00 and I. Normally, however, the spring 82 pulls the lever 19 toward the right to apply pressure to the push button sufficient in degree to cause disc 99 to engage contacts l0l and NH, as shown in Fig. 7. When, however, the contact 88 rides over the top of a disc 16, during the travel of unit 32 toward the left, the bell-crank lever 19 is moved counterclockwise to the position indicated in Fig. 10, and the disc 99-is caused to engage contacts I00 and I00 which, as will be described hereinafter, causes a change in the transmission from high speed to low speed. This action occurs of course only when theback gauge is moving the sheets toward a trim cut, but the parts are so proportioned and arranged that when a trim cut follows a main cut bell-crank 19 is tilted to release push button by the time the main cut is made. Hence the travel of the back gauge is at low speed always in approaching a trim cut. At other times the bell-crank lever 19 is not disturbed and remains in the position illustrated in Fig. '1, it being understood that no auxiliary stop is attached to a main stop except where a trim cut follows the main out. We term this switch the Slow-fast switch.
A second push button I04 (Fig. 8) also carried by the traveling unit 32, normally makes electrical engagement between two contacts I05 and I06 through a metallic disc I01. When the push button is pressed, this engagement is broken. Bell-crank lever I08, pivotally mounted at I09 upon the traveling unit 32, carries at its lower forward extremity an anti-friction roller IIO. This roller is engaged and pushed rearwardly by the angular finger 69 on each main stop at a point of travel a short distance in advance of the point where the contacts 86 and 81 are electrically connected by the disc 66. This breaking of the circuit across the contacts I05 and I 06 serves to shift the transmission from high speed to low speed in a manner which will be presently described.
Thus, the transmission is always operating at low speed just before a main point of cut is reached, and as previously stated the rate of travel from a main cut to a 'trim cut is at low speed throughout. The traveling. unit 32, it will be observed therefore, comprises means for slowing up travel before a main stop position, means for maintaining travel at the slow rate between a main and an adjacent trim cut position, and means for stopping the travel precisely at the cut position, whether main or trim.
The transmission-Referring now to Figs. 1 to 5 inclusive, it will be noted that a V-pulley II I is fixed upon the rear end of feed screw 21. This pulley is driven by a v-belt II2 which runs over a second V-pulley I I3 keyed to one end of a shaft II4 which is journaled in the transmission casing II5.
Power for operation of the transmission may be drawn from any suitable source, such as an electric motor, not herein illustrated; but designated diagrammatically at H6 in Fig. 21. The motor drives shaft II1 upon'which. there is a fiy-wheel H8 and a sprocket wheel H9. Chain I20 runs over the latter and over a smaller sprocket wheel I2I. The sprocket I 2| is keyed to a sleeve I22, see Fig. 5, which is loose upon a shaft I23, the shaft being mounted in bearings I24 carried by the transmission casing. The sleeve I22 is connected with shaft I23 through any suitable friction clutch. As illustrated herein, the sleeve I22 carries a metal disc I25. I26 is a clutch element keyed to the shaft and carrying a plate I21 which is resiliently drawn toward the element I26. Rings I28 of friction material are arranged on both sides of the disc I25. As will be obvious, this clutch construction will serve to transmit rotation from the sleeve I22 to the shaft I23 except when unusual resistance is presented, at which times it will slip and thereby protect the working parts of the machine.
On the inner end of shaft I23 there is a bevel gear I29 which meshes continuously with bevel gears I30 and I3I, rotating them in opposite directions. These two gears turn freely upon the shaft II4. A sprocket wheel I32 is also keyed to shaft I23, and through a chain I33 drives a larger sprocket I34 which is fixed to a transverse shaft I35 that is journaled in the transmission casing below the level of shaft H4. The shaft I35 carries a worm I36 which meshes with a worm wheel I31 that has a hub that turns freely on the shaft II4. I38 is a collar keyed to slide upon shaft II 4. At either end this collar is provided with dog clutch teeth that are adapted to engage similar teeth on the hubs of gears I30 and I31. As will be apparent, there is a considerable speed reduction between shaft I23 and worm wheel I31. Hence, when collar I38 is shifted to engage gear I30, power is transmitted to shaft I I4 at high speed, whereas when collar I38 is shifted to engage worm'wheel I31, power is transmitted to the shaft at low speed. The direction of travel is the same in both instances, and is such as to turn screw 21 in the proper direction for imparting forward travel to back gauge 26.
On the forward extremity of shaft II4 exteriorly of the transmission casing II5 there is a collar I39 keyed to slide upon the shaft I I4, and provided with dog clutch teeth for engagement with similar teeth on the hub of bevel gear I3I. When this collar is shifted to the right from the position illustrated in Fig. 3, rotation is imparted to shaft H4 in a reverse direction and at high- On this shaft are keyed two yoke arms I4I which engage the groove in collar I38 for shifting the latter to low speed, high speed, or neutral position. Near one end the shaft I40 has keyed thereto a walking beam lever I42. A link I43 extends upwardly from this lever to a crank arm I44 which is slidably keyed to a control rod I45 mounted in the frame of the machine for longitudinal as well as rotational movements. Rotation of rod I45 will therefore swing lever I42, rocking shaft I40, and shifting collar I38 from one operative position to another.
On the frame of the machine in front of transmission casing II5 there is pivotally mounted at I46 a yoke lever I41 which engages collar I39 and is thereby adapted to connect or disconnect the reverse drive. This lever I41 is also pivotally connected to a sleeve I48 which surrounds control rod I45, being held against movement longitudinally of the rod by means of two collarsv I49 pinned to the rod. It will be obvious therefore that when the rod I45 is pulled forwardly by manual force applied to its handle I 50, the collar I39 will engage the hub of gear I3I, throwing in reverse drive,
We provide automatic disconnection of reverse drive when the back gauge reaches a predetermined position in its rearward travel. To this end the yoke lever I41 may be provided with an arm I5I which is adapted to be engaged by a downwardly projecting inclined finger I52 that is integral with an adjustable plate I53 mounted upon 9. depending bracket I54 of the back gauge. When this bracket reaches a predetermined position in its rearward travel, the finger I52 engages an inclined surface I55 on the arm I5I and swings that arm around, operating yoke lever I41 to disconnect the reverse drive. The inertia of the moving parts is quite suflicient to carry out this operation. As soon as the operator releases handle I50, a coil spring I56 which surrounds the rod moves the latter longitudlnally rearward again to itsnormal position.
This produces a further slight travel of collar I39 outwardly on shaft II4, which is of no moment however.
When control rod I45 has been rotated in either direction to rock shaft I40 from the neutral position shown in the drawings to a forward high speed or forward low speed position, we provide means for automatically interrupting such forward travel when the back gauge reaches a predetermined forward position. This means may consist of an anti-friction roller I5I rotatably mounted at the end of an arm I58 which is keyed to slide upon the control rod I45, or rather to permit the rod to slide with respect to this arm, the latter being held against bodily movement lengthwise of the machine frame by a bracket I59 secured to the frame and having rod encircling members I68 and I6I between which the hub of arm I 58 is positioned.
on the back gauge there is a small bracket I82 provided with a horizontal slot having a flared mouth facing forward. Assuming that the rod I45 is turned out of normal position to effect forward travel of the back gauge then when the bracket I 62 reaches the roller I51, one or the other side of the flared slot in bracket I62 will engage the roller I51 and swing the arm I 58 back to neutral position, thereby acting through rod I45, crank arm I44, link I43, and walking beam lever I42 to throw the transmission to neutral and stop the back gauge travel.
We also provide means to prevent the control rod I 45 from being pulled forward by the operator to engage the reverse gear I3I while one of the forward drives is operating. This means consists of a pin I63 fixed in the rod M5, which pin engages the end wall of member I6I preventing the forward movement of the rod I45 except when the latter is turned to neutral position, whereupon, in response to a forward pull upon the rod, pin I68 is free to move into a slot I64! formed in member I6I at the proper angle.
Electrical controZ.We provide electrical control for the forward travel only of the back gauge, inasmuch as no automatic stopping is required when the back gauge is being reversed.
Accordingly, manual control is regarded as sufiicient for reverse travel. The shifting of the transmission to low speed position is accom-- plished electrically by means of the energization of an electromagnet L which rocks the shaft Mil in a counter-clockwise direction to lock the worm wheel I37 to shaft II i for low speed operation. Similarly, the transmission is shifted to high speed position by the energization of an electromagnet H, which tilts the rock shaft M8 clockwise, thereby locking gear I38 to shaft M8 for high speed operation. The armatures of these electromagents are connected by links I65 with the respective arms of walking beam lever M2. The walking beam I82 is normally held in neutral position, as illustrated in the drawings, by coil springs I66 and I8I surrounding vertical rods I68 and I69 pivotally connected to the ends of the walking beam. Sleeves or collars IIfl are pinned to the rods I68 and I69 and serve as abutments for the upper ends 'of the springs. The lower ends of the springs abut in each case against a hollow screw III which is threaded into the lower extremity of tubular casing I712 or I13 as the case may be. Lock nuts I'M hold these hollow screws in adjusted position. The rods I68 and I69 extend down into the hollow screws ITI.
It will be apparent that when the electromagnet L is energized to pull down the left side of walking beam lever I42, spring I66 will be compressed by the collar I'IIl on rod I68, and when the electromagnet is again deenergized, the spring I66 will tend to return the walking beam to neutral position. Similarly the spring I 61 opposes the downward movement of the right-hand end of lever I42 in response to the action of electromagnet H, and tends to return the lever to neutral position after electromagnet H is deenergized.
I15 is a spring plunger with an anti-friction roller I16 at its upper end, which normally fits into a notch I" in a central arm I'I8 depending from lever I42. This plunger is urged upwardly by its spring I19, the tension of which may be adjusted as desired by a hollow screw I80 similar to the hollow screws I'II previously described. The plunger I15 therefore tends to center the transmission at neutral and to hold it there.
In Fig. 11 I have shown at I8I the usual crank shaft of a paper cutting machine, which makes a single revolution for each cutting operation to force the knife down-through the paper to make the cut, and then raises the knife to inoperative position. This is conventional construction and its more detailed illustration herein is not deemed necessary. The shaft is shown in Fig. 11 in its normal position of rest. Formed upon the crank shaft there is a cam I82. When the shaft I8! makes its single revolution, and while the knife is rising to its inoperative position, the cam I82 engages and raises an anti-friction roller I 83 on an electric switch, momentarily closing the switch and making a circuit through a pair of contacts I84 and I85 connected with conductors I86 and I 8?. Just before the revolution of the shaft is completed, the roller I83 again descends and the electrical connection is broken. This momentary joining of the contacts I 841 and I85 causes the energization of electromagnet H in a manner which will be later described, and starts the travel of the back gauge forward at high speed.
We provide a safety switch for cutting out the electrical control'when the manual control rod I85 is pulled forward to connect the reverse drive gear I3I to shaft I II. For this purpose we prefer to employ a push button switch I88 which is normally held compressed by the rear end of rod I85, so as to complete an electrical connection between contacts I88 and I98, these contacts being connected with conductors HI and I92, respectively. A circuit through these conductors must be complete as a prerequisite to the energization of either of the electromagnets L or H. When the rod I45 is pulled forward however, the spring I 83 of the push button breaks the circuit, and hence no electrical operation is possible during reverse travel.
In addition to the automatic operation of the electrical control, we provide means for operating it manually as well, which means is quite distinct from the manual operation of rod I45. For this purpose, we mount in a convenient position at the front of the machine a series of three push buttons I98, I95 and I86 facing toward a common center. In alignment with this common center there is a wobble stick I81, which consists primarily of a rod with a handle threaded onto its forward extremity, the rod extending through a suitable opening in the rear wall of a casing I98, and having coil springs I98 and 200 surrounding it on opposite sides of the casing rear wall and abutting against nuts threaded onto the rod, as disclosed in Fig. 15. These springs tend to hold,
the wobble stick in central position and to return it to central position whenever it has been moved out of that position.
Push button I35 carries a disc 20I which is adapted to engage contacts 202 and 203 when the button is depressed. This causes the energization of the high speed electromagnet H. Push button I34 carries a disc 204 which normally engages contacts 205 and 205. When the push button is depressed, the disc 204 is caused to engage two other contacts 201 and 203. Push button I 35 carries a disc 203 which normally engages two contacts 2I0 and 2. Depression of this button breaks the electrical connection across contacts 2I0 and 2| I. When the operator shifts wobble stick I31 to the left, operating push button I35, high speed electromagnet H is energized, throwing the transmission to high. When the wobble stick is moved to the right, operating push button I34, low speed electromagnet L is energized, shifting the transmission to low. When the wobble stick is moved downwardly, depressing push button I36, the operating circuits are opened, and the transmission is moved to neutral by that one of the coil springs I33 and I51 which had been previously compressed.
When the manual control rod I45 is set for neutral, and forward travel of the back gauge is being controlled electrically, a forward limit switch is brought into use. As herein disclosed, we may employ a construction for this purpose which. comprises a bracket 2I2 attached to the frame of the machine carrying a push button switch 2 I3 which normally closes two contacts 2 I4 and 2I5. On the bracket 2I2 there is pivotally mounted an arm or lever 2I0 which overlies push button 2I3, but the weight of which is not sumcient to depress the push button in opposition to the spring 2" of the latter. When the back gauge moves forward however to a predetermined point, the bracket I62 on the back gauge strikes the upper surface of lever 2I5 and depresses the .,lever sufllciently to force the push button 2I3 down to break electrical connection across the contacts 2I4 and 2I5, which opens the operating circuits and stops the back gauge.
The electrical system-The electric circuits for the electrical control of the forward travel of the back gauge are shown in Fig. 21. In this figure the line wires are indicated at 220 and 22 I. The driving motor H6 is connected across these line wires by a conductor 222 within which there is a suitable on and off switch 223. The master switch for the electrical system is shown at 224,
being located in a conductor 225 wherein there is an indicator lamp 226. The switch 224 and the lamp 226 are preferably located at the front end of the machine near the other controls. When the switch 224 is open, the, electrical system is inoperative, but the motor I I6 may be running and the machine may be operated in the ordinary manner, that is without the automatic stop features, by the manipulation of hand control rod I45.
From the conductor 225 connection is made with contact 2I4 by a short conductor 221. Conductor I32, as shown, connects contact I30 with contact 2I0 in the wobble stick housing. In this housing contacts 203 and 205 are connected by a conductor 223. From contact 208 there extends a conductor\223, which is one of the principal conductors of the system. A second major conductor 230 is connected with contact 201, and a third major conductor 23I is connected with contacts 203 and 205 through their connecting conductor 2'23. Contacts 202 and 2 are connected with conductor 223 by short conductors 232 and 233, respectively.
In the system there are two principal relays S and F, the function of the relay 8 being to seal in the low speed electromagnet L, and the function of relay F being to seal in the high speed electromagnet H. The coil of relay 5 is bridged across conductors 230 and 23I by conductors 234 and 235., The coil of relay F is connected with contact 2037in the wobble stick housing by conductors 235, and on the opposite side it is Joined to conductor 235.
Relay S has three pairs of contacts 231, 231', 233, 233', and 233, 233. Relay F has four pairs of contacts numbered 240, 240', 2, 24I', 242, 242', and 243, 243. It will be observed that when the armature 244 or relay 8 is raised, all three pairs of its contacts are Joined. When the armature 245 of relay F is down, contacts 2 and 24I' are joined. When this armature is raised those contacts are separated electrically, while the contacts of the remaining. three pairs are joined together.
Line wire 220 is connected with contacts 231 of relay S by conductor 243. A conductor 214 leads from contact 231' to contact 240 of relay F. From contact 240' a conductor 243 leads to one side of the coil of electromagnet H, the other side being connected with conductor 235. From conductor 241 there is a short conductor 243 leading to contact 2. Contact 24I' is connected with one side of electromagnet L by a conductor 250, the opposite side of the electromagnet being connected with conductor 235.
Contact 233 of relay S is connected with conductor 223 by a short conductor 25I. Contact 233' and contact 242 are connected by a conductor 252. Contacts 242' and I05 are connected by a conductor 253, and contact I05 is connected by a conductor 254 with conductor 23I. A conductor 255 connects conductor 223 with contact 243' of relay F, while contact 243 is connected with conductor 230 by a short conductor 253.
In order to avoid electrical difllculties, I use a low voltage circuit on the traveling unit 32. This circuit comprises a conductor 251, part of which is flexible to accommodate the movement of the unit, connected with the two leads 34 and 35, and extending to one side of the coil of a relay A. From the other side of this coil another conductor 253 extends to a battery 253. A conductor 260, with a flexible portion, connects the other side of the battery with the two leads 35 and 31. The lamp 38, previously referred to, is bridged across the conductors 251 and 253.
The armature 25I of relay A normally bridges two pairs of contacts 252, 252', and 253, 233'. Contact 252 is connected by a conductor 254 with conductor 223. Contact 202' is connected with contact 238 of relay S by a conductor 265. Contact 238' of the latter relay is connected by a conductor 256 with major conductor 230.
Contact 263 of relay A is*connected by a conductor 251 with major conductor 223. Contact 263' is connected by a conductor 263 with one end of the coil of a relay B, the opposite end of the coil being connected by a conductor 263 with line wire 22I. Relay B has one pair of contacts 210 and 210', which are adapted to be bridged by the armature 21I of the relay when the latter is deenergized. A conductor 212 extends from contact 210 to conductor 230, while contact 210' is connected by a conductor 213 with one end of the coil of another relay C, the opposite end of that coil being connected by a conductor 214 with line wire 22I. Relay C also has one pair of contacts 215 and 215' that are adapted to be bridged by the armature 216 of the relay when the coil thereof is energized. A conductor 211 joins contact 215 with conductor 230, and a conductor 218 joins contact 215' with conductor 229.
The conductor I81 joining the contacts I and I85 is itself connected with contact IN by a conductor 219, the contact IOI' being connected by a conductor 280 with conductor 23I.
Automatic operation of electrical system.- When the operator desires to use the automatic electrical system, he operates manual control rod I 45 to cause the reverse travel of the back gauge into its initial rear position. A stack of sheets is then placed on the table and squared up against the back gauge and the usual side guide. The operator then closes master switch 224. The front limit switch and the safety switch indicated at 2I3 and I88, respectively, in Fig. 21 of the drawings, are assumed to be in' their normal closed positions.
The operator now moves wobble stick I91 to operate push buttom I95, thereby causing switch disc 20I to bridge contacts 202 and 203 momentarily. A circuit is thereby set up from line wire 220 through switches 224, 2I3, I88 and 209 to conductor 229, and thence through conductor 232 across contacts 202 and 203, through conductor 228, contact 205, switch disc 204, contact 206, conductor 236, relay F and conductor 235 to line wire 22 I. The armature 245 of relay F then rises joining contacts 243 and 243' whereby a circuit is set up from conductor 229 through conductors 255 and 256 to conductor 230, and thence through conductor 234, the coil of relay S and conductor 235 to line wire 22L Relay S, being thus energized, bridges contacts 231 and 231', whereby a circuit is set up from line wire 220 through conductors 246 and 241 to contact 240, and through raised armature 245 to contact 240', and thence by conductor 248 through high speed electromagnet H and conductor 235 to line wire 22I. The right-hand end of walking beam I45 is thereby depressed, shifting the transmission from neutral to high speed. The back gauge therefore immediately begins forward travel at high speed.
At this time there is no bridging of contacts 86, 81 or 83, 89 on the traveling unit 32, and accordingly relay A is deenergized and its contacts are bridged, as shown in Fig. 21. Relay B is therefore energized, being bridged across conductor 229 and line wire 22I, contacts 210 and 218 are disconnected, and relay C is deenergized. A circuit is set up however, through conductor 229, which is in communication with line wire 220 as previously described, through conductors 264 and 295 to contact 238 of relay S, and across the armature thereof to contact 238, and thence by conductors 266, 230 and 234 through the coil of relay S and conductor 235 to line wire 22I. Relay S is thereby sealed in and remains energized after the operator releases the wobble stick control. Relay F is also sealed in by a circuit running from conductor 229 through conductors 25!, 252, 253 and 254, the armatures 244 and 245 then being up, to conductor 23I, thence through conductor 228 to contact 205, through switch disc 29:1 to contact 206, through conductor 236 to the coil of relay F and thence through conductor 235 to line wire 22I,
The travel of the back gauge in a forward direction at high speed therefore continues until the push button I04 is pressed by angular finger 69 on the first stop, through the intermediacy of the lever 106. When this occurs disc I01 breaks the connection across contacts I and I06. The sealing circuit for relay F is thereby broken, and the armature 245 falls, breaking the connection across contacts 240 and 240' and making connection across contacts 24I and 24I. The circuit through high speed electromagnet H is thereby broken, but a circuit through low speed electromagnet L is immediately made from line wire 220 through conductor 246 across contacts 231 and 231', relay S being still energized, then through conductors 241 and 249, across contacts 24I and 24I and through conductor 250 to electromagnet L, and thence through conductor 235 to line wire 22I. The transmission is thereby shifted to low speed, and travel of the back gauge at low speed continues until contacts 66 and 81 on the traveling unit 32 ride into engagement simultaneously with disc 66 on the first stop. The low voltage circuit is then completed, relay A is energized, raising armature 26I and breaking communication between contacts 262 and 262'. The circuit through conductors 229, 264, 265, 266, 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S is thereby interrupted, and armature 244 falls, breaking the connection across contacts 231 and 231. The circuit through electromagnet L is therefore broken and the spring I66 returns walking beam I42 to intermediate position, throwing the transmission into neutral. The back gauge therefore stops immediately;
The work is now in such'position upon the machine table that the first line of cut is directly beneath the cutter blade. The operator then, by suitable means not herein disclosed but well understood in the art, causes the crank shaft I8I to revolve through one revolution forcing the cutter blade down through the work and again raising the blade to its top or inoperative position. Just before the crank shaft I8I completes its revolution, however, the cam I82 thereon operates push botton I83 to momentarily connect contacts I84 and I85. This makes a circuit from line wire 220 through switches 224, 2I3 and I86, conductor I92, contact 2I0, switch disc 209, contact 2! I, conductors 233, 229 and I86, across contacts I84 and I85, through conductors I81 and 219, across contacts IN and I0! (disc 99 being then in its normal position illustrated in Figs. '1 and 21), through conductors 200, 23I and 22B, contact 205, switch disc 204, contact 206 and conductor 236 to the coil of relay F, and thence through conductor 235 to line wire 22I. Immediately after the energization of relay F, a circuit is set up through relay S in the same manner as previously described, and the electromagnet H is energized to start the back gauge forward at high speed, as also previously described.
The relay S cannot be sealed in by the same mcansas previously described however, because at the instant the crank shaft switch I03 closes, contacts 86 and 81 on the traveling unit 32 are still in communication, and relay A is energized. There is, therefore, at that time no circuit from conductor 229 through conductors 264, 265, 266, 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S. The sealing in of relay S is accomplished at this time in a different manner. Because armature 26I. is raised, the circuit through relay B is broken. Consequently contacts 210 and 210 are connected through armature 21 I, and relay C is energized. Armature 216 is therefore raised, connecting contacts 215 and 215', and a circuit is thereby set up from conductor 229 through conductor 218, across contacts 215 and 215, through conductors 211, 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S, and through conductor 235 to line wire 22I. Relay F is also sealed in at this time through conductors 25I, 252, 253 and 254 in a manner previously described. This condition continues until the connection across contacts 86 and 81 of the traveling unit is broken, when the armature 26I falls, causing the energization of relay B and the deenergization of relay C. The sealing circuit through relay S just described is therefore broken. Just prior to that time, however, there is set up again the sealing circuit for relay S through conductors 264, 265, 266, etc. which was previously described. From this point on the operation is the same as before until the second stop on the carrier bar 56 is approached by the contacts 86 and 81 to cause the back gauge to slow up and then stop for the second cut.
Assuming that an auxiliary stop 12 is mounted on the second main stop, in other words that the second main cut is to be followed by a trim cut, the work being in position for the second cut, the operator sets crank shaft I8I in motion as before to perform that cut. When the knife rises to its inoperative position contacts I84 and I85 are bridged momentarily by push button switch I83. Contact 88 of bell-crank lever 19 will then have ridden up onto the disc 16 of the auxiliary stop, and the finger 84 of that lever will havebeen withdrawn, permitting push button 85 in response to the action of its own spring to bring switch disc 99 into engagement with contacts I00, I00. The circuit through relay F across contacts IM and IOI, as previously described, therefore will not be completed, but instead a circuit will be set up from conductor 229 through conductor I86, across contacts I84 and I85, through conductor I81, across contacts I00 and I00, through conductors 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S, and through conductor 235 to line wire 22I. Immediately thereafter a circuit will be established from line wire 220 through conductor 246, across contacts 231 and 231' through conductors 241 and 249, across contacts MI and 24I and through conductor 250 to low speed electromagnet L and thence by conductor 235 to line wire 22I. The transmission will thereby be shifted from neutral to low speed, and travel of the back gauge in a forward direction at low speed will be initiated. The relay S will be sealed in at the start of this movement through conductors 229, 218, 211, 230 and 234, the coil of relay S, and conductor 235 to line wire 22I. As soon as the connection between contacts 86 and 81 is broken that sealing circuit will be interrupted, and the sealing circuit through conductors 264, 265, 266, etc. will be established, as described previously. Slow travel of the back gauge in a forward direction continues until contacts 88 and 89 both engage simultaneously the contact disc 16 of the auxiliary stop, when relay A will be energized, and the sealing circuit for relay S through conductors 264, 265,-etc., will be broken, thereby dropping armature 244 and breaking the circuit through low speed electromagnet L, which will permit coil spring I66 to return the transmission to neutral, stopping the back gauge.
The operator then causes the crank shaft I 8| to make its revolution, and the cutting knife to descend and again rise, when the switch I 83 momentarily bridges contacts I84 and I85. At this time switch disc 99 is in its normal position bridging contacts IOI and NH, so that travel forward is initiated at high speed.
The operation continues in the manner described through the various main cuts and any further trim cuts, as marked and defined by the stops on the carrier bar, until the last out is made. After the last cut is made the operator should pull control rod I45 forward tore'verse the back gauge travel, but if he should fail for any reason to operate this reverse control before a safe limit of forward travel of the back gauge is reached, the forward travel of the latter will be interrupted automatically by the depression of lever 2I6 and the opening of switch 2I3, thereby breaking any or all circuits which may be .es-
, tablished at the time through relays S and F and electromagnets H and L, and stopping the back gauge.
Manual actuation of electrical c0ntTol.Control of the forward travel of the back gauge by manipulation of the wobble stick I91 will now be described. The manner of instituting forward travel at high speed by movement of the wobble stick to the left has already been stated. If, however, the operator instead of only momentarily closing the circuit across contact 202 and 203 holds the switch disc 20I in engagement with those contacts, forward travel at high speed'will' continue as long as desired, overrunning any stops in the path of the traveling unit, or until the circuits are broken by the opening of front limit switch 2I 3. This overrunning takes place for the reason that the sealing circuits for relays S and F, which are controlled by the making and breaking of the low voltage circuit, are not then a factor in the operation of the system. The circuit through F is maintained as long as contacts 202 'and 203 are bridged, current flowing from conductor 229 through conductor 232, across contacts 202 and 203, through conductor 228, across contacts 205 and 206 by way of switch disc 204, through conductor 236 to the coil of relay F and then through conductor 235 to line wire 22I. Armature 245 then being raised, current also flows from conductor 229 through conductor 255 across contacts 243 and 243, through conductors 256, 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S, and through conductor 235 to line wire 22 I Hence the regular circuit for high speed electromagnet H is established and maintained, from line wire 220 through conductor 246, contacts 231 and 231', conductor 241, contacts 240 and 240, conductor 248, electromagnet H and conductor 235 to line wire 22I. If the operator releases the wobble stick at a time other than when the back gauge is in a regular stop position, the travel of the latter will continue to the next stop position, because the sealing circuit through conductors 264, 265, 266, etc., to the coil of relay S will be established,
'and the sealing circuit through relay F by way of conductors 25I, 252, 253, etc., will also be established in a manner previously described. When the stop position is approached the transmission will be shifted to low and a stop will be made at the predetermined point. If the operator however, desires to have the back gauge stop at some point intermediate two stop positions, he may depress the wobble stick to disengage switch disc 209 from contacts 2I0 and 2H, whereupon the stop will be made as soon as the inertia of the moving parts will permit, for in that case conductor 229 will be disconnected from line wire 220, and no current can flow through the system.
Should the operator desire to obtain forward travel of the back gauge at low speed, the wobble stick is moved toward the right, causing switch disc 204 to move out of engagement with the contacts 205 and 206 into engagement with the contacts 201 and 209. Current then flows from conductor 229 across contacts 208 and 201, through conductors 230 and 234 to the coil of relay S, and thence through conductor 235 to line wire 22!. Immediately thereafter current will flow also from line wire 220 through conductor 246, across contacts 231 and 231, through conductors 241 and 249, across contacts 2 and 2M, and through conductor 250 to low speed electromagnet L, and thence through conductor 235 to line wire 22!. If desired low speed travel may be continued in this manner and caused to override a stop position. When the wobble stick is released travel at low speed will continue until the next stop position is reached or until the front limit switch 2 I3 is opened, unless the operator in the meantime depresses the wobble stick to break communica tion between contacts 2H! and 2| I, when the back gauge will be brought to a stop as previously explained.
It will be apparent therefore that we have provided an automatic forward travel control effected electrically, a manual forward travel control efe fected electrically, and a manually operated mechanical control for both forward and rearward travel, together with means for limiting forward travel however instituted, means for limiting rearward travel, and safety means for preventing the actuation of the mechanical control to reverse drive position when the back gauge is moving forwardly as well as means for preventing the institution of forward travel electrically while the mechanical control is in reverse drive position.
Variations from the described structure may be employed. Accordingly we desire it to be understood that the scope of the invention is to be regarded as defined exclusively by the appended claims rather than by the foregoing description or the accompanying illustrations.
Having thus described our invention, we claim:
1. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means in said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral positions, electrical means for shifting said transmission from neutral to low speed or from neutral to high speed, and mechanism cooperating with said electrical means and actuated by the work advancing means for shifting the transmission from neutral to high speed after an operation at a given station is 'completed where the predetermined location for the next succeeding operation is spaced away from the preceding location more than a predetermined distance, and for shifting from neutral to low speed where the next succeeding operation is spaced less than said predetermined distance.
2. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral positions, electrical means for throwing the transmission to high speed position, electrical means for throwing the transmission to low speed position, and means for returning the transmission to neutral position automatically upon the deenergization of both of said electrical means.
3. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral positions, a control for said transmission means comprising a shaft movable to different angular positions corresponding with the different operative positions of said transmission, crank means attached to said shaft, electrical means connected with said crank means for turning the shaft to the limit of its movement in one direction, electrical means connected with said crank means for turning the shaft to its limit of movement in the opposite direction, and automatically acting means connected with said crank means for moving the shaft to intermediate position whenever both of said electrical means are deenergized.
4. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral positigns, a control for said transmission means comprising a shaft movable to different angular positions corresponding with the different operative positions of said transmission, crank means attached to said shaft, electrical means connected with said crank means for turning the shaft to the limit of its movement in one direction, electrical means connected with said crank means for turning the shaft to its limit of movement in the opposite direction, automatically acting means connected with said crank means for moving the shaft to intermediate position whenever both of said electrical means are deenergized, and mechanical means adapted to be manually operated for moving said crank means from any one of its three positions to any other one of said positions.
5. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral or stop positions, means for electrically operating said transmission means for controlling the forward travel of the work advancing means, means for causing reverse travel of the work advancing means, a control for holding said reverse travel means in the operative position, and an electric switch operated by said control to disconnect the electrical transmission operating means before the reverse travel begins, said means being adapted to hold said switch in the said position until the reverse travel is completed. a
6. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral or stop positions, means for electrically operating said transmission means for controlling the forward travel of the work advancing means, means for causing reverse travel of the work advancing means comprising a control rod movable lengthwise, and a switch in said electrical operating means adapted to be operated by said rod to interrupt the flow of current to said electrical operating means when the rod is moved to reverse position, and to permit the flow of current when the rod is returned to normal position.
'7. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral or stop positions, means for electrically operating said transmission means for controlling the forward travel of the work advancing means, means for causing reverse travel of the work advancing means comprising a control rod movable lengthwise, a switch in said electrical operating means adapted to be operated by said rod to interrupt the flow of current to said electrical operating means when the rod is moved to reverse position and to permit the flow of current when the rod is returned to normal position, and means for automatically returning the rod to normal position.
8. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, transmission means for said advancing means having high speed, low speed and neutral or stop positions, control means for said transmission means comprising a control element having three positions corresponding to the said three positions of said transmission means, said element being movable from any one of said three positions to either one of the remaining positions, electrical means for moving said control element, and manual means for moving said control element.
9. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work, electrical means for automatically stopping the work advancing means at predetermined points, and manual means for starting the work advancing means, said manual means being adapted to be held in position to cause said work advancing means to override said automatic stopping means.
10. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work, electrical means for starting the work advancing means, and electrical means for automatically stopping the work advancing means at predetermined points, said starting means being adapted to be held in operative position to cause said work advancing means to override said automatic stopping means.
11. In a. machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, a transmission for said advancing means having a forward travel position and a neutral or stop position, control means for said transmission comprising a rock shaft having angular positions corresponding with said forward and neutral positions of the transmission, and means actuated by the forward travel of the work advancing means when it reaches the forward limit of its motion for turning said rock shaft to neutral position.
12. In a machine of the character described, a back gauge. means for advancing the back gauge step by step and for returning it to rearmost position, said means including transmission means having a position for instituting and maintaining forward travel, a position for stopping forward travel, a position for instituting and maintaining reverse travel and a position for stopping reverse traveL-and a control rod having rotational movements for shifting the transmission into forward travel and stop positions, and having axial movements for shifting the transmission into reverse travel and stop positions.
13. In a machine of the character described, a back gauge, means for advancing the back gauge step by step and for returning it to rearmost position, said means including transmission means having a position for instituting and maintaining forward travel, a position for stopping forward travel, a position for instituting and maintaining reverse travel and a position for stopping reverse travel, a control rod having rotational movements for shifting the transmission into forward travel and stop positions, and having axial movements for shifting the transmission into reverse travel and stop positions, automatic means for turning the control rod to stop position when the back gauge has reached the limit of its forward travel, and automatic means for shifting the transmission to stop position when the back gauge has reached the limit of its reverse travel.
14. In a machine of the character described, a back gauge, means for advancing the back gauge step by step, said means comprising a transmission having high speed, low speed, and neutral or stop positions, a rock shaft operatively connected with said transmission having extreme angular positions corresponding with the high and low speed positions of the transmission respectively and having an intermediate position corresponding with neutral position of the transmission, and means actuated by the travel of the back gauge at the forward limit of its motion for turning its rock shaft from either extreme angular position to intermediate position.
15. In a machine of the character described, a back gauge, means for advancing the back gauge step by step and for returning it to rearmost position, said means including transmission means having a position for instituting and maintaining forward travel, a position for stopping forward travel, a position for instituting and maintaining reverse travel, and a position for stopping reverse travel, a control rod having rotational and axial movements, and connections between said control rod and said transmission for instituting or stopping travel in one direction when the rod is rotated one way or the other, and for instituting or stopping travel in the opposite direction when the rod is moved axially in one direction or the other.
16. In a machine of the character described, a back gauge, means for advancing the back gauge step by step and for returning it to rearmost position, said means including transmission means having a position for instituting and maintaining forward travel at high speed, a position for instituting and maintaining forward travel at low speed, a position for stopping forward travel, a position for instituting and maintaining reverse travel, and a position for stopping reverse travel, and a control rod having rotational movements for shifting the transmission into forward high speed or low speed positions or stop position, and having axial movements for shifting the transmission into reverse travel or stop positions.
17. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, means for determining stop positions of the work comprising one unit moving proportionately to the movement of the work advancing means and one unit fixed against bodily movement, one of said units comprising an elongate stop carrier mounted to turn about its longitudinal axis and having a plurality of longitudinally disposed guides positioned at equal distances from the axis of the carrier, sets of stops mounted in said guides, the other of said units comprising means adapted to cooperate with one of said sets of stops for determining stop positions of the work, and means for holding said carrier in any one of a plurality of different angular positions to maintain a selected set of stops in operative position.
18. In a machine of the class described, means for advancing the work step by step, an elongate carrier mounted to turn about its longitudinal axis, electrical control means for said work advancing means comprising electrical apparatus operatively connected with the work advancing means to move proportionately therewith lengthwise of said carrier, and a plurality of sets of means mounted on said carrier and capable of being brought into operative position one at a time for cooperating with said electrical apparatus to determine stop positions of said work advancing means.
19. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, means for determining stop positions of the work comprising one unit moving proportionately to the movement of the work advancing means and one unit fixed against bodily movement, one of said units comprising an elongate carrier mounted to turn about its longitudinal axis and a plurality of sets of longitudinally extending stop determining means mounted on said carrier and capable of being brought into operative position one set at a. time by the rotation of the carrier about its axis, and the other of said units comprising electrical apparatus capable of cooperating with said stop determining means to determine the stop positions of said work advancing means.
20. In a machine of the character described, transmission means having a plurality of operative positions, electrical means for shifting the transmission from one operative position to another, and control means comprising a wobble stick having angular positions corresponding to the different positions of the transmission means.
21. In a machine of the character described, transmission means having a plurality of operative positions, electrical means for shifting the transmission from one operative position to another comprising a plurality of switches in different angular positions about a given center, and
a wobble stick having a normal position coaxial with said center and capable of being moved to operate any one of said switches.
other comprising a plurality of push button switches arranged in difierent angular positions facing a common center, a wobble stick having a normal position coaxial with said center and capable of being moved to operate any one of said push button switches, and means for automatically returning said wobble stick to center position when released by the operator.
23. In a machine of the character described,
means for advancing the work step by step,
means for determining stop positions for a. plurality of diflerent work pieces comprising a stop carrier having a plurality of. stop guides therein, a plurality of stops adjustably mounted in each of said guides, centers for rotatably supporting said carrier at the ends thereof, whereby a desired guide maybe brought into operative position, and means for withdrawing one of said centers whereby the carrier is made removable.
24. In a machine of the character described, means for advancing the work step by step, means for determining stop positions for a plurality of
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2628680A (en) * 1949-09-02 1953-02-17 E P Lawson Co Inc Guillotine knife-automatic electrical back gauge
US2737158A (en) * 1950-12-09 1956-03-06 E P Lawson Co Inc Automatic back gauge spacer
US2798967A (en) * 1950-12-09 1957-07-09 E P Lawson Co Inc Light interrupting means for photo-electric control system
DE1128836B (en) * 1953-07-25 1962-05-03 Harris Intertype Corp Stop bar program control for the stack feed in a cutting machine for paper, cardboard or the like.
US3194100A (en) * 1961-10-16 1965-07-13 Peerless Machine Company Conveyors for feeding workpieces to a cutoff tool

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2628680A (en) * 1949-09-02 1953-02-17 E P Lawson Co Inc Guillotine knife-automatic electrical back gauge
US2737158A (en) * 1950-12-09 1956-03-06 E P Lawson Co Inc Automatic back gauge spacer
US2798967A (en) * 1950-12-09 1957-07-09 E P Lawson Co Inc Light interrupting means for photo-electric control system
DE1128836B (en) * 1953-07-25 1962-05-03 Harris Intertype Corp Stop bar program control for the stack feed in a cutting machine for paper, cardboard or the like.
US3194100A (en) * 1961-10-16 1965-07-13 Peerless Machine Company Conveyors for feeding workpieces to a cutoff tool

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