US2047152A - Automobile radio cable - Google Patents

Automobile radio cable Download PDF

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Publication number
US2047152A
US2047152A US63908232A US2047152A US 2047152 A US2047152 A US 2047152A US 63908232 A US63908232 A US 63908232A US 2047152 A US2047152 A US 2047152A
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Prior art keywords
cable
shield
shields
conductor
insulating material
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Expired - Lifetime
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Donald H Mitchell
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GALVIN Manufacturing CORP
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GALVIN Manufacturing CORP
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01BCABLES; CONDUCTORS; INSULATORS; SELECTION OF MATERIALS FOR THEIR CONDUCTIVE, INSULATING OR DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES
    • H01B7/00Insulated conductors or cables characterised by their form
    • H01B7/06Extensible conductors or cables, e.g. self-coiling cords

Description

Patented July .7, 1936 AUTOMOBILE RADIO CABLE Donald H.T Mitchell, chicago, nl., assignor to' Galvin Manufacturing Corporation, Chicago,

Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application October 22, 1932, Serial No. 639,082

7 Claims.

My invention relates in general to automobile radios and more in particular to an improved type of cable adapted for connecting various portions of the apparatus employed in an automobile radio.

One of the greatest difficulties in installing an automobile radio satisfactorily is the elimination of interference due to motor pickup and the like.

This interference is found to affect the various cablesl connecting the various portions of the apparatus as, for example, the cables connecting the remote control, power cables, antenna cables, and the like.

The principal object of my present invention is the provision of improved cable adapted for use in an automobile radio.

` Another object is the provision of improved means of eliminating interference in such a radio. Another object is the provision of improved shielding means for such a cable.

Another object is the provision of such a cable adapted for carrying a single lead or va plurality of leads, as may be necessary by the requirements in a particular installation.

In accordance with the general features of the invention, I provide a relatively high inductance, preferably by inductively winding the lead wire about an insulating core. and

provide a suitably insulated shield around the inductance, thus providing a balancing capacity effect. I have found, by the'use of the inductance and capacity distributed substantially over the length of the cable and properly designed to suit particular conditions, the 'current which is normal to the lead wire will not be appreciably aifected but ally stray current such as those produced by the motor ignition will be effectively prevented from entering the radio set. The shielding preferably consists of a flexible braided metallic sheath. In one method of applying this sheath, I employ a double layer of shielding material separated throughout the length of the cable by insulating material, but electrically and magnetically connected at o ne end thereof.

`Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from a consideration of the fol'- lcwing detailed description taken with the accompanying drawing, wherein Fig. 1 is an elevational view of one form of ca- Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken of Fig. 2;

on the line 3-3 Figs. 4 -and 5 are views similar to Figs. 2 and 3, but showing a modification employing double shielding;

Fig. 6 is an elevational view partly broken away to conserve space showing stlll another form 5 which the cable may take;

Fig- 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view with the different layers broken away to show their relationship; and

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on the line 8 8 l0 cally insulated from the other throughout its 15 length, and electrically connecting the metallic shields together at each of the opposite ends, a very low resistance shieldingloop is provided for the central conductor. Therefore with a eld set up around this shield by motor ignition or other 20 stray high frequency currents, in attempting to pass through the central conductor they set up a flow in the shielding loop itself where it is dissipated Without effectively entering or passing through the'inner conductor. I have found that 25 such double shielding is much more effective than a single metallic shield. Such double shield is then preferably connected to ground at one end lrather than to grounding the shielding at both ends. Now, considering first Figs. l, 2 and 3, I employ in one form which the invention may take a center core II formed of insulating material about which I coil a single covered lead wire I2. This coil construction runs the entire length of the cable, causing a relatively high inductance distributed the entire length of the cable. l About the lead wire I2 I provide a sheath I3 of insulating material. 'Ihis sheath I3 is preferably a relatively heavy braided tube formed directly on the cable. 40 On the outside of the insulating sheath I3 I provide a single metallic shield I4. This shield is formed of braided wire and also runs substantially the entire length of the cable; terminating a suflicient distance short of the ends thereof to affordample material in the lead for making the4 necessary connections and the like. The ends I4a of the shield are braided together to form a relatively small cros's section tubular extension by means of which the shield may be grounded at one or both ends as appears to be required by the conditions under which it is used.

v The cable shown in Figs. 1 to 3 has been used with very remarkablel success as the A supply in the radio receiver described in my copending appllcation, Serial-No. 639,081 filed October 22, 1932. I find that substantially every trace of motor noise was eliminated, whereas without the construction employed in this cable but when using conventional shielding it was impossible to eliminate all stray pickup. The form shown in Figs. 4 and 5 is the same as that `shown and described in connec- 'tion'with Figs. 1 to 3, with the exception that I employ an additional shield I6, with an insulating layer I1 between the two shields. The various portions of Figs. 4 and 5 corresponding to Figs. 1 to 3 are marked with the same reference characters and'need not be referred to again in detail. The two shields preferably are connected at one end, employing for example the construction shown in the following figures.

Figs. 6 to 8, inclusive, show some of the features of my invention applied to a two-conductor cable. In this form, I employ the two conductors I8 and I9 provided with a braided insulated covering 2| and 22, respectively. A metal shield 20 is provided about the insulator over conductor I9 and the two conductors preferably are twisted about each other in a conventional manner and a. single metal shield 23 is provided directly over both of them with successive layers of insulating material 24 and an outside metal shield 2B. The metal shields 20, 23 and 26 are in the preferred form made of braided wire, but, of course, other constructions producing equivalent results may be used.

'I'he shielding terminates short of the ends of the conductor to allow the necessary space for making contact. Suitable terminals 21 and 28 are provided at the ends of the conductors, and the conductors carry their braided insulation as they extend from the shield. At one end the shields are extended to partly cover the extending conductors, the inner shield being extended at 23a to cover one of the conductors and the outer shield being connected at 26a to cover the remaining conductor. The shields are in electrical and magnetic contact with each other where they are spliced to extend down to the portions 23a and 26a. The shields are also extended at 23h and 25h to form relatively small cross section tubular extensions adapted to be connected to a suitable ground.

At the opposite end the cables are unconnected, nor do they extend over the projecting portions of the conductors. They are, however, provided with extensions as shown. In employing thev cable, both of the extending ends 23o and 26e may also be grounded. Ina preferred form of the invention, the insulating sheath 24 is enlarged as at 24a topermit the insertion of a tubular extension from a metal containerl 21, in which radio apparatus is housed. This has the effect of placing the extension 23o inside of the metal container. grounding one of the shields to the inside of the container and the other to the outside of the container, very satisfactory shielding effects are ob- By then inductively disposed conductor, a metal shield extending around said conductor, and insulating material disposed around said metal shield, a second metal shield disposed around said insulating material, said shields being electrically connected 5 together at their opposite ends, and means for grounding both of said shields.

2. A cable adapted to be employed in an auto mobile radio installation, said cable comprising an inductively disposed conductor, a metal shield extending around said conductor, and insulating material disposed around said metal shield, a second metal shield disposed around said insulating material, means for grounding both of said shields at one end, and means for electrically connecting said shields together at the end of the cable opposite the grounded end.-

3. A cable for connecting the battery of an automobile ignition system with aradio installation, said cable comprising an insulating core, a 20 conductor helically wound on said core to provide a relatively large amount of distributed inductance running substantially the length of the cable, a metal shield disposed around said conductor, and means for grounding said shield, a second shield insulated from said first mentioned shield, and means for connecting said shields together at both ends of the cable.

4. A cable adapted to be employed in an automobile radio installation, said cable comprising 30 an insulated conductor, a shield disposed around said conductor, a layer of insulating material disposed around said shield. a second shield disposed around said insulating material, means for connecting said shieldstogether at one end of 35 the cable, and means for grounding said shields at the opposite end of the cable.

5. A cable adapted to be employed in an automobile radio installation, said cable comprising a pair of insulated conductors, a metal shield dis- 40 posed around said conductors, a sheath of insulating material disposed\` around said shield, a second metal shield disposed around said sheath of insulating material, said conductors projecting at the ends of the cable, one of said shields having 45 an extension at one end extending around one of the conductors, the second shield having an extension at the same end `extending around the second conductor, and said shields being in contact with each other at the end of the cable where they extend to the individual conductors.

6. Acable as defined in claim 5 wherein said sheath is slightly enlarged at the opposite end of the cable to extend over a tubular extension from a metal container, and whereby one of such 55 shields may be grounded to the inside of the container and the other ofthe shields grounded to the outside of the container.

7. A cable employed with a radio set installed adjacent an internal combustion engine, said cable including a central conductor, and means for minimizing interference effects including a metallic shield disposed around said conductor, I a layer of insulating material disposed around said shield, a second metallic shield disposed around said layer of insulating material, and means for electrically connecting said metallic shields together in simple conductive relationship at their opposite ends to form a closed conductive loop of low resistance.

DONALD- H. MITCHELL.

US2047152A 1932-10-22 1932-10-22 Automobile radio cable Expired - Lifetime US2047152A (en)

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US2047152A US2047152A (en) 1932-10-22 1932-10-22 Automobile radio cable

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US2047152A true US2047152A (en) 1936-07-07

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Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2416561A (en) * 1943-06-29 1947-02-25 Rca Corp Combination electrical and fluid conducting cable
US2520705A (en) * 1945-03-21 1950-08-29 Gen Motors Corp Shielded ignition cable
US2631220A (en) * 1948-12-22 1953-03-10 Armstrong Cork Co Temperature-responsive device
US4599483A (en) * 1983-10-14 1986-07-08 Audioplan Renate Kuhn Signal cable
US5378853A (en) * 1992-01-29 1995-01-03 Filotex Shielded multibranch harness
US5705774A (en) * 1995-11-24 1998-01-06 Harbour Industries (Canada) Ltd. Flame resistant electric cable
US5750930A (en) * 1994-12-22 1998-05-12 The Whitaker Corporation Electrical cable for use in a medical surgery environment
US5971799A (en) * 1997-04-26 1999-10-26 Swade; George Y-shaped harness for the interconnection between a vehicle radio, a vehicle harness and add-on electronic device
US6255584B1 (en) * 1994-12-13 2001-07-03 Eurocopter Shielded bundle of electrical conductors and process for producing it
US6686538B2 (en) * 1997-01-30 2004-02-03 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Method for connecting electronic devices and connecting cable
US20060093303A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Randy Reagan Fiber drop terminal
US20060153516A1 (en) * 2005-01-13 2006-07-13 Napiorkowski John J Network interface device having integral slack storage compartment
US20060233506A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2006-10-19 Michael Noonan Fiber breakout with integral connector
US7251411B1 (en) 2006-03-09 2007-07-31 Adc Telecommunication, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with “Y” block
US20070212009A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US20070212005A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with helical fiber routing
US20070212003A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with potted closure
US7289714B1 (en) 2006-09-26 2007-10-30 Adc Telecommunication, Inc. Tubing wrap procedure
US20080037945A1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2008-02-14 Jeff Gniadek Cable payout systems and methods
US7333708B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2008-02-19 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US20080080818A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-04-03 Cobb John C Iii Factory Spliced Cable Assembly
US20080085091A1 (en) * 2006-10-10 2008-04-10 Dennis Ray Wells Systems and methods for securing a tether to a distribution cable
US20080089652A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Dennis Ray Wells Overmold zip strip
US20080187274A1 (en) * 2007-02-06 2008-08-07 Scott Carlson Polyurethane to polyethylene adhesion process
US7418177B2 (en) 2005-11-10 2008-08-26 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout system, packaging arrangement, and method of installation
US7422378B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2008-09-09 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with excess fiber length
US20090022460A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2009-01-22 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Factory Spliced Cable Assembly
US20090060431A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-05 Yu Lu Indoor Fiber Optic Distribution Cable
US7532799B2 (en) 2007-04-12 2009-05-12 Adc Telecommunications Fiber optic telecommunications cable assembly
US7558458B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2009-07-07 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Universal bracket for mounting a drop terminal
US7609925B2 (en) 2007-04-12 2009-10-27 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with tensile reinforcement
US7680388B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2010-03-16 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Methods for configuring and testing fiber drop terminals
US20100092146A1 (en) * 2008-10-14 2010-04-15 Conner Mark E Optical Fiber Management Shelf for Optical Connection Terminals
US7740409B2 (en) 2007-09-19 2010-06-22 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US20110132660A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2011-06-09 Geo. Gleistein & Sohn Gmbh Cable with electrical conductor included therein
US20140076628A1 (en) * 2012-09-20 2014-03-20 Icore International, Inc. Rigidified non-conduited electrical harnesses
US8755663B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2014-06-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Impact resistant fiber optic enclosures and related methods
US8873926B2 (en) 2012-04-26 2014-10-28 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic enclosures employing clamping assemblies for strain relief of cables, and related assemblies and methods
US8885998B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2014-11-11 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Splice enclosure arrangement for fiber optic cables
US8915659B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2014-12-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Splice enclosure arrangement for fiber optic cables
US9069151B2 (en) 2011-10-26 2015-06-30 Corning Cable Systems Llc Composite cable breakout assembly

Cited By (70)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2416561A (en) * 1943-06-29 1947-02-25 Rca Corp Combination electrical and fluid conducting cable
US2520705A (en) * 1945-03-21 1950-08-29 Gen Motors Corp Shielded ignition cable
US2631220A (en) * 1948-12-22 1953-03-10 Armstrong Cork Co Temperature-responsive device
US4599483A (en) * 1983-10-14 1986-07-08 Audioplan Renate Kuhn Signal cable
US5378853A (en) * 1992-01-29 1995-01-03 Filotex Shielded multibranch harness
US6255584B1 (en) * 1994-12-13 2001-07-03 Eurocopter Shielded bundle of electrical conductors and process for producing it
US6655016B2 (en) 1994-12-13 2003-12-02 Societe Anonyme Dite: Eurocopter France Process of manufacturing a shielded and wear-resistant multi-branch harness
US5750930A (en) * 1994-12-22 1998-05-12 The Whitaker Corporation Electrical cable for use in a medical surgery environment
US5705774A (en) * 1995-11-24 1998-01-06 Harbour Industries (Canada) Ltd. Flame resistant electric cable
US6686538B2 (en) * 1997-01-30 2004-02-03 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Method for connecting electronic devices and connecting cable
US5971799A (en) * 1997-04-26 1999-10-26 Swade; George Y-shaped harness for the interconnection between a vehicle radio, a vehicle harness and add-on electronic device
US7333708B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2008-02-19 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US7653282B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2010-01-26 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US7680388B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2010-03-16 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Methods for configuring and testing fiber drop terminals
US7805044B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2010-09-28 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber drop terminal
US7627222B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2009-12-01 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber drop terminal
US7489849B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2009-02-10 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber drop terminal
US20060093303A1 (en) * 2004-11-03 2006-05-04 Randy Reagan Fiber drop terminal
US9851522B2 (en) 2004-11-03 2017-12-26 Commscope Technologies Llc Fiber drop terminal
US20060153516A1 (en) * 2005-01-13 2006-07-13 Napiorkowski John J Network interface device having integral slack storage compartment
US20060233506A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2006-10-19 Michael Noonan Fiber breakout with integral connector
US8041178B2 (en) 2005-04-19 2011-10-18 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Loop back plug and method
US20060257092A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2006-11-16 Yu Lu Loop back plug and method
US7349605B2 (en) 2005-04-19 2008-03-25 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber breakout with radio frequency identification device
US20100014824A1 (en) * 2005-04-19 2010-01-21 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Loop back plug and method
US7565055B2 (en) 2005-04-19 2009-07-21 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Loop back plug and method
US7418177B2 (en) 2005-11-10 2008-08-26 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout system, packaging arrangement, and method of installation
US7251411B1 (en) 2006-03-09 2007-07-31 Adc Telecommunication, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with “Y” block
US20100080514A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2010-04-01 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US20090022459A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2009-01-22 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US7424189B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2008-09-09 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with potted closure
US7422378B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2008-09-09 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with excess fiber length
US7317863B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2008-01-08 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US7630606B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2009-12-08 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US20070212003A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with potted closure
US20070212005A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with helical fiber routing
US20070212009A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with retention block
US7590321B2 (en) 2006-03-09 2009-09-15 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Mid-span breakout with helical fiber routing
US20100034506A1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2010-02-11 ADC Telecommunications, Inc.. Cable payout systems and methods
US8121456B2 (en) 2006-08-09 2012-02-21 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Cable payout systems and methods
US20080037945A1 (en) * 2006-08-09 2008-02-14 Jeff Gniadek Cable payout systems and methods
US7599598B2 (en) 2006-08-09 2009-10-06 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Cable payout systems and methods
US20090022460A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2009-01-22 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Factory Spliced Cable Assembly
US7454106B2 (en) 2006-08-14 2008-11-18 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Factory spliced cable assembly
US20080080818A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2008-04-03 Cobb John C Iii Factory Spliced Cable Assembly
US20110286708A1 (en) * 2006-08-14 2011-11-24 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Factory Spliced Cable Assembly
US7840109B2 (en) 2006-08-14 2010-11-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Factory spliced cable assembly
US7289714B1 (en) 2006-09-26 2007-10-30 Adc Telecommunication, Inc. Tubing wrap procedure
US7480436B2 (en) 2006-10-10 2009-01-20 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Systems and methods for securing a tether to a distribution cable
US20080085091A1 (en) * 2006-10-10 2008-04-10 Dennis Ray Wells Systems and methods for securing a tether to a distribution cable
US20080089652A1 (en) * 2006-10-13 2008-04-17 Dennis Ray Wells Overmold zip strip
US7403685B2 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-07-22 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Overmold zip strip
US20080187274A1 (en) * 2007-02-06 2008-08-07 Scott Carlson Polyurethane to polyethylene adhesion process
US7489843B2 (en) 2007-02-06 2009-02-10 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Polyurethane to polyethylene adhesion process
US7558458B2 (en) 2007-03-08 2009-07-07 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Universal bracket for mounting a drop terminal
US7609925B2 (en) 2007-04-12 2009-10-27 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic cable breakout configuration with tensile reinforcement
US7532799B2 (en) 2007-04-12 2009-05-12 Adc Telecommunications Fiber optic telecommunications cable assembly
US20090060431A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-05 Yu Lu Indoor Fiber Optic Distribution Cable
US7769261B2 (en) 2007-09-05 2010-08-03 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Fiber optic distribution cable
US7740409B2 (en) 2007-09-19 2010-06-22 Corning Cable Systems Llc Multi-port optical connection terminal
US20110132660A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2011-06-09 Geo. Gleistein & Sohn Gmbh Cable with electrical conductor included therein
US9340924B2 (en) * 2007-10-19 2016-05-17 Helukabel Gmbh Cable with electrical conductor included therein
US20100092146A1 (en) * 2008-10-14 2010-04-15 Conner Mark E Optical Fiber Management Shelf for Optical Connection Terminals
US9798085B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2017-10-24 Commscope Technologies Llc Splice enclosure arrangement for fiber optic cables
US8915659B2 (en) 2010-05-14 2014-12-23 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Splice enclosure arrangement for fiber optic cables
US8755663B2 (en) 2010-10-28 2014-06-17 Corning Cable Systems Llc Impact resistant fiber optic enclosures and related methods
US8885998B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2014-11-11 Adc Telecommunications, Inc. Splice enclosure arrangement for fiber optic cables
US9069151B2 (en) 2011-10-26 2015-06-30 Corning Cable Systems Llc Composite cable breakout assembly
US8873926B2 (en) 2012-04-26 2014-10-28 Corning Cable Systems Llc Fiber optic enclosures employing clamping assemblies for strain relief of cables, and related assemblies and methods
US20140076628A1 (en) * 2012-09-20 2014-03-20 Icore International, Inc. Rigidified non-conduited electrical harnesses

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