US2038140A - Packing head - Google Patents

Packing head Download PDF

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US2038140A
US2038140A US54883931A US2038140A US 2038140 A US2038140 A US 2038140A US 54883931 A US54883931 A US 54883931A US 2038140 A US2038140 A US 2038140A
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Prior art keywords
packer
bore
head
piston
pipe
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Stone Frederick
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Hydril LLC
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Hydril LLC
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B33/00Sealing or packing boreholes or wells
    • E21B33/02Surface sealing or packing
    • E21B33/03Well heads; Setting-up thereof
    • E21B33/06Blow-out preventers, i.e. apparatus closing around a drill pipe, e.g. annular blow-out preventers

Description

\ F. STONE PACKING HEAD April 21, 1936.

Filed Jilly e, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor fieaerzc/ 6mm? April 21, 1936. TONE 2,033,140

PACKING HEAD Filed July 6, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 20 i l 1 I 66 I I 60 a g I I I7 0622 /'02" Frederz. c/r Stone Fl STONE PACKING HEAD April 21, 1936.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jul'y e, 1951 W E; k w

6 Z nf ve W n n W 1m Patented Apr. 21, 1936 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PACKING HEAD -Applicatio n July 6, 1931, Serial No. 548,839

24 Claims.

This invention relates generally to packing heads, and is more particularly concerned with such heads as are used in carrying out various well drilling operations by the rotary method and against fluid pressure within the well bore.

The head includes novel packing-off arrangements which may be used either singly or in combination to aid in the carrying out of many different operations. I will limit'the description to only one or two of these operations, but it will be apparent to those skilled in the art, after reading the description-of these chosen operations, how the head may be used to advantage in many other situations. Therefore, my choice of a description of a particular operation is in no way to be considered indicative as a limitation on the uses to which the head may be put.

- Likewise, while I have shown two distinct packing assemblies in the head, and while these assemblies are used in combination during certain operations, each assembly has features of novelty and advantage by itself, and in carrying out certain operations, only one or the other of them need be used. Therefore, only such claims as specifically mention those two assemblies are to be considered as limitative on the invention in this regard.

Generally, it may be considered as the object of my invention to provide a packing head. of a nature to effect a proper packing around a well pipe passing through the head,- with means for maintaining the pack-off as the well pipe is either rotated or moved longitudinally through the head for performingdrilling operations or during the 0 setting or removal of the pipe. The packing-off means is of such a nature that it will handle.

pipe having portions of different outside diameters, for distance, flush joint drill pipe of con- 40 stant outside diameter having drill collars of larger outside diameter. This example is given by way of illustration, only, and'is not to be construed as indicating the adaptability of the head limited to work of such a particular nature.

As a feature of major importance, I have provided in the head a novel type of packer for packing-off the drill stem during rotation and reciprocation thereof. In theusual type of drilling packer, the packing rubber is compressed against the rotating drill pipe by applying pressure from above. With sufllcient pressure thus applied to prevent all leakage, the high pressure from the well quickly builds up beneath the packer and acts against the lower end thereof ,5 in a manner to compress it to a point where it is so tightly engaged with the drill stem that said stem quicklyburns and wears the rubber away. In contradistinction to such an arrangement, my drilling packer operates generally 7 as follows. The packer rubber is of downwardly pointing 5 conical characteristics, against the inclined wedge faces of which there is applied a contractor adapted, by movement upwardly through the head and with relation to the packer, to contract or constrict. the packing rubber about the well pipe. I

This contracter is in the form of a piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to the fluid pressure in the head below the plug. By virtue of the pressure thus applied against the contracter, said contracter is moved upwardly in a manner to constrict the packing rubber about the pipe, adjustable means being provided forlimiting the upward stroke of the contracter so only a selected amount of the fluid pressure directed thereagainst is effective to constrict the rubber.

- In other words, while the full force of the fluid pressure isavailable for constricting the packing rubber, I have provided means whereby only such a part of this force' is; effectively applied to the contracter as will give the packer the exact amount of radial constriction necessary to provide a proper seal about the well pipe and yet permit said pipe to be moved with relation to the packer without undue resistance. The constricting movement of the contracter may be regulated easily and with a great degree of accuracy. Furthermore the well pressure acts directly on a comparatively small area of rub- 35 her. All these'features contribute greatly to the provision of an accurately. settable packing rubber, and one which has a relatively great length of useful life under the most severe service conditions.

Below the drilling packer I have provided an inflatable packer which is constructed in a neculiarly novel and effective manner. Its mounting within the packing head is also novel and peculiarly effective for the purpose, but the char-, acteristics of this packer and its mounting are such that they may be discussed to better advantage in the detailed description.

As a further object of the invention, I have arrangedthe packer assemblies so that maybe assembled with the head around the work and removed from such assembly with great ease and dispatch, this being an important feature inasl much as the bore of the head must be cleared of operations.

or furnished with said assemblies during certain There are many other features of advantage and points of novelty in my packing head but these may be brought out to decidedly better advantage as the detailed description of the head progresses. Reference will be had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal, medial section through apacking head embodying my invention, showing the same fully assembled;

Fig. 2 is a reduced section on line 2--2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a reduced secti'n on line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a reducedsection on line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a detached, top plan view of the setting ring;

Fig. 6 is a reduced elevation of the packing head, parts being in broken away section and showing the lower packer in engagement with a drill collar on the work;

Fig. 'I is an enlarged fragmentary section showing a detail of the packer guard;

Fig. 8 is a view of Fig. 7 looking in the direction of arrow 8;-

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary section showing a detail of the inlet connection to the inflatable-packer; and

Fig. 10 is a view of Fig. 9 looking in the direction of arrow I0.

Referring particularly to Fig. 1, the numeral l 0 indicates generally my improved packing head, while numeral H indicates vertically extending work which passes through the bore l2 of head H! with annular clearance. In the drawings, work H is in the nature of a rotary, tubular drill stem or pipe l3 having thereon a drill collar 14 of increased outside diameter. Now it will be understood that the head is adapted to take and operate upon work having other external characteristics, and the particular work shown is to be considered only as illustrative of one type capable of being handled to advantage with my packing head. To those skilled in the art, it will be immediately apparent from a consideration of this single choice for descriptive purposes that many other types of work may be handled to advantage. Likewise, I shall describe only one or two operations to be performed upon the chosen work by the packing head, but this is not intended as indication of the limitation of operability, as will be readily understood.

Head ID includes a tubular housing generally indicated at IS (the bore 12 may be considered. as the bore of this housing) having in the upper part of its bore a drilling packing assembly generally indicated at l 6, and therebeneath a second packing assembly generally indicated at H, the packer member of the latter being of the inflatable type. During certain operations these assemblies are used in combination, and in other situations they are used singly orindependently. Therefore, only such claims as specify the combination of the two packers are to be construed as limited to such an aspect of the invention.

For purposes to be described, it is preferable that housing l5 be of two-part characteristics, the lower bowl or sleeve part I8 having internal thread l9 to take the mating threads on the upper sleeve part or cylinder 20. Sleeve 20 is of lesser diameter than bowl i8, the sleeve end thus forming an internal, annular, and downwardly facing shoulder 2| in the enlarged bore portion 22 of the bowl.

The lower end of bowl l8 has an'attachment flange 23 for connection to casing length 24. Of

' are not shown in the drawings, but are mentioned merelyjzo indicate that the head is used to advantage in connection with such a system and to account for the handling of -a situation where neither assembly it nor I! are in full effective position to care for the well pressure.

, Well pressure stands, of course, in bore 12, and it is the purpose of packer assemblies "Send I! so to pack-off the space between the housing wall and the work that various operations on the work, such as rotating it or moving it vertically may be carried on without escape of the fluid under pressure between the housing wall and said work. Of course the packers are just as effective when the work is stationary, and therefore the utility of the head is not limited to situations where the work is moving either angularly or axially. The fluid pressure below the packers may be regulated through the use of customary beans or choke nipples arranged in the outlet from the casing bore, but such outlet and beans are not shown here since they are no part of the present invention. I

I will first describe the packing head in fully assembled condition (Fig. 1) setting out the relation and application of the parts to the work, following with a discussion of the disassembling and reassembling procedures during certain illustrative operative changes.

The relatively reduced bore portion 25 of bowl l8-0pens upwardly and outwardly at 26 to bore portion 22, there being an upwardly facing annular shoulder 21 at the lower end of bore portion 22, which shoulder preferably is grooved at 28. A gasket 29 is seated on shoulder 21, being deformed and compressed into grooves 28 by downward pressure exerted upon box 39 which makes up a part of packer assembly l1. Box 3!! is made up of a ring or sleeve portion 3! which has sliding fit in bore 22 and whose inner peripheral face 33 may be considered as a circumferential seat for the packer 34 carried within the box. At the lower end of sleeve or ring portion 3| is an internal, annular flange 35 upon which packer 34 rests.

Packer 34 may be described generally as a tubular, ring-shaped bag preferably of rubber and adapted to be extended by internal fluid or gas pressure radially inwardly and outwardly into sealing engagement with work I I or i l and seating face 33, respectively. Preferably, though not necessarily, the packing ring 34 is parted at 31, the hollow 36 being closedoff at 38 at each side of the parting. However, when the ring or bag 34 is extended by the application of fluid under pressure-to hollow 36, the free ends of the rings are brought together sufliciently to provide a proper seal. By virtue of the ring-parting, the packer 34 may be stripped from the work or applied to the work (when assembly I1. is lifted clear of the bowl, as will be described) by transverse movement of said packer with respect to the work, thus avoiding the necessity of sliding the packer longitudinally clear of the work, to obvious ad vantage.

At a point preferably diametrically opposite parting 31, the ,outer wall of packer 34 is apertured at 39 (Fig. 9) to take a ferrule 40 made up drill stem l3 and to take drill collar l 4. However, I

shown in Fig. 7, their upper ends being anchored of sleeve 4| and head flange 42. The packer wall is clamped between flange 42 and a nut 43 which is threaded on sleeve 4| at the exterior of the packer. Preferably nut 43 has an annular lip 44 adapted to be pressed tightly into the packer wall. Nut 43 is also provided with a cylindric flange 45 which is taken within opening 46 provided through ring 3 I the fit of the flange in said opening preventing relative rotation of the packer and box 30, though not preventing the packer from being removed from the box when the packer is deflated and the assembly I! is clear of bowl I 8.

Opening 46 is in register with a bore 41 and counterbore48 which extend through the wall of bowl IS, a key 49 permanently carried by bowl l8 projecting into keyway 50 in box 38 to preserve this registration by preventing relative rotation of the bowl and box. Keyway 50 opens to the under face of box 30, thus allowing said box to be raised from and lowered to position in the bowl. The key also acts as a pilot, or indicator to aid in the proper placement of the box when the latter is being lowered to position, the box being rotated until the key is taken in the keyway and then dropped to final position.

A nipple 5|, leading from any suitable source of controlled fluid or gas pressure (not shown) is adapted to be projected through openings 41 and 46 into disconnectible attachment with ferrule 40, the connection here being shown as mating threads 52. The irmer end 53 of nipple 5| is of reduced diameter to leave annular clearance 54' in the form of a ring and preferably has threaded bores 6| opening to its upper face to accommodate pick-upj bolts,(not shown) for use when'occasion arises for, removing box 30 from the bowl. Cover 60 may be considered as an upper internal annular flange.

Packer 34 is preferably rounded oil at 62 and 63 to facilitate the entrance of work to the bore 64 thereof. When packer 34 is in collapsed condition the, diameter of bore 64 is such as to provide annular clearance between said packer and the range of packer 34 is such that it may not only be constricted about drill collar I4 but also about drill stem l3.

. The upper and'inner rounded end 63 of packer 34 is preferably internally reenforced by strips of fabric 65, or the like, such reenforcement being provided to prevent deformation of'the packer and more particularly to prevent said upper end from being squeezed upwardly between drill stem l3 and the bore of cover ring 66. 'Though this is not essential in all cases, I sometimes prefer to upper ends, only, with respect tov the packer 34. Each arm 61 is made/up of a plurality of spring leaves68, 69 and which are bowed as clearly to cover ring 60-by a retaining ring II and screw 12. The free end of a given, lower leaf 68 is rolled over as at 13 at opposite sides of slit 14. In the roll-over or hollow bead 13 at one side of slit 14 is'anchored a connecting'pin which extends into loose fit with the hollow bead '13 of the adjacent bottom leaf 68. This pin connection between the free ends of the lower leaves continues around guard 66, thus keeping the leaves generally lined up in proper assembled relationship but allowing the guard, as a whole, to expand or contract radially. V

Each lower leaf 68 extends over rounded end 63 as clearly shown in Fig. 1, the beads 13 being seated on a complementary annular shoulder 16.. With the packer in the condition of Fig. 1, intermediate leaf 69 of any given arm 61 is preferably spaced slightly at its lower end from leaf 68 and stops a little short of bead 13. Leaf 18, in turn, preferably stops a little short of the end of leaf 69. I Consequently, when ring 34 is inflated to constrict the packer bore, arms- 61' are swung upwardly, the" leaves coming progressively into play to resist increasingly any tendency the packer end may have to move. upwardly along stem I3. Beads 13 come successively into engagement with the butt ends of leaves 69 and 18, thus further increasing the resistance of the spring arm.

With housing sleeve threaded down to the position of Fig. 1, it will be seen that its shoulder 2| engages the upper. face of box-plate 60 to retain the box against upward vertical movement,

and to compress longitudinally the gasket29 and thus effect a fluid-tight seal between said box and the bowl. Preferably there is also provided a gasket '11 between the end of sleeve 20 and the top of box 30, which gasket is compressed between said members to effect a fluid tight seal at the top of the box around the bowl wall. A key block I8 is mounted at the free end of a stiff leaf spring. I

I is adapted to move the inner and outer peripheral walls of said packer against'the work and seating fa'ce 33,-respectively. Since the packer containing box 30 is sealed at 29 and 11 with respect to the bowl or housing, it will be seen that inflation of the packer effects a seal between the work, and, in effect, the housing.

Sleeve 20 has a downwardly opening cylinder bore 82 and an upwardly opening counterbore 83, there being diametrically opposite and vertically extending ways 84 sunkin the wall defining the counter-bore. The upper end of the sleeve is angularly relieved as at 85. Adapted to slide vertically within and removable upwardly through the 65 sleeve bore is a packer-actuating member 86 employed for radially contracting or constricting drilling packer 81 about thework. Member 86 has a lower plunger or piston head 88 which carries piston rings 88', of any suitable nature, to give it close sliding and fluid'tight fit within cylinder 82. The low'r end of piston headr88 is annularly recessed as at.89 and 96. The extreme end shoulder 9| is adapted to seat on top plate 69 to limit the, downward movement of contracter or piston 86 when no fluid pressure is applied from When sleeve beneath, though in Fig. 1 said contracter is indicated as having been raised by the application of fluid pressure from below to clear end 9| from plate 60.

Box 30 thus serves as a stop for limiting the downward movement of the contracter, which provision is of convenience from a manufacturing and assembly viewpoint, but it will be readily understood that any other annular shoulder suitably positioned within the housing bore may be utilized as such a limiting stop.

Due to the provision of recesses 89 and 90 there is always provided communication fromthe space between drill stem I3 and packer assembly I1 to the underside of the piston head; that is, to the downwardly facing shoulders defining the recesses. been lifted to the slightest extent, end also becomes effective as a pressure-taking shoulder.

With packer 34 deflated, it will be seen that well pressure is constantly imposed on the underside of the piston head 88, that is, assuming that the drilling valve and control packer spoken of previously as being in or connected to casing 24, are not elsewhere taking this pressure. The application of this fluid pressure to the lower end of the piston, tends, of course, to move contracter 86 upwardly through the sleeve bore, this action serving to constrict drilling packer 81, as will be made evident.

The upper end of contracter 80 inclines upwardly and outwardly, terminating in a cylindrical portion 92 whose upper end face 93 is provided with threaded bores 94 for the application of pick-out bolts (not shown). The bore 95 of tubular contracter 86 tapers inwardly and downwardly to provide a conical seating wedge face 96 to take the complementary conical face 91 of packer 81. This packer is made of rubber or the like and is generally in the shape of a tubular, downwardly pointing cone, though near its upper end it has a short cylindrical portion 90 from which extends the inwardly and upwardly inclining conicalportion 99. The packer has an axial bore I00 and, at its lower end, a counterbore WI. *The tip I02 of the drilling packer is preferably grooved at I03 to provide lips I04 which are spread apart by fluid pressure entering said grooves, the outer lips thus being urged by fluid pressure into engagement with wall 96.

Due to the complementary, inclined walls 96 and 51, it will be seen that relative longitudinal telescopic movement of packer 91 and contracter 80 will result in a wedging of the packer between work i 3 and the contracter, the packer being thus radially contracted or constricted tightly about stem I3.

Preferably-packer 81 is longitudinally parted as at 105, the parting here being shown as angular to reduce to a minimum the danger of undue leakageat the parting when the packer is contracted. The parting of the packerallows said member to be spread open so it may be applied to or removed from the stem by relative movement transversely thereof, rather than requiring that it he slipped endwise over the pipe, an obvious advantage particularly when it is desired to replace worn packers, as will be made evident.

The bore I00 of packer 81 is offsmaller diameter than the bore of packer 34 when the latter is collapsed. Packer 81 is thus adapted to pack off drill stem I3, but is not normally capable of f un'ctioning with respect to drill collar I4.

Applied to the upper end of the. packer is a washer or adapter I06 and a setting ring I01.

Of course, as soon as contracter 86 has Preferably, both these members are halved to allow their application to or removal from the stem by movement transversely thereof. To hold the halves of ring I01 in proper alinement, there are provided pilot pins I08 (Fig. 5) at their meeting faces.

While it is not at all essential to the invention, considered in its broader aspects, I prefer to interconnect detachably the packer 81, adapter I06 and ring I01, whereby the assembly, as a unit,

may be lowered into or raised from the housing.

For this purpose, I mould into packer 81 the nuts I 09 and provide upwardly opening bores I I0 from the nut bores. Cap screws I I Pare passed downwardly through ring I01, adapter I06, and bore H0; and threa/dably connected with nuts I09, thus releasably holding the three members in assembly. The screw-taking holes III through the ring and adapter are sufliciently larger than the screws to permit horizontal play thereof and thus allow for their-movemen t asset up by constriction of (the, packer Ring I 01 has threaded bores H2 to receive pick-up" bolts (not shown).

As was stated above it is not necessary that members 81, I00, and I01 be connected together as a unit, but when such connection is made it is necessary to include in the assembly the depresser ring H3. When the several parts mentioned are not connected by screws III the parts may be adapted to take packer end 99, downward move- 3 ment of the ring with respect to the packer thus tending to constrict the upper end of the packer about stem I3. Ring I I3 is adapted to rest on top contracter 86 and has a key I I5 entered in one of the ways 04 (Fig. 2) to hold said ring from rotation with respect to sleeve 20.

Setting ring or plate I01 has a bore I I6 of greater diameter than bore I00, and the ring includes a depending hub port-ion I I1 and an upper, annular flange portion lI8 whose under face IIS is complementary to face 85.

Threaded through flange IIB are the several 7 adjusting or setting bolts I20 which are adapted to extend downwardly to a point where they serve adjustably to limit the upward movement of ring H3 and hence of contracter 86 with respect to sleeve 20 and with respect to packer 81, it being noted that setting plate I01, being held from vertical movement with respect to sleeve 20 by means to be described, serves to hold packer 81 from upward bodily movement with respect sleeve 20.

A bonnet ring I2I is threaded at I22 on sleeve 20 and has an internal annular flange I Madamed to overlie and engage flange H8. Flange I23 is provided with transverse sockets I24 and diametrically opposite keyways I25 (only one of which appears in the sectional view, Fig. 1) to take external or internal spanner wrenches, re spectively, for threadably adjusting the bonnet on sleeve 20. Keys I26 are carried on flat springs I21 which are anchored at I 28 to the bonnet, these keys being adapted to be spring-held in keyways I29 beneath shoulders I30 when the bonnet has been threaded to its proper position, the keys thereafter preventing an accidental loosening of the bonnet.

Bonnet I2I serves as a retainer for assembly I6 and for holding ring I01 in such position that it acts as a shoulder against which packer 81 is longitudinally pressed during upward movement of compresser 86.

With the parts in the positions shown in Fig. 1, it is assumed that well pressure is applied to piston 88 to hold packer 81 in suchengagement with drill stem I3 as to form a proper seal about the drill pipe- The fit is such as will permit rotation or longitudinal movement of the drill stem without burning or unduly wearing the packing rubber and yet allow only such leakage through the packer as will serve as a packer and drill stem lubricant.

It will thus be seen that though the full pressure of fluid within casing 24 is applied to the piston 88, bolts I28 by limiting the upward move- ,ment of the piston, allow only such a portion of the pressure to become effective in contracting packer 81 as will preserve exactly the proper degree of packer-contraction about stem I3. Of course, the full well pressure is available to act on the piston to compress packer 81 into an exceedingly tight fit with the work, but screws I28 serve as adjusting means for regulatably utilizing only such a portion of this'well pressure as is desired in agiven situation. It will be seen that bolts I28 may be adjusted longitudinally to give a very fine degree of packer control.

When work II is'initially being lowered into the casing, the bore of head I8 will be entirely cleared of the packer assemblies, the method of clearing being later described. This allows relatively large tools to be lowered freely through the head, well pressure being shut ofl from said head by means of thedrilling valve previously mentioned as being in or connected to casing 24 at a point below the head. The packer mentioned above as cooperating with the drilling j valve, is then operated to pack oi? the work about a drill collar extending therethrough, whereupon the drilling valve is opened and-the work lowered until all tools larger than the drill collar have passed through the housing I8.

Packer assembly I1 is then inserted, clamped in place, and extended (all in a manner to be described) into engagement with drill collar I4, as indicated in Figure 6. The drilling valve is opened whereby well pressure is admitted to bore I2. Packer assembly I8 is now inserted in a manner to be described and contracted into proper engagement with drill stem I3. The large tools and the drill collar are then lowered until the smaller drill stem is approximately in the position of Fig. 1. Packer 34 is then deflated and the drill stem lowered toworking position, whereafter it maybe reciprocated or rotated without losing well pressure at the drilling head.

In removing the work from the casing, the same steps are followed but in the reverse order.

When packer 81' finally becomes worn sufliciently to call for adjustment, it is only necessary to back-off bolts I28 slightly, thus raising the limit of upward movement of contracter 88, whereupon said contracter is moved by fluid pressure up to that new limit and consequently radially compresses packer 81 an amount which will compensate for the wear. Likewise, if fluid pressure conditions vary, bolts I28 may be adjusted to maintain a predetermined packer constriction in spite of such variance in fluid pressure.

I will now setforth the steps followed in removing and replacing packer assembly I6, this description serving also to point out certain of the steps followed when it is desired to clear the housing I8 entirely of all packing means and positions and packer 34 is deflated. Imm

'orthat a thicker adapter I88 (or any other suitable washer) be interposed between setting ring I81 and the top of the packer. In either event,

the operation calls for a partial disassembly-of the packing head, though the work is still held packed off within the head so that rotation or reciprocation thereof may continue during the exchange or shimming of packer 81.

, The first step in the operation is to inflate packer 34 into engagement with stem I3 by the admission of controlled fluid pressure through nipple 5|. Movement of stem I3 may continue after packer 34 is thus sets Keys I28 are then lifted from ways I29, and bonnet I2I is unscrewed from sleeve 28 and lifted to a height which will permit the packer assembly I 6 to be cleared from sleeve 28. Ring I81 and its connected parts then being lifted clear of sleeve 28, screws I II are removed to permit ring I81, adapter I86 and packer 81 to be stripped transversely from the drill stem. Thereupon either a new packer is substituted or a thicker adapter It will be observed that packer box '38 has been maintained in its original position while assembly I8 was removed, by reason of the fact that sleeve end 2| has not been disturbed.

Bonnet I2I is then threaded down on sleeve 28 to a point where bolts I28 are holding con-,

tracter end 9| on plate 68 and where hub II1,

by pressing packer 81 downwardly into taper bore 95, gives an initial setting of said packer about work I3, although care is taken not to depress packer 81 suiliciently to' constrict it too tightly about the work. Bonnet I2I is then backed off sleeve 28 a slight amount which opens up a vertical gap between flanges H8 and I23 so the piston and packer have a capacity for slight upward movement.

Keys- I 28 are then returned to their locking tely the fluid pressure raised between packer stem I3 acts against the lower end of pistiin 88 and packer 81 to lift the entire assembly until ring flange I I8 engages bonnet flange I23. Bolts I28 are then backed away slightly to allow the fluid pressure acting ,o'rrpiston 88 to move contracter 88 upwardly with respect to packer 81, remembering that such pack '5 now held against bodily upward moveme by ring I81. This upward movement of contracter 86 radially constricts packer 81 more tightly about the drill pipe, bolts I28 being adjusted to control the length of piston stroke to such a degree that packer 81 will be constricted about the drill stem toan amount which will allow only sufiicient lealiage of fluid therebetween to serve as a lubrican When it is desired to replace packer 88, one first clears bonnet I2I and the'drilling packing assembly I8 from sleeve 28, as described alcoves 28 and the sleeve is subsequently unscrewed from bowl I8 by introducing a spanner wrench in keyways 84. Gland 58 and packing 51 are removed from bowl l8 and nipple is disconnected from ferrule 40.

The box 30 is then lifted clear of the bowl, cap 60 unscrewed and raised from the box, proper, and packer 34 is lifted clear of the box and stripped transversely from stem l3, remembering that it is parted at 31 to allow such stripping. A new packer may then'be inserted in the box and the entire packing head be reassembled in a, reverse order of steps.

I have spoken of lifting out the various interior parts of the packing head. It will be understood that where vertical movement of stem I3 is allowable said stem may be elevated to lift out the various parts by reason of any upwardly facing shoulders thereon, such as presented by the upper end of drill collar M, which are of larger diameter than the inside diameter of a given head-part.

While I have described in detail the removal of the drilling packer and deflatable packer for purposes of replacement or adjustment, it will be understood that when the packing head is to be cleared by final removal of said parts, the disassembly is followed in the order given above.

Likewise, while I have described in detail the insertion of the head parts in connection with their replacement after temporary removal, it will be understood the same order of placement is followed when the packer parts are first assembled about the work.

As stated in the fore-part of this application, the chosen description of a particular type of work handled by the packing head and the particular operations performed .by the head in connection with this work, are merely illustrative and not at all exhaustive. However, the chosen description will make it apparent to those skilled in the art how the head may be used to advantage in many other situations and in connection with many other types of work.

While I have shown and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that various changes in design, structure and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a well pipe through its bore, a radially contractible packer in the housing and about the pipe, said packer being limited as to bodily upward movement along the pipe, a packer-contracter engaged with the packer and movable vertically through the housing bore and effective, by virtue of upward movement with respect to the packer, to contract the packer about the pipe, said contracter having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer, a fluid tight seal between the housing and contracter, the packer providing a seal between the contracter and well pipe, and adjustment screws in the housing adjustably limiting the upward movement of the contracter with respect to the packer under the influence of such fluid pressure.

2. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing and about the pipe, said piston having fluid-tight, sliding fit in the housing, the piston throughout its length being spaced annularly from the pipe, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, a' conical, radially resilient packer fitted in said piston bore about the pipe, and means for holding the packer from upward movement, said piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer.

3. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing and about the pipe, said piston having fluid-tight, sliding fit in the housing, the piston throughout its length being spaced annularly from the pipe, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, a conical, radially resilient packer fitted in said piston bore about the pipe, means for holding the packer from upward movement, said piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer, and adjustable means for limiting upward movement of the piston through the housing with respect to the packer;

4. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a well pipe through its bore, a radially contractible packer in the housing and about the pipe, said packer being limited as to bodily upward movement along the pipe, a packer-contracter movable vertically through the housing bore along the packer, said packer and'contracter having coacting inclined faces whereby upward movement of said contracter radially contracts the packer about said pipe; and means acting positively against said contracter for moving said contracter downwardly.

5. In a-packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a well pipe through its bore with annular clearance, a radially contractible packer in the housing and about the pipe, a

vertically movable, tubular piston encircling the packer, said piston being effective by upward movement to radially contract the packer and having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer; and means for moving said piston downwardly.

6. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing and about the pipe, there being annular clearance between the piston and pipe, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, a conical, radially resilient packer fitted in said piston bore about the pipe, said piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer, a ring about the pipe and above the packer, said ring being detachably held to the housing and holding the packer against bodily upward movement, and adjusting members carried by and passed through the ring, said members being movable vertically towards and away from the piston to establish adjustably its uper limit of movement.

7. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing and about the pipe, there being annular clearance between the piston and pipe, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, a conical, radially resilient packer fitted in said piston bore about the pipe, said piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer, a ring about the pipe and above the packer, a bonnet detachably held to said housing, said bonnet overlying saidring to hold said ring in a position to retain the packer against bodily upward movement, and adjusting members carried by and passed through the ring, said members being movable vertically towards and away from the piston to establish adjustably its upper limit of movement.

8. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a pipe throughits bore with annular clearance, a packer comprising a ring-shaped bag of flexible material having an opening from its outer wall to the bag-hollow,

said packer being disposed within the housing bore, and a'fiexible annular guard disposed in the housing at an end of the packer, said guard embodying a plurality of resilient arms, each fixed at one end and having its opposite end overlying said end of the packer, and loose connections between said opposite ends of the arms maintaining them in substantial alinement.

9. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a pipe through its bore with annular clearance, a packer comprising a ring-shaped bag of flexible material having an opening from its outer wall to the bag-hollow, said packer being disposed within the housing bore, and a flexible annular guard disposed in the housing at an end of the packer, said guard embodying a plurality of resilient arms, each fixed at one end and having its opposite end overlying said end of the packer, each arm comprising a plurality of bowed leaves.

10. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a pipe through its bore with annular clearance, a packer comprising a ring-shaped bag of flexible material having an opening from its outer wall to the bag-hollow, said packer being disposed within the housing bore, and a flexible annular guard disposed in the housing at an end of the packer, said guard embodying a plurality of resilient arms, each fixed at one end and having its opposite end overlying said end of the packer, each arm comprising a plurality of bowed leaves, said leaves being arranged to come successively and accumulatively into play as the resilient arms are flexed.

11. In a device of the character described, a tubular housing adapted to take work through its bore, packing in said housing and about the work, movable, packer-actuating means in the housing and, by virtue of its movement, effective on said packing to vary its packing eifect, said actuating means being exposed to fluid pressure in the housing therebelow whereby said pressure tends to move it-in a direction to increase the packing effect of the packer, and adjustable means operable for positively limiting the movement of said actuating means in said direction at any selected point irrespective of the value of said fluid pressure.

12. In a device of the character described, a tubular housing adapted to take work through its bore, fluid-pressure actuated packing in said housing and about the work. and a constantly acting control associated with the packing and operable to maintain constant packer actuation under fluid pressure of increasing value.

13. In a device of the character described, a tubular housing adapted to take work through its bore, packing in the housing and about the work, a fluid-pressure actuated piston for setting the packing, and an adjustable control associated with the piston and operable to vary the extent of piston actuation under fluid pressure of given value.

14. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a well pipe through its .bore, a radially contractible packer in the housing and about the pipe, a packer-contractor engaged with the packer and movable vertically with relation thereto and effective, by virtue of upward relative movement, to contract the packer about the pipe, said contracter having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer whereby the contracter is adapted to be moved upwardly to contract the packer, the contracter having a given range of upward movement throughout which the contracter is effective to compress the packer, and a control-stop coacting with the contracter when it is below its limit of upward movement to hold the contracter against upward movement therepast irrespective of the value of the fluidpressure directed against said shoulder, said control-stop being shiftable to vary the extent of upward movement allowed to the contracter under given fluid pressure. v

15. In a. packing head forwell pipe, a tubular housing adapted to take a well pipe through its bore with annular clearance, a radially resilient packer in the housing and about the pipe, and

a tubular piston movable vertically with respect to the pipe and engaged with said packer. said piston being efiective by upward movement thereton being eflectlve by upward movement thereof to radially contract the packer about the pipe and having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid-pressure in the head below the packer, the lower end of said packer having an annular groove therein which is likewise exposed to said fluid-pressure.

17. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing about the pipe, said piston having fluidtight, sliding fit in the housing, the piston being spaced annularly, and from end-to-end, from the pipe,' the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, and a conical, radially resilient packer in said piston bore and about the pipe, said piston and said packer each having downwardly presented faces exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer.

18. In a device of the character described, a tubular housing, a tubular piston movable vertically through the housing bore, the bore of the tically through the housing bore, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly. a tubular packer within the piston bore and having its opposite ends shaped externally as oppositely pointing cones, the lower, conical end of the packer fitting the taper of the piston bore, and the upper end of thepacker extending above the piston, aring engaged with the upper end of the piston and havingan inwardly and upwardly tapering bore fitting the upper conical end of the packer, and means adjustably carried by the housing and engaging said ring to limit upward movement of the piston.

20. A tubular packing rubber for packing heads ternally as oppositely pointing truncated cones,

one of the ends being annularly grooved to provide downwardly extending, spreadable lips, the

rubber being parted at one side of its bore and from top to bottom thereof with the line of parting extending substantially in the form of a V.

22. A tubular packing rubber for packing heads and the like, having one end thereof shaped as a downwardly pointing cone and an attachment socket in said rubber, the bore of said socket being accessible from the opposite end'oI the rubber.

23. A tubular packing rubber for packing heads and the like, having one end thereof shaped as a downwardly pointing cone, the rubber being parted at one side of its bore and from top to bottom, and a pair of threaded sockets in said rubber, one at each side of the line of parting, the bores of said sockets being accessible from the opposite end of the-rubber.

24. In a packing head for well pipe, a tubular housing, a vertically movable, tubular piston in the housing and about the pipe, there being annular clearance between the piston and pipe, the bore of the piston tapering inwardly and downwardly, a conical, radially resilient packer fitted in said piston bore about the pipe, said piston having a downwardly facing shoulder exposed to fluid pressure in the head below the packer, a ring about the pipe and above the packer, means suspending the packer from the ring and holding the packer against movement bodily downward from the ring, said ring being detachably held to the housing and holding the packer against bodily upward movement, and adjusting members carried -by and passed through the ring, said members being movable vertically towards and away from .thepiston to establish adjustably its upper-limit of movement.

FREDERICK, STONE.

US2038140A 1931-07-06 1931-07-06 Packing head Expired - Lifetime US2038140A (en)

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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2506359A (en) * 1946-03-01 1950-05-02 Karl M Brenner Well blowout preventer
US2598207A (en) * 1946-06-14 1952-05-27 Bailey Meter Co Valving apparatus
US2599334A (en) * 1947-07-26 1952-06-03 Republic Steel Corp Seal for blast furnace hoppers and bells
US2648554A (en) * 1949-07-21 1953-08-11 Syntron Co Inflatable standby seal for stationary, revolving, sliding, and rocking tubes and the like and shafts and the like
US2760751A (en) * 1952-04-28 1956-08-28 Shaffer Tool Works Compensating gate ram packer
US2822192A (en) * 1953-12-07 1958-02-04 Guy M Beatty Pipe coupling with socketed inflatable sealing member
US2943874A (en) * 1955-09-19 1960-07-05 Walter J Valdi Stern tube safety ring assembly
US3253835A (en) * 1959-11-23 1966-05-31 Brown Oil Tools Well pipe sealing device
US4447037A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-05-08 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4452421A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-06-05 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4461448A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-07-24 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4605195A (en) * 1985-05-01 1986-08-12 Hydril Company Annular blowout preventer packing unit
US20050178540A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-08-18 Siewert Neil E. Pack off system & apparatus
US20060144622A1 (en) * 2002-10-31 2006-07-06 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control head radial seal protection and leak detection systems
US7926593B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2011-04-19 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control device docking station
US7997345B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2011-08-16 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Universal marine diverter converter
WO2012001402A2 (en) 2010-06-28 2012-01-05 Weatherford / Lamb, Inc. Oilfield equipment and related apparatus and method
US8286734B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2012-10-16 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Low profile rotating control device
US8322432B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2012-12-04 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Subsea internal riser rotating control device system and method
US8347983B2 (en) 2009-07-31 2013-01-08 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Drilling with a high pressure rotating control device
US8347982B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2013-01-08 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. System and method for managing heave pressure from a floating rig
US8826988B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2014-09-09 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Latch position indicator system and method
US8844652B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2014-09-30 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Interlocking low profile rotating control device
US9359853B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2016-06-07 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Acoustically controlled subsea latching and sealing system and method for an oilfield device
US9970254B2 (en) * 2015-08-31 2018-05-15 Cameron International Corporation Blowout preventer with inflatable element
US10041335B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2018-08-07 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2506359A (en) * 1946-03-01 1950-05-02 Karl M Brenner Well blowout preventer
US2598207A (en) * 1946-06-14 1952-05-27 Bailey Meter Co Valving apparatus
US2599334A (en) * 1947-07-26 1952-06-03 Republic Steel Corp Seal for blast furnace hoppers and bells
US2648554A (en) * 1949-07-21 1953-08-11 Syntron Co Inflatable standby seal for stationary, revolving, sliding, and rocking tubes and the like and shafts and the like
US2760751A (en) * 1952-04-28 1956-08-28 Shaffer Tool Works Compensating gate ram packer
US2822192A (en) * 1953-12-07 1958-02-04 Guy M Beatty Pipe coupling with socketed inflatable sealing member
US2943874A (en) * 1955-09-19 1960-07-05 Walter J Valdi Stern tube safety ring assembly
US3253835A (en) * 1959-11-23 1966-05-31 Brown Oil Tools Well pipe sealing device
US4447037A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-05-08 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4452421A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-06-05 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4461448A (en) * 1981-06-25 1984-07-24 Hydril Company Well blowout preventer, and packing element
US4605195A (en) * 1985-05-01 1986-08-12 Hydril Company Annular blowout preventer packing unit
US8113291B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2012-02-14 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Leak detection method for a rotating control head bearing assembly and its latch assembly using a comparator
US20060144622A1 (en) * 2002-10-31 2006-07-06 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control head radial seal protection and leak detection systems
US7836946B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2010-11-23 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control head radial seal protection and leak detection systems
US8714240B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2014-05-06 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Method for cooling a rotating control device
US7934545B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2011-05-03 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control head leak detection systems
US8353337B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2013-01-15 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Method for cooling a rotating control head
US20050178540A1 (en) * 2004-02-12 2005-08-18 Siewert Neil E. Pack off system & apparatus
US8939235B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2015-01-27 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control device docking station
US10024154B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2018-07-17 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Latch position indicator system and method
US20110168392A1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2011-07-14 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Remote Operation of an Oilfield Device
US7926593B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2011-04-19 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control device docking station
US9784073B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2017-10-10 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Rotating control device docking station
US9404346B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2016-08-02 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Latch position indicator system and method
US8701796B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2014-04-22 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. System for drilling a borehole
US8826988B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2014-09-09 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Latch position indicator system and method
US8408297B2 (en) 2004-11-23 2013-04-02 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Remote operation of an oilfield device
US7997345B2 (en) 2007-10-19 2011-08-16 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Universal marine diverter converter
US9004181B2 (en) * 2007-10-23 2015-04-14 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Low profile rotating control device
US20130009366A1 (en) * 2007-10-23 2013-01-10 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Low Profile Rotating Control Device
US8286734B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2012-10-16 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Low profile rotating control device
US8844652B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2014-09-30 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Interlocking low profile rotating control device
US10087701B2 (en) 2007-10-23 2018-10-02 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Low profile rotating control device
US10041335B2 (en) 2008-03-07 2018-08-07 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Switching device for, and a method of switching, a downhole tool
US9359853B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2016-06-07 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc Acoustically controlled subsea latching and sealing system and method for an oilfield device
US8770297B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2014-07-08 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Subsea internal riser rotating control head seal assembly
US8322432B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2012-12-04 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Subsea internal riser rotating control device system and method
US8636087B2 (en) 2009-07-31 2014-01-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Rotating control system and method for providing a differential pressure
US9334711B2 (en) 2009-07-31 2016-05-10 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc System and method for cooling a rotating control device
US8347983B2 (en) 2009-07-31 2013-01-08 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Drilling with a high pressure rotating control device
US8347982B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2013-01-08 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. System and method for managing heave pressure from a floating rig
US9260927B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2016-02-16 Weatherford Technology Holdings, Llc System and method for managing heave pressure from a floating rig
US8863858B2 (en) 2010-04-16 2014-10-21 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. System and method for managing heave pressure from a floating rig
WO2012001402A2 (en) 2010-06-28 2012-01-05 Weatherford / Lamb, Inc. Oilfield equipment and related apparatus and method
US9175542B2 (en) 2010-06-28 2015-11-03 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Lubricating seal for use with a tubular
US9970254B2 (en) * 2015-08-31 2018-05-15 Cameron International Corporation Blowout preventer with inflatable element

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