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US2034050A - Spiked sport shoe - Google Patents

Spiked sport shoe Download PDF

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Publication number
US2034050A
US2034050A US75654334A US2034050A US 2034050 A US2034050 A US 2034050A US 75654334 A US75654334 A US 75654334A US 2034050 A US2034050 A US 2034050A
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Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
plate
sole
shoe
spike
spikes
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
Samuel F Levy
Original Assignee
Internat Golf Plate Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43CFASTENINGS OR ATTACHMENTS OF FOOTWEAR; LACES IN GENERAL
    • A43C15/00Non-skid devices or attachments
    • A43C15/16Studs or cleats for football or like boots
    • A43C15/162Studs or cleats for football or like boots characterised by the shape
    • A43C15/164Studs or cleats for football or like boots characterised by the shape having a circular cross section
    • A43C15/165Studs or cleats for football or like boots characterised by the shape having a circular cross section pointed or conical, e.g. calks, spikes, pins

Description

March 17, 1936,

s. F. LEVY 2,034,050 sPIED SPORT SHOE Filed Deo. 7, 1934 Patented Mar. 17, 1936 UNITED STATES.

SPIKED SPORT SHOE Samuel F. Levy, Philadelphia, Pa.,

assignor to International Golf Plate Corporation. Philadelphia, Pa., a corporation of Delaware Application December 7, 1934, Serial No. 756,543

2 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in spiked sport shoes, and a principal object of the invention is to provide simplified and generally improved means for mountnig the spikes in the sole of the shoe.

The mounting of spikes on shoes has always presented a considerable problem. Not only must the spikes be securely retained in the sole, but they should be so mounted as to have a substantial rigidity preventing angular displacement from their normal axes. Screw-threaded spikes are incapable of adequately holding in the sole and quickly become displaced in the relatively soft leather. Spikes riveted in the sole are secure but are subject to displacement from their normal axes so that they lose their eiciency and make the shoe uncomfortable. Riveted spikes are also diicult to install and require the services of an expert for both installation and replacement.

An object of the present invention is to provide an eilicient spike assembly that may be attached readily to any shoe by means" involving no modication of the shoe structure beyond the capacity of the average layman.

Another object of the invention is to provide a. novell spike device not only insuring positive retention of the spike on the shoe but also precluding angular displacement of the spike from its normal position.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a spike device in which the parts are so rigidly retained in normal position that even after extended wear the sole of the shoe will remain undeformed and comfortable to the foot.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a spike device of the stated character wherein the individual spikes may be readily removed for replacement in the event of excessive wear.

The invention further resides in certain novel structural details hereinafter described and illustrated in the attached drawing, in which:

Figure l is a view in perspective of a shoe equipped with spikes in accordance with my invention;

Figs. 2 and 3 are views in perspective showing the elements of a preferred embodiment of my device;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary section on the line 4 4, Fig. 1, and

Figs. 5, 6, and 7 are fragmentary sectional views illustrating modifications within the scope of the invention.

With reference to the drawing, my device in a preferred embodiment comprises a sole plate I and a heel plate 2 both preferably made of noncorrodible metal, such as stainless steel. nickel silver or the like. The plate I, which is preferably of triangular form as illustrated, is provided with a series of countersunk threaded sockets 3 which preferably and as illustrated in Fig. 4 are pressed out of the metal of the-plate I so as to constitute integral parts of the latter. On that side of the plate which in assembly lies against the sole of the s'hoe the sockets 3 provide a recess for reception of the head of a threadedspike 4, the outer substantially cylindrical portion of the socket being threaded for reception of the correspondingly threaded portion of the spike element.

'Ihe plate I is adapted to be secured to the sole of the shoe in the position illustrated in Fig. l, and the sockets 3 preferably are arranged along that edge of the plate which adjoins the inner edge of the sole of the shoe and along the diagonal edge, this arrangement affording the most eifective distribution for golfing. It will be understood, however, that other forms of plate and other distributions of spikes on the plate may be used without departure from the invention.

'I'he plate I in the illustrated embodiment and as shown in Fig. 4 is secured to the sole by means of a male screw element 5 and a mating female element 6, the female element being inserted from the inside of the shoe through a hole in the sole and the male element 5 being threaded into the female element from the outside of the plate. This type of connection alords an extremely rigid and strong union between the plate and the sole, is readily applied, and provides for removal of the plate 3 by simple release of the male screw element 5 from the outside of the shoe. Preferably the plate I is provided with three apertures l located as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 for reception of the retaining screw 5.

The heel plate 2 illustrated in Fig. 3 is provided with three sockets 3a corresponding to the sockets 3 of the sole plate I for reception of the threaded spikes 4, and this plate is also provided in a preferred embodiment with three openings for reception of the male element 5a` of the plate-retaining screws, the female element 6a being of suiiicient lengthto pass through the increased thickness of the heel. In all essential respects, the heel plate 2 corresponds structurally with the sole plate I described above.

An important feature of the construction resides in the mounting of all the spikes in a rigid plate adapted to be firmly secured to the bottom of the sole of the shoe. With this construction, the individual spikes are held rigidly in ,their comfort to the wearer.

normal relative positions with respect to each other and to the sole of. the shoe. When the plate l is secured by positive means such as the male and female screw elements 5-6 to the sole, there is no opportunity for displacement of any of the elements of the spike device or for misalignment of said elements resulting in distortion of the sole of the shoe and consequent dis- At the same time by reason of the detachable mounting of the individual spikes in the plate and the readily detachable character of the means for securing the plate to the shoe, provision is made for replacement of the individual spike elements when the latter are worn to an extent destroying their effectiveness. It will be apparent further that utilization of the spike device entails merely the drilling of the sole of the shoe at the points where the retaining screws 5--6 are to enter and the insertion of the female elements 6 and 6a from the interior of the shoe through these apertures.

In Fig. 5, I have illustrated a modication within the scope of the invention wherein the threaded spike elements 8 are made to function also as the means for securing the plate la to the shoe, thus eliminating the separate retaining screws 5-6. In this case, as in the embodiment previously described, it may be desirable, in order to prevent displacement of the plate la in the plane of the sole and to avoid any consequent cocking of the spike elements resulting in the formation of protrusions at the inner surface of\ the sole, to provide screws 9 countersunk in the plate la and threaded into the sole of the sho-e. These screws have. no function in holding the plate la to the sole and merely tend to prevent displacement of the plate in its own plane so that the strains imposed upon the screws 9 are negligible, and there is no tendency for the screws to loosen in the sole.

In the embodiment illustrated in Fig. 6, the spike elements I0 are riveted to the plate Ib and are, therefore, not readily detachable therefrom. When replacement is required in this instance, the entire plate Ib is removed and a new oneinstalled. Whilethistypeofdeviceisan entirely practical one, the other embodiments are preferred by reason of the ability aorded to replace the spikes individually without the necessity for replacing -the base plate.

In Fig. '7 I have illustrated a modied heel spike in the form of a screw i l passed through the heel from the inside of the shoe and held in place by a nut I2 inserted in a countersunk hole alt the bottom of the heel and' seating upon the latter. The thickness and relative rigidity of the heel prevent undesirable cooking of this individual spike. For relatively shallow heels, however, the plate formation is desirable.

I claim:

1. A spike device for sports shoes comprising a thin metal plate adapted to be secured against the bottom of the sole and having a plurality of threaded apertures for reception of projecting spike elements, means for rigidly securing the plate against the sole, and spike elements having head portions seating against the sole-engaging face of the plate and rigidly yet detachably secured to the plate by said threads, said plate in localized and limited areas immediately embracing said apertures being of extra effective thickness and thereby affording the apertures a threaded length in excess of the normal plate thickness suiiicient to adequately hold the spikes against both transverse and longitudinal strains.

2. A spike device for sports shs comprising a thin metal plate adapted to be secured against the bottom of the sole and having a plurality of threaded apertures for reception of projecting spike elements, means for rigidly securing the plate against the sole, and spike elements having head portions seating against the sole-engaging face of the plate and rigidly yet detachably secured to the plate by said threads, the metal of said plate in the localized areas immediately embracing said apertures being pressed out of the normal plane to provide an extra effective thickness aiording the apertures a threaded length in excess of the normal plate thickness sufficient to adequately hold the spikes against both transverse and longitudinal strains.

SAMUEL F. LEVY.

US2034050A 1934-12-07 1934-12-07 Spiked sport shoe Expired - Lifetime US2034050A (en)

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US2034050A US2034050A (en) 1934-12-07 1934-12-07 Spiked sport shoe

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629943A (en) * 1951-08-31 1953-03-03 Nick A Camody Ice cleat for footwear
US3526976A (en) * 1968-05-20 1970-09-08 Charles E Jacobs Interchangeable sports shoe
DE2314627A1 (en) * 1972-05-24 1974-09-26 Adolf Dassler Dorn for sports shoes, particularly racing shoes
US4984377A (en) * 1989-12-11 1991-01-15 Schneider Gottlieb R All condition fishing waders
DE4425147A1 (en) * 1994-07-15 1996-01-18 Helmut Thienemann Multi-purpose shoe
US5946828A (en) * 1995-03-01 1999-09-07 J. Charles Jordan Athletic shoe with retractable spikes
US6256907B1 (en) 1998-04-14 2001-07-10 Retractable, Inc. Athletic shoe with retractable spikes
US20030145489A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-07 Willis Major Full or partial footweat attaching anti-slip surface gripper
US20060090373A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2006-05-04 Savoie Armand J Removable footwear traction plate
US20080196274A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable Pod System
US20130219583A1 (en) * 2012-02-27 2013-08-29 Kenny McDonald Offensive and defensive protection device

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629943A (en) * 1951-08-31 1953-03-03 Nick A Camody Ice cleat for footwear
US3526976A (en) * 1968-05-20 1970-09-08 Charles E Jacobs Interchangeable sports shoe
DE2314627A1 (en) * 1972-05-24 1974-09-26 Adolf Dassler Dorn for sports shoes, particularly racing shoes
US4984377A (en) * 1989-12-11 1991-01-15 Schneider Gottlieb R All condition fishing waders
DE4425147A1 (en) * 1994-07-15 1996-01-18 Helmut Thienemann Multi-purpose shoe
US5946828A (en) * 1995-03-01 1999-09-07 J. Charles Jordan Athletic shoe with retractable spikes
US6256907B1 (en) 1998-04-14 2001-07-10 Retractable, Inc. Athletic shoe with retractable spikes
US20030145489A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-07 Willis Major Full or partial footweat attaching anti-slip surface gripper
US8510974B2 (en) 2004-07-12 2013-08-20 Cleats Llc Removable footwear traction plate
JP2008505727A (en) * 2004-07-12 2008-02-28 クリーツ・エルエルシー Removable footwear traction plate
US20060090373A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2006-05-04 Savoie Armand J Removable footwear traction plate
US7654013B2 (en) * 2004-07-12 2010-02-02 Cleats Llc Removable footwear traction plate
US20100064553A1 (en) * 2004-07-12 2010-03-18 Cleats Llc Removable Footwear Traction Plate
US9049903B2 (en) 2004-07-12 2015-06-09 Cleats Llc Removable footwear traction plate
US20080196274A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2008-08-21 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable Pod System
US8250781B2 (en) 2007-02-16 2012-08-28 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable pod system
US20110072688A1 (en) * 2007-02-16 2011-03-31 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable Pod System
US8516720B2 (en) 2007-02-16 2013-08-27 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable pod system
US7866064B2 (en) 2007-02-16 2011-01-11 Nike, Inc. Interchangeable pod system
US20130219583A1 (en) * 2012-02-27 2013-08-29 Kenny McDonald Offensive and defensive protection device
US9091504B2 (en) * 2012-02-27 2015-07-28 Kenny McDonald Offensive and defensive protection device

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