US2029457A - Apparatus for flowing wells - Google Patents

Apparatus for flowing wells Download PDF

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US2029457A
US2029457A US737621A US73762134A US2029457A US 2029457 A US2029457 A US 2029457A US 737621 A US737621 A US 737621A US 73762134 A US73762134 A US 73762134A US 2029457 A US2029457 A US 2029457A
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well
pressure
reservoir
tubing
pressure medium
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Herbert F Beardmore
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INDIAN TERRITORY ILLUMINATING
INDIAN TERRITORY ILLUMINATING OIL Co
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INDIAN TERRITORY ILLUMINATING
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B34/00Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells
    • E21B34/06Valve arrangements for boreholes or wells in wells

Description

Feb. 4, 1936. H F, BEARDMORE 2,029,457
APPARATUS FOR FLOWING WELLS Filed July 30, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 4, 1936. H. F.BEARDMORE APPARATUS FOR FLOWING WELLS Filed July 30, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 III Ifrllllal INVENTOR He/er, ea/amara ATTORNEY Feb. 4, 1936. H. F. BEARDMoRE APPARATUS FOR FLOWING WELLS 4 sheds-sheet :s
Filed July 30, 1934 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 H. F. BEARDMORE APPARATUS FOR FLOWING WELLS Filed July 30, 1954 INVENTOR Z7 Herbe/ff 5mn/mare ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 4, 1936 PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR FLOWING WELLS Herbert F. Beardmore, Oklahoma City, Okla., assignor of one-half to Indian Territory Illuminating Oil Company, Bartlesville, Okla., a corporation of New Jersey Application July 30, 1934, Serial N0. 737,621
24 Claims. (Cl. 10S-231) My invention relates to apparatus for flowing wells, particularly oil wells, with gas or air, supplied articially in lieu of or supplement to natural gas originally accompanying the oil from the producing formation in insuflicient volume to lift the oil to the top of the well, or which has been depleted to that degree, and has for its principal object to effect such artificial flow of oil from the well without interference with flow of oil from the producing formation to the well hole.
Other objects of the invention are to provide an improved apparatus for applying the artificial pressure medium, to provide application 'of the pressure medium. at two or more stages, to provide for diverting the pressure medium from an upper stage to a lower stage, to provide a reservoir at the upper stage into which the oil is owed from the lower stage without the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the reservoir acting against flow of fluid from the lower stage, and to provide for controlling application of the pressure medium in timed relation to the flow of well fluid into the reservoir.
In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention, as hereinafter pointed out, I have provided improved apparatus which is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:
Fig. 1 is a vertical perspective section through a well equipped with a flowing apparatus embodying the features of the present invention, the flowing apparatus also being shown in perspective section to better illustrate its construction and method of operation.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged section through the intermitter used in controlling ow of uid pressure medium.
Fig. 3 is a sectional view showing the well uid flowing. into the inducer tubing from the bottom of the well.
Fig. 4 is a similar view showing the well uid fiowing from the inducer tubing to ll the reservoir from which the well fluid is blown from the well.
Fig. 5 is a similar view showing the step of blowing the well fluid from the reservoir to the top of the well.
Fig. 6 is an enlarged vertical section through the educer valve mechanism which controls discharge of the pressure medium to effect blowing of the well fluid from the reservoir and showing the diverting means whereby the pressure medlum is conducted to a lower stage.
Fig. 7 is a horizontal section on the line 'l-l, Fig. 6.
Fig. 8 is a horizontal section on the line 8-8, Fig, 6.
Fig. 9 is a horizontal section throughthe injector of the rst stagetaken on the line 9 9, Fig. l1.
Fig. 10 is a. detail perspective view of the upper end of the inducer tubing, particularly illustrating the ports through which the well fluid is flowed intov the reservoir.
Fig. l1 is an enlarged vertical section through the injector comprising the rst stage.
Fig. 12 is a vertical section through a well showing a modified form of well flowing apparatus.
Fig. 13 is a similar view showing a still further modified form of the invention as used in wells having sufficient formation pressure to elevate the well fluid for iiow into the reservoir from which it is blown from the well by artificial pressure.
Referring more in detail to the drawings:
I designates a Well hole extending from the earth surface 2 to a subsurface oil producing stratum 3, from which oil ows into the bottom of the well hole by gravity or gas pressure. The upper portion of the well hole is provided with the usual casing 4 having its lower end seated on a cap rock formation 5 above the oil sand 3, and having its upper end projecting from the well and carrying a conventional type casing head 6 to which is connected a pipe l for discharging the well fluid as later described.
In some oil producing localities the pressure from the producing strata is sufficient to ow the oil through the casing and discharge it from the pipe l. However, as the field becomes developed the natural pressure is gradually reduced until finally it ceases to flow the well and it is necessary to provide means for introducing an artificial pressure medium to take the place of the depleted gas pressure. In present practice, when artificial pressure medium is applied in a well, the pressure acts against the now of fluid from the producing strata and reduces the production of the well below that at which the well is capable of flowing l In practicing the present invention, I apply artificial pressure medium in such a manner that the pressure and velocity thereof promote natural flow of fluid from the producing sand rather than oppose it. I also provide for elevating the oil through a series of stages in such a manner that the hydrostatic pressure of the oil in an upper stage does not act against flow of well fluid from a preceding lower stage, as now to be described,
Referring rst to the form of the invention illustrated in Figs. 1 iso-11, inclusive, which show apparatus for iiowing the well when the natural well pressure is depleted, suspended from the casing head 6 and extending downwardly within the casing 4 is a string of tubing 8 through which a pressure medium, such as gas or compressedair, is injected into the well for eifectingiiow of the well iiuid, the pressure'medium being supplied through a conduit 9 connected with the upper end of the tubing 8. The tubing 8 may extend into the well to within four to six hundred feet of the setting point of the casing 4 on the cap rock 5, and carries a coupling I for suspendingly supporting a pipe connected thereto by a reduced nipple I2. 'I'he coupling III includes a horizontal diaphragm I3 having a central port I4 which is normally closed by a back pressure valve i5. The back pressure valve I5 has a stem I6 extending through a spider-like guide I1 on the coupling and carries a coil spring I8 having one end bearing against the guide and the other against a stop shoulder I9 on the valve stem to retain the valve in normally closed position, but which allows the ow of pressure medium through the port I4 when the pressure is sufcient to overcome the resistance of the spring I8.
The coupling I0 also carries a gas strainer 20 comprising a perforated dome-shaped member having its lower endseated about the guide I1 to prevent foreign matter that is carried with the pressure medium from clogging the back pressure valve and various air passageways and openings in the respective stages, later described.
Fixed on the pipe at a point just below the swedged nipple I2 is a substantially cone-shaped skirt 2| having its lower end suspendingly supporting a string of tubing 22 of larger diameter than the pipe I to form an annular ow channel 23 therebetween. The tubing, however, is of substantially smaller diameter than the casing 4 to form an annular reservoir 24 that extends from the skirt 2| to a point adjacent the lower end of the casing 4 and which has its bottom formed by a packer 25. The packer 25 is secured to the string of tubing 22 as in conventional manner as close to the casing seat as is practicable and includes a compresslble ring 26 sealingly engaged with the tubing 22 and inner surface of the casing 4 to prevent leakage of liquid and pressure medium from the reservoir 24 into the bottom of the well hole. The lower end of the tubing 22 extends through the packer and terminates above the bottom of the well in submergence with the well fluid owing from the producing stratum 3.
'I'he lower end of the tubing carries a perforated strainer 21 through which the well fluid ows into the tubing under control of a standing or check valve 28.
The standing valve 28 is of conventional design and includes a valve seat 29 adapted to be closed by a ball valve 38 adapted to move to and from engagement with the seat in guided relation within a cage 3| to allow well uid to enter the tubing but to prevent its return when the artificial pressure medium is applied, as later de scribed.
With the construction thus fardescribed, the well fluid will flow into the lower end of the tubing through the standing valve until the hydroe static pressure of the column of fluid approaches the hydrostatic pressure within the well; and in order to elevate the iiuid for discharge through slotted openings 32l in the skirt 2| to ll the reservoir 24 when the natural well pressure is low or depleted, I provide means for diverting pressure medium from the pipe to an injector mechanism 33 located in the tubing 22 just above the standing valve 28.
The injector includes an inducer tubing 34 of substantially the same diameter as the tubing to form an injector chamber 35. The lower end of the tubing 34 is threadedly mounted within a collar 36 that is welded or otherwise secured to the inner Walll of the tubing 22 to close the annular space exteriorly of the pipe section 34 from the fluid space 31 above the standing valve 28. -The upper end of the pipe section 34 terminates in spaced relation with the lower end of the pipe and carries a packing element 38.
The packing element is best illustrated in Fig. 6 and includes 'packing rings 39 and 40 having their outer peripheries engaging the inner wall of the tubing 22 and their inner circumference engaged against the upper endof the pipe section 34. 'Ifhe packing rings 39 and 40 are retained between follower rings 4| and 42, the upper follower ring 4| engaging against a stop ring 43 that is welded to the wall of the pipe section 22. The lower follower ring 42 is retained in yielding engagement with the packing rings by means of a spring 44 coiled about the pipe section 34 and having its upper end bearing against the followei` ring and its lower end against a seat ring 45 that is secured to the pipe section 34 by set screws 46,
the set screws being threaded through the ring and engaging the pipe section.
It is thus apparent that the coiled spring 44 urges the lower follower ring into compressing relation with the packing to force it into sealing engagement with the respective inner and outer surfaces of the tubing 22 and pipe section 34 for preventing leakage therebetwen.
Carried on the lower end of the pipe I I is a diverter and educer mechanism 41 for diverting the pressure medium for ilow from the pipe into the annular space 48 surrounding the pipe lsection 34 and to allow ow of the pressure medium into the reservoir, as now to be described. The mechanism 41 is best illustrated in Fig. 6 and includes a tubular body 49 having its upper end threadedly engaged with a coupling member 50 that is secured to the lower end of the pipe and has its lower end threadedly engaged with a spring seat member 5|.
The coupling member 50 includes a sleeve portion 52 threadedly engaged with the pipe II and l an externally threaded depending shank 53 threadedly engaged with the tubular body 49. Formed within the coupling member in axial alignment with the pipe is a conical chamber 54 having its lower end terminating in a port 55 opening through a valve seat 56. The port 55 is normally closed by a cone-shaped valve 51 that is formed by a projecting cone-shaped lug on the upper end of a piston 58 slidable within the tubular body 49. The piston includes a skirt portion 59 having sealing means such as spaced annular grooves 60 which form liquid seals to prevent leakage around the piston. The head of the piston surrounding the conical-shaped valve 51 has a concave annular recess 6| for directing upward flow of pressure medium from the pipe Il when the valve 51 is opened, as later described.
The piston 58 carrying the valve 51 is normally retained in the upper end of the tubular body 49 to engage and close the port 55 by means of a coil spring 62 having its upper end bearing on the bottom of the piston head and its lower end against an internal shoulder 63 formed in the spring seat member .Fluid pressure is established on the bottom side of the piston through a port 64in the spring seat member 5| to allow free movement thereof under influence of the spring 62.
When the valve 51 is closed, the iiuid pressure medium is diverted through a lateral port 65 openingthrough the shank 53 and the tubular body 49 to connect through a nipple 66 with a by-pass conduit 61.
The conduit 61 is secured longitudinally of the side of the tubing 22 and has its lower end communicating through a port 68 with the annular space 48 surrounding the pipe section 34. Formed inthe lower end of the pipe section 34 is a port 69 (Fig. 10) communicating with an injector 1|).
The injector comprises an L-shaped tting having a horizontal leg 1| secured to the tubing 34 over the port 69, and a vertical leg 12 having a nozzle 13 positioned concentrically with the axis of the tubing 34 for discharging the pressure medium upwardly within the tubing to induce flow of the well uid collecting therein upwardly through the tubing and into the annular space 23 for overflow through the slots 32 into the reservoir 24. In lorder to increase the injector effect of the pressure medium discharged from the nozzle 13, the tubing 34 is preferably provided with a Venturi tube 14 positioned therein directly above the leg 12 of the nozzle.
In one form of the invention, pressure medium is supplied to the pipe 9 at alternately low and high pressures, the low pressure being utilized to induce flow of well fluid into the reservoir and the higher pressure to blow the oil out of the reservoir to the top of the well as now to be described.
Connected to the pipe 9 by a Y-shaped section 15 (Fig. 1) are high and low pressure lines 16 and 11 each equipped with a shut-olf valve 18 and 19 respectively, having reciprocable stems 80 and 8| connected by a common actuating lever 82.
The fulcrum 83 of the actuating lever is located intermediate the valves so that when the valve 19 in the low pressure line 11 is opened to permit ow of pressure medium under low pressure into the well, the valve 18 in the high pressure line 16 is closed and vice versa. Assuming that the pressure medium is flowing into the well from the low pressure line and the spring 62 is set to hold the piston valve 51 closed at that pressure, all of the pressure medium will be diverted through the port 65 and through the by-pass 61,
then through the annular chamber 48 and port` 69 to the injector nozzle 13 for discharge through the venturi 14. Velocityof the pressure medium moving through the venturi produces a pressure drop within the inlet chamber 31 so that well iiuid will iiow `thereinto through the standing valve and be moved by the jet of pressure medium upwardly through the pipe 34 and tubing 22 for overflow into the reservoir 24 through the ports 32 in the skirt 2|. When the reservoir has filled, the valve 19 in the low pressure line 11 is closed and the one in the high pressure line 16 is opened to -admit high pressure to the pipe which acts against the area of the piston exposed through the port 55.
Acting on the bottom area of the piston at this time is the spring 62 plus the pressure of the flowing column exerted downwardly between the tubings and 22 4and. up under the piston through the port 64; however, the pressure acting on top of the piston, namely, the pressure medium passing through the port 55 plus the head of liquid in the reservoir exerted through ports 84 presently described and the weight of any owing column. of gas and liquid above the reservoir 24 acting on the rim 6| of the piston, preponderates over the pressures tending tohold the educer valve closed. The valve is therefore opened to pass the pressure medium from the tubing to the ports 84 that lead from the piston chamber upwardly into the reservoir.
The ports 84 are formed by nipples 85 having their respective ends secured over openings 86 in the tubular body 49 and over openings 81 in the tubing 22, the openings 36 being located so that the upper edge 88,01 the piston does not fully cover them, as shown in Fig. 6.
As soon as the valve opens the pressure is effective over the entire area of the piston and the piston goes down until stopped by the shoulder 89 provided by the spring seat member 5|. With the ports 84 uncovered, the pressure medium will escape therethrough into the load of well fluid collected in thel reservoir and on its return to the surface through the casing 4 it flows or lifts the well fluid to the surface in the form of a slug as shown in Fig. 5, the elevation of the well uid being effected through the velocity of the pressure medium.
Upon opening of the educer valve, the velocity of the pressure uid is at its maximum; however, the pressure tends to drop in the pipe after initial escape of pressure medium through the ports 84 and consequently the velocity of' return through the casing is correspondingly reduced.
Since the differential across the ports 84 determines the velocity of pressure medium through the ports and since there is a fixed relation between size of port and size of the upward flow cross-sectional area, the control of velocity across the ports also controls the velocity of flow in the flowing area.
It is-well known that too slow velocity of the return causes great loss in eiiiciency by slippage or dropping back of the well uid and it is, therefore, necessary to retain the pressure medium in the pipe until it is of suiilcient value to produce the desired differential.
This is accomplished by designing the valve so that as the pressure above the piston reduces or the pressure below the piston increases to a point that there is insulcient differential to give the proper velocity, then the spring is the overbalancing force which pushes the valve to its seat until the desired differential is reestablished.
It is thus apparent that by proper combination of port sizes and spring compression, a definite velocity range can be obtained. The valve will open and start ow with a certain velocity and when this velocity tends to fall below a certain rate, the piston automatically closes the port 55.
In extremely deep wells long lengths of tubing interfere with the delivery of large volumes of the fluid pressure medium because friction on the walls thereof reduces the effectiveness of sudden release of gas through the ports 84, but in the present invention this disadvantage is overcome by the ow educer which automatically closes when the velocity becomes too slow and to lagging ofthe ow of pressure medium because of friction, the spring 62 moves the piston to carry the valve to closed position and holds 4the valve closed until the pressure in the pipe again preponderates over the pressures acting on the under side of the piston, whereupon the piston will \again/ open to allow discharge of jets of pressure medium through the ports 84 and continue discharge of well fluid to the top of the well.
ln order to provide an entirely automatic apparatus, it is necessary to provide means for timing the operation of the valves in the high and low pressure iow lines in timed relation with the ow of well iuid to and from the reservoir. This may be accomplished by connecting the lever 82 with the actuating rod 9| of a suitable intermitter 92. In the illustrated instance, the intermitter includes a diaphragm housing 93 having a chamber 94 therein divided by a flexible diaphragm 95 to form separate pressure chambers 96 and 91 on the respective sides thereof and which are alternately vented to atmosphere through ports 98 and 99 through which the rod 9| projects to connect with the diaphragm as at |00. 'Ihe ports are controlled by valve disks |0| and |02 fixed to the rod 9| on the respective sides of the diaphragm so that when the rod is at its upper limit of travel, the valve disk will close the port 98 to prevent exhaust of pressure medium from the chamber 96 through the port. When the rod is in this position, the valve disk |02 allows exhaust of pressure medium from the chamber 91 through the port 99, the pressure medium being supplied to the chambers 93 and 91 atconstant pressure through branch lines |031 and |04 having control valves |05 and |06 for regulating the volume of iiow of pressure medium to the respective chambers.
In order to effect intermittent reciprocatory movement of the rod 9| whereby the valves |0| and |02 are retained in their respective positions for a definite period of time, the rod 9| carries a latch block |01 having spaced grooves |08 and |09 adapted to be alternately engaged by the latch balls ||0 and that are carried in guides ||2 and ||3.
The guides 2 and 3 comprise tubes mounted in a tubular boss ||4 extending upwardly from the housing 93 to forma guide for the latch block |01. The latch balls ||0 and are yieldingly retained in position to engage the respective grooves |08 and |09 by springs ||5 and ||6 mounted in the guides and bearing against the ball latches and against the ends of adjusting A The branches |03 and |04 may be supplied with pressure medium through a pipe ||9 connecting the respective branches with the pressure line 16, the pipe ||9 being connected with the pres sure line ahead of its valve 18 so that the pressure medium is continuously supplied to the branch lines |03 and |04.
The operation of the intermitter is as follows:
Assuming that the valve disk |0| is closing the port 98 and the ball latches ||0 and are engaged with the lower groove |09 so that the rod 9| is yieldingly retained in its uppermost position holding the valve 19 closed and the valve 18 open, the fluid pressure mediumiiows through the branch line |03 and builds up pressure Within the chamber 96 until the pressure therein acting against the diaphragm 95 is such as to preponderate over the resistance of the ball latches ||0 and Thereupon, the sudden release of the latch balls will cause snap action on the diaphragm to causethe valve disk |02 to close the port 99 and the ball latches ||0 and to engage the upper groove |08 in the latch block |01. During this movement of the rod 9|, the valve 19 is opened and the valve 18 closed. The pressure medium owing through the branch line |04 becomes effective to 'act against the diaphragm 95 while the pressure medium owing through the branch g will escapeto atmosphere through the port As soon as sufcient pressure builds up Within the chamber 91 to overcome the resistance of the latch balls, the rod 9| will be reciprocated in the opposite direction to again effect closing of the valve 19 and opening of the valve 18.
It is thus apparent that as long as pressure medium is supplied to the respective branches .|03 and |04, the rod 9| will be reciprocably operated to effect alternate .opening and closing of the valves 18 and 19 and that the interval between separation of the valves may be regulated .in timed relation with the iiow of fluid to and from the reservoir 24 of the well flowing apparatus by regulating the valves |05 and |06 to control the velocity of fluid flowing through the branches |03 and |04 and thereby regulating the time required in building sufficient pressure in the respective chambers 96 and 91 to overcome the resistance offered to the latch block |01. 1
In operating a ow apparatus such as illustrated in Figs. 1 to 11, inclusive, the low pressure valve 19 is opened to supply pressure medium to the well at low enough pressure that it will not be effective in opening the educer valve, but the pressure medium will be diverted thereby through the by-pas's 61, annularspace 48, and through the port 68 to the injector nozzle 13. The velocity of the pressure medium flowing through the nozzle is directed through the venturi 14 to induce ilow of well uid through the inducing chamber 35 and eiect movement of fluid from t-he bottom of the well hole and past the standing valve 30 to replace the fluid being moved through the inducer chamber into the tubing 22 and through the ports 32 at the upper end thereof into the annular reservoir 24.
The supply of pressure medium through the branch line |04 of the intermitter is regulated by adjusting its valve |06 sol that the diaphragm will be actuated at the time the reservoir has lled with well fluid. Upon movement of the diaphragm, the rod 9| of the intermitter is actuated to effect closing of the valve 19 in the low pressure line and opening of the valve 18 in the high pressure line.
'I'he iiuid pressure medium will then ow at a higher pressure into the tubing This higher pressure uid coming into the tubing builds up pressure and acts on the area of the piston exposed through the port 55.
This pressure aided by the pressure in the reservoir and acting on the annular rim 9| of the piston, now preponderates over the liquid, gas and spring pressures acting on the bottom of the piston to cause opening of the valve 51 so that the 'fluid pressure medium becomes effective over the entire area of the piston and cooperates with the hydrostatic pressure of the fluid in the casing to move the piston against the'spring seat member 5|, whereupon jets of pressure medium are discharged through the ports 84. Since the pressure medium is now acting over the entire area of the piston, it is effective in holding the piston open so that the fluid pressure medium is eifective in blowing the well uid collected in in a well 'wherein there is sufllcient natural iiow the reservoir to the top of the well. However, if the pressure in the tubing il tends to drop, the spring 62 then becomes effective in moving the piston to closed position. Y
As the pressure again builds up in the tubing Ii, the piston again opens to continue the flow until all of the iluid above the ports 84 has been discharged from the reservoir.
Duringoperati'on of the educer, the hole in the bottom of the spring seat member serves as a retarder for the piston as it restricts ilow of fluid to and from the piston cylinder and, therefore, retards the action of the piston and times the interval at which the pressures become effective in moving the piston to and from open position.
- The valve |05 .controlling flow o f pressure'me- 95 in the opposite direction to effect opening of the low pressure valve 19 and closing of the high pressure valve 18, again making the injector nozzle eiective in reiilling the reservoir.
When the reservoir is filled, the valves are again operated to repeat the cycle of operation above described.
In some instances, the well may be made to ilow automatically without the use of the high and low pressure lines. In such a case, the pressure medium is supplied at relatively constant pressure which is normally not suiicient to effect opening of the educer. The ow of pressure medium is then diverted through the by-pass into the injector nozzle to effect i-llling of the reservoir by means of the injector nozzle as above described.
As the level of the fluid rises in the reservoir 24, the hydrostatic pressure thereof acting on the top of the piston 58 through the ports 84 becomes eiective and cooperates with the pressure in the tubing to open the educer valve against tension of the spring 62. upon opening of the valve, the iluid pressure medium is discharged through the ports 84 to blow the load of well fluid from the well.
As soon as sufficient well fluid has been blown from the well to drop the hydrostatic pressure of the uid in the reservoir below the point where it is less than the pressure acting below the piston, the spring becomes effective to close the educer valve which again renders the injector nozzle effective to refill the reservoir and the cycle is repeated as soon as the hydrostatic pres- 'sure has reached a point at which the pressure above the piston preponderates over the pressure below the piston.
In the form of the invention'shown in Fig. 12 the injector is omitted and the injection eiect is obtained in a substantially different manner. In this form of the invention the by-pass duct 51 is extended downwardly alongside the educer and terminates in a concentric portion |2| having an inverted cone-shaped baille |22 xed to the lower end thereof, whereby the air is diverted upwardly to aerate the oil collecting in the tubing 22 above the standing valve and to cause its movement therethrough for overow into the reservoir 24. Otherwise the apparatus shown in Fig. l0 operates in substantially the same manner as that disclosed in the form of the invention above described.
In Fig. 13 is illustrated .the apparatus as used Immediately y to-raise the oil into the reservoir 24.
In this form of the invention the lower end of the pressure supply pipe |23 carries a standing valve |24 similar to the standing valve 28 so that when the well pressure preponderates over the pressure in the pipe oil will flow through the standing valve into the pipe which acts to add to the capacity of the reservoir |26.
'I'he valve |24 is also important as it allows the reservoir to fill suillciently through the standing valve and through the jet port |25 when the well pressure is not sufficient to lift the well uid to the top of the tubing 22.
In this form of the invention when the pressure is admitted through the tubing Il, the pressure acts to displace the uid from the lower end of the tubing into the port |25 and force the fluid from the outer reservoir |28 to the top of the well by the jet of air escaping therethrough.
The tubing Il vis provided adjacent the upper f end of the tubing 22 with a kick off port or drain hole |21. This port drains the tubing Il and thereby permits the tubing to ll with liquid as above described. It also allows escape of gas Y that may come down the tubing from leakage during a shut off period that would blow liquid out of thel tubing 22.
It is also useful in aerating the liquid column in the tubing 22 and reservoir. This mechanism requires an intermittent operation of the valve mechanism similar to that shown in Fig. 2 in order that the pressure medium may be turned oil during filling of the reservoir and turned on when filled.
From the foregoing, it is apparent that I have provided an improved apparatus for owing wells wherein the artificial pressure is prevented from interfering with ow of oil from the formation into the casing.
It is also apparent that due to the arrangement of the reservoirs, the hydrostatic pressure of the oil therein does-not act against the upward ow of oil to the reservoir.
It is also apparent that aload may be accumulated in the reservoir which will have much greater hydrostatic head than could be supported by the pressure in the formation from which the fluid was taken.
What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. Apparatus for flowing iluid from the bottom of a well including means at the bottom of the well for initially inducing flow of well uid, means forming a reservoir above the bottom of the well to collect the induced flow, means for injecting a pressure medium into the well, an educer mechanism for intermittently discharg-l ing the pressure medium into the reservoir to blow the collected uid from the reservoir, and means for establishing pressure diierentials on opposite sides of said educer mechanism to eiect intermittent operation thereof.
2. Apparatus for flowing fluid from the bottom of a well including means for initially inducing iiow of well fluid, means forming a reservoir above the bottom of the well to collect the induced ow, means for injecting a pressure medium into the well, an educer mechanism for intermittently discharging the pressure medium into the reservoir to blow the collected fluid from the reservoir, and means for establishing pressure differentials on opposite sides of said educer mechanism to eiect intermittent operation thereof.
3. Apparatus for flowing fluid from the bottom of a well including means at the bottom of the well for initially inducing ow of well fluid, means forming a reservoir above the bottom of the well to collect the induced flow, means for injecting a pressure medium into the well, :an educer mechanism for discharging the pressure medium into the reservoir to blow the collected fluid from the reservoir, means for establishing pressure differentials on opposite sides of said educer mechanism to effect operation thereof, and an intermitter at the top of the well for effecting periodic injection of the pressure medium.
4. Apparatus for fiowing fiuid from a well including an injector at the bottom of the well, means forming a reservoir in the well at a point above the injector, means fordelivering low pressure medium into the well to operate the injector to induce flow of well fluid into the reservoir, means for delivering high pressure medium into the well for blowing the uid from the reservoir, and means alternately rendering said high and low pressure delivery means effective.
5. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well tncluding an injector at the bottom of the well, means forming a reservoir in the well at a point above the injector, means for delivering low pres-- sure medium into the well to operate the injectorto induce flow of well fluid into the reservoir, means for delivering high pressure medium into the well for blowing the fluid from the reservoir, means alternately rendering said high and low pressure delivery means effective, and an inducer valve in the well for diverting flow of said low pressure medium to the injector.
6. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a. well including an injector at the bottom of the well, means forming a reservoir in the well at a point above the injector, means for delivering low pressure medium into the well to operate the injector to induce flow of well fluid into the reservoir, means for delivering high pressure medium into the well for blowingthe fluid from the reservoir, means alternately rendering said high and low pressure delivery means effective, an inducer valve in the well for diverting flow of said low pressure medium to the injector and releasing the high pressure medium to the reservoir.
7. A well flowing apparatus including a casing extending-to a point near the bottom of the well, a tubing in the casing, means connected with the tubing and cooperating with the casing to form an open top reservoir in the casing, means connected with the upper end of the tubing for delivering a pressure medium to the tubing, an injector carried below the tubing, means for diverting the pressure medium from the tubing to the injector for inducing flow of well fluid into the reservoir, .and an educer connected with the tubing and operable in response to hydrostatic head of fluid in the reservoir for delivering the pressure medium to the reservoir for elevating the well fluid collecting therein.
8. A well flowing apparatus including a casing extending to a point near the bottom of the well, a tubing in the casing. means connected with the tubing and cooperating with the casing to form an open top reservoir in the casing, means connected with the upper end of the tubing for delivering a pressure medium to the tubing, means Vfor inducing flow of well fluid into the reservoir,
and an educer connected with the tubing and operable in response to hydrostatic head of fluid inthe reservoir for delivering the pressure rnedium to the reservoir tor elevating the well fluid collecting therein.
9. A well flowing apparatus including a casing extending to a point near the bottom of the well, a tubing in the casing, a tubing depending from the lower end of the first named tubing and having its upper end in communication with the casing, a packer on the depending tubing and engaging the casing to form a reservoir in the lower end of the casing for collecting well uid delivered through the depending tubing, a standing valve on the lower end of the depending tubing, an injector in the depending tubing for inducing flow of fluid therethrough into the reservoir, a by-pass connecting the injector with the first named tubing, and an educer fixed to the lower end of the first named tubing for delivering pressure medium into the reservoir and for diverting pressure medium through said by-pass to the injector.
10. A well flowing apparatus including a casing extending to a point near the bottom of the well, a tubing in the casing, a tubing depending from the lower end of the first named tubing and having its upper end in communication with the casing, a packer in the depending tubing and engaging the casing to form a reservoir in the lower end of the casing for collecting well uid delivered through the depending tubing, a standing valve on the lower end of the depending tubing, an injector in the depending tubing for inducing flow of fluid therethrough into the reservoir, a by-pass connecting the injector with the first named tubing, and a pressure actuated educer fixed to the lower end of the iirst named tubing for delivering pressure medium into the reservoir and for diverting substantially/*al1 of said pressure medium through said by-pass to the injector incidental to a definite reduction in pressure of said pressure medium.
11. In combination with a well casing, a well fiowing apparatus including a tubing suspended in the casing for injecting an artificial pressure medium into the well, a larger tubing suspended from the first named tubing cooperating with the casing to form a reservoir for collecting a body of well fiuid and having a port communicating directly with the reservoir, an educer casing carried by the tubing and having a valve seat above said port, a valve engaging said seat for controlling flow of pressure medium from the tubing through said port, a piston having one end connected with said valve and having said end subject to the hydrostatic head of well fiuid in the reservoir acting through said port and tending to unseat said valve and means normally supporting the piston with the valve in closed position and yieldable in response to said pressure medium supplemented by the hydrostatic head of well iluid to allow discharge of the pressure medium through said port.
12. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well including an injector at the bottom of the well, means forming a reservoir in the well at a point above the injector, means for delivering pressure medium into the well to operate the injector to induce ow of well fluid into the reservoir, and.
control means for said pressure medium actuated responsive to hydrostatic head of uid in the reservoir supplemented by said pressure medium for admitting said pressure medium into said reservoir to elevate the fluid from the reservoir.
13. A well flowing apparatus including a casing extending to a point near the bottom of the well, a tubing in the casing, an apertured skirt on the tubing, a second tubing suspended from the skirt and vcooperating with the casing to form an open top annular reservoir in the casing. means connected with the upper end of the tubing for delivering a `pressure medium to the tubing, an l injector, means supporting the injector from the tubing, means for diverting the pressure medium to the injector for inducing ilow of well fluid through the last named tubing and through the aperture of said skirt into the reservoir, and an educer connected with the ilrst named tubing for delivering the pressure medium to the reservoir for elevating the well fluid collecting therein.
14. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well including means for4 introducing a low pressure medium into the lower portion of the Well to effect an initial iloW of well fluid, a reservoir in the well for receiving said'initial flow, means for delivering a high pressure medium into the well for inducing flow of fluid from the reservoir, and means alternately rendering said high and low pressure mediums effective.
15. Apparatus for flowing Wells including means for introducing a pressure medium into the well for inducing flow of well uid from the bottom of the well,v means located in the Well at a point above the bottom of the well for collecting the induced flow, means for intermittently releasing the pressure medium for elevating thel collected induced flow, and means controlling duration of said intervals responsive toy pressure diilerentials in the well at the point of collection.
16. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well having suilicient formation pressure to flow the fluid into the well, a reservoir in the well for receiving well fluid at substantially the normal liquid level in the well, means for supplying a pressure medium to the well, an educer for intermittently admitting pressure medium into the reservoir for blowing the collected uid from the reservoir, means for establishing pressure differentials on opposite sides of the educer to effect intermittent operation thereof responsive to accumulations of pressure medium above the educer, and an intermitter'at the outlet of the Well for effecting periodic injection of the pressure medium.
17. Well flowing apparatus including in combination with well casing and tubing for conducting an artificial pressure medium into the well, means cooperative with the well casing to form an open top reservoir for collecting a body of well fluid and having ports, an educer casing carried by the tubing and having a valve seat and ports below said valve seat connected with the ports in said cooperating means and having a vent port, a valve for said seat, a piston connected with said valve, having its upper and lower ends subjected to the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well and in the reservoir through said connected ports and through said vent port respectively, and a spring in the educer casing normally retaining the valve closed and yieldable upon preponderance of pressure on said valve and on the upper end of the piston to release said pressure medium into the reservoir for elevating the well iluid.
18. Well flowing apparatus including a reservoir communicating with the outlet of a well, a collecting chamber communicating with the well inlet and with the reservoir, a uid pressure me-I dium supply line, an inducer in constant communication with the supply line for inducting supply oi' fluid pressure medium from the line to the reservoir, and means for supplying fluid pressure medium to the supply line under alternately high and low pressure.
19. Well flowing apparatus including 'a reservoir communicating with the outlet of a well, a collecting chamber communicating with therv well inlet and with the' reservoir, a fluid pressure medium supply line, an inducer in constant communication with the supply line for inducting fluid from the well inlet to the collecting chamber, means including a spring urged valve responsive to differential in pressure of fluid medium in the line and the spring and to differential influence of hydrosatic head of fluid on opposite sides of the valve. providing controlled supply of pressure medium from the line to the reservoir.
20. Apparatus for `flowing fluid from a well having suiflcient formation pressure to flow the fluid into the well, means in the well for effecting elevational flow to establish a hydrostatic head in the well greater than can be normally supported by said formation pressure, a reservoir for co1- lecting the elevational flow adjacent the level of said head, means for injecting a pressure medium into the well, an educer for intermittently discharging the pressure medium into the reservoir to flow the collected fluid from the reservoir, and means for establishing pressure differentials on opposite sides of said educer to effect intermittent operation thereof.
21. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well having sufcient formation pressure to flow the fluid into the well, means in the well for effecting elevational ilow to establish hydrostatic head in the well greater than can vbe normally'supported by said formation pressure, a reservoir in the well for collecting said elevational flow adjacent the level of said head, means supplying a. pressure medium to' the well, an educer for intermittently discharging the pressure medium into the reservoir to flow the collected fluid from the reservoir, means for establishing pressure differentials on opposite sides of the educer to' effect intermittent operation thereof responsive to accumulations of pressure medium above the educer, and an intermitter at the outlet of the well for effecting periodic injection of the pressure medium.
22. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well having a suilicient formation pressure to flowv the fluid into the well, means for introducing a low pressure medium into the well for inducing an elevational flow to establish a hydrostatic head Vgreater than can be normally supported by said formation pressure, collection means in the well for collecting the elevational flow adjacent the level of said head, and means for introducing a high pressure medium into'the fluid in said collection means for inducing flow of the collected fluid toward the top of the well.
23. Apparatus for flowing fluid from a well having sui'llcient formation pressure to ilow the fluid into the well, means for introducing a low pressure medium into the well'for inducing elevational flow to establish a hydrostatic head greater than can be normally supported by said formation pressure, collection means in the well for collecting the fluid adjacent the level of said head, means for introducing a high pressure medium into the fluid in said collection means to' induce flow of the collected fluid toward the top of the well, and means rendering said high pressure medium eilective for inducing flow o'f the collected fluid.
24. In a well flowing apparatus including a tubing for' injecting an articial pressure medium into a weil, means cooperating withr` the tubing izo form a reservoir for collecting a body of well fluid and having ports, an educer casing carried by the tubing and having a valve seat above said ports, a piston slidable in the casing, a valve connected with the piston for engaging said seat for controlling iow of pressure medium from the tubing through said ports, a spring normally supporting the piston with the valve in closed position and yieldable in response to said pressure medium to 'allow discharge o'f the pressure medium, and bypass means connected with said tubing above the valve seat and discharging into the weil below the educer casing for diverting al1 of said pressure medium to induce ow of well uid into the reservoir when the valve is closed by said spring.
y HERBERT F. BEARDMORE.
US737621A 1934-07-30 1934-07-30 Apparatus for flowing wells Expired - Lifetime US2029457A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2423111A (en) * 1944-07-10 1947-07-01 Charles M O'leary Pneumatic pumping mechanism
US2542259A (en) * 1944-07-10 1951-02-20 Charles M O'leary Unloader valve
US3198134A (en) * 1961-12-19 1965-08-03 Us Industries Inc Pumping system for gas wells
US4390061A (en) * 1980-12-31 1983-06-28 Charles Short Apparatus for production of liquid from wells
US4505646A (en) * 1982-11-15 1985-03-19 Diversey Wyandotte Corporation Eductor pump and process
US4726420A (en) * 1986-02-27 1988-02-23 Petro-Lift Development Corp. Oil well pumping system
US20180010389A1 (en) * 2015-03-27 2018-01-11 Charles Abernethy Anderson Apparatus and method for modifying axial force
US11168526B1 (en) * 2020-04-30 2021-11-09 Hughes Tool Company LLC Jet pump drilling assembly

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2423111A (en) * 1944-07-10 1947-07-01 Charles M O'leary Pneumatic pumping mechanism
US2542259A (en) * 1944-07-10 1951-02-20 Charles M O'leary Unloader valve
US3198134A (en) * 1961-12-19 1965-08-03 Us Industries Inc Pumping system for gas wells
US4390061A (en) * 1980-12-31 1983-06-28 Charles Short Apparatus for production of liquid from wells
US4505646A (en) * 1982-11-15 1985-03-19 Diversey Wyandotte Corporation Eductor pump and process
US4726420A (en) * 1986-02-27 1988-02-23 Petro-Lift Development Corp. Oil well pumping system
US20180010389A1 (en) * 2015-03-27 2018-01-11 Charles Abernethy Anderson Apparatus and method for modifying axial force
US11149495B2 (en) * 2015-03-27 2021-10-19 Charles Abernethy Anderson Apparatus and method for modifying axial force
US11168526B1 (en) * 2020-04-30 2021-11-09 Hughes Tool Company LLC Jet pump drilling assembly

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