US20190093355A1 - Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same - Google Patents

Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same Download PDF

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Publication number
US20190093355A1
US20190093355A1 US16/019,303 US201816019303A US2019093355A1 US 20190093355 A1 US20190093355 A1 US 20190093355A1 US 201816019303 A US201816019303 A US 201816019303A US 2019093355 A1 US2019093355 A1 US 2019093355A1
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Prior art keywords
panel
panels
members
bridge
stud
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Abandoned
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US16/019,303
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Benjamin Baader
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Benjamin Baader
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Priority to US201361917188P priority Critical
Priority to PCT/CA2014/000904 priority patent/WO2015089642A1/en
Priority to US201615030944A priority
Application filed by Benjamin Baader filed Critical Benjamin Baader
Priority to US16/019,303 priority patent/US20190093355A1/en
Publication of US20190093355A1 publication Critical patent/US20190093355A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/30Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure
    • E04C2/34Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure composed of two or more spaced sheet-like parts
    • E04C2/36Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure composed of two or more spaced sheet-like parts spaced apart by transversely-placed strip material, e.g. honeycomb panels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C44/00Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling or foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles
    • B29C44/02Shaping by internal pressure generated in the material, e.g. swelling or foaming ; Producing porous or cellular expanded plastics articles for articles of definite length, i.e. discrete articles
    • B29C44/12Incorporating or moulding on preformed parts, e.g. inserts or reinforcements
    • B29C44/1271Incorporating or moulding on preformed parts, e.g. inserts or reinforcements the preformed parts being partially covered
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/84Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ
    • E04B2/86Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ made in permanent forms
    • E04B2/8611Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ made in permanent forms with spacers being embedded in at least one form leaf
    • E04B2/8617Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ made in permanent forms with spacers being embedded in at least one form leaf with spacers being embedded in both form leaves
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/84Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ
    • E04B2/86Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ made in permanent forms
    • E04B2/8635Walls made by casting, pouring, or tamping in situ made in permanent forms with ties attached to the inner faces of the forms
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/02Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials
    • E04C2/26Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials composed of materials covered by two or more of groups E04C2/04, E04C2/08, E04C2/10 or of materials covered by one of these groups with a material not specified in one of the groups
    • E04C2/284Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials composed of materials covered by two or more of groups E04C2/04, E04C2/08, E04C2/10 or of materials covered by one of these groups with a material not specified in one of the groups at least one of the materials being insulating
    • E04C2/288Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by specified materials composed of materials covered by two or more of groups E04C2/04, E04C2/08, E04C2/10 or of materials covered by one of these groups with a material not specified in one of the groups at least one of the materials being insulating composed of insulating material and concrete, stone or stone-like material
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/30Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure
    • E04C2/34Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure composed of two or more spaced sheet-like parts
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/44Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the purpose
    • E04C2/46Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the purpose specially adapted for making walls
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G11/00Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs
    • E04G11/06Forms, shutterings, or falsework for making walls, floors, ceilings, or roofs for walls, e.g. curved end panels for wall shutterings; filler elements for wall shutterings; shutterings for vertical ducts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2025/00Use of polymers of vinyl-aromatic compounds or derivatives thereof as moulding material
    • B29K2025/04Polymers of styrene
    • B29K2025/06PS, i.e. polystyrene
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS OR TO MATERIALS FOR MOULDS, REINFORCEMENTS, FILLERS OR PREFORMED PARTS, e.g. INSERTS
    • B29K2105/00Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped
    • B29K2105/04Condition, form or state of moulded material or of the material to be shaped cellular or porous
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/757Moulds, cores, dies
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/776Walls, e.g. building panels
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04CSTRUCTURAL ELEMENTS; BUILDING MATERIALS
    • E04C2/00Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels
    • E04C2/30Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure
    • E04C2/34Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure composed of two or more spaced sheet-like parts
    • E04C2002/3488Building elements of relatively thin form for the construction of parts of buildings, e.g. sheet materials, slabs, or panels characterised by the shape or structure composed of two or more spaced sheet-like parts spaced apart by frame like structures

Abstract

An insulated concrete form panel system, and method of making same, is provided, the system and method comprising first and second opposed panels forming a cavity therebetween and an internal connector frame serving as a mold for receiving expandable polymer material to form the first and second panels, such that the irreleasably pre-assembled connector frame extends between, and is integral to, first and second panels. The present system provides first and second panel pairs may be mechanically connected to panel pairs positioned adjacent thereto (e.g. above, below, or side-by-side), increasing integrity of the structure.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCES
  • This application claims priority to U.S. Patent Application No. 61/917,188 filed Dec. 17, 2013 entitled “Improved Insulated Concrete Panel Form and Method of Making Same”, incorporated herein in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates to insulated concrete formwork (ICF) used for concrete construction. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to an improved ICF pre-formed panel system and method of making same.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Concrete forms have long been used as formwork for the construction of concrete structures, such as the walls or floors of a building. Traditional form systems typically entail setting up two spaced apart form panels and pouring concrete into the space created between the panels. After the concrete hardens, the forms are removed, leaving the cured concrete wall. Traditional systems, however, have several drawbacks including the time required to erect the forms, the time for the concrete to cure, and the time to take down the forms, making the process expensive and labour-intensive.
  • Many modular insulated concrete form (ICF) systems are been developed to overcome the drawbacks of traditional form systems. Modular ICF systems typically comprise setting up the form system, generally classified as either “block” or “panel” systems, pouring the concrete into the space between the forms and leaving the form in place. As such, the insulating form becomes a permanent part of the structure after the concrete cures. Modular ICF systems are increasingly popular because they serve to insulate the concrete structure in addition to containing the fluid concrete as it solidifies, reducing the time and cost required to create the structure.
  • “Block” ICF systems typically comprise preassembled blocks having two expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam members connected together with ties or webs, wherein the ties or webs create a cavity between the two foam members for receiving fluid concrete. The ties or webs connecting the panels together can be molded to the foam members during the manufacturing process. As such, block ICF systems are often referred to as “fixed-tie” systems, and the blocks are installed at the construction site by stacking the blocks one on top of another (in a staggered fashion similar to the assembly of a brick wall). Blocks are then affixed together by fastening the webs of one block to the webs of an adjacent block manually, often with cable-ties.
  • As a result the manufacturing process, however, the size, shape and cavity size of EPS blocks are limited by the molding machine used to create the block. Further, stacking multiple blocks one atop the other creates a plurality of joints between the blocks, reducing the overall strength of the wall, increasing the risk of vertical or horizontal skewing, and making the incorporation of design elements, such as windows, doors, corners etc., difficult.
  • “Panel” ICF systems are often constructed to be longer (e.g. taller) than block systems for faster installation. A number of variations of modular panel ICF systems and methods for their use have been developed. Typically, such panel ICF systems use two opposed EPS foam panels manufactured from commercially available pre-formed expanded polystyrene slabs connected together with spacers to form a cavity for receiving concrete between the two panels. The polystyrene slabs are cut down to size using a hot-wire cutting process and the spacers connecting the panels together are extruded to the desired size/shape from plastic materials before being affixed to the panels. The spacers are either fastened to the interior surface of the panels, or extend through the panels themselves, to create the cavity therebetween. Spacers or “bridging members” are known to have varying shapes, sizes, and strengths, often being used to reinforce the building structure.
  • Panel ICF systems allow for the manufacture of larger panels, resulting in easier and faster installation at the construction site. The panels can also be stacked one on top of the other (many stories high) to form the concrete structure. Larger panels also reduce the number of joints between panels and the risk of the wall skewing, increasing the overall strength of the wall. Design elements, such as doors and corners, are also easier to incorporate in panel structures. Although the prior art proposes variations to achieve improvements with concrete form systems, however, many drawbacks still exist.
  • By way of example, Canadian Patent Application No. 2,597,832 describes a panel ICF system where two panels are connected together by individual internal spacers coupled to individual external studs protruding through the panel and held together by external support straps. Both panels are pre-formed and cut from an EPS slab to the desired panel size and shape, including the apertures through the panels for receiving the internal spacers/external studs. At the construction site, the worker must first line the two panels up then manually position each individual spacer into the apertures of both panels. This laborious process requires that cutting of the panels be extremely precise to achieve proper alignment of the spacers/studs and apertures for receiving same.
  • A similar system is described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/200,846, however the individual spacers are mounted on a common spacer “frame” (extending vertically up the interior surface of the panel). Use of the spacer frame provides simpler installation than having to align a plurality of individual spacers. Although somewhat easier to install, the panel system nonetheless requires detailed positioning and cutting of the pre-formed panels and the apertures therethrough for receiving the internal spacer “frame” and corresponding studs. The system is also held together by external connector straps.
  • Despite the benefits provided by known panel ICF systems, the manufacturing process of cutting panels from standard EPS creates waste of excess material and must be accurate (e.g. placement of apertures for receiving spacers, and positioning of spacers with corresponding external stud and strapping) for on-site assembly of the panel structure to be efficient and successful. One further disadvantage common to the prior art is the limited ability to readily vary the spacing between the side panels of the forms, and therefore the thickness of the concrete wall.
  • There is a need for an improved ICF panel system and a process of making same, the system being capable of being manufactured into one continuous section for easy installation in the structure. It is desired that such a system could provide an internal stabilizing frame for use as a mold to receive expandable polystyrene material, such that the frame becomes integral to the panels molded thereto. Such a system may provide for easy assembly of pre-formed panels at the construction site, without the panels being limited in size or shape.
  • SUMMARY
  • There is provided an improved insulated concrete form panel system comprising two opposed form panels positioned in spaced relation to create a cavity therebetween, and an internal skeletal frame positioned within the cavity, wherein the frame is pre-assembled and serves as a mold for receiving expanded polystyrene material to form the opposed panels. According to embodiments herein, the internal frame comprises a plurality of bridge members irreleasably connected to a plurality of stud members, such that the bridges are positioned substantially perpendicular to the studs. The internal frame is integrally connected to the opposed form panels molded thereto, and provides that each panel pair section can be mechanically connected to adjacent panel pair section via both the bridge members connecting to adjacent bridge members, and via the stud members connecting to stud members positioned thereabove or below. It is understood that any reference to horizontal, vertical, above or below are for explanatory purposes only and are not intended to be limiting.
  • More specifically, an insulated concrete form panel system is provided, the system comprising first and second panels having exterior and interior surfaces and positioned in opposed spaced relation forming a cavity between the interior surfaces, an internal connector frame disposed within the cavity having a plurality of bridge members irreleasably connected to a plurality of stud members, each bridge member having a first end and a second end, each first and second end having connection means for connecting adjacent bridge members positioned end-to-end, and a plurality of side ends, each side end having opposed first coupling means for coupling the bridge members to the stud members, and each stud member having a first end, a second end, each first and second end having connection means for connecting adjacent stud members positioned end-to-end, and at least one second coupling means corresponding to the first coupling means for coupling the bridge members to the stud members, wherein the stud members are integral to first and second panel members. It is understood that the first and second panels are irreleasably connected to one another via internal frame, and that adjacent first and second panel pairs are slidably connected to one another via mechanical (“friction” or “interference fit”), increasing the integrity of the structure. A method of manufacturing the insulated concrete form panel system is also provided.
  • A method of manufacturing an insulated concrete form panel system is also provided, the panel system having first and second panels in opposed spaced relation forming a cavity therebetween for receiving liquid concrete, the method comprising:
      • a. providing assembly means for assembling a mold frame having at least one bridge member irreleasably connected to at least one stud member, the bridge and stud members positioned substantially perpendicularly to each other to form a skeletal matrix,
      • b. applying an expandable polymer material for forming the first and second panels to the connector frame,
      • c. allowing the polymer material to solidify.
  • An apparatus of manufacturing the present insulated concrete form system is also provided. The apparatus may or may not be entirely automated.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a perspective side view of one panel pair of the present system according to embodiments herein,
  • FIG. 2A shows a perspective side view of the bridge element according to embodiments herein,
  • FIG. 2B shows a top down view of the bridge in FIG. 2A,
  • FIG. 3A shows a perspective side view of the stud elements according to embodiments herein,
  • FIG. 3B shows a side view of the stud in FIG. 3A,
  • FIG. 4 shows a zoomed in view of the engagement (e.g. “snap-fit”) between the bridge and stud elements according to one embodiment herein,
  • FIG. 5 shows a side view of bridge member having grooves for receiving reinforcing steel according to embodiments herein,
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of a panel form according to embodiments herein being installed in a wall structure,
  • FIG. 7 shows a side view of the panel form in FIG. 6 being slidably received by an adjacent panel form in the wall structure,
  • FIG. 8 shows a side perspective view of an apparatus for forming the present panel system according to embodiments herein, and
  • FIG. 9 shows a top down view of the apparatus in FIG. 8.
  • DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS
  • The present insulated concrete form system and method of making same relate to the fabrication of concrete walls, foundations, floors, and other concrete structures. Apparatus and methodologies more particularly described herein are intended as illustrative only since numerous modifications and variations therein will be apparent to those skilled in the art.
  • According to embodiments herein, the present insulated concrete form (ICF) system 10 comprises first and second panels 12,14, each panel having interior surfaces 12 i,14 i, and exterior surfaces 12 e,14 e, respectively. Having regard to FIG. 1, in position, first and second panels 12,14 are in opposed spaced relation such that their interior surfaces 12 i,14 i form a space or cavity 16 therebetween. During installation, concrete is poured in its fluid state into cavity 16 and allowed to cure (i.e., harden) to form the structure. The type and volume of concrete received within cavity 16 is determined by cavity 16, that is—by the distance between surfaces 12 i,14 i and height of panels 12,14.
  • Panels 12,14 can be manufactured from any appropriate lightweight foam material including an expandable polymer material such as expanded polystyrene (“EPS”). The polymer material may be in particulate or bead form, provide desired thermal insulation and sufficient strength (R factor, high density, etc.) to hold the concrete. The polymer material may further provide impedance to sound transmission.
  • According to embodiments herein, panels 12,14 can be manufactured to have any desired pre-determined width, length and height according to the particular structure being built. Panels 12,14 may each have a standard width or thickness of approximately 3-3¼ inches, and having a standard length (e.g., side to side, or horizontal to the ground) of approximately 12-48 inches, and any height (e.g., extending longitudinally) that may be desired including a standard height of at least 4 feet. A person skilled in the art would appreciate that the size, shape and dimensions of panels 12,14 can be altered according to the particular structure being built. It is further understood that the panels 12,14 may be installed vertically or horizontally (for e.g. in a foundation setting below-grade), and that any reference to the “width”, “height” or “length” of panels 12,14 is for explanatory purposes only and is not intended to limit the scope of the present invention.
  • Panels 12,14 are connected to one another by internal connector skeleton “matrix” or frame 18. Connector frame 18 comprises horizontal bridge member 20 and vertical stud member 22. Bridge 20 and stud 22 couple to form a skeletal connector frame 18 of the present structure, the frame 18 being pre-assembled to serve as a mold for the application of the expandable polymer material to form panel 12,14. It is understood that the number of bridge members 20 and studs 22 positioned in frame 18 can dictate the overall size (e.g. height and length) of panels 12,14.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B show one embodiment of bridge member 20 having a first end and a second end. First and second end of bridge member 20 may have connection means 20 a,20 b for mechanically (e.g., slidably) engaging bridge members 20 positioned adjacent to one another (e.g. end-to-end) in skeletal frame 18. Each connection means 20 a,20 b means may form corresponding apertures 23 a,23 b, respectively, for securing adjacent bridge members 20 together by interference or “friction” fit. For example, during installation, the first end of bridge members 20 of a first wall section is slidably received by the second end of bridge members 20 of a second adjacent wall section being placed into position. More specifically, female connection means 20 b of the first bridge members 20 slidably receive male connection means 20 a of the second, adjacent bridge members 20. Once in sliding engagement, apertures 23 a,23 b align and a bolt or other securing member (not shown) may be positioned through both apertures 23 a,23 b, further securing the structure. A person skilled in the art would appreciate that apertures 23 a,23 b or any other connecting means may be used to secure bridge members 20 positioned in end-to-end alignment. Bridge members 20 may further comprise stabilizing bar 27 for guiding bridge members 20 together and further stabilizing bridge members 20.
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B also show bridge member 20 having at least one side end, each side end having opposed couplings for irreleasably connecting bridge 20 to studs 22. For example, side ends may have a coupling means 24 for coupling bridge member 20 to stud 22. Coupling means 24 may comprise female “snap-fit” engagement means for receiving corresponding second coupling means 26 of stud 22. It is understood that at least one bridge member 20 may be positioned perpendicularly to a plurality of studs 22 to form skeletal frame 18. In some embodiments, bridge members 20 may be positioned to extend laterally (horizontally) along interior surfaces 12 i,14 i of panels 12,14, although reference to the horizontal and vertical are not limiting. Side ends may further comprise grooves or recesses 25 (FIG. 5) for receiving reinforcing steel, such as re-bar, prior to concrete being poured into cavity 16. It is understood that the reinforcing steel may be utilized to provide further structural integrity to the concrete.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B show one embodiment of stud member 22 having a first (e.g., upper) end and a second (e.g., lower) end. First and second ends of stud 22 may have connection means 22 a,22 b for slidably engaging other studs 22 positioned adjacent thereto (e.g. above and below) in frame 18. For example, during installation, first connection means 22 a of studs 22 in a first wall section may comprise a female end 22 a for slidably receiving the corresponding male end 22 b of studs 22 in a second wall structure being positioned above the first wall section. In embodiments herein, studs 22 may be positioned to extend longitudinally (e.g., vertically) along interior surfaces 12 i,14 i of panels 12,14, although reference to the horizontal and vertical are not limiting. More than one stud 22 may be aligned prior to forming panels 12,14, increasing the length (height) of the panels 12,14 as desired.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B also show stud member 22 having at least one coupling means 26, said coupling means 26 positioned in spaced longitudinal relation along stud 22, for irreleasably connecting studs 22 to bridge members 20. Coupling means 26 may comprise male “snap-fit” engagement means, as shown in FIG. 4, for being received by corresponding coupling means 24 of bridge members 20. It is understood that a plurality of studs 22 may be coupled to at least one bridge member 20 to form skeletal frame 18. Reference to horizontal and vertical are for explanation purposes only.
  • As depicted in FIGS. 6 and 7, it is understood that first and second panels 12,14 are irreleasably connected to one another via internal frame 18, and that, during installation, adjacent first and second panel 12,14 pairs can be mechanically fastened to one another (eliminating the need to “tie” the panels together), increasing structure stability, but easily disengaged if errors, concept changes or damage to panels 12,14 occur. Mechanical engagement between first and second panel 12,14 pairs increases the integrity and strength of the structure, reduces time and expertise required to assemble the structure, and aligns of the panels 12,14 of the overall structure (i.e. pulling adjacent panel pairs together and minimizing skewing between pairs). The mechanical connection can also be sufficiently sufficient to prevent any skewing between the wall and the concrete footing (upon which the present system 10 is installed) by pulling the panels into alignment.
  • It is contemplated that the present insulated concrete form system 10 may be configured to create form panels 12,14 via manual or automated means, or a combination thereof. For example, FIGS. 8 and 9 depict apparatus 50 for manufacturing panels 12,14 according to embodiments herein. It is understood that apparatus 50 may be used to pre-assemble skeletal frame 18 according to the size of panels 12,14 being manufactured, to apply expandable material to the frame 18 (e.g., allowing the material to mold around, or to, studs 22 of the frame 18), to allow the material to cure to form panels 12,14 integral to frame 18 and, once cured, to cut the panels 12,14 to size. Apparatus 50 may be entirely automated.
  • It is contemplated that panels 12,14 can be molded to pre-assembled frame 18 to form one solid, continuous section of the structure, creating more accurate panel 12,14 tolerances, minimizing on-site adjustment, and reducing worker error (e.g. “gaps” created by hot-wire cutting mechanisms). Molding panels 12,14 directly to the pre-assembled frame 18 enables the present system 10 to be entirely pre-formed and delivered to the job site for easy installation, saving time, costs and the necessity of having skilled workers.
  • It is understood that the present apparatus and method of making same may result in a substantial reduction in manufacturing and assembly time and costs because the present apparatus may be pre-assembled and pre-molded prior to delivery to the job site, wherein the panels 12,14 pairs need only be mechanically connected together in position (beside each other or one atop the other) at the job site. It is further contemplated that the present insulated concrete form system 10 may be used to manufacture custom panel systems, such as corners, angles or windows. The present insulated concrete form system 10 may also be custom designed to be incorporated into or used with pre-existing block or panel ICF systems.
  • Example 1
  • It is understood that the width, height and length of the present insulated concrete form system can be dictated by the size of the structure being built.
  • By way of example, the present form system may be configured such that individual bridge members may have a width (between side ends) corresponding to standard building sizes (i.e. to create a cavity of between approximately two feet and four feet). Individual bridge members 20 may further be configured to extend to standard building lengths, or to form panels approximately 4″, 6″ or 8″ long. It is understood, however, that a plurality of bridge members 20 can be aligned end-to-end to create substantially longer panels 12,14.
  • The present form system may further be configured such that studs 22 may have a height corresponding to standard building construction (i.e. at least four, eight or twelve feet tall). It is understood that a plurality of stud members 22 may be aligned end to end to create substantially taller panels 12,14.
  • The present form system may further be configured to create shaped or non-linear (e.g. curved) panels 12,14. Panels 12,14 may also be adapted for use with known or customized “corner” members, as would be appreciated by a person skilled in the art.
  • It is contemplated that the present form system may be manufactured manually (e.g. assembling frame 18, foaming and cutting the panels 12,14 by hand), automatically by a apparatus 50, or a combination thereof. Where automated, the present system may be entirely continuous, creating a single panel unit that can be easily installed at the construction site.
  • It is an advantage of the present form system that, when positioned in place, panels 12,14 connect to panels 12,14 positioned beside, above or below to increase the integrity and strength of the structure, to reduce the time and expertise required to install panels 12,14, particularly in higher structures, and to serve to align the panel forms creating the overall structure (i.e. minimizing skewing caused by the wall or floor of the structure).
  • It should be known and understood that the present disclosure provides a detailed description of various elements required to build a panel system used in constructing a concrete structure, but that many other known elements required to finish the structure have not described herein.
  • Although a few embodiments have been shown and described, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made to these embodiments without changing or departing from their scope, intent or functionality. The terms and expressions used in the preceding specification have been used herein as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, it being recognized that the invention is defined and limited only by the claims that follow.

Claims (15)

We claim:
1. An insulated concrete form panel, comprising:
first and second panels having exterior and interior surfaces and positioned in opposed spaced relation forming a cavity between the interior surfaces,
an internal connector frame disposed within the cavity having a plurality of bridge members irreleasably connected to a plurality of stud members,
each bridge member having
a first end and a second end, each first and second end having connection means for connecting adjacent bridge members positioned end-to-end, and a plurality of side ends, each side end having opposed first coupling means for coupling the bridge members to the stud members,
and
each stud member having
a first end, a second end, each first and second end having connection means for connecting adjacent stud members positioned end-to-end, and at least one second coupling means corresponding to the first coupling means for coupling the bridge members to the stud members,
wherein the stud members are integral to first and second panel members.
2. The panel of claim 1, wherein the bridge members extend substantially perpendicularly to the stud members.
3. The panel of claim 1, wherein the first and second panels are formed from an expandable polymer material.
4. The panel of claim 3, wherein the expandable polymer material is expanded polystyrene.
5. The panel of claim 3, wherein the connector frame is pre-assembled to serve as a mold for the polymer material.
6. The panel of claim 1, wherein the first and second panels have any pre-determined width, height and length.
7. The panel of claim 5, wherein the first and second panels are molded to have a width of approximately 3-3¼ inches.
8. The panel of claim 5, wherein the first and second panels have a length of approximately 12 to 48 inches.
9. The panel of claim 5, wherein the first and second panels have a height of at least 4 feet.
10. The panel of claim 1, wherein the bridge member further comprises at least one stabilizing bar.
11. The panel of claim 1, wherein a first form panel can mechanically engage an adjacent second form panel positioned beside, above or below the first form panel.
12. A method of manufacturing an insulated concrete form panel, the panel having first and second panels in opposed spaced relation forming a cavity therebetween for receiving concrete, the method comprising:
a. providing assembly means for assembling a mold frame having at least one bridge member irreleasably connected to at least one stud member, the bridge and stud members positioned substantially perpendicularly to each other to form a skeletal matrix,
b. applying an expandable polymer material for forming the first and second panels to the connector frame,
c. allowing the polymer material to solidify.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the method may be manual, automatic or a combination thereof.
14. An apparatus for manufacturing the insulated concrete form of claim 1.
15. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein the apparatus may be automated.
US16/019,303 2013-12-17 2018-06-26 Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same Abandoned US20190093355A1 (en)

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US201361917188P true 2013-12-17 2013-12-17
PCT/CA2014/000904 WO2015089642A1 (en) 2013-12-17 2014-12-16 Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same
US201615030944A true 2016-04-21 2016-04-21
US16/019,303 US20190093355A1 (en) 2013-12-17 2018-06-26 Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same

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US15/030,944 Continuation US10006200B2 (en) 2013-12-17 2014-12-16 Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same

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US16/019,303 Abandoned US20190093355A1 (en) 2013-12-17 2018-06-26 Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same

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SE538828C2 (en) * 2013-08-15 2016-12-20 Incoform Ab Concrete form for forming a wall or the like and a method for forming a said wall or the like and a support
CA2925625A1 (en) * 2013-12-17 2015-06-25 Benjamin BAADER Insulated concrete panel form and method of making same
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EP3084095A1 (en) 2016-10-26
US20150167295A1 (en) 2015-06-18
CA2925625A1 (en) 2015-06-25
EP3084095A4 (en) 2017-05-03
EP3084095B1 (en) 2021-02-24
WO2015089642A1 (en) 2015-06-25
US10006200B2 (en) 2018-06-26
US20160281361A1 (en) 2016-09-29

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