US20180185743A1 - A strategy game of territorial conquest - Google Patents

A strategy game of territorial conquest Download PDF

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Publication number
US20180185743A1
US20180185743A1 US15/740,236 US201615740236A US2018185743A1 US 20180185743 A1 US20180185743 A1 US 20180185743A1 US 201615740236 A US201615740236 A US 201615740236A US 2018185743 A1 US2018185743 A1 US 2018185743A1
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Prior art keywords
unit
units
game
strength
fortress
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US15/740,236
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Ben-Zion Yitzchak Goldstein
Moshe Brachya GLUECK
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Goldstein Ben Zion Yitzchak
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Ben-Zion Yitzchak Goldstein
Moshe Brachya GLUECK
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Priority to US201562187584P priority Critical
Application filed by Ben-Zion Yitzchak Goldstein, Moshe Brachya GLUECK filed Critical Ben-Zion Yitzchak Goldstein
Priority to PCT/IL2016/050670 priority patent/WO2017002106A1/en
Priority to US15/740,236 priority patent/US20180185743A1/en
Publication of US20180185743A1 publication Critical patent/US20180185743A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00075War games
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00173Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece
    • A63F3/0052Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece with a plurality of boards used during one game, i.e. separate game boards or playing areas
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00173Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece
    • A63F3/00261Details of game boards, e.g. rotatable, slidable or replaceable parts, modular game boards, vertical game boards
    • A63F2003/00463Details of the playing field
    • A63F2003/0047Geometric shapes of individual playing fields
    • A63F2003/00476Rectangular
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00173Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece
    • A63F3/0052Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece with a plurality of boards used during one game, i.e. separate game boards or playing areas
    • A63F2003/00523Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece with a plurality of boards used during one game, i.e. separate game boards or playing areas with a separate board for each player

Abstract

The present invention relates to a strategy game comprising: (a) at least 2 panels, constituting together a board game, where each panel is divided by lines into a plurality of square spaces arranged into a grid; (b) a plurality of sets of fighting units, each set of said units having a color to identify the units of the set as belonging to a particular player, the units of each set being subdivided into a plurality of sizes and types; and (c) a plurality of sets of banners.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to games. More specifically to games of strategy and territorial conquest based on chance and skill.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Games of conflict, like chess, have been around for millennia. The desire to simulate, in some way, the battlefield experience and the conquest of territory has given rise to many games of strategy and territorial conquest. Typically, in the world of strategy games, several processes must be ongoing. First a base territory must be claimed. Its people must be taxed to supply the money needed to recruit and train fighters. The fighting units must be created. The fighting units must be maneuvered into position. The inevitable battles must be played out and their results enacted. The result of victory is more territory, more money and more fighting units. The result of defeat is the removal of the defeated units from the game, the loss of territory, the loss of money and the reduction of the fighting army.
  • The introduction of computer games brought a heightened sense of visualization, intensity, and complexity, to these games. Within the virtual reality of the computer game one can design soldiers and units with complex arrays of weapons and abilities, many of which are magical. The interplay of technological advancement, social group processes, economic forces, geographic factors, and the use of weapons could all be simulated and visualized.
  • Recently, there has been a reversal of direction to some extent, and various computer game companies along with traditional board game manufacturers have attempted to create board games that simulate the action of a computer game. One of the problems with computer games is that they require a user to immerse him/her self in the virtual reality of the game. This comes at the expense of real human and social interactions. The goal of publishing board games that mimic computer games is to retain the high degree of complexity and depth but to have the game played out in the real world context of families and friends. It is often assumed that the parents of diehard computer gamers are most likely to be the purchasers of such highly complex board games.
  • Nevertheless, such board games suffer from numerous problems. They are very large, and very complicated. Play often happens at a stultifying pace. Players must move their attentions between the markers on the board, which stand for the fighting units and other information cards that provide the required information about the units' abilities, strengths, speed and the number of dice to be rolled when attacking or defending. Due to the complexity of the action, the rule book must often be consulted. Needless to say, the rule book itself may be very massive and difficult to understand. In short, the transition between the virtual game realities, where information is easily stored and effortlessly retrieved, can result in a morass of confusion when using tangible methods of information management. Lastly, players in such massively complex board games often discover that the units are not well balanced, and that some players, simply by virtue of the kinds of units designated for them, are at an automatic disadvantage which the games creators were not able to foresee.
  • US 2013032999 discloses a strategy board game of territorial conquest for two to four players. As described, each player commands an army of twenty-four pieces on a playing board divided into five regions called territories. The pieces rest on the intersections of lines on the board called Points. In each territory there exists a special board point referred to as a base. The pieces in the game at all times have a specific direction that they face on the game board. The facing of the piece determines its vulnerability to capture by another piece. In addition to facing, different types of playing pieces are assigned different attributes such as movement number, attack number and blocking faces, which affect the utility of each piece in game situations. Nevertheless, the described board game is limited.
  • It would therefore be desired to propose a system void of these deficiencies.
  • SUMMARY
  • It is an object of the present invention to provide a game which is easily learnable, briskly paced, fair and fun.
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a game where all the players have a wide array of possible stratagems with a fair chance of winning.
  • It is still another object of the present invention to provide new play pieces and various units' parameters of strength, speed, weapons range and creation cost.
  • Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds.
  • The present invention relates to a strategy game comprising: (a) at least 2 panels, constituting together a board game, where each panel is divided by lines into a plurality of square spaces arranged into a grid; (b) a plurality of sets of fighting units, each set of said units having a color to identify the units of the set as belonging to a particular player, the units of each set being subdivided into a plurality of sizes and types, each unit having defined attributes specific to its type and each fighting unit comprising: an indicator to denote the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to move, an indicator to denote the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to attack an opponent's unit, an indicator to denote the strength of said unit, and an indicator to denote the price of said unit; and (c) a plurality of sets of banners, each set of banners having a color to identify the banners of the set as belonging to a particular player, the banners of each set being subdivided into a plurality of sizes, and each banner comprising an indicator to denote the strength of said banner.
  • Preferably, the game further comprises a set of ingots for symbolizing a number of Dinari, where said Dinari is used as money of said game, for buying the fighting units and the banners.
  • In one embodiment, 4 panels constitute the board game.
  • Preferably, each of the panels has a different color.
  • Preferably, each of the panels has a slot for placing a banner.
  • Preferably, each of the panels can be turned around in order to change the playing field.
  • Preferably, some of the spaces have interconnecting diagonal roads for allowing the units to move diagonally.
  • Preferably, the strength of a unit consists of a basic strength and the number of dice.
  • Preferably, more than one unit may be stacked combined with other units for a combined joined attack.
  • Preferably, at least one of the spaces on the panels may be signaled for increasing the basic strength to all units of a player that has a unit resting on said signaled space.
  • Preferably, the size of a banner near a fortress determines which grade of units can be created at that fortress.
  • Preferably, the size of a banner near a fortress determines the grade, the income and the strength of that fortress.
  • In one embodiment, the game is an electronic game.
  • In one embodiment, the game is a cellular phone application.
  • Preferably, the banners may be upgraded.
  • Preferably, each banner comprises an indicator to denote the strength of said banner.
  • Preferably, each fighting unit has a size which identifies the grade of said unit.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The accompanying drawings, and specific references to their details, are herein used, by way of example only, to illustratively describe some of the embodiments of the invention.
  • In the drawings:
  • FIG. 1 depicts an illustration of an exemplary embodiment of a singular playing panel for a player of the strategy game, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 2a depicts an illustration of exemplary embodiment of a banner, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 2b depicts an illustration of exemplary embodiment of another banner, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 2c depicts an illustration of exemplary embodiment of yet another banner, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 3a depicts an illustration an exemplary embodiment of the front side of a singular fighting unit, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 3b depicts an illustration of an exemplary embodiment of the back side of a singular fighting unit, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 4 depicts an illustration of an exemplary embodiment of an ingot of Dinari, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 5 depicts an example of an ambush, according to an embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 depicts an illustration of an exemplary embodiment of a singular playing panel for a player of the strategy game, according to an embodiment. The game board, according to an embodiment of the invention, comprises a number of panels such as the depicted panel 100, depending on the number of players. For example, if 2 players are playing, the game board comprises 2 such playing boards, 3 players-3 boards, etc. The boards such as board 100 may be depicted on a cardboard playing surface, for example, or on any other rigid material such as on plastic surfaces. Alternatively, panel 100 may be depicted on an electronic screen, including touch screens, for electronic embodiments. The panel 100 may be divided by lines into a grid of 8×8 squares spaces, or into any other numbers or shapes of spaces upon which the game units may rest. In an embodiment, the grids may provide alphanumeric coordinates along the x-axis and the y-axis of the panel 100 layout. According to an embodiment, each panel may have a different color, different graphics, different drawings, and/or different texts. Each panel may have spaces of different designations. For example, some of the spaces may be designated as fortresses, such as space 110, other spaces may be designated as roads, such as space 120, as fields such as space 130, or may be designated as water, such as space 140.
  • FIG. 2a-2c depict illustrations of exemplary embodiments of banners, according to an embodiment. Each banner may have a color to identify the unit as part of a set belonging to a particular player. Each banner may have a certain size for identifying defined attributes such as its strength, its cost, and/or its production capabilities. Each banner may also have certain graphics for identifying its strength, its cost, and/or its production capabilities. For example, FIG. 2a depicts the largest banner, which may have gold graphics, for identifying that this banner may have the most strength, the highest cost, and the best production capability. According to an embodiment, each banner may also have its price indicator, such as tag 210, printed on its side. According to an embodiment, each banner may also have its strength indicator, such as representation 220, printed on its side. According to an embodiment, the banners may have all have the same base size, such as the size of base 230, for inserting, in an upright position, into the specially designed slots on the game panels. For example, adjacent to a fortress space, a slot may be carved which may have the length and the width for accommodating a base of a banner. Thus, banners may be inserted in the upright positions into slots adjacent to fortresses for symbolizing the fortress as belonging to a certain player, having certain strength, and having a certain production capability.
  • FIG. 3a depicts an illustration of the front side of an exemplary embodiment of a singular fighting unit, according to an embodiment. Each unit may have a color to identify the unit as part of a set belonging to a particular player. Each unit may have defined attributes specific to its type. In some embodiments, each unit may have a certain size symbolizing its “grade”, which will be described later on in relations to creating units. For example, a unit having a larger size may symbolize a better “grade” unit. Each unit may have an indicator, such as tag 310, for denoting the strength of the fighting unit. The strength of a fighting unit may comprise a number of dice and a number of basic strength, which will be discussed in later detail in relations to the game's rules and concepts. Each unit may have an indicator, such as tag 320, for denoting the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to move. Each unit may also have an indicator, such as tag 330, for denoting the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to attack an opponent's unit.
  • FIG. 3b depicts an illustration of the back side of an exemplary embodiment of a singular fighting unit, according to an embodiment. Each unit may have an indicator, such as tag 340, for denoting the price of Dinari of the fighting unit. The Dinari is used as the money of the game, according to an embodiment. In some cases the unit may have a certain capability, or capabilities, and these capabilities may also be written on the back side of the fighting unit, such as the capability of passing over water 350, as depicted in FIG. 3 b.
  • In one embodiment, the colors of the panels, the units and the banners correspond to symbolize their belonging to a player. For example the first player may have a red panel, red units, and red banners.
  • The frame around the edge of the card tells the grade of the fighting unit: wood, iron or gold. It also indicates where this soldier can be created. In FIG. 3b the depicted unit has a wooden frame, which means that the unit is of wood grade and can be created in a fortress flying a wood banner or any higher banner. For example, a unit of an iron grade can only be created in a fortress that flies an iron banner or a gold banner. The unit cannot be created in a fortress flying a wood banner. Similarly, a gold grade fighter cannot be created in a fortress flying an iron or wood banner.
  • FIG. 4 depicts an illustration of an exemplary embodiment of an ingot of Dinari, according to an embodiment. There may be any number of ingots for symbolizing any number of Dinari, such as the depicted ingot 410, which symbolizes 10 Dinari. In one embodiment the game comprises 3 different kinds of ingots, ingot of 10 Dinari, ingot of 50 Dinari, and ingot of 100 Dinari. In other embodiments other ingots may be used. In one embodiment the ingots may differ in size, graphics, texts, symbols, color, etc.
  • For the sake of brevity, the rules, concepts and playing course of the strategic game are set forth, according to an embodiment. These rules, concepts and playing course are set forth for describing a possible embodiment for the sake of enablement alone, they should not to be interpreted as limiting in any way.
  • Goal of the Game
  • Each player commands one of the sets of fighting unit, referred to hereinafter as a tribe. The players may move the tribes to battle each other until only one tribe alone remains, having completely eliminated the other tribes' fighting units and conquered all their fortresses. In the event that the game must be stopped, the player with the most Dinari is declared the winner.
  • Setting up the Game Board
  • Each panel has a kind of terrain represented on its top. In one embodiment each game comes with 4 such panels. Each player receives one panel to be his/her home territory. In one embodiment, each panel has a certain color and the player of that panel will receive the tribe with the same color. The panel can be placed as desired, as long as it touches one of the other panels along a width of at least four squares. Thus each of the panels can be turned around in order to change the playing field before the game starts. Thus the game board comprises a number of panels, where the number of panels corresponds to the number of players. If there are only two players, they will play one against the other. Three or four players can play in all-out war. In one embodiment, four players can play two on two by forming teams.
  • Banners and Fortresses
  • Each player may take the banners that are color coded for his/her chosen tribe.
  • The Tribes use their banners to show control and ownership of a fortress. Having a banner posted in a fortress gives the tribe defensive advantages and allows the tribe to get Dinari from the inhabitants and recruit fighters. To take over a fortress and raise a banner the player must only place one of his/her tribe's fighting units on the desired fortress. Once the unit is in place, the player can plant the tribal banner in the slot next to the fortress.
  • According to an embodiment, there are three kinds of banners: Wood, Iron and Gold. A fortress under a wood banner can recruit and train “wood grade” units. A fortress under an iron banner can train both “wood grade” and “iron grade” units. A fortress under a gold banner can produce all kinds of units, including “gold grade” units.
  • A player can place a fortress under a wood banner for free. The wood banners do not cost money. The player needs only to move one fighting unit into the fortress. That fighter cannot attack during the same turn as it raises the banner. After the banner is raised, the player may leave the fortress unoccupied. It continues to belong to the tribe as long as it flies the tribal banner.
  • In one embodiment, it may cost 100 Dinari to upgrade a fortress from a wood to an iron banner. Upgrading can be done even if there is no fighting unit stationed in the fortress.
  • In one embodiment, it may cost 150 Dinari to upgrade a fortress from iron to gold. As in the previous case, it is not necessary to have a fighting unit in the fortress at the time of the upgrade. A player can upgrade a fortress directly from wood to gold, if he/she has the full price of the upgrade, which is 250 Dinari (100 Dinari for the Iron Upgrade+150 Dinari for the gold upgrade.)
  • In one turn, a player can upgrade as many fortresses as he/she has money to pay.
  • Starting the Game
  • Each player may begin the game with one fortress with a wood banner. The player takes possession of his/her tribe's first fortress by planting the wood banner. The player's first fortress must be one that is as far away as possible from the other player's boards. A fighting unit is not placed in the fortress at this time. Each player may also receive an amount of Dinari at the beginning of the game. In one embodiment, the first player may receive less Dinari than the rest. In some embodiments, during the first round of turns, no money is received from the fortresses.
  • Making Money
  • Beginning with the second round of turns, each player receives at the beginning of his/her turn, money from the fortress or fortresses that fly his/her banners. For example, 50 Dinari for flying a wood banner, 100 Dinari for flying an iron banner and 150 Dinari for flying a gold banner.
  • Creating Fighter Units
  • To create a certain unit, the player takes the price of the unit in Dinari ingots and puts it in the bank. Then the player takes the fighter card which represents the unit he/she wants to create, and places it on one of the fortresses belonging to the tribe. Any fortress belonging to a tribe can be used to create new units for the tribe, no matter how far away it is from the tribes first home. According to an embodiment, if the fortress is flying a wood banner, then only wood grade units can be created there, etc.
  • New units cannot be created in a fortress as long as a unit is stationed there. First the unit must be moved out of the fortress, and then the new unit can be created (two units are not allowed on the same space). The newly created unit is located in the fortress, but it can be moved out as soon as it is made. The unit which originally left the fortress cannot return to it in the same turn even if it has left over steps. Once a unit has moved to a stationary position and a different unit has been touched, that unit's movement is considered complete. That unit cannot move again during this turn.
  • Setting up the Tribe
  • To get a tribe on the board, the player needs to recruit and train fighter units with the money he/she has. A player's tribe is made up of the fighters that he/she has on the board.
  • The type of units trained, their number, their powers and how they are used will make a difference in the outcome of the game. The effective use of fighting units gives the tribe more victories. So, players must pay attention to all the information located on each unit card.
  • The fighter unit cards are used to represent fighting units on the board. When a player puts a unit card on a space the unit takes over that space.
  • Not all fighter units have special powers. When they are present, special powers need to be used carefully. Some units have powers that help them succeed at their own mission. Other units have powers that help other friendly units. Some fighters have powers that deliver terrible blows to enemy units.
  • A dice strength score is produced during each attack by rolling the dice for the fighting units during battle. A battle outcome score is produced for each attack by adding the attacking unit's basic strength rating to the dice power score for that attack. Similarly, the defending player rolls the dice shown on the card of the defending unit. The defender rolls even when it is not his/her turn to play. The player with the higher battle outcome score wins the battle.
  • The Weapons Range shows the maximum distance in board spaces over which this unit can attack. Some units can only attack units that are right next to them. These are called “melee units” and they fight with weapons like swords and maces. The weapons Range of a melee unit is always 1. Other units have long range weapons that can attack targets that are farther away. These units are called “ranged units.” They fight with arrows or other long distance weapons. Ranged units have a variety of weapons range ratings, depending on the kind of weapon, power or ability the unit has.
  • Speed Rating shows the number of steps, measured in board spaces, that this unit can move in a single turn. Each tribe may have its own color-coded unit cards.
  • Movement Across Terrain
  • During a turn, a player can move as many units as he/she wants. Each fighting unit can only move once during a turn. Units cannot be placed one on the other (except in the case of some magical units that have the ability to carry other units.) Units cannot jump over each other during movement, even if they belong to the same tribe. Units with the ability to fly, of course, can fly over other fighters, friendly or enemy, but they must land on an empty space. Some units don't fly, but can pass through other units all the same by using their sneaky skills. Units with the ability to fly can fly over water or can land on water.
  • There are some units which take over powers, ratings, elements, or body parts of units they have killed, referred to hereinafter as stacking. Such units will be placed on top of their victims and moved as one, to symbolize that the victorious unit has absorbed something of the killed unit/s. This helps the players in remembering how many elements the victorious unit has absorbed.
  • A fighting unit can move and act only once in a turn. Actions refer to attacking, taking over a fortress or casting an active spell. For instance, a unit can move first and then attack, or attack first and then move. However, a unit cannot move a little, then attack and then move some more. When moving, the fighting unit does not need to move all the distance allowed by its speed rating. Defending when attacked does not count as an action.
  • Taking over Fortresses: A tribe can take over fortresses or upgrade fortresses as many times during a turn as conditions allow. However, a single fighting unit cannot take over more than one fortress in a turn, since taking a fortress is considered an action. Sometimes a player will need to decide which is more important; taking control of a new fortress, attacking an enemy unit or casting an active spell.
  • Distance is measured by counting spaces on the board. Distance is measured in straight lines from one square to the next. In other words, a unit can move up/down or side to side, but cannot cross from one square to the next diagonally, by crossing at the corner; unless the unit is moving on a diagonal path marked on the board. A unit can move anywhere on the board on the paths, on the grass or through the trees, except on the water. A unit cannot cross water unless it has a special power that allows travel over or through water. The magic needed to cross water, is considered a passive spell, and does not count as an action. Therefore the fighting unit can move, cross water and attack all in a single turn.
  • Moving diagonally; A fighting unit can move diagonally only if it is following a path marked on the board. There are many paths on the board that move diagonally from one square to the next. Following the paths helps units cover more distance on the board.
  • Figuring Distance Before Attacking
  • Before launching an attack, the player must check that the unit or the fortress being targeted is within Weapons Range of the attacking unit. If the targeted unit is within weapons range of the attacker, then (and only then) can the attack commence. The unit's Weapons Range is noted on its card. As described before, some units can only attack targets that are right next to them, other units have long range weapons that can attack targets that are farther away. This rule also holds true if a unit is being used to “send” special powers or abilities to other friendly units. The units receiving these powers must be within weapons range of the sending unit. Some units have the ability to send their powers across distances and strengthen friendly units.
  • Units with long range weapons can attack across bodies of water, even if they cannot move over them. The fighting unit's weapons range is calculated as if the unit was actually moving towards the target. All distances must be measured in straight lines, across the sides of the squares, either up/down or side to side. If the line of attack follows a diagonal path marked on the map, then the distance of the attack should also be measured diagonally.
  • Attacking and Defending
  • First, in order to Attack, the unit takes up position. If the target enemy unit is out of the attacker's Weapons Range and the attacking unit has not yet moved during this turn, the player should move the attacking unit so that the enemy unit is within Weapons Range. Each attack can have only one target. If the target unit is already in weapons range and has not moved in this turn, then the attack can start right away. If the attacking unit survives the battle, it will be able to move afterwards.
  • Stage 1: Roll the Dice. The attacking player rolls the number of dice depicted on the attacking unit's card. The player adds up the numbers of the dice and receives the Dice Power Score for that attack.
  • Stage 2: Check the unit's Basic Strength Rating. That may be the number shown next to the dice, according to an embodiment.
  • Stage 3: Add up the Battle Outcome Score for the attack. The player receives the Battle Outcome Score for this attack by adding the Dice Power Score to the Basic Strength Rating. For instance, if the dice gave a score of 12 and the Basic Strength Rating is 10 then the Battle Outcome Score for this attack is 22. (10+12=22)
  • Stage 4: The defender adds up the defensive Battle Outcome Score. The defending player also rolls the dice, getting the Dice Power Score. The player adds the defending unit's Basic Strength Rating to the Dice Power Score, to get the Battle Outcome Score for this defense. If the two units are in weapon range of each other, then the unit (be it defender or attacker) with the highest Battle Outcome Score wins the battle. The loser is killed and taken off the board. It doesn't matter if the loser is the attacker or the defender. The loser is dead.
  • If the attacker is out of range of the defender's weapons, then the attacker will stay on the board to fight again, even if he loses the battle. The defending unit, however, will be killed if he loses.
  • In the unlikely case that the two Battle Outcome Scores are equal, the attacker can choose to attack and roll the dice again, and even again, until there is a clear outcome.
  • Coordinated Attacks
  • More than one unit can be coordinated to attack a single unit at the same time, referred to hereinafter as an ambush. Fighting units can make an ambush when two or more friendly units have an enemy unit within Weapons Range. In an ambush, the player will combine the Battle Outcome Scores of all the attacking units. This makes it much more likely that the attackers will win. However, doing an ambush also increases risk for the attacker. If in the course of the battle, the dice go against the attackers and the defender wins, then all the attacking units in weapons range of the defending unit will be eliminated from the board. Attackers in an ambush act as a single unit for the purpose of that attack. Since each fighter can only attack once during a turn. If several fighters do an ambush together, this means they are all unable to attack again until the next move.
  • No matter how many attacking units there are, the attack must be aimed at a single target unit.
  • FIG. 5 depicts an example of an ambush, according to an embodiment. To defend against the dragon 510, the forest elves, such as elf 520, are mounting an ambush with four fighting units attacking at the same time. The defending dragon 510 is in weapons range of all the attacking elfish units. Thus the Battle Outcome Score for the attack is received by adding the Dice Power Score and the Basic Strength Rating of all the attacking units.
  • Stars of Power
  • Stars may be scattered on the panels, such as the star 150 depicted in FIG. 1. Each star marks a focus point where astral power comes to earth. If a tribe has a unit placed on one of these stars, astral power flows to other tribal units, no matter where they are located. If a unit is standing on the Star, then it conveys astral energy to all the units of that tribe increasing their base strength by 2 points each. If a tribe has more than one unit positioned on stars, each star adds 2 points, either of Basic Strength to each kind of unit. Controlling stars greatly increase a tribe's fighting power. If a unit moves off a star or loses a battle, the Tribe stops receiving the star's energy. If a player puts a unit back on the star, the extra astral energy is restored to the Tribe. In some embodiments the astral energy may be a range enhancer or strength enhancer.
  • Attacking and Defending a Fortresses
  • Fortresses add a defensive advantage for a unit located there. Each banner shows the number of dice a player rolls when defending a fortress. For example, a wood banner may allow a player to roll 1 die, an iron banner 2 dice and a gold banner 3 dice. A fortress can defend itself all alone, just not very well. A fortress has no Basic Strength Rating. If units are located in the fortress, the number of dice rolled by the fortress is added to the defending unit's dice. The combined Dice Power Score is added to the Basic Strength
  • Rating of the defending unit to get the total defensive Battle Outcome Score. Thus, the fortress can only defend. It does not add any power to an attack. Still, if a ranged unit is located in a fortress, and it wins a defensive battle, it can eliminate the attacker, if the attacker is within the defending unit's weapons range. The fortress adds its dice power to the defending unit for that battle. The defending ranged unit can also utilize its bonus astral power points to increase its range. For example, a defending melee unit located in a fortress will eliminate the attacking unit only if the attacker is positioned right next to the fortress, in a weapons range of 1. The Dice power of the fortress is added to the dice power of the defending unit. If the defending melee unit has an astral power bonus, it too will be added to the unit's basic strength, becoming part of the combined Battle Outcome Score.
  • In the event that there is a defending unit in the fortress when an attacker wins, that fighter is taken of the board. The defeated tribe's banner is taken down. Still, the fortress does not automatically belong to the victorious tribe until a unit is placed there to raise the tribe's banner.
  • When a fighting unit moves in to a fortress that doesn't belong to anyone and raises the tribe's banner, it is considered that the unit has taken an action. That unit cannot attack or move again until the next turn. During the next turn, the unit can leave the fortress unattended. As long as the Tribe's banner flies over the fortress, it will give the tribe money at the beginning of each turn, and create units for the tribe (if the tribe has the money to pay for them.) However, without units, the fortress it is quite easy to overcome, since it has only Dice Power Score in defense.
  • There is no risk to units attacking an empty fortress from a nearby square. The defending fortress has no weapons range.
  • Units may move directly in to an unoccupied fortress that flies another tribe's banner and then play out the battle for that fortress. In that case there is a risk to the attacking unit. If the attacker loses the battle, the unit is removed from the board. If the attacker wins, then the defending tribe's banner is taken down and the attacking tribe raises its banner immediately. In this case only, attacking and raising a banner are considered to be one action.
  • Coordinated Defense
  • Defensive helping units can only help with their Basic Strength Rating. Defending units can add their additional astral basic strength units, if the tribe has one or more units located on a star. However, defensive helping units cannot add their dice to the defending unit's dice.
  • Any friendly units that have an attacking enemy unit in weapons range can assist with their Basic Strength. Units that do not have an attacker in weapons range cannot help. If several units are performing an ambush, any unit belonging to the defending tribe which has any one of the attacking units in its weapons range, can join and assist in the defense. Range units with bonus astral power, can utilize their extra weapons range to join in a defense.
  • The defenders who assisted remain on the board. Attacking is different than defending. Attacking units act as a single group, so if the attack goes bad, all the units in the defender's weapons range are destroyed. However, when defending, the assisting units are only lending their strength to the defending unit. If the defending unit goes down, the assisting units live to fight again.
  • Summarized Rules, According to an Embodiment
  • A. The principle rule for the game is that a unit can only move and perform one action during a player's turn. All units on the board during that turn may act and move. A unit may move and then act, or act and then move, but it cannot act twice, or move twice during a move, even if according to its speed rating the unit still has squares it could traverse. Actions include: attacking, using magical abilities, and occupying a fortress. Defending against attack is not considered an action, because it always happens during a different players turn.
  • B. Units must be created in a fortress belonging to that tribe and flying the banner which allows for the creation of grade of unit desired by the player. However, units cannot be created in a fortress that has a unit already in it. If the fortress is occupied, it must be evacuated before the desired unit can be created. The empty fortress still serves the tribe whose banner stands next to it, and the desired unit can be created there. This rule introduces an element of risk, because an unoccupied fortress is more vulnerable to attack.
  • C. When moving on the board, player must count the number of spaces that unit is allowed to move. Movement diagonally (across the corner of a square) is not allowed. However, when following a path, diagonal movement is allowed. Movement diagonally covers more distance than movement from the sides. This simple rule simulates the increased ease of movement for units when following a road, without having confusing multiple speed ratings for the units.
  • D. When calculating whether a target is within a unit's weapons range, the distance between the attacking unit and the target is counted as if the unit was moving to the target. Weapons cannot be fired diagonally, and the distance must be counted using side to side or up and down movements from one square to the next. However, if there is a path leading diagonally from the attacking unit to the target, then weapons range can be counted moving diagonally. However, weapons range differs from actual movement in one significant way. Bodies of water can block a unit's movement, but if the unit has long range weapons, they may fire right over the water. This way of calculating weapons range simulates the difficulty of firing across natural terrain as contrasted with the ease of firing across a level area.
  • E. The ability to traverse water, or move through or over another unit, friendly or enemy, is reserved for those units gifted with this magical ability, and for units that fly. Units cannot be placed on top of each other, except in cases where some magical ability allows this. There are some units which take over various powers, numerical ratings or aspects of units they have killed, referred to hereinafter as “stacking”. Such units will be placed on top of their victims and moved as one to symbolize that the victorious unit has absorbed something of the killed unit/s. This serves primarily to assist the players in remembering the powers, ratings, abilities or aspects which that unit has absorbed, as well as signifying that the absorbed powers have not dissipated yet. This defined stacking option is one of the ways in which this game simulates the action of a virtual computer game, by storing information within the physical constraints of the game as it plays out on the board.
  • F. An attack is always made against a single target. Multiple friendly units can act as one during an attack, combining their strength and dice scores. The result of the dice is added to the basic strength rating of the attacking units. If the attackers have the higher Battle Outcome Score, the attack succeeds, and the target enemy unit is removed from the board. If the defender receives the higher Battle Outcome Score, then attack fails, then all the attacking units that are within weapons Range of the defending unit are removed from the board. The defender rolls the dice for his defending units even when it is not his/her turn to play. Attacks always happen during a player's turn. Defenses always happen out of the player's turn.
  • G. Even though a defending unit stands alone as the object of attack, assistance can be given to the defending unit by other units of the defender's tribe located in the area. Any unit belonging to the defending tribe which has the weapons range required to attack any of the units taking part in the attack, may provide assistance. Assisting units contribute their basic strength rating to that of the defending unit. If attackers win, only the specific target of the attack is taken off the board, since every attack has only one target, no matter how many units join the attack.
  • H. An attack against an occupied fortress, must take place from a location outside that fortress. The number of dice pictured on the banner next to the fortress is added to the number of dice rolled by the defender to determine the outcome of the battle. In that case, attacking the fortress and occupying it will be counted as two actions, which cannot be accomplished in a single turn. If, on the other hand the fortress is unoccupied, and enemy unit will be able to move directly into the fortress, fight the battle for it and occupy it in a single action.
  • Skill and Power Chart, According to an Embodiment
  • List of Abbreviations used on the Fighter Unit Cards:
  • Pt=Point
  • WR=Weapons Range
  • WR Pts=Weapons Range Points
  • St=Strength
  • St Pts=Strength Points
  • Sp=Speed
  • Sp Pts=Speed Points
  • Ft=Fortress
  • A=Active Magic
  • P=Passive Magic
  • Magic spells last till end of the player's turn, unless stated otherwise.
  • “Lasts 1 round” means the magic lasts until the beginning of that player's next turn.
  • “No time limit” means that the magic goes on and on, until enchanted unit is killed.
  • “Once in turn” means that even though a certain magic is passive, (so using it doesn't count as an action) the magic has to be called up to take effect. Such magic can only be called up once in a player's turn.
  • All active magic or continues even after the spell casting unit is killed.
  • When magic changes the situation on the board by killing units, moving units, making money, rotating the board or any similar effect, the outcomes of the magic remain even after the unit that cast the spell is killed. Magic that passively or automatically adds points to a unit stops working when the sending unit is killed. Still, whatever the unit did by moving, making money or winning battles remains true after the magic goes away.
  • “Victim stacked” means that the defeated unit card is placed under the victorious unit card. Mostly, this will show that the victorious unit has absorbed something helpful from the defeated unit. At other times, this will show that the defeated unit is still damaging or controlling the enemy unit in some way, even after the defeated unit's death. When the killed unit's power goes to a friendly unit, the killed unit is put under the friendly unit receiving the power.
  • Logic of the Game
  • One of the elements of this game is the delicate balances between the various units and between the numerical ratings of the units' parameters.
  • For the sake of brevity, the principles and premises, which may determine the numerical values of the Fighter Cards, are described below. The formulae, principles and premises, described below, are only some of the embodiments of the invention and should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention in any way. The formulae in the numerical ratings governing the units' actions, has been set such that all the tribes are carefully balanced and that each player has an equal chance of being victorious.
  • The Mathematical Formulae: Method of Calculating, Premises and Principles
  • There are three groups of fighter units, Wood, Iron and Gold. Each group has three cards each. The game's expansion set introduces an unusual unit that can be considered as being in a group of its own, situated between the Wood and the Iron Groups.
  • In the following descriptions and explanations, W stands for Wood, E stands for Expansion Set, I stands for Iron and G stands for Gold. The units can be listed as: W-1, W-2, W-3, E-1, I-1, I-2, I-3, G-1, G-2, and G-3. Although the tribes and their fighter units seem very different from each other, the same underlying structure, logic and numerical values may be shared by all. Each of the groups W, I and G comprise both Melee Units and at least 1 Ranged Units. Melee Units fight hand to hand, and therefore have a weapons range of 1. Ranged Units have long ranged weapons. They can attack across a distance of 3 or more squares. It should be understood that all units have an essential weapons range of 1. The essential weapons range refers to the minimum weapons range than any unit in the game possesses. Ranged units are granted additional points for this parameter. The amount of extra points granted is correlated with a number that will be referred to as O. This number O will tell how many points will be allocated for range, but those points must be taken from other parameters. In other words, the actual Weapons Range of a Ranged Unit is O+1.
  • The element of chance is introduced to the game by rolling dice. The player for each unit rolls a certain number of dice when attacking or defending against attack. The number of dice rolled is the Dice Rating. It may also be correlated to O. Unlike the Weapons Range, the Dice Rating is a free gift to the Unit. O determines the limit of this gift, but it does not contribute anything to the Dice Rating. In principle the Dice Rating is equal to O.
  • Within each of the groups, W, and I, there is one unit whose strength rating is high in the extreme and whose speed rating is low in the extreme. Opposite this unit, there will be a corresponding unit whose strength rating is low in the extreme, but whose speed rating is very high. These are called “the mirrored units” in the group. The opposition between the values of strength and speed reflects a basic reality. Speed is light and unencumbered. Strength is heavy and armored. Needless to say, there are adjustments or augmentations made to these essential values to make the play more effective.
  • In the W group, the values 1 and 5 are the extremes. In the I group the extreme high/low values are 1 and 6. In the G group the low value increases, beginning with 2 and rising to 3 and 4. The high value for all units in the G group is 7. However, there is a great deal of adjusting and magical augmenting that goes on in the G group in order to pump up these units' extreme strength ratings. The E group is also a special case, and its high Strength Rating is augmented magically.
  • If a unit's Strength and Speed ratings should happen to be equal, the original strength rating will transfer 1 point to the dice rating.
  • When a unit is very strong, some of its strength can overflow to influence its speed. In this case there is an Overflow Quotient to be projected from the high value to the low value. The Overflow Quotient is defined as the whole number that is either half or less than half of the High Value, in other words: O≤1/2 HV. If the High Value is odd then O will be less than half the high Value. If the High Value is even, then O will be half of the High Value. Transferring the overflow does not diminish the unit's strength. It is important to note that overflow only moves from strength to speed. It does not move from a high speed rating to a low strength rating. Points will be taken from a high speed rating to increase the unit's weapons range. In such cases the High Speed rating will be diminished.
  • As explained before, the Unit's O becomes its Dice Rating. This does not imply there is an overflow from the High Value to the Dice Rating. The Dice rating is a free gift, so to speak, given to the unit. O simply sets the limit on that gift. For ranged units, O is added to the essential weapons range of 1 to determine the unit's actual weapons range. Nevertheless, the extra weapons range must be paid for by a reduction in other parameters. A high Speed Rating can enhance a unit's weapons range by adding O, but the high rating in itself is reduced by O. In cases of Magical Augmentation, O may be calculated, but not utilized. When that happens, O is simply lost, but it will still determine the limit of the Dice Power.
  • There are two kinds of magical augmentation that effect the unit's numerical Values, Speed Pump (SpP) and OPO Pump (OPO.) Speed Pump, involves melding the fighting unit with a high speed animal, gas driven vehicle, spirit wind or other form of conveyance. In principle, the Speed Pump equalizes the units Strength Rating and its Speed Rating. In actuality, however, it is never good to have the Strength Rating exactly the same as the Speed Rating. Therefore, the Strength Rating passes 1 point to the Dice Rating so this magic can take effect. OPO Pump involves deriving O, then adding an extra strength point (as if this unit belonged to the next higher group) and then deriving a second O. The two values O and the extra point P can be applied in various ways. Sometimes one or more of these values just dissipates and is lost. Sometimes they can be applied directly to the strength rating, or to some other parameter requiring augmentation. The highest possible strength rating is achieved when both values O along with the extra point P are magically applied back onto the strength rating itself. There is a pattern that governs the retention or loss of O, P and O2, as will be explained.
  • Usually there is a monetary cost for every element of the OPO Pump which the unit retains. However, if the first O is used to enhance the Speed Rating, (as in the case of E-1) this is considered natural, and requires no extra cost. If the first O is applied otherwise (for instance to augment the units own Strength Rating or Weapons Range) then the first O is most definitely Magical and must be paid for by the tribe. Incidentally, those units which fire long range projectiles (G-1) require OPO to have the strength for working the machinery.
  • There are numerous kinds of other magic which units may possess that do not alter their numerical ratings. This are referred to as Magical Abilities, or MA. There are six of kinds of this magic which are referred to as MA1-6. This is described at length below. It should be said that it does not matter if these abilities are presented as being the result of magic or of advanced technologies. They are magical in the sense that they operate outside the usual “nature” of the game's rules.
  • As regards Fortresses, the Revenue per turn and the Cost of upgrading to higher banners are based upon the Dice Rating, which rises from wood to Iron to Gold, starting with the minimum possible dice rating (DM) and rising in this sequence 1×DM, 2×DM, 3×DM. To receive the Revenue per turn rating, the fortresses actual dice rating (D) multiplied by a revenue factor (RF.) In this embodiment of the game, the minimum Dice Rating is 1, so that a wood fortress rolls one die, an Iron fortress 2 dice and a Gold fortress rolls 3 dice. The Revenue Factor is 50, so that a Wood fortress provides 50 Dinari each turn, an Iron fortress, 100, and a Gold fortress 150. The cost of raising a new banner over a fortress should, in principle, be the same as the Revenue per turn (R) which the fortress provides. This is indeed the case as regards the Iron and Gold fortresses. The cost of upgrading to these banners equals the revenue per turn which the fortress provides (C=R). However, In the case of the wood fortress the cost of raising the banner is reduced to 0. This is necessary because each Tribe initially claims 1 wood fortress at the very beginning of the game. At that point, money is also given free to the tribe to help it get started. If the tribes were to pay 50 Dinari to raise the wood banner, they would be receiving money in order to return it immediately. Therefore, the wood banner is given to the tribe free. If that is the case regarding the first wood fortress, it makes sense to keep that value throughout the game. In addition, the fact that the wood banner is free, insures that even a tribe which has run out of money and lost its fortresses can still have a chance of rehabilitating itself.
  • As regards the relationship between the Revenue per turn from the fortresses and the costs of the units, while not directly related, it is always the case that the Revenue per turn (R) from a fortress of a given grade is insufficient by itself to purchase even the lowest ranking unit (UL) of that grade.
  • A. The Ten Mathematical Formulae
  • The following formulae are set as a possible embodiment for the game.
  • 1. O<1/2 HV (where O is the Overflow and HV is the High Value within that group)
  • 2. D=O (Where D stands for the Dice Rating. Sometimes, this dice rating is enhanced by the transfer of points from other parameters.)
  • 3. [WE]=LV of W (The essential Weapons Range of all units is equal to the Low Value of the Wood Group. In this embodiment of the Game, [WE]=1.)
  • 4. WA=O+WE (The actual weapons range of a ranged unit is O added to its essential Weapons Range of 1. Melee units always have just their essential range of 1.)
  • 5. R≤HV+LV+WE+(2×O) (The sum of all a unit's ratings must be equal to or less than the units High Value, its Low Value, its essential Weapons Range of 1 and twice the O quotient. Magical augmentations are not subject to this rule.)
  • 6. SPP=HV−LV. Therefore, ST=HV−1 and D=O+1 (The points added by a magic Speed Pump augmentation is the same as the difference between the High Value & the Low Value. When the Speed Pump is applied, the Strength Rating will be reduced by 1 & the Dice Rating will be increased by 1.)
  • 7. LVX of G=previous LV+1 (The Low Value for any unit of the Gold Group is 1 point higher than the previous Low Value.)
  • 8. [St]→OPO=HV+O+P+O2 The highest possible Strength Rating resulting from magic OPO Pump is the same the unit's High Value, taken along with the first O quotient, the extra Point and the second O quotient.
  • 9. R per T=D×R (Revenue per turn provided by a fortress is equal to its Dice Score [when unoccupied by a unit] multiplied by a Factor. In this game that factor is 50)
  • 10. R<UL (The revenue per turn from a certain grade of fortress is always less that the cost of the least expensive unit in that grade.)
  • B. OPO Pump Table of Variation
  • There are four units that receive this magical augmentation: E-1, G-1, G-2 and G-3. Only G-2 retains all three elements, O, P and O2. The other units retain some and lose some. There is a pattern to this variation. And it can be illustrated as follows: (Y=retains, X=does not retain)
  • no hypothetical E-1 G-1 magic G-2 G-3 unit O Y X X Y Y X P X X X Y Y Y O2 Y Y X Y X X For E-1, D = O. For G-1, D = O. For G-2, D = O2 + P. For G-3, D = O2
  • The “no magic” column helps make sense of the sequence in the pattern. The hypothetical unit is extremely unlikely, since it would only retain 1 point from the entire OPO Pump. It wouldn't be worth the expense.
  • C. List of Magical Abilities (MA)
      • MA1: The ability to cross land, water or pass over or through other units both enemy and friendly
      • MA2: Failsafe ability that kicks in when the unit's attack fails
      • MA3: The ability to absorb a defeated enemy unit's power or utilize some other aspect of it.
      • MA4: Magic ability that operates across distances
      • MA5: Miscellaneous heroic abilities
  • MA6: Miscellaneous abilities for powerful flying units
  • D. Price List:
  • All costs are given in Denari ingots, the simulated currency of the game. To translate the Cost Rating, given in points, to a Denari value, it is necessary to multiply that point rating by a Currency Factor (C.) In this embodiment of the game, the currency factor is 10.

  • Basic cost of any unit=(HV+LVC

  • Cost of Ranged Unit=(HV+LV+[W A −W E])×C
  • (Note: all added range must be paid for, no matter where it comes from.)
  • M1 ability to cross land, water or other units, friendly or enemy

  • (for W−3)=(O of W group+R EC=30D

  • 1 element of OPO Pump magical augment (be it O, P or O 2)=O of W Group×C=20D

  • 2 elements of OPO=2×O of W Group×C=40D

  • 3 Elements of OPO=3×O of W Group×C60D

  • M 2 Failsafe Magic that takes effect when attack fails (for E−1)=O of W×C=20D

  • M 3 Magic for absorbing power or other aspect of fallen enemy (for I−1) HV of W×C50D

  • M 4 Magic effective at long distances (for I−2) HV of W×C=50D

  • Speed Pump magic augment+high speed training (for I−3)=HV of I+O of I×C=90D

  • Long range projectiles (for G−1)=O of G×C=30D

  • M 5 Heroic magic (for G−2)=O 2 of G×C=40D

  • M 6 Airborne magic (for G−3)=2×O of G×C=60D
  • E. Ranking System:
  • Wood:
  • For all Wood Units, HV=5, LV=1, R=11, W-1 and W-3 are Mirrored and Melee, W-2 is Ranged. W-3 has magic ability MA1. The other two units do not have magic abilities.
  • Expansion Set
  • HV=5, LV=1. Has 1 High Strength Melee unit. This unit has OPO augmentation of Strength Rating.
  • Iron:
  • For all Iron Units, HV=6, LV=1, but Low Strength is enhanced by 1 point transfer from Dice. R=14. I-1 (Melee) and I-2 (Ranged) are mirror units.
  • Iron group has 2 Melee units and 1 Ranged Unit; as regards magic, it has 2 MA augmented units and one SPP augmented unit.
  • Gold:
  • HV=7, LVX=previous LV+1 (i.e. 2, 3, and 4.) All units are High Strength Rating/Low Speed Rating. G-1 and G-3 are ranged. G2 is Melee. All units have some form of OPO. 2 units have MA.
  • F. Differential Price List Per Unit:
  • Wood Group W-1 Melee- Low Speed price = 60 High Value + High Strength Low Value × 10 = 60 W-2 Ranged- Low Speed price = 80 [(HV + LV + High Strength added Weapons Range pts (2)] × 10 = 80 W-3 Melee- High Speed price = 90 [HV + LV + Low Strength MA1 power (3)] × 10 = 90 Expansion Set Group E-1 Melee-- Low Speed Price = 100 [(HV + LV) + High Strength (single OPO) (2) + MA2(2)] × 10 = 100 Iron Group I-1 Melee- Low Speed price = 120 [(HV + L V) + High Strength MA3 (5)] × 10 = 120 I-2 Ranged- High Speed price = 150 [HV + LV + Low Strength Extra Range (3) + M4 (5)] × 10 = 150 I-3 Melee- Low Speed price = 160 [HV + LV + High Strength SPP (6) + High Speed Training (3)] × 10 = 160 Gold Group G-1 Ranged Price: 180 [HV(7) + LV(2) + (by Magic) extra range (4) + single OPO (2) + long range projectiles (3)] × 10 = 180 G-2 Melee Price 200 [HV(7) + LV (3) + triple OPO (6) + MA5 (4)] × 10 = 200 G-3 Ranged Price 220 [HV (7) + LV (4) + Extra Range(1) + Double OPO (4) + MA6 (6)] × 10 = 220
  • G. Overview of Fighter Units, Ratings and Costs
  • 1. The Wood Group
  • In the Wood Group the extreme values are 1 and 5. R=11
  • W-3 (for the Human Tribe this is the Mermaid Unit) is the exemplary illustration of the extreme high/low numerical values. It has a Strength Rating of only 1 and a Speed Rating of 5. The high Speed Rating cannot overflow to the low Strength Rating, as explained previously. As expected for a Melee unit, the weapons range is 1. For this and all the other units in the Wood Group, 0=2. Therefore the Dice Rating is 2. In summation: for all W-3 units, the Strength Rating is 1, the Dice Rating is 2, the Weapons Range is 1 and its Speed Rating is 5.
  • The Mirror Unit is W-1 (in the Human Tribe this is called the Warrior Unit.) It has a high Strength Rating of 5. Admittedly, one would expect the speed rating to be just 1. However, due to the overflow from the high Strength Rating, O (=2) is added to low Speed Rating of 1, arriving at an enhanced Speed Rating of 3. The original high Strength Rating is not affected. Also, O becomes the Dice Rating. In summation: for all W-1 Units, the Strength Rating is 5, the Dice Rating is 2, the Weapons Range is 1 and the Speed Rating is 3.
  • W-2 (in the human tribe this is called the Archer Unit) is essentially the same as W-1, but with added range. To calculate its ratings we begin with the same high/low extreme values for the Wood Group: a strength rating of 5 and an essential speed rating of 1. Then we enhance the Speed Rating by adding O, which raises it to 3. The Dice score will be 2. Since W-2 is defined as a ranged unit it must receive the same increase of O, except that now this increase will come at the expense of the Strength Rating and the Dice rating, subtracting ½ of O from each. Thus this unit will not exceed R.
  • As a result, the archer Unit has a Strength Rating of 4, and Dice Rating of 1, a weapons range of 3 and a Speed Rating of 3
  • The Overall Structure of the Wood Group is as Follows:
  • Extreme Values 1 5 Or 5 1 W-1 Melee- Low Speed price = 60 High Value + High Strength Low Value × 10 = 60 W-2 Ranged- Low Speed price = 80 [(HV + LV + High Strength added Weapons Range pts (2)] × 10 = 80 W-3 Melee- High Speed price = 90 [HV + LV + Low Strength MA1 power (3)] × 10 = 90
  • The Cost of a unit is based upon the sum of its high/low values. A ranged unit's extra range, even when it comes at the expense of other ratings, must be paid for. The Wood Group has one unit (W-3) with a Magical Power to cross both land and water. This power is not related to the unit's strength, as are its other numerical ratings. The added power is pure magic, and it is paid for by the tribe
  • 2. The Expansion Set Group
  • The Game's expansion set has a single fighter unit ES-1. This unit is essentially the same as the wood group's basic melee unit, W-1, except that ES-1 is OPO augmented with strength, according to the YXY pattern illustrated in the table of variation. First O is calculated using the actual High Value of 5. Then, the extra point is added, as if this unit belonged to the higher Iron Group. Since the High Value for the Iron Group is 6, its O2 quotient is 3. The first O quotient is retained, and applied to enhance the low Speed Rating. O2 is applied back to the original High Strength rating of 5, resulting in an augmented Strength Rating of 8. All its other ratings are based upon the unit's natural strength. Its dice rating is two. Its range is 1 and its speed is three, just as with the W-1 melee unit. Without the magic, this unit would have been identical to W-1. In addition to the Strength Augment, this unit also possesses a magic power. The OPO magical augmentation does not violate the limit of □R, as explained previously.
  • The Structure of the Expansion Set Group is as Follows:
  • The unit in this group, E-1 Has an additional magical ability unrelated to its numerical parameters. It also has a magical strength augmentation.
  • Extreme Values: 5 1 E-1 Melee-- Low Speed Price = 100 [(HV + LV) + High Strength (single OPO) (2) + MA2(2)] × 10 = 100
  • 3. The Iron Group
  • In this group the low Value is 1 and the high Value is 6. □R is 14. In the Iron Group, a low strength rating can be enhanced by reducing the units Dice Rating, which means that in actuality, all units in this Group have a Strength Rating of at least 2.
  • The Mirrored Groups units are I-1 and I-2. The I-1 Unit has a Strength Rating of 6 and should have had an essential Speed Rating of 1. The I-2 Unit has an essential Strength Rating of 1 and should have had an essential Speed Rating of 6.
  • However, the Ratings of these units are adjusted in the following ways: I-1 has a high Strength Rating, so the O quotient of 3 is added to its speed, resulting in an enhanced Speed Rating of 4. The O quotient 3 is taken as the Dice Power Rating. Since I-1 is a Melee unit, its weapons range is not enhanced. In summation, I-1 has a Strength Rating of 6, and Dice Rating of 3, a Weapons Range of 1 and a Speed Rating of 4.
  • I-2 is also based upon the high/low values of 1 and 6. Here the Strength Rating is low and the Speed Rating is high. However, being a ranged unit, the weapons range must be enhanced. Therefore, O is added to essential weapons range of 1. This results in a Weapons Range of 4. In this case, the enhanced range comes at the expense of the original high Speed Rating. The essential Dice Rating is 3. Since this is an Iron unit, some enhancement of the low strength rating is in order, so the Dice Rating is reduced by 1 and the Strength Rating is raised by 1. In Summation, I-2 has a Strength Rating of 2, a Dice Rating of 2, a Weapons Range of 4 and a Speed Rating of 3.
  • I-3 receives the Speed Pump. These magical changes increase the Speed Rating, making a high strength unit as fast as it is strong. Without the magic, I-3 would have simply been a High strength melee unit, just like I-1. When its speed is augmented, it becomes necessary to avoid having two equal ratings for Strength and Speed in the same unit. To allow the magical augmentation, the Strength Rating must transfer one of its points to the Dice Rating, which would otherwise be 3. Since I-3 is a Melee Unit, the weapon Range is necessarily 1. In summation, the Strength Rating is 5, the Dice Rating is 4, the Weapons Range is 1 and the Speed Rating is 6.
  • The Overall Structure of the Iron Group is as Follows:
  • Of the I group, I-1 and I-2 have magical abilities unrelated to their numerical parameters.
  • I-3 has the magical augmentation Speed Pump which affects its numerical parameters. This augmentation is required because this unit has animal, mechanical, gaseous of spiritual forms of high speed mobility. This is the only unit with High Speed capabilities.
  • Extreme Values 1 6 Or 6 1 I-1 Melee- Low Speed price = 120 [(HV + L V) + High Strength MA3 (5)] × 10 = 120 I-2 Ranged- High Speed price = 150 [HV + LV + Low Strength Extra Range (3) + M4 (5)] × 10 = 150 I-3 Melee- Low Speed price = 160 [HV + LV + High Strength SPP (6) + High Speed Training (3)] × 10 = 160
  • 4. The Gold Group
  • In this group the values given to the various parameters are subject to many enhancements or augmentations. Once again, there are High Values (HV) and Low Values (LV.) In all the Gold Units the High Value is for strength and the Low value is for speed. The Low Speed Ratings are not augmented in the ordinary way. Instead, the overflow is sometimes applied back magically to the unit other parameters.
  • The Low values proceed according to the principle of Previous Low Value +1=Next Low Value, or LVX/G=LVX-1+1. The previous low value in both the Wood and Iron Groups is 1. Thus the next Low Value (the first in the Gold Group) will be 2. The Low Value of the next unit will be 3, and the Low Value for the unit after that will be 4. Since the Low Values are applied to the speed ratings, G-1 has a Speed Rating of 2, G-2 has a Speed rating of 3 and G-3 has a Speed Rating of 4.
  • The High Values proceed with a different formula, as I will explain. The previous High Value in the Iron Group is 6. The next high Value, the basic one in the in the gold group is 7. This is indeed the strength rating of the first unit in the gold group, G-1. In the Gold Group, magical augmentations of the parameters (other than Speed) are allowed. Augmentation is by OPO. We begin with the basic strength of 7, and receive its O quotient (3). Ordinarily, this quotient would be applied to enhance the speed rating. However, the speed ratings in the Gold Group do not get enhanced. Then, an extra point is added to the High Value, to allow the derivation of O2 (4.)
  • G-1 follows the pattern XXY, as described by the Table of OPO Variations. In the case of unit G-1 the first O Quotient is applied as the limit of the units Dice Power, but it is not otherwise retained by the unit. The extra point (P) which was added to the High Value to derive O2, is not retained either. O2 itself is retained and added to the essential weapons range of 1 yielding a total weapons Range of 5. The nature of this unit is that it consists of a vehicle for firing long range projectiles. It is therefore fitting that the weapons Range be augmented. In the end, G-1 has a strength rating of 7, a dice rating of 3, a weapons range of 5 and a speed rating of 2.
  • G-2 follows the Pattern YYY, so it is extremely pumped up with OPO in its Strength Rating. In the case of G-2, O, P and O2 are applied directly back to the unit's strength rating like this: HV+O+P+O2=Augmented Strength Rating (7+3+1+4=15). The entire second augmentation (5 pts) is taken as the limit of the unit's dice rating. As a pure Melee unit, its Range remains only 1. The Low speed rating is already enhanced to equal 3 by. In summation, unit G-2 has a Strength Rating of 15, a Dice Rating of 3, a Weapons Range of 1 and a Speed Rating of 3.
  • G-3 is the last unit in the Gold Group. It also receives OPO according to the YYX pattern. The first O is applied to its own strength rating. The High Value of the Gold Group is 7, so the first O quotient is 3. That O is magically applied to the unit's strength, resulting in a Strength Rating of 10. After adding 1 Extra Point (P) to the High Value, the resulting O2 quotient (4) is applied as the limit of the unit's Dice Score. However, the O2 is not retained, and adds no power to any of the unit's parameters. P is retained and it is applied to the weapons range, raising it to 2. G-3 is a flying Melee Unit, so some increase of its weapons range is in order. As a result of these augmentations, G-3 has a strength rating of 10, a dice rating of 4, a weapons range of 2 and a speed rating of 4.
  • Overall Structure of the Gold Group
  • High Value Low Value (Speed) 2, 3, 4 (Strength) 7 G-1 Ranged Price: 180 [HV(7) + LV(2) + (by Magic) extra range (4) + single OPO (2) + long range projectiles (3)] × 10 = 180 G-2 Melee Price 200 [HV(7) + LV (3) + triple OPO (6) + MA5 (4)] × 10 = 200 G-3 Ranged Price 220 [HV (7) + LV (4) + Extra Range(1) + Double OPO (4) + MA6 (6)] × 10 = 220
  • H. Chart of Units, Ratings and Abilities.
  • List of Abbreviations Used on the Fighter Unit Cards:
  • Pt=Point
  • WR=Weapons Range
  • WR Pts=Weapons Range Points
  • St Pts=Strength Points
  • Sp Pts=Speed Points
  • Ft=Fortress
  • A=Active Magic
  • P=Passive Magic
  • Magic spells last till end of the player's turn, unless stated otherwise.
  • “Lasts 1 round” means the magic lasts until the beginning of that player's next turn.
  • “No time limit” means that the magic goes on and on, until enchanted unit is killed.
  • “Once in turn” means that even though a certain magic is passive, (so using it doesn't count as an action) the magic has to be called up to take effect. Such magic can only be called up once in a player's turn.
  • All active magic or continues even after the spell casting unit is killed.
  • When magic changes the situation on the board by killing units, moving units, making money, rotating the board or any similar effect, the outcomes of the magic remain even after the unit that cast the spell is killed. Magic that passively or automatically adds points to a unit stops working when the sending unit is killed. Still, whatever the unit did by moving, making money or winning battles remains true after the magic goes away.
  • “Victim stacked” means that the defeated unit card is placed under the victorious unit card. Mostly, this will show that the victorious unit has absorbed something helpful from the defeated unit. At other times, this will show that the defeated unit is still damaging or controlling the enemy unit in some way, even after the defeated unit's death. When the killed unit's power goes to a friendly unit, the killed unit is put under the friendly unit receiving the power.
  • Skill and Power Chart:
  • Strength, dice, range, speed and cost is the same for each group, but the magic abilities for each group are different.
  • Name Strength Dice Range Speed Magic Ability Cost Wood Warriors 5 2 1 3 None 60 Archers 4 1 3 3 None 80 Flying 1 2 1 5 Moves over land, 90 Units water and units. P Metal Power 6 3 1 4 Rolls 1 extra die 120 Takers for each unit killed. Victim stacked. P. No time limit. Power 2 2 4 3 Moves friendly 150 Givers unit in its WR to any location in its WR. A Long 5 4 1 6 None 160 Distance Gold Catapults 7 3 5 2 none 180 Movers 15 5 1 3 Immune to base 200 strength of all ranged units. P Dragons 10 4 2 4 Carries 1 wood 220 unit and fights as 1. Carried unit gets on and off at will. P
  • While the above description discloses many embodiments and specifications of the invention, these were described by way of illustration and should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention. The described invention may be carried into practice with many modifications which are within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (17)

1. A strategy game comprising:
a. at least 2 panels, constituting together a board game, where each panel is divided by lines into a plurality of square spaces arranged into a grid;
b. a plurality of sets of fighting units, each set of said units having a color to identify the units of the set as belonging to a particular player, the units of each set being subdivided into a plurality of sizes and types, each unit having defined attributes specific to its type and each fighting unit comprising:
i. an indicator to denote the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to move,
ii. an indicator to denote the maximum number of spaces said unit is allowed to attack an opponent's unit,
iii. an indicator to denote the strength of said unit, and
iv. an indicator to denote the price of said unit; and
c. a plurality of sets of banners, each set of banners having a color to identify the banners of the set as belonging to a particular player, the banners of each set being subdivided into a plurality of sizes.
2. The game of claim 1 further comprising a set of ingots for symbolizing a number of Dinari, where said Dinari is used as money of said game, for buying the fighting units and the banners.
3. The game of claim 1 where 4 panels constitute the board game.
4. The game of claim 1 where each of the panels has a different color.
5. The game of claim 1 where each of the panels has a slot for placing a banner.
6. The game of claim 1 where each of the panels can be turned around in order to change the playing field.
7. The game of claim 1 where some of the spaces have interconnecting diagonal roads for allowing the units to move diagonally.
8. The game of claim 1 where the strength of a unit consists of a basic strength and the number of dice.
9. The game of claim 1 where more than one unit may be combined with other units for a joined attack.
10. The game of claim 1 where at least one of the spaces on the panels may be signaled for increasing the basic strength to all units of a player that has a unit resting on said signaled space.
11. The game of claim 1 where the size of a banner near a fortress determines which grade of units can be created at that fortress.
12. The game of claim 1 where the size of a banner near a fortress determines the grade, the income and the strength of that fortress.
13. The game of claim 1 where the game is an electronic game.
14. The game of claim 13 where the game is a cellular phone application.
15. The game of claim 1, where the banners may be upgraded.
16. The game of claim 1, where each banner comprises an indicator to denote the strength of said banner.
17. The game of claim 1 where each fighting unit has a size which identifies the grade of said unit.
US15/740,236 2015-07-01 2016-06-23 A strategy game of territorial conquest Abandoned US20180185743A1 (en)

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EP3316978A4 (en) 2018-05-16

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