US20180144554A1 - Systems for augmented reality visual aids and tools - Google Patents

Systems for augmented reality visual aids and tools Download PDF

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US20180144554A1
US20180144554A1 US15/817,117 US201715817117A US2018144554A1 US 20180144554 A1 US20180144554 A1 US 20180144554A1 US 201715817117 A US201715817117 A US 201715817117A US 2018144554 A1 US2018144554 A1 US 2018144554A1
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user
acds
adaptive control
training
visual enhancement
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US15/817,117
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David Watola
Jay E. Cormier
Brian Kim
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Eyedaptic, LLC
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Abstract

Adaptive Control Driven System/ACDS 99, supports visual enhancement, mitigation of challenges and with basic image modification algorithms and any known hardware from contact lenses to IOLs to AR hardware glasses, & enables users to enhance vision with user interface based on a series of adjustments that are applied to move, modify, or reshape image sets and components with full advantage of the remaining useful retinal area, thus addressing aspects of visual challenges heretofore inaccessible by devices which learn needed adjustments.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO PRIORITY APPLICATIONS
  • Expressly incorporated by references, the present disclosures relate to the U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 62/424,343 filed Nov. 18, 2016 and assigned to EYEDAPTIC, LLC. All domestic and foreign priority reserved and claimed from said USSN remains the property of said assignee.
  • FIELD
  • The fields of vision augmentation, automation of the same, specialized interfaces between users and such tools, including but not limited to artificial intelligence—particularly for visually challenged users of certain types, were a launch point for the instant systems now encompassing improved systems for augmented reality visual aids and tools.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURES
  • A modicum of background stitches together the various aspects of what the instant inventions offer to several divergent attempts to merge optical, visual and cognitive elements in systems to create, correct and project images for users.
  • Augmented Reality (AR) eyewear implementations fall cleanly into two disjoint categories, video see-through (VST) and optical see-through (OST). Apparatus for VST AR closely resembles Virtual Reality (VR) gear, where the wearer's eyes are fully enclosed so that only content directly shown on the embedded display remains visible. VR systems maintain a fully-synthetic three-dimensional environment that must be continuously updated and rendered at tremendous computational cost. In contrast, VST AR instead presents imagery based on the real-time video feed from an appropriately-mounted camera (or cameras) directed along the user's eyeline; hence the data and problem domain are fundamentally two-dimensional. VST AR provides absolute control over the final appearance of visual stimulus, and facilitates registration and synchronization of captured video with any synthetic augmentations. Very wide fields-of-view (FOV) approximating natural human limits are also achievable at low cost.
  • OST AR eyewear has a direct optical path allowing light from the scene to form a natural image on the retina. This natural image is essentially the same one that would be formed without AR glasses. A camera is used to capture the scene for automated analysis, but its image does not need to be shown to the user. Instead, computed annotations or drawings from an internal display are superimposed onto the natural retinal image by (e.g.) direct laser projection or a half-silvered mirror for optical combining.
  • The primary task of visual-assistance eyewear for low-vision sufferers does not match the most common use model for AR (whether VST or OST), which involves superimposing annotations or drawings on a background image that is otherwise faithful to the reality seen by the unaided eye. Instead, assistive devices need to dramatically change how the environment is displayed in order to compensate defects in the user's vision. Processing may include contrast enhancement and color mapping, but invariably incorporates increased magnification to counteract deficient visual acuity. Existing devices for low-vision are magnification-centric, and hence operate in the VST regime with VST hardware.
  • Tailoring the central visual field to suit the user and current task leverages a hallmark capability of the VST paradigm—absolute control over the finest details of the retinal image—to provide flexible customization and utility where it is most needed. Even though the underlying platform is fundamentally OST, careful blending restores a naturally wide field-of-view for a seamless user experience despite the narrow active display region.
  • There exists a longstanding need to merge the goals of visual-assistance eyewear for low-vision sufferers with select benefits of the AR world and models emerging from the same—which did not exist, it is respectfully proposed, in advance of the instant teachings thus making them eligible for Letters Patent under the Paris Convention and National and International Laws.
  • OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The FOV model from AR in light of the needs of visually challenged users then becomes a template used for changes needed for re-mapping and in many cases the required warping of subject images, as known to those of skill in the art. Like the adjustments used to create the model, modifications to parameters that control warping are also interactively adjusted by the user. In addition to direct user control of the image modification coupled with instantaneous visual feedback, the software imposes a structured process guiding the user to address large-scale appearance before fine-tuning small details. This combination allows the user to tailors the algorithm precisely to his or her affected vision for optimal visual enhancement.
  • For people with retinal diseases, adapting to loss a vision becomes a way of life. This impact can affect their life in many ways including loss of the ability to read, loss of income, loss of mobility and an overall degraded quality of life. However, with prevalent retinal diseases such as AMD (Age related Macular Degeneration) not all of the vision is lost, and in this case the peripheral vision remains intact as only the central vision is impacted with the degradation of the macula. Given that the peripheral vision remains intact it is possible to take advantage of eccentric viewing and through patient adaptation to increase functionality such as reading. Another factor in increasing reading ability with those with reduced vision is the ability to views words in context as opposed to isolation. Magnification is often used as a simply visual aid with some success. However, with increased magnification comes decreased FOV (Field of View) and therefore the lack of ability to see other words or objects around the word or object of interest. The capability to guide the training for eccentric viewing and eye movement and fixation training is important to achieve the improvement in functionality such as reading. These approaches outlined below will serve to both describe novel ways to use augmented reality techniques to both automate and improve the training.
  • In order to help users with central vision deficiencies many of the instant tools were evolved. It is important to train and help their ability to fixate on a target. Since central vision is normally used for this, this is an important step to help users control their ability to focus on a target, as leg work for more training and adaptation functionality. This fixation training can be accomplished through gamification built into the software algorithms, and is utilized periodically for increased fixation training and improved adaptation. The gamification can be accomplished by following fixation targets around the display screen and in conjunction with a hand held pointer can select or click on the target during timed or untimed exercise. Furthermore, this can be accomplished through voice active controls as a substitute or adjunct to a hand help pointer.
  • To aid the user in targeting and fixation certain guide lines can be overlaid on reality or on the incoming image to help guide the users eye movements along the optimal path. These guidelines can be a plurality of constructs such as, but not limited to, cross hair targets, bullseye targets or linear guidelines such as singular or parallel dotted lines of a fixed or variable distance apart, a dotted line or solid box of varying colors. This will enable the user to increase their training and adaptation for eye movement control to following the tracking lines or targets as their eyes move across a scene in the case of a landscape, picture or video monitor or across a page in the case of reading text.
  • To make the most of a user's remaining useful vision methods for adaptive peripheral vision training can be employed. Training and encouraging the user to make the most of their eccentric viewing capabilities is important. As described the user may naturally gravitate to their PRL (preferred retinal locus) to help optimized their eccentric viewing. However, this may not be the optimal location to maximize their ability to view images or text with their peripheral vision. Through use of skewing and warping the images presented to the user, along with the targeting guidelines it can be determined where the optimal place for the user to target their eccentric vision. Eccentric viewing training through reinforced learning can be encouraged by a series of exercises. The targeting as described in fixation training can also be used for this training. With fixation targets on and the object, area, or word of interest can be incrementally tested by shifting locations to determine the best PRL for eccentric viewing.
  • Also, pupil tracking algorithms can be employed and not only have eye tracking capability but can also utilize user customized offset for improved eccentric viewing capability. Whereby the eccentric viewing targets are offset guide the user to focus on their optimal area for eccentric viewing.
  • Further improvements in visual adaptation are achieved through use of the hybrid distortion algorithms. With the layered distortion approach objects or words on the outskirts of the image can receive a different distortion and provide a look ahead preview to piece together words for increased reading speed. While the user is focused on the area of interest that is being manipulated the words that are moving into the focus area can help to provide context in order to interpolate and better understand what is coming for faster comprehension and contextual understanding.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various preferred embodiments are described herein with references to the drawings in which merely illustrative views are offered for consideration, whereby:
  • FIG. 1A is a view of schematized example of external framed glasses typical for housing features of the present invention;
  • FIG. 1B is a view of example glasses typical for housing features of the present invention;
  • FIG. 1C is a view of example glasses typical for housing features of the present invention;
  • FIG. 1D is a view of example glasses typical for housing features of the present invention
  • FIG. 2 is a flowchart showing integration of data management arrangements according to embodiments of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a flowchart illustrating interrelationship of various elements of the features of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4A is a flowchart showing camera and image function software;
  • FIG. 4B is a flowchart showing higher order function software;
  • FIG. 4C is a flowchart showing higher order function software;
  • FIG. 5A is a schematic and flow chart showing user interface improvements;
  • FIG. 5B is a schematic and flow chart showing user interface improvements; and
  • FIG. 5C is a schematic and flow chart showing user interface improvements.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTIONS AND EXAMPLES
  • As defined herein “ACDS” comprises those objects of the present inventions embodying the defined characteristic functionality illustrated herein by way of schematic Figures and exemplary descriptions, none of which is intended to be limiting of the scope of the instant teachings. By way of example, any other and further features of the present invention or desiderate offered for consideration hereto may be manifested, as known to artisans, in any known or developed contact lens, Intra Ocular Lens (IOL), thin or thick film having optical properties, GOOGLE® type of glass or the like means for arraying, disposing and housing functional optical and visual enhancement elements.
  • As referenced, embodiments of the Interactive Augmented Reality (AR) Visual Aid inventions described below were designed and intended for users with visual impairments that impact field of vision (FOV). Usages beyond this scope have evolved in real-time and have been incorporated herein expressly by reference.
  • By way of example these disease states may take the form of age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, Stargardt's disease, and other diseases where damage to part of the retina impairs vision. The invention described is novel because it not only supplies algorithms to enhance vision, but also provides simple but powerful controls and a structured process that allows the user to adjust those algorithms.
  • Referring now to FIG. 1-10 and in particular to FIGS. 1A-1D and 2, exemplary ACDS 99 is housed in a glasses frame model including both features and zones of placement which are interchangeable for processor 101, charging and dataport 103, dual display 111, control buttons 106, accelerometer gyroscope magnetometer 112, Bluetooth/Wi-Fi 108, autofocus camera 113, as known to those skilled in the art. For example, batteries 107, including lithium-ion batteries shown in a figure, or any known or developed other versions, shown in other of said figures are contemplated as either a portion element or supplement/attachment/appendix to the instant teachings the technical feature being functioning as a battery.
  • In sum, as shown in FIG. 1A-1D, any basic hardware can constructed from a non-invasive, wearable electronics-based AR eyeglass system (see FIG. 1A-1D) employing any of a variety of integrated display technologies, including LCD, OLED, or direct retinal projection. Materials are also able to be substituted for the “glass” having electronic elements embedded within the same, so that “glasses” may be understood to encompass for example, sheets of lens and camera containing materials, IOLs, contact lenses and the like functional units. Likewise, electronic magnifiers may be used such as the Ruby® brand of Electronic Modifier.
  • A plurality of cameras, mounted on the glasses, continuously monitors the view where the glasses are pointing. The AR system also contains an integrated processor and memory storage (either embedded in the glasses, or tethered by a cable) with embedded software implementing real-time algorithms that modify the images as they are captured by the camera(s). These modified, or corrected, images are then continuously presented to the eyes of the user via the integrated displays.
  • It is contemplated that the processes described above are implemented in a system configured to present an image to the user. The processes may be implemented in software, such as machine readable code or machine executable code that is stored on a memory and executed by a processor. Input signals or data is received by the unit from a user, cameras, detectors or any other device. Output is presented to the user in any manner, including a screen display or headset display. The processor and memory is part of the headset 99 shown in FIG. 1A-1D or a separate component linked to the same. Electronic magnifiers, as discussed are also able to be used.
  • Referring also to FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing example or representative computing devices and associated elements that may be used to implement the methods and serve as the apparatus described herein. FIG. 2 shows an example of a generic computing device 200A and a generic mobile computing device 250A, which may be used with the techniques described here. Computing device 200A is intended to represent various forms of digital computers, such as laptops, desktops, workstations, personal digital assistants, servers, blade servers, mainframes, and other appropriate computers. Computing device 250A is intended to represent various forms of mobile devices, such as personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, smart phones, and other similar computing devices. The components shown here, their connections and relationships, and their functions, are meant to be exemplary only, and are not meant to limit implementations of the inventions described and/or claimed in this document.
  • The memory 204A stores information within the computing device 200A. In one implementation, the memory 204A is a volatile memory unit or units. In another implementation, the memory 204A is non-volatile memory unit or units. In another implementation, the memory 204A is a non-volatile memory unit or units. The memory 204A may also be another form of computer-readable medium, such as a magnetic or optical disk.
  • The storage device 206A is capable of providing mass storage for the computing device 200A. In one implementation, the storage device 206A may be or contain a computer-200A. In one implementation, the storage device 206A may be or contain a computer-reading medium, such as a floppy disk device, a hard disk device, an optical disk device, or a tape device, a flash memory or other similar solid state memory device, or an array of devices, including devices in a storage area network or other configurations. A computer program product can be tangibly embodied in an information carrier. The computer program product may also contain instructions that, when executed, perform one or more methods, such as those described above. The information carrier is a computer- or machine-readable medium, such as the memory 204A, the storage device 206A, or memory on processor 202A.
  • The high speed controller 208A manages bandwidth-intensive operations for the computing device 200A, while the low-speed controller 212A manages lower bandwidth-intensive operations, Artisans understand that ACDS 99 comprises any and all incorporated sensing, computer and optical and visual data management tools, and/or state of the art signal processing coupling and communication means. Such allocation of functions is exemplary only. In one implementation, the high-speed controller 208A is coupled to memory 204A, display 216A (e.g., through a graphics processor or accelerator), and to high-speed expansion ports 210A, which may accept various expansion cards (not shown). In the implementation, low-speed controller 212A is coupled to storage device 206A and low-speed bus 214A. The low-speed bus 214, which may include various communication ports (e.g., USB, Bluetooth, Ethernet, wireless Ethernet) may be coupled to one or more input/output devices, such as a keyboard, a pointing device, a scanner, or a networking device such as a switch or router, e.g., through a network adapter.
  • The computing device 200A may be implemented in a number of different forms, as shown in the figure. For example, it may be implemented as a standard server 220A, or multiple tunes in a group of such servers. It may also be implemented as part of a rack server system 224A. In addition, it may be implemented in a personal computer such as a laptop computer 222A. Alternatively, components from computing device 200A may be combined with other components in a mobile device (not shown), such as device 250A. Each of such devices may contain one or more of computing device 200A, 250A, and an entire system may be made up of multiple computing devices 200A, 250A communicating with each other.
  • Computing device 250A includes a processor 252A, memory 264A, an input/output device such as a display 254A, a communication interface 266A, and a transceiver 268A, along other components. The device 250A may also be provided with a storage device, such as a Microdrive or other device, to provide additional storage. Each of the components 250A, 252A, 264A, 254A, 266A, and 268A, are interconnected using various buses, and several of the components may be mounted on a common motherboard or in other manners as appropriate.
  • The processor 252A can execute instructions within the computing device 250A, including instructions stored in the memory 264A. The processor may be implemented as a chipset of chips that include separate and multiple analog and digital processors. The processor may provide, for example, for coordination of the other components of the device 250A, such as control of user interfaces, applications run by device 250A, and wireless communication by device 250A.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 4A-4C and 5A-5C schematic flow-charts show detailed operations inherent in subject software, as implemented in ACDS 99, or any related IOC, contact lenses or combinations thereof.
  • FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C show how cameras, which continuously capture images are stored, manipulated and used with ACDS 9A. FIG. 4B shows sequences of operations once control buttons 106 are actuated including setup/training and update modes. FIG. 4C details users mode and FIG. 5A integrates displays with functional steps and shows setup, training and update interplay.
  • Referring now to 5B trainer controlled modules and sub-modes are illustrated whereby users learn to regain functional vision in placed imparted by their visual challenges. FIG. 5C completes a detailed overview of user interfacing as their own, to those skilled in the art with user registration, visual field calibration, VOV definition, contrast configuration and indicator configuration and control registration.
  • Processor 252A may communicate with a user through control interface 258A and display interface 256A coupled to a display 254A. The display 254A may be, for example, a TFT LCD (Thin-Film-Transistor Liquid Crystal Display) or an OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) display, or other appropriate display technology. The display interface 256A may comprise appropriate circuitry for driving the display 254A to present graphical and other information to a user. The control interface 258A may receive commands from a user and convert them for submission to the processor 252A. In addition, an external interface 262A may be provided in communication with processor 252A, so as to enable near area communication of device 250A with other devices. External interface 262A may provide for example, for wired communication in some implementations, or for wireless communication in other implementations, and multiple interfaces may also be used.
  • The memory 264A stores information within the computing device 250A. The memory 264A can be implemented as one or more of a computer-readable medium or media, a volatile memory unit or units, or a non-volatile memory unit or units. Expansion memory 274A may also be provided and connected to device 250A through expansion interface 272A, which may include, for example, a SIMM (Single In Line Memory Module) card interface. Such expansion memory 274A may provide extra storage space for device 250A, or may also store applications or other information for device 250A. Specifically, expansion memory 274A may include instructions to carry out or supplement the processes described above, and may include secure information also. Thus, for example, expansion memory 274A may be provided as a security module for device 250A, and may be programmed with instructions that permit secure use of device 250A. In addition, secure applications may be provided via the SIMM cards, along with additional information, such as placing identifying information on the SIMM card in a non-backable manner. The memory may include, for example, flash memory and/or NVRAM memory, as discussed below. In one implementation, a computer program product is tangibly embodied in an information carrier. The computer program product contains instructions that, when executed, perform one or more methods, such as those described above. The information carrier is a computer- or machine-readable medium, such as the memory 264A, expansion memory 274A, or memory on processor 252A, that may be received, for example, over transceiver 268A or external interface 262A.
  • Device 250A may communicate wirelessly through communication interface 266A, which may include digital signal processing circuitry where necessary. Communication interface 266A may provide for communications under various modes or protocols, such as GSM voice calls, SMS, EMS, or MMS messaging, CDMA, TDMA, PDC, WCDMA, CDMA2000, or GPRS, among others. Such communication may occur, for example, through radio-frequency transceiver 268A. In addition, short-range communication may occur, such as using a Bluetooth, WI-FI, or other such transceiver (not shown). In addition, GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver module 270A may provide additional navigation- and location-related wireless data to device 250A, which may be used as appropriate by applications running on device 250.
  • Device 250A may also communicate audibly using audio codec 260, which may receive spoken information from a user and convert it to usable digital information. Audio codec 260A may likewise generate audible sound for a user, such as through a speaker, e.g., in a handset of device 250A. Such sound may include sound from voice telephone calls, may include recorded sound (e.g., voice messages, music files, etc.) and may also include sound generated by applications operating on device 250A.
  • The computing device 250A may be implemented in a number of different forms, as shown in the figure. For example, it may be implemented as part of ACDS 99 or any smart/cellular telephone 280A. It may also be implemented as part of a smart phone 282A, personal digital assistant, a computer tablet, or other similar mobile device.
  • Thus, various implementations of the system and techniques described here can be realized in digital electronic circuitry, integrated circuitry, specially designed ASICs (application specific integrated circuits), computer hardware, firmware, software, and/or combinations thereof. These various implementations can include implementation in one or more computer programs that are executable and/or interpretable on a programmable system including at least one programmable processor, which may be special or general purpose, coupled to receive data and instructions from, and to transmit data and instructions to, a storage system, at least one input device, and at least one output device.
  • These computer programs (also known as programs, software, software applications or code) include machine instructions for a programmable processor, and can be implemented in a high-level procedural and/or object-oriented programming language, and/or in assembly/machine language. As used herein, the terms “machine-readable medium” “computer-readable medium” refers to any computer program product, apparatus and/or device (e.g., magnetic discs, optical disks, memory, Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs)) used to provide machine instructions and/or data to a programmable processor, including a machine-readable medium that receives machine instructions as a machine-readable signal. The term “machine-readable signal” refers to any signal used to provide machine instructions and/or data to a programmable processor.
  • To provide for interaction with a user, the systems and techniques described here can be implemented on a computer having a display device (e.g., a CRT (cathode ray tube) or LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor) for displaying information to the user and a keyboard and a pointing device (e.g., a mouse or a trackball) by which the user can provide input to the computer, as mentioned known or developed Electronic Magnifier (ROV infra) are ______able to be used? Other kinds of devices can be used to provide for interaction with a user as well; for example, feedback provided to the user can be any form of sensory feedback (e.g., visual feedback, auditory feedback, or tactile feedback; and input from the user can be received in any form, including acoustic, speech, or tactile input.
  • The systems and techniques described here can be implemented in a computing system (e.g., computing device 200A and/or 250A) that includes a back end component (e.g., as a data server), or that includes a middleware component (e.g., an application server), or that includes a front end component (e.g., a client computer having a graphical user interface or a Web browser through which a user can interact with an implementation of the systems and techniques described here), or any combination of such back end, middleware, or front end components. The components of the system can be interconnected by any form or medium of digital data communication (e.g., a communication network). Examples of communication networks include a local area network (“LAN”), a wide area network) (“WAN”) and the Internet.
  • The computing system can include clients and servers. A client and server are generally remote from each other and typically interact through a communication network. The relationship of client and server arises by virtue of computer programs running on the respective computers and having a client-server relationship to each other.
  • In the example embodiment, computing devices 200A and 250A are configured to receive and/or retrieve electronic documents from various other computing devices connected to computing devices 200A and 250A through a communication network, and store these electronic documents within at least one of memory 204A, storage device 206A, and memory 264A. Computing devices 200A and 250A are further configured to manage and organize these electronic documents within at least one of memory 204A, storage device 206A, and memory 264A using the techniques described herein.
  • In addition, the logic flows depicted in the figures do not require the particular order shown, or sequential order, to achieve desirable results. Furthermore, other steps may be provided or steps may be eliminated from the described flows, and other components may be added to, or removed from, the described systems. Accordingly, other embodiments are within the scope of the following claims.
  • It will be appreciated that the above embodiments that have been described in particular detail are merely example or possible embodiments, and that there are many other combinations, additions, or alternatives that may be included. For example, while online gaming has been referred to throughout, other applications of the above embodiments include online or web-based applications or other cloud services. Similarly, for example, VMWares future event failure systems approach may be used in conjunction with the instant systems.
  • Unless specifically stated otherwise as apparent from the above discussion, it is appreciated that throughout the description, discussions utilizing terms such as “processing” or “computing” or calculating” or “determining” or “identifying” or “displaying” or “providing” or the like, refer to the action and processes of a computer system, or similar electronic computing device, that manipulates and transforms data represented as physical (electronic) quantities within the computer system memories or registers or other such information storage, transmission or display devices.
  • Based on the foregoing specification, the above-discussed embodiments of the invention may be implemented using computer programming or engineering techniques including computer software, firmware, hardware or any combination or subset thereof. Any such resulting program, having computer-readable and/or computer-executable instructions, may be embodied or provided within ACDS or within one or more computer-readable media, thereby making a computer program product, i.e., an article of manufacture, according to the discussed embodiments of the invention. The computer readable media may be, for instance, a fixed (hard) drive, diskette, electronic magnifier with on-board memory, optical disk, magnetic tape, semiconductor memory such as read-only memory (ROM) or flash memory, etc., or any transmitting/receiving medium such as the Internet or other communication network or link. The article of manufacture containing the computer code may be made and/or used by executing the instructions directly from one medium, by copying the code from one medium to another medium, or by transmitting the code over a network.
  • Referring now also to FIG. 3, another schematic is shown which illustrates an example embodiment of ACDS 99 and/or a mobile device 200B (used interchangeably herein). This is but one possible device configuration, and as such it is contemplated that one of ordinary skill in the art may differently configure the mobile device. Many of the elements shown in FIG. 3 may be considered optional and not required for every embodiment. In addition, the configuration of the device may be any shape or design, may be wearable, or separated into different elements and components. ACDS 99 and/or a device 200B may comprise any type of fixed or mobile communication device that can be configured in such a way so as to function as described below. The mobile device may comprise a PDA, cellular telephone, smart phone, tablet PC, wireless electronic pad, or any other computing device.
  • In this example embodiment, ACDS 99 and/or mobile device 200B is configure with an outer housing 204B that protects and contains the components described below. Within the housing 204B is a processor 208B and a first and second bus 212B1, 212B2 (collectively 212B). The processor 208B communicates over the buses 212B with the other components of the mobile device 200B. The processor 208B may comprise any type of processor or controller capable of performing as described herein. The processor 208B may comprise a general purpose processor, ASIC, ARM, DSP, controller, or any other type processing device.
  • The processor 208B and other elements of ACDS 99 and/or a mobile device 200B receive power from a battery 220B or other power source. As discussed, it is contemplated that use of superconductive materials for super batteries is incorporated or implemented in ACDS, see, for example, LAMBORGHINI/MIT battery-type of functional elements by using materials which store and release energy, at room temperature output like batteries with other technical benefits are outlined. An electrical interface 224B provides one or more electrical ports to electrically interface with the mobile device 200B, such as with a second electronic device, computer, a medical device, or a power supply/charging device. The interface 224B may comprise any type of electrical interface or connector format.
  • One or more memories 210B are part ACDS 99 and/or mobile device 200B for storage of machine readable code for execution on the processor 208B, and for storage of data, such as image data, audio data, user data, medical data, location data, shock data, or any other type of data. The memory may store the messaging application (app). The memory may comprise RAM, ROM, flash memory, optical memory, or micro-drive memory. The machine-readable code as described herein is non-transitory.
  • As part of this embodiment, the processor 208B connects to a user interface 216B. The user interface 216B may comprise any system or device configured to accept user input to control the mobile device. The user interface 216B may comprise one or more of the following: keyboard, roller ball, buttons, wheels, pointer key, touch pad, and touch screen. A touch screen controller 230B is also provided which interfaces through the bus 212B and connects to a display 228B.
  • The display comprises any type of display screen configured to display visual information to the user. The screen may comprise an LED, LCD, thin film transistor screen, OEL, CSTN (color super twisted nematic). TFT (thin film transistor), TFD (thin film diode), OLED (organic light-emitting diode), AMOLED display (active-matrix organic light-emitting diode), capacitive touch screen, resistive touch screen or any combination of these technologies. The display 228B may further comprise a display processor (not shown) or controller that interfaces with the processor 208B. The touch screen controller 230B may comprise a module configured to receive signals from a touch screen which is overlaid on the display 228B. Messages may be entered on the touch screen 230B, or the user interface 216B may include a keyboard or other data entry device.
  • Also part of this exemplary mobile device is a speaker 234B and microphone 238B. The speaker 234B and microphone 238B may be controlled by the processor 208B and are configured to receive and convert audio signals to electrical signals, in the case of the microphone, based on processor control. Likewise, processor 208B may activate the speaker 234B to generate audio signals. These devices operate as is understood in the art and as such are not described in detail herein. Expressly incorporated herein is the system of U.S. Pat. No. 9,782,084, as mentioned above, Artisans understanding that remote devices, sensors, and interactive communication tools are readily interface into, and data-friendly with ACDS 99.
  • Also connected to one or more of the buses 212B is a first wireless transceiver 240B and a second wireless transceiver 244B, each of which connect to respective antenna 248B, 252B. The first and second transceiver 240B, 244B are configured to receive incoming signals from a remote transmitter and perform analog front end processing on the signals to generate analog baseband signals. The incoming signal may be further processed by conversion to a digital format, such as by an analog to digital converter, for subsequent processing by the processor 208B. Likewise, the first and second transceiver 240B, 244B are configured to receive outgoing signals from the processor 208B, or another component of the mobile device 208B, and up-convert these signals from baseband to RF frequency for transmission over the respective antenna 248B, 252B. Although shown with a first wireless transceiver 240B and a second wireless transceiver 244B, it is contemplated that the mobile device 200B may have only one such system or two or more transceivers. For example, some devices are tri-band or quad-band capable, or have Bluetooth and NFC communication capability.
  • It is contemplated that ACDS 99 and/or a mobile device, and hence the first wireless transceiver 240B and a second wireless transceiver 244B may be configured to operate according to any presently existing or future developed wireless standard including, but not limited to, Bluetooth, WI-FI such as IEEE 802.11 a,b,g,n, wireless LAN, WMAN, broadband fixed access, WiMAX, any cellular technology including CDMA, GSM, EDGE, 3G, 4G, 5G, TDMA, AMPS, FRS, GMRS, citizen band radio, VHF, AM, FM, and wireless USB.
  • Also part of ACDS 99 and/or a mobile device is one or more system connected to the second bus 212B which also interfaces with the processor 208B. These devices include a global positioning system (GPS) module 260B with associated antenna 262B. The GPS module 260B is capable of receiving and processing signals from satellites or other transponders to generate location data regarding the location, direction of travel, and speed of the GPS module 260B. GPS is generally understood in the art and hence not described in detail herein.
  • A gyro 264B connects to the bus 212B to generate and provide orientation data regarding the orientation of the mobile device 204B. A compass 268B, such as a magnetometer, provides directional information to the mobile device 204B. A shock detector 272B, which may include an accelerometer, connects to the bus 212B to provide information or data regarding shocks or forces experienced by the mobile device. In one configuration, the shock detector 272B generates and provides data to the processor 208B when the mobile device experiences a shock or force greater than a predetermined threshold. This may indicate a fall or accident, again reference to the Device of U.S. Pat. No. 9,782,084 and communication systems and methods apply herein.
  • One or more cameras (still, video, or both) 276B are provided to capture image data for storage in the memory 210B and/or for possible transmission over a wireless or wired link or for viewing at a later time. The processor 208B may process image data to perform the steps described herein.
  • A flasher and/or flashlight 280B are provided and are processor controllable. The flasher or flashlight 280B may serve as a strobe or traditional flashlight, and may include an LED. A power management module 284 interfaces with or monitors the battery 220B to manage power consumption, control battery charging, and provide supply voltages to the various devices which may require different power requirements.
  • Eccentric Viewing & Peripheral Vision Adaptation—Further modules are included to guide the trainer and user in order for the user to more effectively and consistently utilize their peripheral vision. This includes more quickly adapting to the most effective eccentric viewing technique and preferred retinal locus.
  • Contextual Viewing & Inclusion with Hybrid Distortion—In order to better utilize the full FOV of the augmented reality device and take advantage of the nonlinear transformations that maximize the field of vision, this training module to help the user understand and adapt to this view is utilized.
  • Gamification of Training—The above modules can be gamified to help the user practice and improve over time. Many such games can be constructed to help improve fixation, eccentric viewing, contextual viewing and adaptation.
  • Distortion Mapping—As described elsewhere, when distortion is present in a user's field of view, a mapping can be interactively fashioned to reflect the details of this distortion. In training mode this map can be constructed with help of the trainer/specialists for later use to undistort the user's vision.
  • Training Mode also functions as a greatly-enhanced Setup Mode, providing a trained facilitator with a number of graphical user interface tools for tailoring the device to a specific user's requirements. Whereas the standard Setup Mode provides a low-complexity route to semi-custom settings suitable for a class of users who make the same choices in Setup Mode, Training Mode allows for detailed customization to the specific user.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 4B, 4C, 5A, 5B & 4C, for example, the facilitator can narrow down the wide array of possible parameter combinations presented by the device by choosing from a set of tool palettes that contain archetypical configurations for various conditions, e.g. Age-related Macular Degeneration, Retinitis Pigmentosa, etc. This initial choice subsequently determines the baseline scenarios selected for User Mode. Additional adjustments made during Training mode can automatically fine-tune these for the user. The initial choice also restricts the suggested processing options to help the trainer test and evaluate their utility for the specific user, but the facilitator always has the option of incorporating any feature combination into a user's configuration.
  • Update Mode
  • When update mode is entered from Setup Mode, the operator can initiate a request to check for available software updates or patches. The device will attempt to satisfy this request by connecting to a remote server via an available wireless or tethered interface. If the device is not up-to-date, the user will be asked to confirm a desire to perform the update. Once confirmed, the update will occur automatically.
  • Interrupted updates that are recoverable (e.g. due to loss of connection) will prompt the operator for a decision about continuing or returning to Setup Mode. Unrecoverable interruptions (e.g. loss of power) will require a restart into User Mode, and will be accompanied by a warning message.
  • Overview & Modes
  • The User Interface for the Eyedaptic AR glasses, taking advantage of Hybrid See Through technology, (described in a separate provisional patent filing) offers several modes for either the user or trainer. Many of these feature unique constructs and methodologies to address usage with a variety of retinal diseases such as macular degeneration. These combine advanced functions to enable adaptations tailored to the user's particular affliction and its progression along with a simple and easy to use control interface for everyday usage in a variety of settings. The supported modes are:
  • User Mode—The AR visual aid automatically boots into this mode upon power up. Setup Mode—A specific sequence and/or combination of buttons (or a specific physical or wireless connection) places the visual aid into a setup mode for user or trainer control of the visual field and user controls. Setup Mode is also the gateway to Training and Update Modes. Training Mode—When in Setup Mode, a specific sequence and/or combination of buttons (or a specific physical or wireless connection) places the visual aid into a training mode intended for use by a trained Low Vision Specialists to help the user adapt and to customize settings for the user.
  • Update Mode—This is a separate mode, also entered from Setup Mode, that supports software updates and patches as well as restoration of user settings to a previous configuration.
  • User Mode
  • For everyday operation by the end-user, the inherentrange of features and capabilities of the device is balanced against its utility by providing a simple and responsive user interface that provides instantaneous access to the most commonly-used functionality.
  • This is accomplished by defining overarching use-case templates, or scenarios. A single button B1 located on the eyewear controls the current scenario: a short button-push cycles through the available scenarios in a fixed order, while a prolonged (e.g. one-second) button-press immediately selects a predefined “home” scenario. Sufficiently dexterous users can associate other sequences (e.g. appropriately-timed “double-clicks,” etc.) with specific scenarios, but otherwise multiple pushes provide cycling behavior to avoid causing confusion and frustration for users with less developed fine motor skills.
  • Each scenario corresponds to a common vision-related use-case or set of similar use-cases. For example, the device ships preconfigured with three use-case templates:
      • A “plain” scenario that does not apply any processing to the input image (until further customized) preconfigured as the default “home” scenario;
      • A “wide” scenario—suitable (e.g.) for navigating indoors, or watching television—where tiered radial warping is configured with a medium-sized inner circle and moderate magnification so that objects can be recognized at a distance while still maintaining context;
      • A “narrow” scenario—suitable for reading and other close-in work—where tiered radial warping is configured with a relatively large inner circle and high magnification.
  • Additional scenarios can be added in Setup Mode. Because User Mode operation always falls within the context of one of these mutually-exclusive templates, a visual cue is needed to orient the user; a color-coded border or partial-border indicates the currently-selected scenario (e.g. no border for “plain,” a green border for “wide,” and a red border for “narrow”). Colors can be reassigned according to preference and for mnemonic value (e.g. “red” to suggest the “reading” use-case), but clearly fewer scenarios are inherently more manageable.
  • Transitions between scenarios are effected by gradually and smoothly varying the parameters of the various relevant processing effects (e.g. magnification, amount of contrast enhancement, radii in tiered warps). Using a brief but obvious animation gives the user a visual indication of the changes that are occurring. When applicable, further screen annotations can further point out the modifications, e.g. a visible circle that animates to show ac hanging radius. When the user is quickly cycling past multiple scenarios, such animations can be deferred until a final selection is determined.
  • Every scenario is bipartite, comprising one segment used “sustained” viewing and another for “spotting.” Each segment possesses a full set of parameters that can be independently chosen, but are most advantageously selected for complementary usage (as demonstrated by the default preconfigured scenarios, below). When the user activates a scenario, the sustained subset of parameters is applied. A prolonged press of a second device-mounted button B2 changes parameters to the corresponding spotting subset (with accompanying animation); conversely, releasing the button restores sustained settings once again. No border color change or other indicator marks transitions between sustained and spotting segments since they are always coincident with direct user manipulation of button B2. Spotting mode is normally transient, but a discrete command (separate button or voice command) can be used to lock in place indefinitely, until released by a complementary command or B2—an additional unique display element or pattern will unambiguously indicate the locked configuration.
  • The table below illustrates one possible baseline configuration for the three default scenarios, where sustained and spotting characteristics are chosen to complement each other. Consider the “narrow” scenario, primarily intended for reading or similar close-up work using the sustained subset. When tailored to the individual, this reading-optimized sustained configuration might include color mapping or binarization to give high-contrast two-level images. Occasionally, the user may desire to look up and examine the environment or interact with another person without experiencing visual processing artifacts best suited to text processing; the spotting mode expedites reducing magnification and restoring a more natural, less distorted field of view with no color changes for this purpose. This can be further facilitated with automatic adaptive shifting between spotting and sustaining modes, which is discussed later. The other sample scenarios presented here exemplify use-cases where it is desirable to apply more magnification temporarily.
  • Scenario Primary Usage Sustained Segment Spotting Segment
    “Plain” Outdoors No processing Tiered radial warp
    [Outdoor with medium inner
    navigation] radius and high zoom
    [Reading street signs]
    “Wide” Indoors, Tiered radial warp Tiered radial warp
    navigation, with medium inner with medium/large
    TV radius and moderate inner radius and high
    magnification magnification
    [Indoor navigation, [Reading text on TV]
    TV]
    “Narrow” Reading, Tiered radial warp Tiered radial warp
    close-up with large inner with medium inner
    viewing radius, high radius and moderate
    magnification, magnification, no
    strong contrast color mapping
    enhancement or [looking around,
    binarization/ turning page]
    color mapping
    [reading]
  • There are two keys to success with a strategy built upon a small number of templates. The first is per-user customization. During setup mode, a user customizes each of the scenarios to the peculiarities of his vision, viz. the location and size of visual defects, tiered radial warp configuration, preferred amount of magnification, and desired enhancements to contrast or color. This allows the fewest number of presses (of a single button) to reach the most commonly desired personal configurations without delay.
  • The second key to success is supporting further modification within the existing template. Two additional buttons provide this capability.
  • Button B2, when pressed quickly instead of being held down, cycles through or selects within a fixed set of changes. The specific set of changes is fully customizable, even to the point of radically altering the nature of the display. Once again, however, the device remains more usable when easily-remembered or predicted choices are made. For example, in a scenario defined for reading (e.g. the “narrow” scenario above), it is sensible to have B2 cycle through a small number of contrast-enhancement selections, e.g. low enhancement, high enhancement, inverted video, binarization, and inverted binarization. Setup Mode and Training Mode offer a menu of predefined pallets for common tasks.
  • Button B3 works like B2, but has its own collection of settings. For the reading-related scenario, B3 could be defined (e.g.) to toggle reference guide lines on and off independently of any other settings.
  • A fourth control facilitates further fine-tuning of magnification and/or tiered radial warp internal radius. This control is a touch-pad that allows continuous fine adjustment of parameters. By sliding a finger back and forth on the button along one axis (e.g. parallel to the side of the head), the magnification can be changed. Sliding along the other axis (i.e. left-to-right) manipulates the size of the magnified circle. To reduce complexity, the outer circle radius automatically changes along with the inner circle radius in a predefined non-linear fashion. For some users, having two controls share a single touchpad is untenable; in that case, Setup Mode can configure the touchpad to control only magnification directly, and both radii will then be automatically adjusted in conjunction.
  • The four-control (B1, B2, B3, and touchpad) user interface described above exists to provide a minimum viable control mechanism to all users. Its existence is crucial because the presence of an external controller or online data service connection cannot be guaranteed. Some users will be unable to maintain external hardware reliably without misplacing it; other will lack the dexterity or visual ability to use one. When possible, additional buttons will be provided. Additionally, the Eyedaptic visual aid affords a wide variety of control interfaces for more sophisticated and determined users. These interfaces provide fine-grained access to all features and capabilities, and include voice access for spoken commands and responses, handheld Bluetooth controllers, mobile phone or tablet-based applications, and Wifi-based control by computers or other devices. Any of the remote devices can incorporate virtual graphical user interfaces, command-line or scripted interfaces, physical switches and other physically-manipulated controls, or motion-sensing devices. Supporting Wifi, Bluetooth, and other wireless communication schemes also means that controls can originate at great distances.
  • Because the device incorporates motion sensors, they are also part of the user interface. Movements can trigger behavior dependent on the scenario. For example, when operating in a sustained scenario for reading or other close-up work, large head motions can be caused to trigger a switch to associated spotting parameters, allowing the user to re-orient his view; once large-scale motions cease, an automatic return to the sustained reading configuration will occur after a suitable programmed delay. As a more complex example, the amount of magnification can be adjusted to be proportional to the amount of head motion. Automatic image stabilization, which depends in part on these embedded motion sensors, can also be associated with a specific subset of scenarios.
  • With the addition of more interfaces and controls comes even greater flexibility. One important feature that requires more than the minimal user interface is the “floating” scenario. As described above, the touchpad and B2/B3 can be used to fine-tune a scenario. However, such changes are ephemeral, and will be lost as soon as B1 is used to change the scenario. A permanent change to the default settings for a scenario requires returning to Setup Mode. As an expedient alternative, the current configuration can be instantly stored into a designated “floating” scenario via a single button press, voice command, or other well-defined control activation. This allows the user to tailor a custom configuration on-the-fly, creating a corresponding pair of sustained/spotting configurations suited to a specific task without entering Setup Mode. Once created, the floating scenario behaves just like any other scenario except that it retains any changes made to it.
  • Another advanced feature that needs to be voluntarily activated is “autozoom,” or automatic magnification based on text size. In a scenario that is intended to be a reading context (either sustained or spotting), when this feature is activated the images are scanned to look for text or text-like features in the high-acuity portion of the wearer's field of view. A standard Computer Vision/Optical Character Recognition technique such the well-known Stroke Width Transform can be used to locate these features. When detected, the magnification level and/or field-of-view is adjusted to increase small text to the preferred text size for reading. The magnification is never permitted to change too quickly, and is restored to a neutral setting when large head movements are detected. Autozoom can operate fully autonomously, or can be activated in a one-shot fashion by a command.
  • Note that relatively few distinct features converge in this device to give it tremendous power in User Mode without producing overwhelming complexity. A summary of set of independent features displayed in User Mode follows:
      • Selectable scenarios with user defined contents, but typically based on generic, widely-applicable and archetypical templates that are tailored to user preferences
        • Single-button rapid cycling through available scenarios
        • Single-button expedited selection of a designated “home” scenario.
        • Animated transitions to avoid disorientation
        • Scenario indicator via a colored border or partial border
        • Additional two button controls cycle through scenario-dependent options (user-tailored behavior)
      • “Floating” scenario that can be defined on-the-fly
        • Single button or other designated control (not part of minimal interface) to snapshot current configuration as “floating” sustained or spotting parameters
        • Floating scenario retains all changes made to it
      • Unique complementary sustained vs. spotting segments comprising each bipartite scenario.
        • Single-button switching between sustained and spotting behaviors
        • Motion-based switching between sustained and spotting behaviors (not necessarily symmetric)
        • Ability to lock or unlock spotting mode (which is normally transient) via a discrete command
          • Unambiguous additional displayed element or pattern indicates locked configuration
        • Animated transitions to avoid disorientation
      • Tiered radial warping (described in detail elsewhere) with continuous field-of-view and magnification adjustment
        • Touchpad control of FOV and magnification parameters in real-time
        • Magnification, inner, and outer radius parameters individually controlled, OR
        • Magnification and inner radius individually controlled with outer radius automatically adjusted in a consistent and visually pleasing way, OR
        • Magnification individually controlled, with the two radii automatically adjusted in a consistent and visually pleasing way.
          • Automatic magnification adjustment based on head movement, with increased FOV and decreased magnification accompanying larger movements
      • Basic contrast adjustment (for global contrast)
      • Local contrast adjustment using unsharp masking to induce prominent high-contrast halos (“Britext”) at image transitions, particularly text, in order to improve reading ability and speed; although this is a continuously-varying parameter, it is anticipated that any given user will prefer to use a small number of settings (e.g. “moderate” and “very high”).
    Setup Mode
  • This mode can be entered from User Mode, and can be utilized by the user, the trainer, or someone helping the user to configure their device. This mode supports not only initial setup and registration plus later configuration changes to override existing User Mode settings, but also constitutes a prerequisite gateway to the other special-purpose modes, Training Mode and Update Mode, which can only be entered from Setup Mode.
  • Functions provided here are deliberately limited to avoid confusing the untrained user, but still provide a high degree of utility and customizability. The determined and capable user can perform further customizations by entering Training Mode.
  • Setup Mode functions are:
      • Registration—User data such as name, date, contact information, etc. is entered. This does not typically change after initial setup, but can be updated as desired.
      • Rough calibration of visual field—A short device-directed exercise is used to obtain a very rough estimate of the size, shape, and placement of a central scotoma or other visual field defect for later use in automatically adapting the processing to the user's visual characteristics.
      • Magnification and FOV—A short device-directed exercise is used to help the user select desired amounts of magnification under conditions simulating typical visual tasks, such as reading or navigating. Field of view is automatically adjusted based on requested magnification, with the exact formula depending on the measured visual field. Preferred text size is also configured here for use with automatic zooming.
      • Contrast—A short device-directed exercise assists the user in selecting preferred contrast enhancements under conditions simulating typical visual tasks that often require improved contrast (e.g. reading).
      • Mode indicator configuration—Allows the user to override the automatic choices made for indicating mode changes in the display; typically the user will adjust this to obtain mnemonically-useful results, e.g. “red” for “reading.”
      • Control interface—The user can enable or disable voice control, external controllers, and other control-related options (e.g. to limit the control scheme in User Mode for a low-dexterity user).
  • For the most part, the basic Setup Mode makes a large number of complex processing decisions based on a small number of interactive user decisions. The result is expected to be satisfactory for a majority of users; those who desire further customization must turn to Training Mode.
  • Training Mode
  • This mode is targeted for trainers, usual Low Vision Specialists or Occupational Therapists who help the users with their low vision training. This offers the capabilities of Setup Mode available to either the trainer or user, but layers on many novel features. During training mode, the trainer has external control of the device via a wirelessly-linked console or tablet. He or she can monitor what the camera captures by using an external display, and can also provide the wearer with alternate visual displays or overlayed annotations that aid in the training process. The trainer directs the flow of the training session, giving limited control to the wearer only for the purpose of making user-directed responses or adjustments under guidance. User-based control of the state (mode) is limited to abandoning Training Mode via the same control sequence that initiates Setup Mode; this facility is provided mainly for the case where Training Mode has been accidentally activated.
  • Features used to both calibrate the user's affliction as well as to provide various training aspects for the user for more effective use of the AR visual aid include the following: Initial setup (see Setup Mode)—Before entering training mode the trainer will enter into setup mode for initial setup of data entry, registration and default user settings.
  • Clock face scotoma mapping—This module gives the ability to establish a rough map of the users scotoma or visual defect in order to better understand their low vision affliction and needs. The clock face methodology, which presents only the numbers associated with a traditional clock face, is instantly recognizable and relatable to most users. Once a rough mapping of a visual field defect is established based on visibility of numbers at the standard twelve positions on a clock faces of various sizes, those same positions can be used to grade acuity further by varying the brightness or size of the numbers, or using the well-known “oriented-E” technique.
  • Eye movement control & fixation training—This module guides the user in a training regime in order to better control eye movement and fixation in order to optimize usefulness of the augmented reality device. This includes displayed guide lines and targets to help both the user and trainer. It may also include eye tracking in order for the trainer to better understand the user's particular needs.
  • Eccentric Viewing & Peripheral Vision Adaptation—Further modules are included to guide the trainer and user in order for the user to more effectively and consistently utilize their peripheral vision. This includes more quickly adapting to the most effective eccentric viewing technique and preferred retinal locus.
  • Contextual Viewing & Inclusion with Hybrid Distortion—In order to better utilize the full FOV of the augmented reality device and take advantage of the nonlinear transformations that maximize the field of vision, this training module to help the user understand and adapt to this view is utilized. This feature also supports training for reading in the presence of the nonlinear transformation, both with and without the presence of reference guidelines. Gamification of Training—The above modules can be gamified to help the user practice and improve over time. Many such games can be constructed to help improve fixation, eccentric viewing, contextual viewing and adaptation.
  • Distortion Mapping—As described elsewhere, when distortion is present in a user's field of view, a mapping can be interactively fashioned to reflect the details of this distortion. In training mode this map can be constructed with help of the trainer/specialists for later use to undistort the user's vision.
  • Training Mode also functions as an Enhanced Setup Mode, providing the trained facilitator with a number of graphical user interface tools for tailoring the device to a specific user's requirements. Whereas the standard Setup Mode provides a low-complexity route to semi-custom settings suitable for an equivalence-class of users who make the same choices in the basic Setup Mode, Training Mode allows for detailed customization to the specific user. Whenever none of the special training module functions is engaged, the device is nominally providing this Enhanced Setup capability. During this period, it displays a distinctive “Training Mode” status indicator but responds to standard user inputs as if in User Mode; however, the trainer can also manipulate the configuration. In fact, the trainer is permitted to enable, disable, or adjust any feature or mode at any time, even during the execution of a training module. This freedom allows is issues to be addressed or experiments to be performed without having to suspend the current activity.
  • For example, the facilitator can narrow down the wide array of possible parameter combinations presented by the device by choosing from a set of tool palettes that contain archetypical configurations for various conditions, e.g. Age-related Macular Degeneration, Retinitis Pigmentosa, etc. This initial choice subsequently determines the baseline scenarios selected for User Mode. Additional adjustments made during Training mode can automatically fine-tune these for the user. The initial choice also restricts the suggested processing options to help the trainer test and evaluate their utility for the specific user, but the facilitator always has the option of incorporating any feature combination into a user's configuration.
  • Update Mode
  • When update mode is entered from Setup Mode, the operator can initiate a request to check for available software updates or patches. The device will attempt to satisfy this request by connecting to a remote server via an available wireless or tethered interface. If the device is not up-to-date, the user will be asked to confirm a desire to perform the update. Once confirmed, the update will occur automatically.
  • Interrupted updates that are recoverable (e.g. due to loss of connection) will prompt the operator for a decision about continuing or returning to Setup Mode. Unrecoverable interruptions (e.g. loss of power) will require a restart into User Mode, and will be accompanied by a warning message.
  • While several embodiments of the present disclosure have been described and illustrated herein, those of ordinary skill in the art will readily envision a variety of other means and/or structures for performing the functions and/or obtaining the results and/or one or more of the advantages described herein, and each of such variations and/or modifications is deemed to be within the scope of the present disclosure. More generally, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that all parameters, dimensions, materials, and configurations described herein are meant to be exemplary and that the actual parameters, dimensions, materials, and/or configurations will depend upon the specific application or applications for which the teachings of the present disclosure is/are used.
  • Those skilled in the art will recognize, or be able to ascertain using no more than routine experimentation, many equivalents to the specific embodiments of the disclosure described herein. It is, therefore, to be understood that the foregoing embodiments are presented by way of example only and that, within the scope of the appended claims and equivalents thereto, the disclosure may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described and claimed. The present disclosure is directed to each individual feature, system, article, material, kit, and/or method described herein. In addition, any combination of two or more such features, systems, articles, materials, kits, and/or methods, if such features, systems, articles, materials, kits, and/or methods are not mutually inconsistent, is included within the scope of the present disclosure.
  • All definitions, as defined and used herein, should be understood to control over dictionary definitions, definitions in documents incorporated by reference, and/or ordinary meanings of the defined terms.
  • Unless otherwise indicated, all numbers expressing quantities of ingredients, properties such as molecular weight, reaction conditions, and so forth used in the specification and claims are to be understood as being modified in all instances by the term “about.” Accordingly, unless indicated to the contrary, the numerical parameters set forth in the specification and attached claims are approximations that may vary depending upon the desired properties sought to be obtained by the present invention. At the very least, and not as an attempt to limit the application of the doctrine of equivalents to the scope of the claims, each numerical parameter should at least be construed in light of the number of reported significant digits and by applying ordinary rounding techniques. Notwithstanding that the numerical ranges and parameters setting forth the broad scope of the invention are approximations, the numerical values set forth in the specific examples are reported as precisely as possible. Any numerical value, however, inherently contains certain errors necessarily resulting from the standard deviation found in their respective testing measurements.
  • The terms “a,” “an,” “the” and similar referents used in the context of describing the invention (especially in the context of the following claims) are to be construed to cover both the singular and the plural, unless otherwise indicated herein or clearly contradicted by context. Recitation of ranges of values herein is merely intended to serve as a shorthand method of referring individually to each separate value falling within the range. Unless otherwise indicated herein, each individual value is incorporated into the specification as if it were individually recited herein. All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., “such as”) provided herein is intended merely to better illuminate the invention and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the invention otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element essential to the practice of the invention.
  • Groupings of alternative elements or embodiments of the invention disclosed herein are not to be construed as limitations. Each group member may be referred to and claimed individually or in any combination with other members of the group or other elements found herein. It is anticipated that one or more members of a group may be included in, or deleted from, a group for reasons of convenience and/or patentability. When any such inclusion or deletion occurs, the specification is deemed to contain the group as modified thus fulfilling the written description of all Markush groups used in the appended claims.
  • Certain embodiments of this invention are described herein, including the best mode known to the inventors for carrying out the invention. Of course, variations on these described embodiments will become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon reading the foregoing description. The inventor expects skilled artisans to employ such variations as appropriate, and the inventors intend for the invention to be practiced otherwise than specifically described herein. Accordingly, this invention includes all modifications and equivalents of the subject matter recited in the claims appended hereto as permitted by applicable law. Moreover, any combination of the above-described elements in all possible variations thereof is encompassed by the invention unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context.
  • Specific embodiments disclosed herein may be further limited in the claims using consisting of or consisting essentially of language. When used in the claims, whether as filed or added per amendment, the transition term “consisting of” excludes any element, step, or ingredient not specified in the claims. The transition term “consisting essentially of” limits the scope of a claim to the specified materials or steps and those that do not materially affect the basic and novel characteristic(s). Embodiments of the invention so claimed are inherently or expressly described and enabled herein.
  • As one skilled in the art would recognize as necessary or best-suited for performance of the methods of the invention, a computer system or machines of the invention include one or more processors (e.g., a central processing unit (CPU) a graphics processing unit (GPU) or both), a main memory and a static memory, which communicate with each other via a bus.
  • A processor may be provided by one or more processors including, for example, one or more of a single core or multi-core processor (e.g., AMD Phenom II X2, Intel Core Duo, AMD Phenom II X4, Intel Core i5, Intel Core i& Extreme Edition 980X, or Intel Xeon E7-2820).
  • An I/O mechanism may include a video display unit (e.g., a liquid crystal display (LCD) or a cathode ray tube (CRT)), an alphanumeric input device (e.g., a keyboard), a cursor control device (e.g., a mouse), a disk drive unit, a signal generation device (e.g., a speaker), an accelerometer, a microphone, a cellular radio frequency antenna, and a network interface device (e.g., a network interface card (NIC), Wi-Fi card, cellular modem, data jack, Ethernet port, modem jack, HDMI port, mini-HDMI port, USB port), touchscreen (e.g., CRT, LCD, LED, AMOLED, Super AMOLED), pointing device, trackpad, light (e.g., LED), light/image projection device, or a combination thereof.
  • Memory according to the invention refers to a non-transitory memory which is provided by one or more tangible devices which preferably include one or more machine-readable medium on which is stored one or more sets of instructions (e.g., software) embodying any one or more of the methodologies or functions described herein. The software may also reside, completely or at least partially, within the main memory, processor, or both during execution thereof by a computer within system, the main memory and the processor also constituting machine-readable media. The software may further be transmitted or received over a network via the network interface device.
  • While the machine-readable medium can in an exemplary embodiment be a single medium, the term “machine-readable medium” should be taken to include a single medium or multiple media (e.g., a centralized or distributed database, and/or associated caches and servers) that store the one or more sets of instructions. The term “machine-readable medium” shall also be taken to include any medium that is capable of storing, encoding or carrying a set of instructions for execution by the machine and that cause the machine to perform any one or more of the methodologies of the present invention. Memory may be, for example, one or more of a hard disk drive, solid state drive (SSD), an optical disc, flash memory, zip disk, tape drive, “cloud” storage location, or a combination thereof. In certain embodiments, a device of the invention includes a tangible, non-transitory computer readable medium for memory. Exemplary devices for use as memory include semiconductor memory devices, (e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, solid state drive (SSD), and flash memory devices e.g., SD, micro SD, SDXC, SDIO, SDHC cards); magnetic disks, (e.g., internal hard disks or removable disks); and optical disks (e.g., CD and DVD disks).
  • Furthermore, numerous references have been made to patents and printed publications throughout this specification. Each of the above-cited references and printed publications are individually incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • In closing, it is to be understood that the embodiments of the invention disclosed herein are illustrative of the principles of the present invention. Other modifications that may be employed are within the scope of the invention. Thus, by way of example, but not of limitation, alternative configurations of the present invention may be utilized in accordance with the teachings herein. Accordingly, the present invention is not limited to that precisely as shown and described.

Claims (27)

What is claimed is:
1. In a system for dramatically changing display of the environment to a user, the improvements comprising, in combination:
a means-for-direct user control of image modification;
instantaneous visual feedback; and a structural software process guiding a user to address large-scale appearance before fine-tuning smaller details, to tailor the subject outputs to optimized visual enhancement to address visual defects, whereby relatively intact peripheral vision can be used to provide data to be used to improve central vision impacted by degradation of the macula.
2. The system of claim 1, further comprising use of eccentric viewing through patient adaptation to increase functionality such as reading, by viewing words in context, for example.
3. The system of claim 2, whereby a user's field of view (FOV) is not decreased by overmagnification, rather automated by use of Augment Reality (AR) methodologies.
4. The system of claim 3, wherein the continuous-space model for camera's inputs and displayed FOVs is governed by a class of radial mapping function with simple parameterizations having limited degrees of freedom, lending them to intuitive adjustment by un-trained users.'
5. The system of claim 4, further comprising fixation training, for example, gamification accomplished by following fixation target around a display screen in conjunction with at least one of a hand held pointer and voice active controls.
6. The system of claim 5, further comprising, in combination:
Grid-based mapping functions;
Composability and scalability of warps;
Visual updates in real-time and temporally independent ability to adjust and fine-tune the subject models.
7. The system of claim 6, disposed within a device, lense, IOL, two or three dimensional film, sheet, modular assembly of integrated components, and any type of internal or external framed glasses skeleton, infrastructure or housing or frame being wearable and non-invasive to a user.
8. An adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement and correction useful for addressing ocular disease states, which comprises, in combination;
Software using at least one feature programmed to simulate improved functional vision for a user from a matrix selected from the group consisting of:
Hybrid magnification & warping; FOV dependent on head tracking;
Word shifting with “target lines”; Central radial warping;
Interactive on the fly FOV mapping; Dynamic Zoom;
OCR & Font change adaptation; Distortion Grid adjustment;
Scotoma interactive adjustment; and,
Adaptive peripheral vision training.
9. An adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 8 and correction useful for identifying, diagnosing for addressing, or otherwise mitigating ocular disease states, comprising hardware which further comprises, at least the following features and their functional equivalents:
At least a wearable machine or manufacture of matter in the state of the art effective for managing;
One button wireless update;
Stabilization & targeting training;
Targeting lines & crosshairs for eye fixation & tracking;
Interactive voice recognition and control;
Reading & text recognition mode;
Voice memo; and
Mode shift transitions.
10. An adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement and correction useful for addressing ocular disease states, which comprises in combination:
At least a set of hardware capable of implementing user-driven adjustments, driven by any subject software described herein to effectively manage;
Hybrid magnification & warping
FOV dependent on head tracking
Word shifting with “target lines”
Central radial warping
Interactive on the fly FOV mapping
Dynamic Zoom
OCR & Font change adaptation
Distortion Grid adjustment
Scotoma interactive adjustment
Adaptive peripheral vision training;
In combination in whole or in part with:
One button wireless update
Stabilization & targeting training
Training lines & crosshairs for eye fixation & tracking
Interactive voice recognition mode
Voice memo, and
Mode shift transitions.
11. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement defined in claim 10, further comprising, in combination:
On-boarded—batteries; Bluetooth-wifi connection; charging and data ports.
12. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement in claim 11, further comprising, in combination:
On-boarded—dual stereoscopic see-thru displays and an autofocus camera.
13. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement 12, further comprising, in combination:
On-boarded—processing and accelerometer gyroscope magnetometer chips.
14. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 13, manifested within and:
Graphically user interfaced through basic set up mode displays and training mode displays; wherein user registration; visual field calibration; field of view definition; contrast configuration indicator configuration and control registration function in tandem.
15. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 14 Further comprising training mode displays.
16. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 15 further comprising software updates.
17. An adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement further comprising processes for driving the ACDS for adaptive peripheral vision training.
18. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 17, further comprising processes for driving the ACDS for adaptive Eccentric viewing Training.
19. The adaptive control driven system/CDS for visual enhancement of claim 18, further comprising pupil tracking with customizable offset for eccentric viewing.
20. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 19, further comprising means for enabling users to experience gamification, namely following fixation targets around screen for training.
21. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 20, further comprising targeting lines overlaid on reality for fixation.
22. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 21, further comprising guided fixation across page or landscape w/head tracking.
23. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 22, further comprising guided fixation with words moving across screen at fixed rates.
24. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 23, further comprising guided fixation with words moving at variable rates triggered by user.
25. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 24, further comprising guided training & controlling eye movements with tracking lines.
26. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 25, further comprising look ahead preview to piece together words for increased reading speed.
27. The adaptive control driven system/ACDS for visual enhancement of claim 26 further comprising distortion training to improve fixation.
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