US20180070916A9 - Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer - Google Patents

Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20180070916A9
US20180070916A9 US14/989,732 US201614989732A US2018070916A9 US 20180070916 A9 US20180070916 A9 US 20180070916A9 US 201614989732 A US201614989732 A US 201614989732A US 2018070916 A9 US2018070916 A9 US 2018070916A9
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
needle
shaft
actuation mechanism
tines
handle
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US14/989,732
Other versions
US20160113621A1 (en
Inventor
Robert K. Deckman
Brian Placek
Michael A. Munrow
Craig Gerbi
Jessica Grossman
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Gynesonics Inc
Original Assignee
Gynesonics Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/409,496 priority Critical patent/US7815571B2/en
Priority to US11/564,164 priority patent/US7874986B2/en
Priority to US12/198,861 priority patent/US20100056926A1/en
Priority to PCT/US2009/054956 priority patent/WO2010027820A1/en
Priority to US12/973,587 priority patent/US8506485B2/en
Priority to US13/023,383 priority patent/US8206300B2/en
Priority to US13/484,076 priority patent/US20170332998A9/en
Application filed by Gynesonics Inc filed Critical Gynesonics Inc
Priority to US14/989,732 priority patent/US20180070916A9/en
Assigned to GYNESONICS, INC. reassignment GYNESONICS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GERBI, CRAIG, GROSSMAN, JESSICA, MUNROW, MICHAEL A., PLACEK, BRIAN, DECKMAN, ROBERT K.
Publication of US20160113621A1 publication Critical patent/US20160113621A1/en
Publication of US20180070916A9 publication Critical patent/US20180070916A9/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/12Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves in body cavities or body tracts, e.g. by using catheters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1485Probes or electrodes therefor having a short rigid shaft for accessing the inner body through natural openings
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/08Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings
    • A61B8/0833Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings involving detecting or locating foreign bodies or organic structures
    • A61B8/0841Detecting organic movements or changes, e.g. tumours, cysts, swellings involving detecting or locating foreign bodies or organic structures for locating instruments
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/44Constructional features of the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic diagnostic device
    • A61B8/4444Constructional features of the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic diagnostic device related to the probe
    • A61B8/445Details of catheter construction
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B8/00Diagnosis using ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic waves
    • A61B8/44Constructional features of the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic diagnostic device
    • A61B8/4444Constructional features of the ultrasonic, sonic or infrasonic diagnostic device related to the probe
    • A61B8/4461Features of the scanning mechanism, e.g. for moving the transducer within the housing of the probe
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/34Trocars; Puncturing needles
    • A61B17/3403Needle locating or guiding means
    • A61B2017/3413Needle locating or guiding means guided by ultrasound
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00053Mechanical features of the instrument of device
    • A61B2018/0016Energy applicators arranged in a two- or three dimensional array
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00315Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for treatment of particular body parts
    • A61B2018/00559Female reproductive organs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00571Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for achieving a particular surgical effect
    • A61B2018/00577Ablation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B2018/1405Electrodes having a specific shape
    • A61B2018/1425Needle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B2018/1405Electrodes having a specific shape
    • A61B2018/1425Needle
    • A61B2018/143Needle multiple needles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B2018/1405Electrodes having a specific shape
    • A61B2018/1425Needle
    • A61B2018/1432Needle curved
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B2018/1475Electrodes retractable in or deployable from a housing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/36Image-producing devices or illumination devices not otherwise provided for
    • A61B90/37Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation
    • A61B2090/378Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation using ultrasound
    • A61B2090/3782Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation using ultrasound transmitter or receiver in catheter or minimal invasive instrument
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B90/00Instruments, implements or accessories specially adapted for surgery or diagnosis and not covered by any of the groups A61B1/00 - A61B50/00, e.g. for luxation treatment or for protecting wound edges
    • A61B90/36Image-producing devices or illumination devices not otherwise provided for
    • A61B90/37Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation
    • A61B2090/378Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation using ultrasound
    • A61B2090/3782Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation using ultrasound transmitter or receiver in catheter or minimal invasive instrument
    • A61B2090/3784Surgical systems with images on a monitor during operation using ultrasound transmitter or receiver in catheter or minimal invasive instrument both receiver and transmitter being in the instrument or receiver being also transmitter

Abstract

A system for imaging and treating tissue comprises a probe having a deflectable distal tip for carrying an imaging array and a delivery needle for advancement within a field of view of the imaging array. Optionally, the needle will carry a plurality of tines which may be selectively radially deployed from the needle. The imaging array will preferably be provided in a separate, removable component.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/484,076 (Attorney Docket no. 31992-711.501), filed May 30, 2012, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/023,383 (Attorney Docket No. 31992-711.301), filed Feb. 8, 2011, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,206,300, which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/198,861 (Attorney Docket No. 31992-711.201), filed on Aug. 26, 2008; U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/484,076 (Attorney Docket no. 31992-711.501) is also a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/973,587 (Attorney Docket No. 31992-706.301) filed Dec. 20, 2010, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,506,485, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/564,164 (Attorney Docket No. 31992-706.501) filed Nov. 28, 2006, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,874,986, which is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 11/409,496 (Attorney Docket No. 31992-706.201) filed Apr. 20, 2006, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,815,571, the full disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention relates generally to medical devices and methods. More particularly, the present invention relates to an imaging and therapy device having a deployable treatment needle or needles and a pivotal imaging array.
  • Uterine fibroids are benign tumors in the uterine wall and are the most common tumor of the female pelvis. Fibroids afflict up to 30% of women of childbearing age and can cause significant symptoms including discomfort, pelvic pain, mennorhagia (excessive bleeding), anemia, infertility, and miscarriage. While fibroids may be located in the muscle (intramural), adjacent to the endometrium (submucosal), or in the outer layer of the uterus (subserosal), and can grow up to several centimeters in diameter.
  • Current treatments for fibroids include both pharmaceutical and surgical intervention. Pharmaceutical treatments include the administration of NSAIDS, estrogen-progesterone combinations, and the like. Medications, however, are generally ineffective and are palliative rather than curative. Surgical interventions include myomectomy, where fibroids are removed in an open surgical procedure requiring laparotomy and general anesthesia, and hysterectomy, involving complete surgical removal of the uterus. Both these procedures are long and have significant blood loss.
  • As improvements over open surgical procedures, several minimally invasive procedures have been developed. Laparoscopic myomectomy is a laparoscopic procedure requiring highly skilled laparoscopic gynecologists. Uterine artery embolization relies on blocking the uterine artery supplying blood to the fibroid by injecting small particles. While sometimes effective, common complications of arterial embolization include infection, premature menopause, and severe pelvic pain. A third approach relies on complete endometrial ablation, which is generally effective for treating bleeding but less reliable for treating fibroids.
  • More recently, and of particular interest to the present invention, the use of radiofrequency needles and other ablation elements for treating individual fibroids via a transvaginal approach has been proposed. As described, for example, in U.S. Patent Publications 2006/0189972; 2007/0179380; and 2008/0033493, each of which is commonly assigned with the present application, a probe carrying a curved needle is used to treat individual fibroids. The probe carries on-board ultrasonic or other imaging so that the needle can be guided into the fibroid under direct observation. While highly effective in many cases, accurate advancement of a curved needle into a fibroid can be problematic. Moreover, use of a single needle does not always deliver sufficient energy to fully ablate relatively large fibroids.
  • For these reasons, it would be desirable to provide alternative devices and methods for treating, ablating, or removing uterine fibroids and other tissue masses. It would be particularly desirable if such methods and devices were able to treat uterine fibroids which are large, difficult to penetrate, or which otherwise resist treatment with curved and laterally deployed needles. At least some of these objectives will be met by the inventions described below.
  • 2. Brief Description of the Background Art
  • The following US Patent Publications discussed above are relevant to the present invention: 2006/0189972; 2007/0179380; and 2008/0033493. See also US Patent Publication 2007/0249936. The disclosures of each of these applications is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides apparatus and methods for imaging and treating fibroids and other tumors and tissue masses located in the walls of a uterus or other body cavity. The apparatus and systems comprise a straight shaft having a distal end and a proximal end. A delivery needle, preferably straight, is reciprocatably coupled to the shaft, typically being mounted in a straight lumen in the shaft, so that a tissue-penetrating tip of the needle can be distally advanced from the shaft along an axial path. The delivery needle may carry tines forming a needle array, deployable from within the delivery needle. A tip or other structure is pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and is moveable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path. The pivotable tip carries or comprises an ultrasonic imaging array, and the tip can be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as the needle is advanced along the axial path.
  • The combination of a straight shaft, delivery needle, and pivotally attached tip or imaging array has a number of advantages. The straight shaft and needle can be advanced with precision into tissue surrounding the body cavity, where the needle can be made sufficiently strong to resist unwanted deflection of the type which could occur with other needle configurations. The use of a delivery needle and shaft also enables and facilitates the deployment of a needle array, including a plurality of tines, from the delivery needle to increase the volume of tissue being treated with the needle array. The pivotable imaging array allows straightening of the imaging array to provide a low profile for introduction through the cervix into the uterus, while also allowing reorientation to cover a wide range of viewing fields after entering the uterus or other body cavity to permit locating fibroids and other tumors and to further follow the advance of the needle array into the fibroids or other tumors. It should be noted that in the preferred embodiment, the delivery needle is for delivery only, and does not provide treatment. In alternative embodiments, the delivery needle may be used for treatment. The pivotable tip further allows the effective field of view of the ultrasound image to be increased by pivoting the tip, which has the effect of sweeping the ultrasound image. The tip may be pivoted to enhance the view of the delivery needle and/or the needle array, including tines.
  • In a preferred embodiment, an imaging and therapeutic delivery system includes a straight shaft having a distal end and a proximal end and a straight needle reciprocatably coupled to the shaft so that a tissue-penetrating tip on the needle can be distally advanced from the shaft along an axial path and a tip pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and movable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path. An ultrasonic imaging array is carried by the pivotally attached tip, wherein the tip can be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as it is advanced along the axial path so as to sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged. The tip is offset from the axial path of the needle.
  • In certain preferred embodiments, an imaging and therapeutic delivery system includes a straight shaft having a distal end and a proximal end. A needle is reciprocatably coupled to the shaft so that a tissue-penetrating tip on the needle can be distally advanced from the shaft along an axial path, said needle exiting said shaft at an angle of 0 degrees relative to said shaft. A tip is pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and movable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path. An ultrasonic imaging array is carried by the pivotally attached tip, wherein the tip can be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as the needle is advanced along the axial path so as to sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the imaging array will be formed on an imaging core, where the imaging core is removably positionable in the straight shaft so that the imaging array extends into the pivotally attached tip. The straight shaft will usually be rigid while the imaging core is relatively flexible, allowing the imaging core to bend at the point where the tip is pivotally attached to the shaft. In alternate embodiments, the needle assembly may be attached directly to the ultrasound probe or the imaging core may be hinged at the point where the tip is pivotally attached to the shaft.
  • In certain preferred embodiments, the delivery needle will carry a needle array having at least one tine which can be advanced from the delivery needle, usually carrying a plurality of tines, where the tines are reciprocatably attached to the delivery needle to permit deployment and retraction, usually after the delivery needle has been advanced into target tissue. A plurality of tines will usually be arranged to radially diverge from the delivery needle as the tines are distally advanced. Optionally, at least one additional tine may be reciprocatably mounted on the delivery needle in a range to be advanced axially from the needle, often forming a center axis to a symmetric deployment of radially diverging tines. In order to localize the treatment, the tines may be electrically conductive while the delivery needle itself is electrically non-conductive or insulating. In such cases, the tines may be arranged to be connected to a single pole of an electrosurgical power supply in order to provide for monopolar treatment. Alternatively, a certain number of the tines may be adopted to one pole of the power supply while others are connected to the other pole, providing for bipolar treatment.
  • In certain exemplary embodiments, the imaging and therapeutic delivery system will further comprise a handle attached to the proximal end of the straight shaft. The handle may include a lever coupled to the pivotally attached distal tip by one or more pull rods. The lever can be pulled or pushed to actuate the pull rod(s) to pivot the tip. Additionally, the handle may include a first slide mechanism coupled to the delivery needle, where the slide mechanism can be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path. In the embodiments which include the plurality of tines, the tines may be reciprocatably attached to the delivery needle and connected to a second slide mechanism on the handle, optionally being disposed on the first slide mechanism itself, to advance and retract the tines relative to the needle. Optionally, a stop structure may be disposed on the pivotally attached tip so that the stop structure prevents advancement of the needle when the tip is parallel to the axial path of the needle.
  • The present invention also comprises methods for treating uterine fibroids. The methods include introducing a straight shaft into the uterus. Uterine fibroids are then located using an ultrasonic imaging transducer carried by or formed as part of a pivotable tip attached to a distal end of the shaft. The tip is pivoted to reposition a field of view of the ultrasonic transducer carried by the tip. Optionally, the tip may block advancement of the needle when disposed parallel to the shaft (prior to deployment) and allow advancement when pivoted from the parallel orientation. A delivery needle may be axially advanced from the distal tip of the shaft into tissue near or in a uterine fibroid located using the ultrasonic transducer. Advancement of the needle may be observed by the transducer by aligning the field of view with the needle advancement.
  • In preferred aspects of the methods of the present invention, the shaft is introduced to the uterus via a transvaginal and transcervical introduction. Locating fibroids may comprise manually rotating and translating the shaft to scan the uterine wall with the ultrasonic transducer. Locating may also comprise pivoting the ultrasonic transducer to adjust the field of view. Optionally, an array including a plurality of tines may be advanced from the delivery needle after the needle has been advanced into tissue at or near the uterine fibroid. This method will sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged. The fibroid is then treated by delivering energy from the needle and/or tines into the fibroid, typically radiofrequency energy, including both monopolar and bipolar radiofrequency energy. Usually, the tines will be electrically active to deliver the radiofrequency energy while the delivery needle is electrically non-conductive to limit the distribution of energy in the uterine wall or other tissue being treated.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B are perspective views of an imaging and therapeutic delivery system constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention shown with portions broken away. In FIG. 1A, a delivery needle and array including radially diverging tines are retracted within the shaft of the device, and a pivotally attached tip is shown in axial alignment with the axial deployment path of the needle. In FIG. 1B, the delivery needle and associated tines are shown in their deployed configuration with the pivotally attached tip shown oriented at an acute angle relative to the axial advancement path of the needle.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the imaging and therapeutic delivery system of FIGS. 1A and 1B in cross-section. FIG. 2A is a detail of the distal tip of the device illustrated in FIG. 2. FIGS. 2B and 2C illustrate a stop structure on the pivotally attached tip which prevents needle advancement prior to deployment of the tip.
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate the pivotal tip deployment mechanism in detail, also in cross-section.
  • FIGS. 4A-4C illustrate the relative movement of the deployment mechanism and the pivotal tip, as the deployment mechanism is actuated.
  • FIGS. 5 and 6 are side and top views of the imaging and therapeutic delivery system shown with portions broken away in a non-deployed configuration.
  • FIGS. 7 and 8 are views similar to FIGS. 5 and 6, except that the delivery needle has been deployed and the pivotally attached tip has been positioned at an acute angle.
  • FIGS. 9 and 10 are views similar to FIGS. 5 and 6 and FIGS. 7 and 8, respectively, further illustrating the deployment of the needle array, comprising radially diverging tines from the delivery needle.
  • FIGS. 11A and 11B illustrate deployment of the delivery needle and tines into tissue.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates a system without an ablation needle.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring to FIGS. 1A and 1B, an imaging and therapeutic delivery system constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention comprises a straight shaft assembly 12 including a hollow rod 14 and a needle tube 16. A tip 18 which is adapted to receive an ultrasonic imaging array (shown in broken line at 38) is pivotally attached to a distal end 20 of the hollow rod 14 of the straight shaft assembly 12. A needle and tine array 21 (FIG. 1B) is deployed through a lumen or central passage in the needle tube 16 at a distal end 20 of the shaft assembly 12. A handle assembly 22 is attached to a proximal end 24 of the straight shaft assembly 12 and includes a pivoting mechanism 26, typically found on its lower surface as illustrated, for selectively pivoting the imaging array tip 18 between a low profile configuration where the tip 18 is axially aligned with the axis of the shaft assembly 12, as illustrated in FIG. 1A, and a deflected configuration where the tip 18 is oriented at an acute or right angle relative to the axis of the shaft, as illustrated in FIG. 1B. The tip 18 may be placed in its axially aligned, low profile configuration for introduction to the body cavity, for example through the cervix into the uterus, and may be shifted to its deflected configuration in order to image tissue and/or to track deployment of the needle/tine array 21. As described in more detail below, the pivoting mechanism 26 includes a lever 28 which may be manually retracted from the distally advanced configuration shown in FIG. 1A to the proximally retracted configuration shown in FIG. 1B in order to pivot the tip 18.
  • The handle 22 will also include a delivery needle/tine deployment mechanism 30 which includes a first slide subassembly 32 and a second slide subassembly 34. The handle will usually further include a port 36 at its proximal end. Port 36 allows introduction of an ultrasonic or other imaging core, where the imaging core has an imaging array 38, typically an ultrasonic imaging array as described in detail in copending application Ser. No. 11/620,594; and parent application Ser. No. 11/564,164; and Ser. No. 12/973,587, the full disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference. The proximal end of the handle will also allow electrical connections to be made to the needle/tine array. Additionally, the distal end of the handle will provide a standard luer connection for the infusion of non-conductive coupling fluids.
  • Optionally, a stop structure 19 may be attached to an upper surface of the pivotally attached tip 18, as illustrated in FIGS. 2B and 2C. When the tip 18 is parallel to the axis of the shaft (hollow rod 14), the stop structure 19 will block the advancement path of the needle 16 (as shown in FIG. 2B). This is advantageous since it prevents accidental needle advancement while the shaft assembly 12 is in the introductory configuration. Deployment of the tip 18, as shown in FIG. 2C, moves the stop structure 19 out of the advancement path of the needle 16, as described below.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 2, 2A, 3A, and 3B, operation of the pivot mechanism 26 for selectively deflecting the tip 18 disposed at the distal end of the straight shaft assembly 12 will be described. For clarity, components of the first slide assembly 32 and second slide assembly 34 have been removed from the view in FIG. 2. The tip 18 is pivotally attached at the distal end 20 of the straight shaft assembly 12 by a pivot pin 40 or similar structure, as best seen in FIG. 2A. A pair of pull rods 42 are attached at anchors 44 so that drawing the wires in a proximal direction will deflect the tip 18 from an axially aligned configuration, as shown in broken line in FIG. 2A, to the deflected configuration, as shown in full line in FIG. 2A. The rods 42 extend through tubes 46 disposed on each side of the hollow rod 14 of the shaft assembly 12. As best seen in FIGS. 3A and 3B, the rods 42 are attached at their proximal ends to a rotating anchor 50 disposed in lever 28. Thus, by drawing the lever 28 proximally, as shown in FIG. 3A, the tip 18 may be laterally deflected, as shown in full line in FIG. 2A. Conversely, by pushing the lever 28 in a distal direction, as shown in FIG. 3B, the tip 18 may be returned to the axially aligned configuration as shown in broken line in FIG. 2A. The lever 28 is pivotally attached to the body of handle 22 by a pivot pin 48 so that the anchor 50 is offset from the point of rotation of the lever 28. Thus, the anchor 50 is actually translated as the lever is rotated back and forth about the pivot pin 48.
  • A locking pin 52 allows the lever 28 to be selectively locked in place to hold the pivot tip 18 in a fixed orientation. Locking pin 52 is mounted in a central passage 54 of the lever 28 and carries a pin 56 which seats in one of a plurality of pockets 58 formed in an arcuate locking strip 60. Thus, the lever 28 can be released by pressing the pin 52 against spring 62 so that the pin 56 is lifted out of the pocket 58, as shown in FIG. 3A. In this configuration, the lever may be moved freely back and forth to deploy the tip 18. When the tip 18 is in its desired location, the locking pin 52 may be released to permit pin 56 to engage the closest pocket 58 where it is held in place by spring 62. It will be appreciated that the lever 28 will typically be advanced forwardly to close the tip 18 to a low profile configuration for introducing the imaging and therapy delivery system 10 to the patient for treatment, for example through the cervix into the uterus. Once in place, the lever 28 can be unlocked using the locking pin 52 and oriented to a desired angle relative to the shaft assembly 12 to permit imaging and, in particular, to allow advancement of the delivery needle 70 in the tissue to be observed.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 4A-4C, use of the lever 28 for deflecting the tip 18 is illustrated. Initially, the tip 18 is axially aligned with the axis of the shaft assembly 12 and the lever 28 is in its forward or distal-most position, as shown in FIG. 4A. By depressing locking pin 52, as shown in FIG. 4B, lever 28 may be drawn proximally as indicated by the adjacent arrow, to deflect the tip 18 away from the axis of shaft 12, as shown by the arrow adjacent the tip in FIG. 4B. When the lever 28 reaches its fully proximal position, as shown in FIG. 4C, the tip 18 has been fully deflected away from the axis of shaft assembly 12. Note that slide subassemblies 32 and 34 (for extending delivery needle 70 and needle array 21) have not been activated in FIGS. 4A-4B.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 5-10, operation of the first slide subassembly 32 and the second slide subassembly 34 will be described. For clarity, portions of the pivot mechanism 26 have been removed from these views. Prior to deployment, as shown in FIGS. 5 and 6, the needle/tine array 21 is fully drawn into the central passage of needle tube 16. Needle tube 16 has an open distal tip 64 through which the delivery needle and tines will emerge when advanced using the slide subassemblies 32 and 34.
  • The first slide subassembly 32 comprises a reciprocating carriage 66 having a coupling 68 attached to a proximal end of the needle 70. The carriage 66 may be axially advanced and retracted by manually pressing buttons 72 to disengage pins 74 (FIG. 5) from pockets 76 in a straight locking strip 78. Once the pins 74 are disengaged, the carriage 66 may be distally advanced, as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, to advance tip 80 of needle 70 from the distal end of the needle tube 16. The buttons 72 may then be released to allow pins 74 to reenter the adjacent pockets 76 in the locking strip 78, thus locking the needle 70 in place.
  • Referring now in particular to FIGS. 9 and 10, a plurality of radially diverging tines 82 may be deployed from the distal end of needle 70 using the second slide subassembly 34 which includes a thumb slide 84. The thumb slide 84 is reciprocatably carried in the carriage 66 so that the thumb slide will advance the tines relative to the needle. The thumb slide is connected to a tine rod 86 which enters a hollow central passage or lumen of the needle 70 and is coupled to the plurality of tines 82 so that advancement of the thumb slide 84 from the retracted position shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 to the distally advanced position shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 causes the tines 82 to emerge from the distal end of the needle 70. The tines 82 are preferably formed from a straight, resilient metal, such as stainless steel, nickel titanium, or the like, and are deflected outwardly by ramps (not shown) in the distal end of the needle. Optionally, a lockout circuit (not shown) may be provided to prevent energizing the tines if the tines are not fully advanced.
  • The use of the imaging and therapeutic delivery system 10 of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 11A and 11B. After imaging using the imaging array 38 carried on or in tip 18, the needle 70 is advanced into target tissue identified by the imaging using the first slide subassembly 32, as shown in FIG. 11A. Usually, the position of the tip 18 will be adjusted to assure that travel of the needle 70 into the tissue may be observed. After the location of the needle tip 80 has been confirmed, the thumb slide 84 of the second slide subassembly 34 may then be advanced, as shown in FIG. 11B, to extend the tines 82 into the tissue. In the preferred embodiments of the present invention, the needle 70 and tines 82 will be rotatably connected to the remainder of the device to allow the handle to be rotated, thus rotating the imaging array 38, to facilitate imaging even after the needle and tines have been deployed.
  • Referring now to FIG. 12, a delivery system 110 without an ablation needle is illustrated. A deflectable distal tip 126 of the rigid shaft 116 may be deflected by the use of pull or tensioning wire(s) housed within the shaft 116. Deflection may occur at a true mechanical pivot or at a flexible zone at the shaft distal end 118. As discussed above, when the delivery shaft 116 is deflectable by a user, various needles may be used to match the amount of deflection provided by the distal tip 126 as well as the amount of tilt provided by the ultrasound array 112. Hence, a needle guide 144 will typically be empty until the distal end 118 of the shaft 116 is deflected. For example, the shaft 116 may be inserted in a straight configuration. The distal tip 126 may then be deflected until a target anatomy is identified. A needle is then back loaded within the guide passage 170 that corresponds to the amount of the deflection.
  • Table I below illustrates possible viewing angles κ that may be achieved by the cumulative effects of the shaft bending angle θ (e.g., either through active deflection of the distal tip or a pre-shaped or pre-bent distal tip) and the ultrasound tilting angle α. The matching needle angles θ based on the possible viewing angles κ are further illustrated. In example 1, the shaft 116 is in a straight configuration so that the viewing angle κ is provided solely by the tilting angle α of the ultrasound array 112. In example 4, the needle 114 will have a straight configuration. In example 5, a non-tilted and non-bent ultrasound array 112 version is covered. It will be appreciated that the viewing angle κ will be more than the bend angle β of the shaft 116 due to the additive effect of the tilting angle α of the ultrasound array 112. This allows the bend on the distal tip 126 of the shaft 116 to be shallower without compromising the cumulative viewing angle κ, which is of particular benefit for patient insertion considerations. In the case of a deflectable distal tip 126 in which insertion may be implemented in a straight configuration, the tiled ultrasound angle α still aids in reducing the needle angle θ.
  • TABLE I Viewing Angle Tilt Angle Bend Angle Needle Angle Example (κ) (α) (β) (θ) 1 7°-10° 7°-10° 80° 2 20° 7°-10° 10°-13° 70° 3 45° 7°-10° 35°-38° 45° 4 90° 7°-10° 80°-83°  0° 5  0° 90°
  • While the above is a complete description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, various alternatives, modifications, and equivalents may be used. Therefore, the above description should not be taken as limiting the scope of the invention which is defined by the appended claims.

Claims (40)

What is claimed is:
1. An imaging and therapeutic delivery system comprising:
a shaft having a distal end and a proximal end;
a needle reciprocatably coupled to the shaft so that a tissue-penetrating tip on the needle is distally advancable from the shaft along an axial path;
a tip pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and movable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path; and
an ultrasonic imaging array carried by the pivotally attached tip, wherein the pivotally attached tip is configured to be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as the needle is advanced along the axial path so as to sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged;
a handle attached to the proximal end of the straight shaft;
a first actuation mechanism on the handle and coupled to the needle, wherein the first actuation mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path;
a plurality of tines carried by the needle and reciprocatably attached to the needle; and
a second actuation mechanism on the handle configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle,
wherein the first and second actuation mechanisms are movable relative to one another.
2. A system as in claim 1, wherein the tip is offset from the axial path of the needle.
3. A system as in claim 1, further comprising an imaging core which includes the imaging array near a distal end thereof, wherein the imaging core is removably positionable in the shaft so that the imaging array extends into the pivotally attached tip.
4. A system as in claim 2, wherein the straight shaft is relatively rigid and the imaging core is flexible, wherein the imaging core can bend at the point where the tip is pivotally attached to the shaft.
5. A system as in claim 2, wherein the shaft is relatively rigid and the imaging core is hinged at the point where the tip is pivotally attached to the shaft.
6. A system as in claim 1, wherein the ultrasonic imaging array sweeps the ultrasound field of view relative to the anatomy, the needle, and the plurality of tines.
7. A system as in claim 1, wherein the plurality of tines are arranged to radially diverge from the needle as they are advanced distally.
8. A system as in claim 7, wherein at least one additional tine is arranged to advance axially from the needle.
9. A system as in claim 1, wherein the needle is electrically non-conductive and the plurality of tines are electrically conductive.
10. A system as in claim 1, wherein the handle includes a lever coupled to the pivotally attached tip by a pull rod, wherein the lever can be pivoted to pivot the tip.
11. A system as in claim 1, wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a first slide mechanism coupled to the needle and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein first slide mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path.
12. A system as in claim 1, wherein the second actuation mechanism comprises a second slide mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein the second slide mechanism can be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle.
13. A system as in claim 1, wherein the plurality of tines are reciprocatably attached to the needle to diverge from the needle as they are advanced distally.
14. A system as in claim 1, wherein rotation of said ultrasonic imaging array about the axial path is independent of movement of said needle.
15. A system as in claim 1, wherein the needle is configured to exit the shaft at an angle of 0 degrees relative to the shaft.
16. A system as in claim 1, wherein the needle comprises a straight needle.
17. A system as in claim 1, wherein the shaft comprises a straight shaft.
18. A system as in claim 1, wherein the first actuation mechanism is disposed at a first location on the handle and the second actuation mechanism is disposed on a second location on the handle, the first location being different from the second location.
19. A method for treating uterine fibroids, said method comprising:
introducing a shaft into a uterus;
locating a uterine fibroid using an ultrasonic imaging transducer carried by a pivotable tip attached to a distal end of the shaft;
pivoting the ultrasonic transducer to reposition a field of view of the ultrasonic transducer;
advancing a needle axially from the distal end of the shaft into tissue near the located uterine fibroid by operating a first actuation mechanism coupled to the needle, wherein the needle is aligned in the field of view and the first actuation mechanism is disposed on a handle;
advancing a plurality of tines from the needle after the needle has been advanced into or near the uterine fibroid by operating a second actuation mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines, wherein the second actuation mechanism is disposed on the handle and is movable relative to the first actuation mechanism; and
imaging the needle and the fibroid using the ultrasound transducer.
20. A method as in claim 19, wherein first actuation mechanism advances and retracts the needle independently from the advancement and retraction of the plurality of tines by the second actuation mechanism such that a degree of advancement of the needle relative to the shaft is independent from a degree of advancement of the plurality of tines relative to the needle.
21. A method as in claim 19, wherein introducing the shaft comprises transcervical introduction.
22. A method as in claim 19, wherein locating comprises manually rotating and translating the shaft to scan the uterine wall with the ultrasonic transducer.
23. A method as in claim 22, wherein imaging comprises rotating the ultrasound transducer relative to an axial path of the needle independently of movement of said needle to scan the uterine wall with the ultrasound transducer.
24. A method as in claim 19, wherein locating comprises pivoting the ultrasonic transducer.
25. A method as in claim 22, wherein locating comprises pivoting the ultrasonic transducer for imaging the plurality of tines.
26. A method as in claim 19, further comprising delivering energy from the tines into the fibroid.
27. A method as in claim 26, wherein the energy is radiofrequency energy.
28. A method as in claim 26, wherein the needle remains electrically non-conductive while the energy is being delivered through the tines.
29. A method as in claim 19, wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a reciprocating carriage enclosed at least partially within the handle and coupled to a proximal end of the straight needle, and wherein the second actuation mechanism is reciprocatably coupled to reciprocating carriage.
30. A method as in claim 19, wherein the needle is advanced from the distal end of the shaft such that the needle exits the shaft at an angle of 0 degrees relative to the shaft.
31. An imaging and therapeutic delivery system comprising:
a shaft having a distal end and a proximal end;
a needle reciprocatably coupled to the shaft so that a tissue-penetrating tip on the needle is distally advancable from the shaft along an axial path;
a tip pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and movable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path; and
an ultrasonic imaging array carried by the pivotally attached tip, wherein the pivotally attached tip is configured to be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as the needle is advanced along the axial path so as to sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged;
a handle attached to the proximal end of the straight shaft;
a first actuation mechanism on the handle and coupled to the needle, wherein the first actuation mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path;
a plurality of tines carried by the needle and reciprocatably attached to the needle; and
a second actuation mechanism on the handle configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle,
wherein the first actuation mechanism is configured to advance and retract the needle independently from the advancement and retraction of the plurality of tines by the second actuation mechanism such that a degree of advancement of the needle relative to the shaft is independent from a degree of advancement of the plurality of tines relative to the needle.
32. A system as in claim 31, wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a first slide mechanism coupled to the needle and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein first slide mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path.
33. A system as in claim 31, wherein the second actuation mechanism comprises a second slide mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein the second slide mechanism can be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle.
34. A system as in claim 31, wherein the first actuation mechanism is disposed at a first location on the handle and the second actuation mechanism is disposed on a second location on the handle, the first location being different from the second location.
35. A method for treating uterine fibroids, said method comprising:
introducing a shaft into a uterus;
locating a uterine fibroid using an ultrasonic imaging transducer carried by a pivotable tip attached to a distal end of the shaft;
pivoting the ultrasonic transducer to reposition a field of view of the ultrasonic transducer;
advancing a needle axially from the distal end of the shaft into tissue near the located uterine fibroid by operating a first actuation mechanism coupled to the needle, wherein the needle is aligned in the field of view and the first actuation mechanism is disposed on a handle;
advancing a plurality of tines from the needle after the needle has been advanced into or near the uterine fibroid by operating a second actuation mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines, wherein the first actuation mechanism is configured to advance and retract the needle independently from the advancement and retraction of the plurality of tines by the second actuation mechanism such that a degree of advancement of the needle relative to the shaft is independent from a degree of advancement of the plurality of tines relative to the needle; and
imaging the needle and the fibroid using the ultrasound transducer.
36. An imaging and therapeutic delivery system comprising:
a shaft having a distal end and a proximal end;
a needle reciprocatably coupled to the shaft so that a tissue-penetrating tip on the needle is distally advancable from the shaft along an axial path;
a tip pivotally attached to the distal end of the shaft and movable between a position parallel to the axial path and a position at an acute or right angle relative to the axial path; and
an ultrasonic imaging array carried by the pivotally attached tip, wherein the pivotally attached tip is configured to be oriented to align a field of view of the imaging array with the needle as the needle is advanced along the axial path so as to sweep the ultrasound field of view relative to the needle and anatomy to be imaged;
a handle attached to the proximal end of the straight shaft;
a first actuation mechanism on the handle and coupled to the needle, wherein the first actuation mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path;
a plurality of tines carried by the needle and reciprocatably attached to the needle; and
a second actuation mechanism on the handle configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle,
wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a reciprocating carriage enclosed at least partially within the handle and coupled to a proximal end of the straight needle, and wherein the second actuation mechanism is reciprocatably coupled to reciprocating carriage.
37. A system as in claim 36, wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a first slide mechanism coupled to the needle and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein first slide mechanism is configured to be reciprocated to advance and retract the needle along the axial path.
38. A system as in claim 36, wherein the second actuation mechanism comprises a second slide mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines and disposed at least partially on the handle, and wherein the second slide mechanism can be reciprocated to advance and retract the plurality of tines relative to the needle.
39. A system as in claim 36, wherein the first actuation mechanism is disposed at a first location on the handle and the second actuation mechanism is disposed on a second location on the handle, the first location being different from the second location.
40. A method for treating uterine fibroids, said method comprising:
introducing a shaft into a uterus;
locating a uterine fibroid using an ultrasonic imaging transducer carried by a pivotable tip attached to a distal end of the shaft;
pivoting the ultrasonic transducer to reposition a field of view of the ultrasonic transducer;
advancing a needle axially from the distal end of the shaft into tissue near the located uterine fibroid by operating a first actuation mechanism coupled to the needle, wherein the needle is aligned in the field of view and the first actuation mechanism is disposed on a handle;
advancing a plurality of tines from the needle after the needle has been advanced into or near the uterine fibroid by operating a second actuation mechanism coupled to the plurality of tines, wherein the first actuation mechanism comprises a reciprocating carriage enclosed at least partially within the handle and coupled to a proximal end of the straight needle, and wherein the second actuation mechanism is reciprocatably coupled to reciprocating carriage; and
imaging the needle and the fibroid using the ultrasound transducer.
US14/989,732 2006-04-20 2016-01-06 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer Pending US20180070916A9 (en)

Priority Applications (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/409,496 US7815571B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2006-04-20 Rigid delivery systems having inclined ultrasound and needle
US11/564,164 US7874986B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2006-11-28 Methods and devices for visualization and ablation of tissue
US12/198,861 US20100056926A1 (en) 2008-08-26 2008-08-26 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer
PCT/US2009/054956 WO2010027820A1 (en) 2008-08-26 2009-08-25 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer
US12/973,587 US8506485B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2010-12-20 Devices and methods for treatment of tissue
US13/023,383 US8206300B2 (en) 2008-08-26 2011-02-08 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer
US13/484,076 US20170332998A9 (en) 2006-04-20 2012-05-30 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer
US14/989,732 US20180070916A9 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-06 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/989,732 US20180070916A9 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-06 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/484,076 Continuation US20170332998A9 (en) 2006-04-20 2012-05-30 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer

Publications (2)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20160113621A1 US20160113621A1 (en) 2016-04-28
US20180070916A9 true US20180070916A9 (en) 2018-03-15

Family

ID=48467481

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/989,732 Pending US20180070916A9 (en) 2006-04-20 2016-01-06 Ablation device with articulated imaging transducer

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20180070916A9 (en)

Families Citing this family (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2018089523A1 (en) * 2016-11-11 2018-05-17 Gynesonics, Inc. Controlled treatment of tissue and dynamic interaction with, and comparison of, tissue and/or treatment data

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8992427B2 (en) * 2012-09-07 2015-03-31 Gynesonics, Inc. Methods and systems for controlled deployment of needle structures in tissue

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US20160113621A1 (en) 2016-04-28

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6241702B1 (en) Radio frequency ablation device for treatment of the prostate
US5370675A (en) Medical probe device and method
US5979453A (en) Needle myolysis system for uterine fibriods
JP4149520B2 (en) Tissue heat treatment device
JP4366077B2 (en) Steerable sphincter instrument and method for cannulation, nipple incision and sphincter incision
EP1018959B1 (en) Deflectable interstitial ablation device
CN102245119B (en) Energy is applied to the method and device of bodily tissue
US6106517A (en) Surgical instrument with ultrasound pulse generator
DE69935315T2 (en) Coaxial needle and cutting blocks
US6106521A (en) Apparatus for thermal treatment of tissue
US8998898B2 (en) Moisture transport system for contact electrocoagulation
US6554801B1 (en) Directional needle injection drug delivery device and method of use
US8308709B2 (en) Endoluminal delivery of anesthesia
AU781381B2 (en) Cutting tissue with electrosurgically deployed electrodes
US7678106B2 (en) Gynecological ablation procedure and system
US20030060856A1 (en) Apparatus and method for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia
EP1383438B1 (en) Electrosurgical apparatus
US7306591B2 (en) Apparatus and methods for treating female urinary incontinence
EP1259181B1 (en) Electro-cautery catheter
CA2378071C (en) Electrosurgical lesion location device
JP3679674B2 (en) Endoscope
JP5209603B2 (en) Methods and apparatus for the treatment of functional uterine bleeding, endometrial pathologies, and cervical neoplasia by use of high intensity focused ultrasound energy
US20100292767A1 (en) Systems and Methods for Prostate Treatment
US5403311A (en) Electro-coagulation and ablation and other electrotherapeutic treatments of body tissue
US7315762B2 (en) Non-surgical incontinence treatment system and method

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: GYNESONICS, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:DECKMAN, ROBERT K.;PLACEK, BRIAN;MUNROW, MICHAEL A.;AND OTHERS;SIGNING DATES FROM 20120605 TO 20120718;REEL/FRAME:037425/0191

STCV Information on status: appeal procedure

Free format text: ON APPEAL -- AWAITING DECISION BY THE BOARD OF APPEALS