US20170340492A1 - First-aid kit - Google Patents

First-aid kit Download PDF

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Publication number
US20170340492A1
US20170340492A1 US15676702 US201715676702A US2017340492A1 US 20170340492 A1 US20170340492 A1 US 20170340492A1 US 15676702 US15676702 US 15676702 US 201715676702 A US201715676702 A US 201715676702A US 2017340492 A1 US2017340492 A1 US 2017340492A1
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Prior art keywords
aid
instruction
instructions
step
backing member
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Abandoned
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US15676702
Inventor
Bernard Fresco
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Bernard Fresco
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F17/00First-aid kits

Abstract

In a first aspect, the invention is directed to a first-aid kit, comprising a backing member, a plurality of step by step instructions arranged on the backing member, and a plurality of first-aid items, wherein each first-aid item is positioned in association with at least one of the instructions and relates to the at least one of the instructions.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/379,454 filed Aug. 18, 2014, which is a 371 of International Application No. PCT/CA2013/000130 filed Feb. 14, 2013, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/600,250, filed Feb. 17, 2012, the contents of all which are incorporated herein in their entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to first-aid kits.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • First-aid kits are very useful for treating injuries and the like, where the injury is relatively small and would not warrant a trip to a hospital, or where the injury is larger but would benefit from treatment quickly, (i.e. before the patient would be able to receive care from a doctor, a paramedic or the like). However, it is typical that the first-aid is carried out by a person with little or no medical training. As such these kits may or may not be provided with instructions for use in carrying out the first-aid. There is still significant opportunity for a person to apply the first-aid incorrectly using such kits however, which can result in less benefit to the injury victim than they could otherwise be provided, or which can in some situations worsen the condition of the injury victim.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In a first aspect, the invention is directed to a first-aid kit, comprising a backing member, a set of step by step instructions arranged on the backing member, and a plurality of first-aid items, wherein each first-aid item is positioned in association with at least one of the instructions and relates to the at least one of the instructions.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will now be described by way of example only with reference to the attached drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first-aid kit in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIGS. 2a-2c are plan views of portions of a backing member with instructions and first-aid items thereon, that forms part of the first-aid kit shown in FIG. 1; and
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of a portion of the backing member, with the instructions and first-aid items arranged differently than those arranged in FIG. 2a -2 c.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In many instances, when a person is injured or is otherwise in a condition requiring medical attention, carrying out a first-aid procedure on the injured person can be helpful in many ways and can in some cases help to save the life of the injured person. However, if the first-aid is carried out incorrectly it may not be as helpful as it could be, and could in some situations make the injured person's condition worse. Unfortunately, the person providing the first-aid is, in many cases, untrained medically. Additionally, the person to whom they are providing the first-aid may be known to them (e.g. a family member, a friend). In some instances the person is performing first-aid on themselves. Additionally, there may be a time sensitivity or at least a perceived time sensitivity to carrying out the first-aid procedure. All of these factors may significantly elevate the stress level of the person providing the first-aid.
  • Some proposed first-aid kits of the prior art include instructions on how to use the various first-aid items included in the kit, however, use of such kits is still prone to error for several reasons. Such a kit may include instructions and a number of first-aid items (multiple types of ointment, gauze, tape, etc). To use such a kit, the user must open the kit, find the instructions from amongst the first-aid items in the kit, read the instructions, and for each step of the instructions they must find the related element or elements from the kit, and then carry out that step. Unfortunately, due to the elevated stress level that may be present in the person providing the first-aid there is an increased likelihood that the person will grab and use the wrong element from the first-aid kit (e.g. the wrong ointment, the wrong drug) and could apply that wrong element to the injured person, with potentially harmful results. Also the elevated stress level in the person providing the first-aid can make them less able to carry out certain tasks quickly, such as to find something from amongst a group of things. Such errors occur periodically in high-stress environments such as an operating theatre where medical professionals sometimes pull the wrong drug from a drug storage cabinet and administer it to a patient in response to a sudden development during an operation.
  • Reference is made to FIG. 1, which shows a first-aid kit 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The first-aid kit 10 is configured to permit a person to carry out a first-aid procedure with multiple steps with a reduced likelihood of error relative to the likelihood of error that would be associated with certain prior art first-aid kits. Referring to FIGS. 2a -2 c, the first-aid kit 10 includes a backing member 12, a set of step by step instructions, shown at 14, arranged on the backing member 12, and a plurality of first-aid items 16, all of which can be folded into a container 18 (shown in FIG. 1). Each first-aid item 16 is positioned in association with at least one of the instructions 14 and relates to the at least one of the instructions 14.
  • The backing member 12 may be a flexible sheet of material (e.g. cloth material or plastic material) and may be foldable to a storage position (FIG. 1) and openable to a use position (FIGS. 2a-2c ). Instead of being a flexible member the backing member 12 could alternatively be made up of a plurality of rigid or semi-rigid members that are hingedly connected together at selected locations to permit them to fold to a storage position and open to a use position. While the backing member 12 is shown as a sheet of material in the figures, it may alternatively be configured as a frame or other open structure. Such a structure may, for example, be made up of connecting members, such as rods, that are connected to each other.
  • In this particular example, the first-aid kit 10 is configured for the treatment of a person who is bleeding. In other examples, the first-aid kit 10 may be configured for the treatment of burns, loss of consciousness, broken bones, hypothermia or any other suitable medical condition. To use the first-aid kit 10, a user opens the container 18 and removes the backing member 12 with the instructions 14 and first-aid items 16 thereon. The user can then open (i.e. unfold) the backing member 12 and carry out the first-aid procedure.
  • As shown in FIGS. 2a -2 c, each instruction 14 may include one or more textual instruction elements 22 and one or more graphical instruction elements 24. For example, the instructions shown at 14 a, 14 b and 14 c each include one textual instruction element 22 and one graphical instruction element 24. In another example, the instruction shown at 14 e in FIG. 2b includes one textual instruction element 22 and two graphical textual elements 24. The textual and graphical instruction elements 22 and 24 may be positioned on the backing member 12 by any suitable means. For example, they may be printed directly on the backing member 12. Alternatively, for example, they may be printed on one large sheet or on individual sheets, whereby the one or more sheets may be joined to the backing member 12 by means of adhesive, by sewing, or by any other suitable means.
  • On the backing member the instructions 14 are preferably positioned in sequential order, as shown in FIGS. 2a -2 c, with the first instruction shown at 14 a at the top, the second instruction shown at 14 b immediately subjacent to instruction 14 a, the third instruction shown at 14 c immediately subjacent to instruction 14 b and so on. Also preferably, the instructions include indicia shown at 20 which indicate the order in which the first aid steps are to be carried out. As shown in FIGS. 2a -2 c, the indicium 20 associated with instruction 14 a is a 1, indicating that that is the first first-aid step to be carried out; the indicium 20 associated with instruction 14 b is a 2, indicating that that is the second first-aid step to be carried out; the indicium 20 associated with instruction 14 c is a 3, indicating that that is the third first-aid step to be carried out. The indicia 20 need not be numerical. The indicia may, for example, be alphabetical. In yet another embodiment, the indicia may be graphical (e.g. in the form of arrows that lead from one instruction 14 to the next).
  • While it is preferred to have the textual instruction elements 22 aligned with each other, the graphical instruction elements 24 aligned with each other and the first-aid items 16 be aligned with each other as shown in FIGS. 2a-2c it is alternatively possible for them to not be precisely aligned with each other, as shown in the arrangement of FIG. 3. Furthermore, while it is preferred to have a consistent arrangement of the textual instruction element 22, the graphical instruction element 24 and the first-aid item 16 in each first-aid step, such as is shown in the first-aid steps identified by indicia 1-8 in FIGS. 2a-2c it is possible to have different arrangements of these elements 22, 24 and 16 in different steps, such as is shown in the first-aid steps by indicia at 1-3 in FIG. 3.
  • In the arrangement shown in FIG. 3 the particular arrangement of the textual and graphical instruction elements changes from instruction 14 to instruction 14, but the instructions 14 are still arranged generally in sequence. That is, the instruction 14 b is positioned subjacent to instruction 14 a; instruction 14 c is subjacent to instruction 14 c and so on. As a result, the arrangement of the instructions 14 generally provides to the user an indication of the order of the first-aid steps to be carried out. When the instructions 14 are arranged in some order, such as the vertical arrangement shown in FIGS. 2a-2c and FIG. 3, it is optionally possible to omit the indicia 20 and to rely solely on the arrangement of the instructions itself to indicate to the user the order in which the first-aid steps are to be carried out. It is alternatively possible to have the instructions 14 arranged in any desired arrangement and to rely on the indicia 20 to indicate to the user the intended order in which the first-aid steps are to be carried out.
  • As noted above, each first-aid item 16 is positioned in association with at least one of the instructions 14. In some embodiments, each instruction 14 has a first-aid item 16 associated with it. Alternatively, however, one or more of the instructions 14 may not have any first-aid item associated therewith. As shown in FIG. 2b , an instruction, such as, for example, instruction 14 f, may have a plurality of first-aid items 16 positioned in association with it.
  • Each first-aid item 16 may be held in a pocket 26 on the backing member 12. The pocket 26 may be formed by any suitable means. Preferably, the pocket 26 is closable (e.g. via a flap, or via a plastic zipper as shown) to ensure that the first-aid item 16 contained therein does not fall out. Also preferably, the first-aid item 16 can be seen through the wall of the pocket 26. Alternatively, the first-aid items 16 may be held on the backing member 12 by any other suitable means.
  • To carry out the first-aid procedure, the user can start with the first instruction shown at 14 a. In the example shown in FIG. 2a , it can be seen that the first instruction 14 a instructs the user to place a glove on each hand. The first-aid item 16 positioned in association with that instruction 14 a is a pair of gloves. The second instruction 14 b instructs the user to apply a disinfectant to the affected area if there is dirt in the wound, using the disinfectant that is the first-aid item 16 positioned in association with the second instruction. The third instruction 14 c instructs the user to apply an antibiotic ointment to the affected area, using the antibiotic ointment that is the first-aid item 16 positioned in association with the third instruction. While the antibiotic ointment and the disinfectant do appear different, it is possible that someone could have gotten one confused with the other when carrying out a first-aid procedure using a certain type of first-aid kit of the prior art. However, by positioning the disinfectant and the antibiotic ointment in association with the second and third instructions respectively, it is relatively unlikely that the user would inadvertently use one in the place of the other. As can be seen, the rest of the instructions 14 follow in FIGS. 2b and 2 c.
  • As noted above, the instruction 14 f has two first-aid items 16 associated with it however these first-aid items 16 are both involved in the carrying out of the instruction 14 f.
  • The set of instructions 14 may contain a decision instruction which involves a decision on the part of the user, wherein the decision has multiple possible outcomes. The decision instruction 14 may branch to different subsequent instructions in the set depending on the different outcomes of the decision. For example, the instruction 14 d in FIG. 2b includes a decision instruction which is: If bleeding persists (after having applied a bandage), the user is to proceed to instruction 14 e. Without it being explicitly stated it will be understood that if bleeding does not persist, the user need not proceed to instruction 14 e in which case there are no further steps to the first-aid procedure.
  • By providing the first-aid items 16 on the backing member 12 in association with the related instructions 14, the user has fewer tasks to perform as compared to some first-aid kits of the prior art. For example, the user, when using the kit 10, does not need to search through a container full of items for a particular item that is needed for a particular step. Furthermore, the user is not faced with the task of deciding which of several items that look similar is the correct one that was intended to be used at a given step in the instructions. By removing the need to perform such tasks the stress on the user of carrying out a first-aid procedure may be reduced, thereby increasing the likelihood of the procedure being carried out correctly. Furthermore, it will be noted that some time is consumed by such tasks as searching through a container for a particular item and comparing similar items to determine which is the correct one to use at a given step. By eliminating such tasks, a user can provide the first-aid more quickly than can be achieved with some kits of the prior art.
  • While the above description constitutes a plurality of embodiments of the present invention, it will be appreciated that the present invention is susceptible to further modification and change without departing from the fair meaning of the accompanying claims.

Claims (10)

  1. 1. A first-aid kit, comprising:
    a backing member;
    a set of step by step instructions which are calls to action to treat a selected injury;
    a plurality of first-aid items supported on the backing member, wherein the plurality of first-aid items are identified in the set of step by step instructions for treating that selected injury, wherein, for at least some of the plurality of first-aid items, each first-aid item is positioned in an individual receptacle in association with at least one of the instructions and relates to the at least one of the instructions; and
    wherein, for at least some instructions in the set of step by step instructions, each instruction is positioned closer to only one of the individual receptacles than to any other one of the individual receptacles.
  2. 2. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein each instruction includes at least one instruction element selected from the group consisting of a textual instruction element and a pictorial instruction element.
  3. 3. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein each instruction includes at least one textual instruction element and at least one graphical instruction element.
  4. 4. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein the instructions include at least one decision instruction that identifies a selected decision to be made, the decision instruction branching to a plurality of groups of further instructions, each group being associated with a selected possible outcome of the decision.
  5. 5. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a storage container, wherein the backing member, while holding the plurality of first-aid items, folds into a storage position wherein the backing member is sized to fit within a storage container.
  6. 6. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein the plurality of first-aid items includes at least one of: a thermal blanket, gauze, medical tape, scissors, disinfectant rinse, antibiotic ointment, and pain relief medicine.
  7. 7. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein the backing member is made up of a flexible sheet of material.
  8. 8. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, further comprising an indicium positioned in association with each instruction wherein the indicia indicate the order in which the instructions are to be carried out.
  9. 9. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein, for at least some instructions in the set of step by step instructions, each instruction is provided in a textual format and a pictorial format.
  10. 10. A first-aid kit as claimed in claim 1, wherein each receptacle is a pocket on the backing member.
US15676702 2012-02-17 2017-08-14 First-aid kit Abandoned US20170340492A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

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US201261600250 true 2012-02-17 2012-02-17
US14379454 US9730845B2 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-02-14 First-aid kit
PCT/CA2013/000130 WO2013120182A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-02-14 First-aid kit with backing member
US15676702 US20170340492A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2017-08-14 First-aid kit

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

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US15676702 US20170340492A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2017-08-14 First-aid kit

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PCT/CA2013/000130 Continuation WO2013120182A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-02-14 First-aid kit with backing member
US14379454 Continuation 2014-08-18

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US14379454 Active US9730845B2 (en) 2012-02-17 2013-02-14 First-aid kit
US15676702 Abandoned US20170340492A1 (en) 2012-02-17 2017-08-14 First-aid kit

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US20150228205A1 (en) * 2012-09-24 2015-08-13 Aid One Solutions Oy Covering for resuscitation and a method for manufacturing thereof
US9592180B2 (en) * 2014-01-30 2017-03-14 Pharmaceutical Design, Llc Method and device for treating allergic reactions and difficult-to-manage respiratory diseases
US10085900B2 (en) * 2014-07-23 2018-10-02 Tactical Medical Solutions, Inc. Trauma kit

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Publication number Publication date Type
US20150027922A1 (en) 2015-01-29 application
WO2013120182A1 (en) 2013-08-22 application
CA2864920A1 (en) 2013-08-22 application
US9730845B2 (en) 2017-08-15 grant

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