US20170138181A1 - Method and system for logging a well - Google Patents

Method and system for logging a well Download PDF

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Publication number
US20170138181A1
US20170138181A1 US14/941,904 US201514941904A US2017138181A1 US 20170138181 A1 US20170138181 A1 US 20170138181A1 US 201514941904 A US201514941904 A US 201514941904A US 2017138181 A1 US2017138181 A1 US 2017138181A1
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Prior art keywords
well
data
method
service string
receiving
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Abandoned
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US14/941,904
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Scott Laurence Ross
Desmond Larry Procinsky
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Sure Shot Wireline Inc
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Sure Shot Wireline Inc
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Priority to US14/941,904 priority Critical patent/US20170138181A1/en
Assigned to SURE SHOT WIRELINE INC. reassignment SURE SHOT WIRELINE INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: PROCINSKY, DESMOND LARRY, ROSS, SCOTT LAURENCE
Publication of US20170138181A1 publication Critical patent/US20170138181A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B47/00Survey of boreholes or wells
    • E21B47/12Means for transmitting measuring-signals or control signals from the well to the surface or from the surface to the well, e.g. for logging while drilling
    • E21B47/122Means for transmitting measuring-signals or control signals from the well to the surface or from the surface to the well, e.g. for logging while drilling by electromagnetic energy, e.g. radio frequency
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B47/00Survey of boreholes or wells
    • E21B47/04Measuring depth or liquid level
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B33/00Sealing or packing boreholes or wells
    • E21B33/02Surface sealing or packing
    • E21B33/03Well heads; Setting-up thereof
    • E21B33/068Well heads; Setting-up thereof having provision for introducing objects or fluids into, or removing objects from, wells
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B37/00Methods or apparatus for cleaning boreholes or wells
    • E21B37/02Scrapers specially adapted therefor
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B47/00Survey of boreholes or wells

Abstract

A method and system for logging a wellbore. A logging tool is tripped into the wellbore on a service string with a service rig. The service string is assembled from tubing joints. The logging tool may be used to receive variable wellbore data of variable wellbore conditions, which would be subject to variance when the wellbore is disturbed by tripping in a work string for use with previous methods of coiled tubing-based or wireline-based logging. The variable wellbore data may be logged while tripping the service string into the well, out of the well, or both. Data of the depth of the service string as a function of time is also received for correlation with the variable data along a common timeline to map the variable data to locations in the wellbores.

Description

    FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates generally to logging a well.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Hydrocarbon-producing wells are subject to a variety of conditions which in some cases result in paraffin scaling or problems which require an intervention. Many such interventions require workover of the well completion. During workover, a service rig is used to pull the production string and run in a temporary work string or scrape the well. Once the work string is in place, coiled tubing or wireline are often rigged in for well logging as part of the workover. After logging, the coiled tubing or wireline is rigged out, the work string is tripped out, and the workover continues.
  • In addition to scraping, logging, and other steps, the production tubing must be tripped back into the well after the workover is finished. Further, logging, scraping, or other operations may also be performed during initial completion of the well or during abandonment. The cost of a workover, completion, or abandonment increases with an increasing variety of or other heavy equipment required, and in the number manhours required to perform the work.
  • SUMMARY
  • It is an object of the present disclosure to obviate or mitigate at least one disadvantage of previous methods of logging a well. Previous logging methods applied as part of workover, completion, or abandonment typically include running a temporary work string into the well after pulling the production tubing. Coiled tubing or wireline is then rigged in through the work string for well logging. Such methods are costly in terms of manhours and equipment. The cost is particularly high for in situ thermal wells, where time must be allowed for temperature recovery after running coiled tubing or wireline into the work string in order to get an accurate temperature log. It is, therefore, desirable to provide an improved process for working over and otherwise servicing a well.
  • Herein disclosed are methods and systems for logging a well. The methods include and the systems facilitate logging a well as part of completion, workover, or abandonment of a well, or other situations in which logging is carried out on a well. A service string assembled from tubing joints and a logging tool is tripped into the well. Logging of variable wellbore properties which are disturbed when a work string is run into the wellbore, such as temperature or pressure, may be performed as a function of time while tripping the service string into the well, while pulling the service string, or both. There is no need for a separate work string in which to run coiled tubing or a wireline including a logging tool and there is consequently no need for an equilibration period. A depth counter measures the total length of the tubing joints and connectors which are tripped into or out of the well as a function of time. The timeline of the depth counter may be merged with the timeline of the variable well property to correlate data of the variable well property with a location along the wellbore. Temperature logging may take place while tripping the service string into the well, mitigating the need for temperature recovery in thermal wells. The methods and systems may be applied to logging while scraping a wellbore. Data of other wellbore properties, including static wellbore properties, may also be logged by adding additional tools to the service string or adding additional functionality to the logging tool.
  • The methods and systems have particular application to a well which has been killed or is otherwise at a low wellbore pressure. In the context of a workover, the well would be killed and the production string tripped out prior to application of the methods and systems disclosed herein. For logging associated with completion, the service string may be tripped in before the production string is tripped in. For logging associated with abandonment, the service string may be tripped in after the production string is tripped out.
  • In a first aspect, the present disclosure provides a method and system for logging a wellbore. A logging tool is tripped into the wellbore on a service string with a service rig. The service string is assembled from tubing joints. The logging tool may be used to receive variable wellbore data of variable wellbore conditions, which would be subject to variance when the wellbore is disturbed by tripping in a work string for use with previous methods of coiled tubing-based or wireline-based logging. The variable wellbore data may be logged while tripping the service string into the well, out of the well, or both. Data of the depth of the service string as a function of time is also received for correlation with the variable data along a common timeline to map the variable data to locations in the wellbores.
  • In a further aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of logging a well comprising: tripping a service string into the well, the service string comprising a logging tool connected with a plurality of tubing joints; receiving variable well data as a function of time with the logging tool; receiving tool depth data of the logging tool as a function of time; and tripping the service string out of the well.
  • In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
  • In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
  • In some embodiments, the variable well data comprises well temperature data.
  • In some embodiments, the variable well data comprises well pressure data.
  • In some embodiments, the well comprises a vertical portion in communication with a wellhead, a heel in communication with the vertical portion, and a horizontal portion in communication with the heel.
  • In some embodiments, the tool depth data comprises data of the number and length of tubing joints and connectors in the service string.
  • In some embodiments, the method includes receiving static well data as a function of time. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well. In some embodiments, receiving the static well data as a function of time comprises receiving the static well data with the logging tool. In some embodiments, the service string further comprises a static well property logging tool and wherein receiving the static well data as a function of time comprises receiving the static well data with the static well property logging tool. In some embodiments, the static well data comprises casing inside diameter data. In some embodiments, the static well data comprises bond strength data. In some embodiments, the static well data casing integrity data.
  • In some embodiments, the service string further comprises a scraper connected with the tubing joints and with the logging tool, and the method further comprising scraping the well with the scraper. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well and scraping the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well. In some embodiments, the method includes receiving static well data as a function of time. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well and scraping the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
  • In a further aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of logging a well comprising: tripping a service string into the well, the service string comprising a plurality of tubing joints connected with a logging tool and with a scraper; scraping the well while tripping the service string into the well; receiving variable well data as a function of time with the logging tool; receiving tool depth data of the logging tool as a function of time; and tripping the service string out of the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well. In some embodiments, at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
  • Other aspects and features of the present disclosure will become apparent to those ordinarily skilled in the art upon review of the following description of specific embodiments in conjunction with the accompanying figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Embodiments of the present disclosure will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the attached figures, in which features sharing reference numerals with a common final two digits of a reference numeral correspond to similar features across multiple figures (e.g. the service string 30, 130, etc.).
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic of a wellbore including production tubing;
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic of the wellbore of FIG. 1 with the production tubing removed;
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic of the wellbore of FIG. 1 with a service string partway downhole;
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic of the wellbore of FIG. 1 with the service string at a toe of the well;
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional elevation schematic of a tubing joint and connector counter connected with a blowout preventer stack;
  • FIG. 6 is a partial cutaway plan view of the tubing joint and connector counter of FIG. 5;
  • FIG. 7 is a schematic of a wellbore with a service string including a scraper partway downhole; and
  • FIG. 8 is a schematic of the wellbore of FIG. 5 with the service string at a toe of the well.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Generally, the present disclosure provides methods and systems for logging a well. The method and system disclosed herein facilitate logging a well as part of completion, workover, abandonment, or other situations in which logging is carried out on a well. In the context of a workover, the well would be killed and the production string tripped out prior to application of the methods and systems disclosed herein. For logging associated with completion, the methods and systems would be applied before a production string is tripped in. For logging associated with abandonment, the methods and systems would be applied after the production string is tripped out. By allowing the service rig to trip in a logging tool, the method and system remove the requirement for running in coiled tubing (“CT”) or a wireline unit. In addition, multiple tools may be included on the service string, which would increase the size and complexity of a lubricator used to run a CT string, but which would not increase the size or complexity of any components of a service rig used to trip in the service string.
  • Methods disclosed herein include, and systems disclosed herein facilitate, assembling a service string from tubing joints and a logging tool connected with the tubing joints, tripping the service string into a wellbore, and receiving variable data of a wellbore property which is subject to variance when the wellbore is disturbed. The wellbore may be disturbed by running a work string downhole or when fluids are passing between a hydrocarbon-bearing formation and the wellbore. The service string is tripped into the wellbore. Logging may be performed while tripping the service string into the wellbore, while pulling the service string, or both. No separate work string in which to run a CT string or a wireline is needed and downhole equipment used to log and otherwise service the well can be tripped in using a service rig.
  • The same service rig that would already be present to trip a production string (and a work string in previous methods) into or out of the wellbore may be used for running the service string and logging the well. In addition, the need for recovery time to restore variable well properties which are subject to variance when the well is disturbed is mitigated or eliminated. For example, the need for temperature recovery in thermal wells after tripping in a work string but prior to temperature logging in a workover is mitigated or eliminated. Data for a temperature log can be received by the logging tool while tripping the service string downhole or uphole. While tripping the service string in, the data of the wellbore temperature and pressure in the undisturbed or “static” state may be obtained since no fluid is moving into or out of the wellbore from the surrounding formation.
  • The methods and systems disclosed herein apply to any operation in which logging is performed, such as completion, workover, abandonment. Except where otherwise indicated, the general example context applied below is application of the methods and systems to a workover. In most applications of the methods and systems, the well would first be killed or would otherwise be at a low wellbore pressure.
  • In the context of a workover, both previous logging methods and the methods and systems disclosed herein are applied after killing the well, removing the Christmas tree and any other uphole artificial lift equipment from the wellhead, pulling production tubing from the well, and connecting a blowout preventer (“BOP”) with the wellhead. After connection of the BOP with the wellhead, the methods and systems disclosed herein may be applied in place of previous logging methods and system.
  • In previous methods, a work string is tripped into the well through the BOP. After the work string is in place, a CT string is run into the work string through an injector, a counter (typically in a single assembly with the injector), and the BOP. A logging tool is then pumped downhole through the CT string. Alternatively, a logging tool connected to a wireline is lowered into the wellbore within the work string using a tractor and the wireline is used to retrieve the logging tool. Logging would be performed while removing the logging tool from the wellbore through the CT string, or while using the wireline to retrieve the logging tool. After the logging is complete, the CT string or wireline is pulled (unless the CT string or wireline is required for any subsequent steps in the workover). Once all steps in the workover are complete, the work string is tripped out. The production string is tripped back in, the BOP removed, and the Christmas tree and any uphole artificial lift equipment are reconnected with the wellhead resume production.
  • When applying the methods and systems disclosed herein, a depth counter is installed. The depth counter may be installed on top of the BOP. Once the depth counter is installed, the logging tool, tubing joints, and connectors included in the service string are run through the BOP and tripped into the wellbore as the service string is assembled. The tubing joints and the logging tool are assembled into the service string one connection at a time as with any jointed tubing system (e.g. with power tongs, etc.). The logging tool receives data of variable wellbore conditions while being tripped into the wellbore, out of the wellbore, or both. The depth of the logging tool is determined using the uphole depth counter, which detects movement of joints and connectors being run in as part of the string. As indicated above, the same rig that would be used to trip the production string and the work string can be used to run a jointed tubing service string which includes the logging tool. The depth counter may include features which facilitate easy removal from the BOP so that once logging is complete, the depth counter can be removed and the logging contractor can leave the wellsite with their equipment while the service rig is used to continue and finish the workover or other operation. In some applications, the systems and methods described herein may facilitate logging while scraping a wellbore. A scraper may be included on the service string downhole of the logging tool and scrape out the wellbore in advance of the logging tool.
  • Tripping the Service String
  • FIGS. 1 to 4 are schematic illustrations of a system being used in a method of logging a wellbore 10. The wellbore 10 extends between a wellhead 12 and a toe 14. A vertical portion 11 of the wellbore 10 extends downward from the wellhead 12 to a heel 13 where the wellbore 10 transitions to a horizontal portion 15. The horizontal portion 15 ends with the toe 14. The methods and systems also apply to wellbores which include only a vertical portion, with no heel, horizontal portion, or toe (not shown).
  • In FIG. 1, a production string 16, shown with a downhole pump 17 proximate the toe 14, is located in the wellbore 10. A Christmas tree 18 is located on the wellhead 12. Uphole artificial lift equipment, casing, and other details which would be in or near the wellbore 10 have been omitted from FIG. 1 and the following figures for simplicity.
  • In FIG. 2, the Christmas tree 18 has been removed from the wellhead 12. A
  • BOP 20 is connected with the wellhead 12. A service rig 22 is present above the wellhead 12 and the BOP 20. A depth counter 24 is mounted above the BOP 20 for receiving data of the length of tubulars which pass through the depth counter 24. The production string 16 has also been removed from the wellbore 10.
  • In FIG. 3, the service rig 22 is being used to trip a service string 30 into or out of the wellbore 10. The service string 30 includes a logging tool 32 at the downhole end of a plurality of tubing joints 34 connected by connectors 36. Power tongs or any suitable method may be used on the rig 22 to assemble the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 into the service string 30. The tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 are run through the BOP 20 and the depth counter 24 by the service rig 22. Where the wellbore 10 has been killed or is otherwise not under pressure, the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 of the tubing string 30 are safely in fluid and pressure communication with the wellbore 10 while being run in.
  • In FIG. 4, the service string 30 is located deep in the wellbore 10, with the logging tool 32 proximate the toe 14. The transient position of the service string 30 in FIG. 3 is illustrated by the service string 30 being located partway along the total depth of the wellbore 10, with the logging tool 32 located partway between the heel 13 and the toe 14.
  • Receiving Data of Wellbore Conditions
  • Some previous methods and systems applied jointed tubing for detecting casing collars as exemplified in U.S. Pat. No. 6,896,056 to Mendez et al. Casing collar location is a static wellbore property in that the location of casing collars will not change as a result of activity in the wellbore 10. Unlike the location of collars in casing used to complete the wellbore 10, variable properties of the wellbore 10 are subject to variance over time, particularly shortly after the wellbore 10 has been disturbed. These properties may include temperature, pressure, and other transient wellbore properties. The methods and systems disclosed herein facilitate logging data of variable wellbore properties using the service string 30, which is be the first string to be run into the wellbore 10 after killing the well and pulling the production string 16. No work string to house a CT string or wireline is necessary as in previous methods. As a result, delay between running a work string (and tractor for wireline) and temperature logging on a CT string, wireline, or slickline associated with previous methods is mitigated or eliminated.
  • In addition to variable wellbore properties, the methods and systems disclosed herein may also be applied to logging data of static properties of the wellbore. Inside diameter, bond strength, gamma emissions, electromagnetic (“EM”) emissions, and casing integrity are all examples of such static properties. While the static wellbore properties may change slowly over the lifetime of the well, the static wellbore properties will not change as a result of recent activity, such as running in a work string. Casing bond strength may change over time where the temperature range in the well includes higher values. However, casing bond strength is not affected in the short term by running strings into the wellbore 10 and in that sense is a static wellbore property.
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 show the work string 30 within the wellbore 10 at different depths. The logging tool 32 may receive the variable wellbore property data while the service string 30 is being tripped into the wellbore 10, out of the wellbore 10, or both. The logging tool 32 may be translated downhole or uphole during logging by tripping the service string 30 further in or out. Data may be acquired by the logging tool 32 while being tripped in, tripped out, or left in one location in the wellbore 10. The depth counter 24 receives depth data of the total length of tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 which have passed through the depth counter 24 and the BOP 20.
  • The variable data received during logging with the logging tool 32 are representative of variable wellbore properties which are subject to variance when the well is disturbed by pulling production tubing and running a work string in previous methods (e.g. temperature, pressure, etc.). Static data of a wellbore property which is not subject to variance when the well is similarly disturbed may also be received by the logging tool 32 (e.g. casing inside diameter data, casing integrity data, etc.). Any reference herein to the service string 30 or the logging tool 32 including more than one data acquisition function, includes either or both of multiple tools with different functionalities, or of one tool with multiple functionalities. Where both variable wellbore data and static wellbore data are received, the variable wellbore data may be received while tripping the service string 30 in and the static wellbore data may be received while tripping the service string out. Where a downhole tool may be temperature sensitive in the temperature range of the wellbore 10, the methods and systems may be applied to temperature logging in advance of using a temperature-sensitive downhole tool on a separate run. The temperature-sensitive downhole tool could be tripped in using a jointed tubing string in accordance with the methods and systems described herein, otherwise using a jointed tubing string, using a CT string, using a wireline, or any suitable approach. Mapping the temperature log to the wellbore 10 may also provide information about hot and cold portions of the wellbore 10, which may be useful for example as indicators of casing damage.
  • As the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 travel through the depth counter 24, data of movement of the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 is converted to depth as a function of time. The variable data may be received by the logging tool 32 while tripping in, tripping out, or both, as a function of time. Static data, if any, which is also received by the logging tool 32, may similarly be received while tripping in, tripping out, or both, as a function of time. The timelines of the depth counter 24 and the logging tool 32 can be aligned to a common timeline for facilitating correlation of depth with the variable and static downhole conditions through the common timeline. In addition, depth or trip speed may be provided in real time during operation based on translation of the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 detected by the depth counter 24 (i.e. without access to the data received by the logging tool 32, which in typical applications using current logging tools would not be available in real-time). A logging tool 32 which uses onboard memory would record the data for being accessed and correlated with the depth data timeline after logging. Previous memory logging systems typically capture depth from encoders that are mounted on coil tubing injectors or wireline measuring heads. These counting systems are typically located on coil tubing or wireline trucks.
  • In many cases, in situ thermal wells are also long-reach horizontal wells, such as wells used to recover hydrocarbons by steam assisted gravity drainage (“SAGD”) or cyclic steam stimulation (“CSS”). In previous methods, during workover of a horizontal wellbore for in situ thermal wells, a guide string is tripped into the horizontal wellbore. A wireline unit is then rigged in and a logging tool is pumped down to the end of the guide string. The well would then be allowed to sit undisturbed for about 3 to 4 hours for temperature recovery, and in some cases as long as 6 hours or more. After recovery, the logging tool receives temperature data while being rigged out along the guide string of the wireline unit. The wireline unit is then rigged out and the guide string is pulled out of the well with the service rig.
  • In contrast to previous methods for logging in situ thermal wells, when the logging tool 32 is tripped downhole on the service string 30 assembled from the tubing joints 34 and the connectors 36 using the service rig 22, data of variable wellbore conditions, including temperature and pressure, may be acquired while the service string 30 is tripped into the wellbore 10 of the in situ thermal well. Waiting time for temperature equalization following delivery of the logging tool 32 to the wellbore 10 is mitigated or eliminated. The methods and systems disclosed herein may be particularly beneficial in terms of reducing the time and cost required when logging wellbore temperature following a steam flood cycle in SAGD, CSS, or other thermal enhanced recovery methods.
  • Use of the service string 30 and the depth counter 24 would allow a temperature log to be recorded by attaching the logging tool 32 to the bottom of the service string 30, tripping the logging tool 32 to proximate the toe 14, then tripping the service string 30 and the logging tool 32 out of the wellbore 10. The data received by the logging tool 32 would then be downloaded and aligned with the depth data recorded on the depth counter 24 by the common timeline for both data sets. This would potentially save 3 to 6 hours or more of rig time in a typical thermal in situ well logging operation. No equalization across a work string and into the work string is necessary because the temperature data or other variable well data captured as the logging tool 32 is tripped into the wellbore 10 would be accurate. In addition, as indicated above, a temperature log may in some cases be required to ensure that the temperature of the wellbore 10 is not beyond the tolerance limit of a tool which will follow temperature logging. In in situ thermal wells, which may exceed 300° C. after a steam cycle, this approach may have particular application.
  • Jointed Tubing Depth Counter
  • FIG. 5 shows a cross-section of a jointed tubing depth counter (“JTDC”) 50 mounted on the BOP 20 (e.g. on pipe slips, etc.). The JTDC 50 is one example of a depth counter 24. The service string 30 is shown passing through the JTDC 50, the BOP 20, and the wellhead 12, into the wellbore 10.
  • FIG. 6 shows a partial cutaway of the JTDC 50 from above. The service string 30, the BOP 20, and the wellhead 12 are not shown in FIG. 6.
  • The service string 30 includes tubing joints 34 and corresponding connectors 36, which may be tripped downhole or uphole through the JTDC 50 and the BOP 20, and into the wellbore 10. The JTDC 50 is an example of a depth counter 24 which is able to accommodate significant variations in outside diameter (“OD”) of the service string 30, such as the difference of about 1″ between OD values of the tubing joints 34 (e.g. 2 ⅜″ OD, 2 ⅞″ OD, 3 ½″ OD, 4 ½″ OD, etc.) and corresponding connectors 36.
  • The JTDC 50 includes a split body 52 having a central aperture 54 defined in the split body 52. The split body 52 includes a first body component 51 and a second body component 53. The first and second body components 51, 53 are joined by a hinged connection 55. A pair of tubing idlers 56 are connected to the split body 52 through swing arms 58. The tubing idlers 56 are rotated through contact with the service string 30 as the service string 30 is tripped through the aperture 54. Rotation of the tubing idlers 56 provides data of translation of the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 through the aperture 54. Any other suitable detection system for receiving data of translation of the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 may be alternatively used (e.g. an optical detector, etc.). The swing arms 58 are urged towards the aperture 54 by gas cylinders 59 (e.g. nitrogen, compressed air, etc.).
  • While gas cylinders 59 are shown, any suitable biasing mechanism which accommodates variations in OD as between the tubing joints 34 and the connectors 36 could be included (e.g. springs, etc.). The gas cylinders 59, or other easily adjustable biasing mechanisms allow the JTDC 50 to be quickly recalibrated for different OD values of the tubing joints 34 and the connectors 36.
  • An encoder 60 receives the depth data from the idlers 56 and provides the data to a trip gauge 62 and to a depth interface tie-in point 64. After processing by the encoder 60, the depth data may be provided to the trip gauge 62 and to the depth interface tie-in point 64 in analog form, digital form, or both. A gas pressure gauge and pressure detection equipment may also be included (not shown).
  • The split body 52 of the JTDC 50 allows the first and second body components 52, 53 to be split and opened at the hinged connection 55. The split body 52 and hinged connection 55 facilitate connection to and disconnection from the BOP 20 while a tubing joint 34 is located in the aperture 54, for example while a tubing joint 34 is towered in the BOP 20 and the JTDC 50. Simplified connection to and disconnection from the BOP 20 reduces the effort required to add the JTDC 50 to the BOP 20 before the logging operation and to remove the JTDC 50 from the BOP 20 once the logging operation is finished. The same service rig 22 used to trip the service string 30 may also be used to trip the production string 16 back into the wellbore 10. Removing the JTDC 50 after completion of logging or any other operation for which the service string 30 was employed, but leaving the BOP 20 in place, facilitates running in the production string 16 with the service rig 22. In addition, this facilitates removal of the depth counter 24 and service string 30, without removing the service rig 22, allowing a logging contractor to leave the site while the crew running the service rig 22 begins to trip the production string 16 back into the wellbore 10.
  • The idlers 56 and swing arms 58 are urged against tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 which are run through the JTDC 50 by gas pressure from the gas cylinders 59 to keep the idlers 56 in firm contact with the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 tripped through the JTDC 50 into the wellbore 10. The force generated on the idlers 56 by the gas cylinders 59 may be adjustable to recalibrate the JTDC 50 for different OD values of the tubing joints 34 and the connectors 36. The idlers 56 are mounted on the swing arms 58 so that the idlers 56 can be urged outward when the connectors 36 (which have a greater OD than the tubing joints 34) pass through the apertures 54. The idlers 56 rotate as the tubing joints 34 and connectors 36 are tripped through the JTDC 50, providing depth data which is provided to the encoder 60 and the trip gauge 62. Analog depth data received by the encoder 60 may be converted to a digital signal for use by logging software depth interfaces. The depth data is transmitted to a user at the depth interface tie-in point 64 by a wired or wireless connection. The encoder 60 and the trip gauge 62 allow a direct correlation between a depth timeline and a timeline which includes data received by the logging tool 32 while tripping the service string 30 into or out of the wellbore 10. In addition, the depth data may be provided to the trip gauge 62 in real time for real-time presentation of the current depth, the trip speed, or other expressions of the depth data, to a user.
  • The JTDC 50 may be applied in the methods and systems for logging a well which are disclosed herein, improving on previous approaches for well logging or other interventions on a killed well which require a logging tool 32 or other downhole tools.
  • Scraping and Other Operations on the Service String
  • A logging tool may be run on a jointed tubing service string in conjunction with other downhole tools, providing additional efficiencies and cost savings.
  • FIGS. 7 and 8 show a service string 130 tripped partway into the wellbore 110 and to the toe 104 of the wellbore 110, respectively. The service string 130 includes a scraper 138 downhole of the logging tool 132. The relative locations of the scraper 137 and the logging tool 132 may be different, including with the logging tool 132 being inside the service string or downhole of the scraper 137 (not shown). The service string 130 facilitates simultaneous logging and scraping of the wellbore 110.
  • In many workover operations, both scraping and logging are necessary, and are in many cases performed by running in separate strings. Using previous approaches, a first string with a scraper would often be run in to scrape the well. After scraping, a work string would be run with the service rig in to provide a conduit for rigging in a CT string or wireline. Applying the method illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 in places of these previous methods provides efficiencies by allowing scraping and logging to occur simultaneously. Where scraping and logging are not necessarily performed simultaneously, both procedures may nonetheless be performed on the same service string 130, which would also save time and costs even if scraping and logging are not simultaneous.
  • Examples Only
  • In the preceding description, for purposes of explanation, numerous details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the embodiments. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that these specific details are not required.
  • The above-described embodiments are intended to be examples only. Alterations, modifications and variations can be effected to the particular embodiments by those of skill in the art without departing from the scope, which is defined solely by the claims appended hereto.

Claims (26)

What is claimed is:
1. A method of logging a well comprising:
tripping a service string into the well, the service string comprising a logging tool connected with a plurality of tubing joints;
receiving variable well data as a function of time with the logging tool;
receiving tool depth data of the logging tool as a function of time; and
tripping the service string out of the well.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein the variable well data comprises well temperature data.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein the variable well data comprises well pressure data.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein the well comprises a vertical portion in communication with a wellhead, a heel in communication with the vertical portion, and a horizontal portion in communication with the heel.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein the tool depth data comprises data of the number and length of tubing joints and connectors in the service string.
9. The method of claim 1 further comprising receiving static well data as a function of time.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well.
11. The method of claim 9 wherein at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
12. The method of claim 9 wherein receiving the static well data as a function of time comprises receiving the static well data with the logging tool.
13. The method of claim 9 wherein the service string further comprises a static well property logging tool and wherein receiving the static well data as a function of time comprises receiving the static well data with the static well property logging tool.
14. The method of claim 9 wherein the static well data comprises casing inside diameter data.
15. The method of claim 9 wherein the static well data comprises bond strength data.
16. The method of claim 9 wherein the static well data casing integrity data.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein the service string further comprises a scraper connected with the tubing joints and with the logging tool, and the method further comprising scraping the well with the scraper.
18. The method of claim 17 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well and scraping the well.
19. The method of claim 17 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
20. The method of claim 17 further comprising receiving static well data as a function of time.
21. The method of claim 20 wherein at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well and scraping the well.
22. The method of claim 20 wherein at least a portion of receiving the static well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
23. A method of logging a well comprising:
tripping a service string into the well, the service string comprising a plurality of tubing joints connected with a logging tool and with a scraper;
scraping the well while tripping the service string into the well;
receiving variable well data as a function of time with the logging tool;
receiving tool depth data of the logging tool as a function of time; and
tripping the service string out of the well.
24. The method of claim 23 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string into the well.
25. The method of claim 24 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well
26. The method of claim 23 wherein at least a portion of receiving the variable well data is performed while tripping the service string out of the well.
US14/941,904 2015-11-16 2015-11-16 Method and system for logging a well Abandoned US20170138181A1 (en)

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