US20170102112A1 - Led lamp - Google Patents

Led lamp Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20170102112A1
US20170102112A1 US15/370,723 US201615370723A US2017102112A1 US 20170102112 A1 US20170102112 A1 US 20170102112A1 US 201615370723 A US201615370723 A US 201615370723A US 2017102112 A1 US2017102112 A1 US 2017102112A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
leds
led
substrate
led lamp
heat
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US15/370,723
Inventor
Raymond G. Janik
Carlo Scianna
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Feit Electric Co Inc
Original Assignee
Feit Electric Co Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation
Priority to US2032608P priority Critical
Priority to PCT/US2009/030741 priority patent/WO2009089529A1/en
Priority to US12/826,774 priority patent/US8408748B2/en
Priority to US13/855,391 priority patent/US9016901B2/en
Priority to US14/638,406 priority patent/US9267649B2/en
First worldwide family litigation filed litigation Critical https://patents.darts-ip.com/?family=40853489&utm_source=google_patent&utm_medium=platform_link&utm_campaign=public_patent_search&patent=US20170102112(A1) "Global patent litigation dataset” by Darts-ip is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Priority to US15/015,834 priority patent/US20160273715A1/en
Application filed by Feit Electric Co Inc filed Critical Feit Electric Co Inc
Priority to US15/370,723 priority patent/US20170102112A1/en
Assigned to Feit Electric Company, Inc. reassignment Feit Electric Company, Inc. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HS PATENT ACQUISITION, LLC
Assigned to GOEKEN GROUP CORP. reassignment GOEKEN GROUP CORP. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: JANIK, RAYMOND G., SCIANNA, CARLO
Assigned to HS PATENT ACQUISITION, LLC reassignment HS PATENT ACQUISITION, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GOEKEN GROUP CORP.
Publication of US20170102112A1 publication Critical patent/US20170102112A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/232Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings specially adapted for generating an essentially omnidirectional light distribution, e.g. with a glass bulb
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/233Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings specially adapted for generating a spot light distribution, e.g. for substitution of reflector lamps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/235Details of bases or caps, i.e. the parts that connect the light source to a fitting; Arrangement of components within bases or caps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/237Details of housings or cases, i.e. the parts between the light-generating element and the bases; Arrangement of components within housings or cases
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/238Arrangement or mounting of circuit elements integrated in the light source
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V19/00Fastening of light sources or lamp holders
    • F21V19/006Fastening of light sources or lamp holders of point-like light sources, e.g. incandescent or halogen lamps, with screw-threaded or bayonet base
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V23/00Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices
    • F21V23/003Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being electronics drivers or controllers for operating the light source, e.g. for a LED array
    • F21V23/004Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being electronics drivers or controllers for operating the light source, e.g. for a LED array arranged on a substrate, e.g. a printed circuit board
    • F21V23/005Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being electronics drivers or controllers for operating the light source, e.g. for a LED array arranged on a substrate, e.g. a printed circuit board the substrate is supporting also the light source
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/80Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with pins or wires
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/83Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks the elements having apertures, ducts or channels, e.g. heat radiation holes
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V3/00Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses
    • F21V3/02Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses characterised by the shape
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V19/00Fastening of light sources or lamp holders
    • F21V19/001Fastening of light sources or lamp holders the light sources being semiconductors devices, e.g. LEDs
    • F21V19/003Fastening of light source holders, e.g. of circuit boards or substrates holding light sources
    • F21V19/005Fastening of light source holders, e.g. of circuit boards or substrates holding light sources by permanent fixing means, e.g. gluing, riveting or embedding in a potting compound
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2101/00Point-like light sources
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2107/00Light sources with three-dimensionally disposed light-generating elements
    • F21Y2107/90Light sources with three-dimensionally disposed light-generating elements on two opposite sides of supports or substrates
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2115/00Light-generating elements of semiconductor light sources
    • F21Y2115/10Light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B45/00Circuit arrangements for operating light emitting diodes [LED]
    • H05B45/10Controlling the intensity of the light
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05KPRINTED CIRCUITS; CASINGS OR CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF ELECTRIC APPARATUS; MANUFACTURE OF ASSEMBLAGES OF ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS
    • H05K1/00Printed circuits
    • H05K1/02Details
    • H05K1/0201Thermal arrangements, e.g. for cooling, heating or preventing overheating
    • H05K1/0203Cooling of mounted components
    • H05K1/0207Cooling of mounted components using internal conductor planes parallel to the surface for thermal conduction, e.g. power planes
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B20/00Energy efficient lighting technologies, e.g. halogen lamps or gas discharge lamps
    • Y02B20/30Semiconductor lamps, e.g. solid state lamps [SSL] light emitting diodes [LED] or organic LED [OLED]

Abstract

An LED lamp that can take the place of incandescent lamps. An elevated light source is positioned above a screw-type base. A first plurality of LEDs is connected in a series on one side of a flat substrate and a second plurality of LEDs, equal in number to the first, is connected in series on an opposite side of the substrate. Each LED of the first and second plurality of LEDs is mounted proximate a heat sink and a drive circuit is provided for the LEDs, with the drive circuit being located proximate and electrically connected to the screw base.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of co-pending U.S. application Ser. No. 15/015,834, filed Feb. 4, 2016, which application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/638,406, filed Mar. 4, 2015 and now U.S. Pat. No. 9,267,649; which application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/855,391, filed Apr. 2, 2013 and now U.S. Pat. No. 9,016,901; which application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/826,774, filed Jun. 30, 2010 and now U.S. Pat. No. 8,408,748; which application is a continuation-in-part of International Application No. PCT/US2009/030741, filed Jan. 12, 2009; which application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/020,326, filed Jan. 10, 2008; the contents of all of which as are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Technical Field
  • This application relates to LED (light-emitting diode) lamps, and in particular to an LED lamp to replace standard incandescent lamps.
  • Incandescent lamps have existed for over a hundred years. They are attractive and aesthetically pleasing for their high Color Rendering Index (CRI) and warm color temperature. However, low efficiency, short life and energy waste have been major drawbacks that forced consumers to switch to more efficient sources of light, such as the fluorescent lamp.
  • The incandescent lamp would have become obsolete many decades ago had it not been for the fact that fluorescent lamps have low CRI, are physically large, exhibit flicker effect and include hazardous materials such as mercury.
  • Until the late 1980s, LEDs had been primarily used as an indicator light in electronic equipment. Their high efficiency compared to incandescent made them very popular. Towards the late 1990s, high intensity LEDs started emerging, including the white LED. Today, the advancement in LED chip design and manufacturing makes it more feasible than ever to replace the incandescent lamp.
  • However there remain several challenges that slow the spread of LED lamps:
  • 1. Low Maximum LED Junction Temperature and Heat Dissipation.
  • LEDs generate heat at a rate equal to the product of the voltage drop VD and the drive current ID,
  • P ( Watts ) = I D ( Amp ) × V D ( Volt ) = Δ Q ( JOULES ) Δ t ( Sec )
  • where P is the power and Q the heat energy produced by the LED. The LED junction temperature rise is a function of the difference between heat generated and heat dissipated. Heat dissipation is a function of the heat sink surface area, the thermal conductivity of the different media and interfaces and the temperature difference between the heat sink and ambient temperature. Most LEDs have a maximum junction temperature of 125° C. and a few manufacturers advertise up to 180° C. Light output from LEDs is limited by how fast heat can be dissipated away from the die. The luminous output of LEDs is reduced as the junction temperature elevates. FIG. 1 is a plot of the luminous output vs. junction temperature of a typical LED.
  • 2. Luminous Output and Efficacy.
  • Luminous Efficacy is the ratio of luminous flux (Lm) to applied power (Watts). Typical values of low power incandescent lamp efficacy are:
  • Luminous Efficacy LM/W Combustion Candle 0.3 5 W Incandescent 5 40 W Incandescent 12
  • LED efficacy has improved over the last few years and has exceeded 100 Lm/W. Commonly available power LEDs can measure up to 85 Lm/W. However, it should be noted that these measurements are taken at 25° C. junction temperature and reduced drive current.
  • As noted earlier, the luminous output decreases when the die temperature increases. Increasing the drive current has an even greater effect on reducing efficacy. As the current increases, the light output increases in a non-linear fashion, as shown in FIG. 2, but as FIG. 3 shows, the voltage increases as well.
  • In other words, if the current I is increased by a factor (1+K, where 0<K<1), not only will the luminous output be increased by a factor (k+1, where 0<k<K), but the LED voltage V will also increase by a factor (1+v). The new LED power consumption will become:

  • P=(I+K)×(V+v)=(I+KV+(I+Kv
  • where the first term represents the increase in power due to increase in current only, and the second term represents the increase in power due to increase in current and voltage.
  • Thus, increasing the LED current will increase the LED output at the expense of reducing its efficacy. The percentage increase in lumens is lower than that of the increase in current, which will reduce efficacy at a much higher rate.
  • 3. An LED is a Unidirectional Light Source.
  • LEDs emit light in a cone that is less than a half space, making it difficult to be used in a traditional “A” type lamp, as FIG. 4 shows. When mounted on a heat sink and placed in a bulb-like shell, some of the light will be absorbed by the package and lens material which will reduce the system efficacy, For a successful implementation of the LED in an ‘A’ type lamp, the LED needs to be elevated to the center of the bulb, but this reduces the thermal dissipation capabilities.
  • 4. Need for Power Conversion.
  • LEDs are current driven devices that require a constant current source power supply (FIG. 5). As FIG. 3 indicates, the voltage reflected by an LED is an exponential function of the drive current. An LED cannot be driven by a voltage source, since the source voltage must match the LED voltage. Otherwise, the difference in voltage divided by the total circuit resistance will result in a current that would easily exceed the maximum LED rating and cause the device to fail.
  • A constant current source power supply adds cost and reduces the reliability and efficiency of the LED lamp system. A fly-back power supply under 5 watts has a typical efficiency of less than 80% which will reduce the luminous efficacy of the whole lamp system.
  • Power supplies occupy valuable real estate in a lamp system, and special measures need to be taken in order to isolate a power supply from the heat generated by the LED.
  • 5. Dimmability.
  • A dimmer controls the light output by phase controlling the AC input voltage. However, a constant current power supply will compensate for any change in input voltage in order to keep the output current constant. There are specialty power supplies that permit dimmability. These power supplies are designed to produce an output current that is proportional to the RMS input voltage. Such power supplies are generally more complex and exhibit lower efficiency.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of an off-line switch mode power supply. A switch mode power supply is required to convert the 120 Vac line voltage to a low DC current (10 mA-350 mA). Power supplies of 5 Watts output power or less are almost always fly-back type, and have a typical efficiency of less than 80%. They are also prone to failure if they encounter a surge, where a spike of high voltage could damage the MOSFET switch, especially if a surge suppressor, such as an MOV (metal oxide varistor), is not incorporated.
  • Another common method of driving low voltage LEDs is by using an impedance in series with AC line to limit the current and drop the excess voltage across it. This impedance may be a resistor, a capacitor or an inductor. A resistor is the cheapest and most available, but the energy E=I2·R·Δt it dissipates is lost and cannot be recovered. The losses increase with the increase in the difference in voltage between the source voltage and the LED voltage, as demonstrated in FIG. 6.
  • Assume Vs=166V, V=36V, and I=20 mA. Then,
  • R = V s - V I = 166 - 36 0.02 = 6.5 k Ω
  • The power dissipation across the resistor is PR=I2×R=2.6 W
  • The efficiency of the system becomes:
  • P OUT P IN = I × V ( I × V ) + P R = 0.02 × 36 ( 0.02 × 36 ) + 2.6 = 0.72 3.32 = 22 %
  • Obviously this system is not feasible.
  • Another solution is to replace R by an impedance that does not dissipate energy, such as an inductor or a capacitor. A capacitor is more available in size and value than an inductor. The only limiting factor is the maximum allowable voltage drop across the capacitor. However, this solution renders the LED non-dimmable and increases the size of the circuit board due to the large size of the AC capacitor which needs to be rated to the line voltage plus a margin.
  • The resistor impedance solution would be feasible if the power dissipation is reduced, which is accomplished if the voltage difference (Vs−V) is reduced. This is done by increasing the number of LEDs in series until the total LED voltage drop approaches the source voltage Vs which will reduce the voltage difference (Vs−V) as well as the value of R required to limit the current.
  • For example, assume several LEDs are connected in series to produce a total load voltage V=136V. The new value for R is:
  • R = V s - V I = 166 - 36 0.02 = 1.5 k Ω
  • The new power dissipation is

  • P R =I 2 LOAD R=0.6 W
  • The new system efficiency becomes
  • P OUT P IN = I × V ( I × V ) + P R = 0.02 × 136 ( 0.02 × 116 ) + 0.6 = 2.72 3.32 = 82 %
  • Clearly, this is well within the acceptable range for power supply efficiency, which is accomplished by shifting more of the wasted power to useful power.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • The invention is directed to an LED lamp comprising a base and an elevated light source. The light source is composed of a first plurality of LEDs connected in series and mounted on one side of a generally flat substrate, the substrate being spaced from the base, and a second plurality of LEDs, connected in series and mounted on an opposite side of the substrate, with the second plurality of LEDs being located generally in registration with the first plurality of LEDs. A heat sink is in the substrate, with each LED of the first and second plurality of LEDs being mounted proximate the heat sink. A drive circuit is provided for the LEDs, the drive circuit being located proximate and electrically connected to the base.
  • In accordance with the preferred form of the invention, the base is a screw-type base. The drive circuit is mounted on a circuit board extending from the flat substrate, the circuit board extending into the base.
  • In one form of the invention, the heat sink comprises at least one conductive heat island on each side of the substrate, each LED of the first plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on the one side of the substrate, and each LED of the second plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on the opposite side of the substrate. The heat sink also includes at least one conductive heat spreader, each heat island being connected to the heat spreader. The heat spreader is located in the substrate, and extends to the base. Preferably, there are first and second heat spreaders, with each heat island on one side of the substrate being connected to the first heat spreader and each heat island on the opposite side being connected to the second heat spreader. Each heat spreader is preferably a unitary structure, although the heat spreaders can be a series of conductive elements connected to one another.
  • Preferably, the invention is in the shape of a conventional light bulb. It therefore includes a globe which is connected to the base. The first and second plurality of LEDs are oriented generally in an arc inside the globe.
  • The drive circuit comprises a surge suppressor, a rectifier, a smoothing capacitor and a resistor, with the first plurality of LEDs and the second plurality of LEDs being connected in parallel and their parallel connection being to the resistor.
  • In one form of the invention, the substrate is oriented parallel to a line extending from the base. In a second form of the invention, the substrate is oriented perpendicular to the line extending from the base. In this form of the invention, the heat sink comprises a plurality of conductive heat spreader rods extending from proximate the base to the substrate.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)
  • The invention is described in greater detail in the following description of examples embodying the best mode of the invention, taken in conjunction with the drawing figures, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a plot of the luminous output versus junction temperature of a typical LED,
  • FIG. 2 is a plot of the light output versus current drive of a LED, FIG. 3 is a plot of LED voltage versus LED current,
  • FIG. 4 is a plot of the cone of light emission of an LED,
  • FIG. 5 is an off-line switch mode power supply for an LED,
  • FIG. 6 demonstrates how losses increase with the increase in the difference between voltage between a source voltage and the LED voltage,
  • FIG. 7 is an elevational illustration of a circuit board according to the invention,
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a simple circuit for connecting LEDs in series,
  • FIG. 9 is a typical circuit used in connection with the present invention,
  • FIG. 10 represents the waveforms for the input alternating current voltage, the rectified voltage and the LED current of the circuit of FIG. 9,
  • FIG. 11A is an elevational view, similar to FIG. 7, of one form of the invention,
  • FIG. 11B is a side elevational illustration of FIG. 11A,
  • FIG. 11C is the substrate of FIGS. 11A and 11B showing the heat spreader,
  • FIG. 12A is an elevational illustration of another form of the invention, FIG. 12B is an elevational view of another form of the invention,
  • FIG. 12C is an elevational view of yet another form of the invention,
  • FIG. 13A is a perspective schematic illustration of another form of the invention with the LEDs oriented perpendicular to the earlier embodiments of the invention,
  • FIG. 13B is a perspective view of the form of the invention shown in FIG. 13A, as a completed lamp,
  • FIG. 14 is an exploded view of the lamp shown in FIG. 13B,
  • FIG. 14A is a plan view of another form of the invention for fluorescent lamp replacement,
  • FIG. 14B is a side elevational view thereof,
  • FIG. 140 is an enlarged partial top plan view of area A of FIG. 14A,
  • FIG. 14D is a second version of the embodiment of FIG. 14A,
  • FIG. 14E is a side elevational view thereof,
  • FIG. 14F is an enlarged partial top plan view of area A of FIG. 14D, and
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a slightly modified version of the invention shown in FIG. 11, with FIG. 15A showing the base, FIG. 15B showing the circuitry and light source, and FIG. 15C showing the globe.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF VARIOUS EMBODIMENTS
  • The invention produces an LED based lamp that overcomes the above-described limitations of the prior art, namely:
    • Simple robust power converter
    • High system luminous efficacy
    • Dimmable
    • Efficient 360° light output
    • Efficient thermal management system
    • Direct replacement for any low power incandescent lamp
    • Designed for manufacturability
  • The invention utilizes multiple low cost surface mount LEDs connected in series on a surface board thereby increasing the load voltage drop as well as the useful light output and the system efficiency (FIGS. 7 and 8). This may also be accomplished by assembling LED dies directly on the printed circuit board (Chip On Board) in the same series combination.
  • An LED emitter can be packaged by combining LED dies in series to produce a high combined LED voltage at the rated current. Such an LED series will draw the same current as a single LED, but will reflect a voltage that is very close to the rectified source voltage. This is different from the Seoul Semiconductor “Acriche” LED where the dies are connected in antiparallel, thereby eliminating the need for a rectifier and transforming the LED into a high voltage AC LED. Combining LEDs in series results in a high voltage DC LED, which will require a rectifier when operated from an AC source. The advantage is the ability to add a smoothing capacitor to reduce current ripple and attain a steady light source with no flicker. The Acriche LED does not allow for a smoothing capacitor to be installed since the rectification process is internal to the package.
  • The assembly of surface-mount devices (SMD) is an automated and low cost process. It is therefore critical that all components are SMD type. This is another reason a high voltage AC capacitor is not feasible since they are hard to find in SMD.
  • FIG. 9 is a schematic of a typical circuit according to the invention, designated generally at 10. The invention is described in relation to an alternating current source 12 although obviously if direct current is available, then a rectifier is unnecessary. The alternating current source 12 is supplied through a fuse to a rectifier 16. The rectifier 16 rectifies the alternating current to produce a voltage source, illustrated schematically at 18. A series resistor 20, described above, is followed by two parallel combinations of LEDs 22 in series and LEDs 24 in series. To increase the reliability of the circuit 10, a surface mounted MOV (metal oxide varistor) surge suppressor 26 is also included. A smoothing capacitor 28 reduces current ripple and eliminates flicker.
  • The efficiency may be further improved by adding more LEDs in series, thus increasing the total voltage drop.
  • In general, let ΔV=Vs−V which is the voltage across the resistor 20. For a given load current I,
  • R = Δ V I and P R = I × Δ V .
  • An adverse effect of a low ΔV is poor regulation. Since the LED voltage drop is not sensitive to current (FIG. 3), a change in the input voltage will be applied to ΔV only, which will cause the current to change in a proportional manner.
  • If δV is the change in the source voltage Vs, the same change will be applied to R, which is now constant. The new current will become:
  • I = Δ V + δ V R
  • where δV may be positive or negative. Let δI represent the change in load current. Then
  • Reg . = δ I I = δ V R Δ V R = δ V Δ V
  • Regulation will be defined as the percentage change in output:
  • Regulation is to be made as small as possible in order to minimize the change in output as the input changes. But a low value for regulation means a large value for ΔV, which increases the losses and reduces the efficiency, as described earlier.
  • P R = I × Δ V = ( Δ V ) 2 R , and efficiency P OUT P IN = I × V ( I × V ) + P R .
  • One aim of the invention is to specify the largest acceptable regulation for a given change δV in source voltage Vs. This will define the smallest ΔV, which will be used to determine R and the efficiency of the system.
  • FIG. 10 represents the waveforms of the input AC voltage, the rectified voltage, and the LED current.
  • LEDs are most efficient when driven at a relatively low current where the losses are the lowest. However, this also means that the total lumen is low. For example, if an LED has an efficiency of 100 Lm/W at 0.03 W, then its output will be 3 lumens. An efficient LED does not necessarily mean a bright LED. On the contrary, the most efficient LED may be so dim that it will be rendered unusable as a light source for illumination.
  • Some prior LEDs have been made up of multiple smaller LEDs, mounted on an insulated aluminum substrate, but they are arranged in series and parallel combination which keeps the total LED voltage low, and its current high. Because the LEDs are packed close to one another, it may be inefficient for all the light to exit, part of which could be absorbed by adjacent LEDs. Driving LEDs at a high current will further reduce efficacy.
  • In the present invention, the low cost efficient LEDs 22 and 24 are arranged in series, on both layers of a printed circuit board or substrate so as to maximize the total lumen output and reduce absorption. The LEDs are driven at a low current to keep the efficacy high. The low lumen output is compensated by increasing the number of LEDs. Since LED size is miniature and the PCB placement cost of surface mount components is low, the only penalty is LED cost.
  • Consider two luminous intensities, a 15 Watt/75 Lm, and a 25 Watt/200 Lm incandescent equivalent LED lamp.
  • For the 75 Lm system, 36 LEDs are arranged in series, 18 on either side of the circuit board in identical locations. The system is shown in FIG. 7 and is driven according to the schematic in FIG. 9, at an LED current of 10 mA. The lumen output per LED at that current is 2 lumens, yielding a total of 75 lumens at a total input power of 1.2 W, and a total system luminous efficacy of 60 Lm/W.
  • The high output version has two parallel circuits of 36 LEDs each on either sides of the PCB, as shown in FIGS. 11A-11C. The LED current for each series circuit is increased to 30 mA.
  • Due to the method in which the LEDs are arranged and mounted inside the lamp, more lumens leave the lamp due to less absorption and obstruction.
  • Even though the large number of LEDs in each circuit will ensure equal current sharing, series resistors 30 are added for each circuit 10 to help dissipate the increase in losses due to the higher output, as well as improve current sharing, The surface mount MOV surge suppressor 26 and fuse 14 can also be added to increase reliability.
  • Even though the previous discussion was limited to two power levels, the same principle can be applied to achieve a higher power of 40 Watts equivalent or higher. The total system efficacy can be increased by utilizing more LEDs and reducing the drive current.
  • The brightness of an LED is limited by the maximum junction temperature. In most cases, the junction temperature is 125° C. Assuming a temperature difference of 10° C. between junction and case, a rule of thumb is to maintain a case temperature of no more than 95° C. with a 15° C. margin. The more heat dissipated from the LED junction, the higher the attainable light output.
  • For prior art power LED lamps of 6 Watts or higher, an external heat sink is usually implemented, which places the LED directly on the heat sink, reducing its affectivity and increasing cost.
  • The present invention offers an alternate method of LED heat dissipation. Rather than dissipating heat from one power LED through an external heat sink, multiple low power LEDs 24 and 26 dissipate their heat through heat spreader copper islands 32 and 34 on top and bottom layers of a multi-layered PCB board or substrate 36. The islands 32 and 34 transfer the heat to two inner layers of copper heat spreaders 38 and 40. Each is located very close to the heat islands 32 and 34 on the outer layers. The inner spreaders 38 and 40 conduct heat internally to a screw base 42 of the lamp, which in turn will dissipate it away through the fixture and electrical wiring (not illustrated). Since the screw base 42 is connected to AC line, it needs to be fully isolated from the rest of the circuit 10. The core thickness of the substrate 36 between the outer islands 32 and 34 and the inner heat spreaders 38 and 40 should have the minimum thickness that the safety standards will allow to reduce thermal resistance to a minimum and maximize heat transfer.
  • Since in this invention heat is dissipated through conduction to the screw base, the lamp can be placed inside a sealed globe 44 (FIG. 12A, etc.) with no air circulation. It will also allow for more light to radiate, since the LEDs are elevated and more visible.
  • At the bottom of the LED substrate 36, the heat spreaders 38 and 40 are thermally bonded together by printed circuit board vias, which are means to provide electrical connection between traces on different layers of a circuit board, in order to maximize power dissipation to the screw base by thermally conducting heat from one layer to another.
  • The LEDs 22 and 24 are positioned on the substrate 36 in an arrangement of an arc that resembles the filament of an incandescent light bulb, with the intention of maintaining its classic look. The power conversion part of the system is installed on a circuit board portion of the substrate 36 in order to minimize cost and simplify assembly. All the components are surface-mount devices which allows for automation.
  • The LEDs 22 and 24 are placed in registration on either side of the substrate 36 in preferably exactly the same relative location which gives the impression of transparency. Since no external heat sink is used, the lamp globe 24 can be made entirely of transparent material with the LEDs 22 and 24 elevated to maximum lumen efficacy. To better resemble the incandescent lamp, the LED Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) should be 2800° K, which is close to that of an incandescent lamp, and the Color Rendering Index (CRI) should be typically 95. The effect will be to create an identical application, effect and look of an incandescent light bulb.
  • The LEDs are precisely placed on either side of the substrate 36 to make the substrate look invisible. The effect is for the observer to see only the trace of light. The shapes and arrangement of the LEDs may vary depending on the effect required.
  • FIG. 12A depicts an A19 and FIGS. 12B and 12C depict B10 type lamps. This invention allows the use of this arrangement of LEDs in any low power incandescent application, including decorative lamps. The pattern in which the LEDs are arranged is not limited to those shown in FIG. 12, and may extend to any arrangement to produce any desired effect.
  • FIGS. 13A, 13B and 14 are other embodiments of the invention where the heat collectors are solid rods 46 bonded to the heat islands. In this case, the lamp will retain more resemblance to the classical incandescent lamp. The elements are the same as the first form of the invention, but since the substrate is horizontal, all elements have the identifier “a”. The power supply circuit 10 is located in the screw base 42 of the lamp.
  • The LEDs 22 and 24 may be incorporated in a plastic polymer shaped as a filament. The LEDs 22 and 24 may be arranged to illuminate the polymer which will efficiently conduct light and give the impression of continuous filament glow.
  • Another embodiment is to mount LED dies directly on the substrate 36 in the same pattern (Chip on Board), and apply phosphor on all the dies at once. This will make the group of LED dies glow as one. It can also reduce the LED cost since they are not packaged individually.
  • The choice of resistive impedance R makes it possible to use with conventional Triac dimmers in a manner similar to incandescent lamps. The only limitation is the LED current which must be higher than the Triac Holding current, which is usually the case since the low intensity B10 type lamps are usually arranged in groups of 5 or more in chandeliers.
  • The LEDs 22 can also be arranged in a linear fashion to replace a fluorescent lamp, as shown in FIGS. 14A through 14F. In this form of the invention, the LEDs 22 are on one side of a PCB board or substrate 36 b, while the circuit 10 is located on the opposite side of the board 36 b.
  • Just as in the earlier forms of the invention in relation to replacement of an incandescent lamp, the lamp of FIGS. 14A-14F can be completely enclosed in a tube or fixture (not illustrated), due to the low amount of generated heat that needs to be dissipated. The LED correlated color temperature (COT) can be anywhere between 3,000° K to 5,000° K for replicating and replacing bulbs in current fluorescent light systems.
  • The invention consists of 3 main parts (FIG. 15), screw base 42, LED circuit 10, and lamp globe 44. The LED-bearing substrate 36 is installed in the screw base 42 by first soldering the middle terminal, then by bonding the plated sides to the barrel of the screw base 42. This will ensure electrical contact as well as provide a thermal passage to conduct the heat generated by LEDs 22 and 24 to the screw base 42 and the electrical wiring (not illustrated) which will act as an extended heat sink.
  • Various changes can be made to the invention without departing from the spirit thereof or scope of the following claims.

Claims (20)

What is claimed:
1. An LED lamp comprising
a. a base,
b. an elevated light source, comprising
i. a first plurality of LEDs connected in series and mounted on one side of a generally flat substrate, said substrate being spaced from said base, and
ii. a second plurality of LEDs, equal in number to said first plurality of LEDs, connected in series and mounted on an opposite side of said generally flat substrate, said second plurality of LEDs being located on said opposite side of said generally flat substrate generally in alignment with said first plurality of LEDs,
c a heat sink in said substrate, each LED of said first and second plurality of LEDs being mounted proximate said heat sink, and
d a drive circuit for said LEDs, said drive circuit being located proximate and electrically connected to said base.
2. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said base is a screw-type base.
3. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said drive circuit is mounted on a circuit board extending from said flat substrate, said circuit board extending into said base.
4. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said heat sink comprises at least one conductive heat island on each side of said substrate, each LED of said first plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said one side, and each LED of said second plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said opposite side.
5. The LED lamp according to claim 4, in which said heat sink includes at least one conductive heat spreader, each heat island being connected to said heat spreader.
6. The LED lamp according to claim 5, in which said heat spreader is located in said substrate, said heat spreader extending to said base.
7. The LED lamp according to claim 5, including first and second heat spreaders, each heat island on said one side of said substrate being connected to said first heat spreader and each heat island on said opposite side being connected to said second heat spreader.
8. The LED lamp according to claim 7, in which said heat spreaders are unitary.
9. The LED lamp according to claim 1, including a globe connected to said base.
10. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said first and second plurality of LEDs are oriented generally in an arc.
11. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said drive circuit comprises a surge suppressor, a rectifier, a smoothing capacitor and resistor, said first plurality of LEDs and said second plurality of LEDs being connected in parallel to said resistor.
12. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said substrate is oriented parallel to a line extending from said base.
13. The LED lamp according to claim 1, in which said substrate is oriented perpendicular to a line extending from said base.
14. The LED lamp according to claim 13, in which said heat sink comprises a plurality of conductive heat spreader rods extending from proximate said base to said substrate.
15. The LED lamp according to claim 14, in which said heat sink includes at least one conductive heat island on each side of said substrate, each LED of said first plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said one side, and each LED of said second plurality of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said opposite side.
16. An LED lamp comprising:
a base,
an elevated light source, comprising:
a first set of LEDs connected in series and mounted on one side of a generally flat substrate, said substrate being spaced from said base, and
a second set of LEDs, equal in number to said first plurality of LEDs, connected in series and mounted on an opposite side of said generally flat substrate, said second plurality of LEDs being located on said opposite side of said generally flat substrate generally in alignment with said first plurality of LEDs, and
a set of electrically isolated heat sinks defined in a first portion of said substrate, each LED of said first and second sets of LEDs being mounted proximate at least one electrically isolated heat sink of said set of electrically isolated heat sinks.
17. The LED lamp according to claim 16, wherein said first portion of said substrate comprises at least one conductive heat island on each side of said substrate, each LED of said first set of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said one side, and each LED of said second set of LEDs being proximate a heat island on said opposite side.
18. The LED lamp according to claim 16, wherein:
said LED lamp further comprises a drive circuit for said LEDs,
said drive circuit is located proximate and electrically connected to said base, and
each LED of said first and second sets of LEDs is further mounted proximate a second portion of said substrate so as to provide electrical connection between said drive circuit and each LED.
19. The LED lamp according to claim 18, in which said drive circuit comprises a surge suppressor, a rectifier, a smoothing capacitor and resistor, said first plurality of LEDs and said second plurality of LEDs being connected in parallel to said resistor.
20. The LED lamp according to claim 16, wherein:
said base is oriented about a central axis extending there-through; and
said substrate extends along and parallel to said central axis.
US15/370,723 2008-01-10 2016-12-06 Led lamp Abandoned US20170102112A1 (en)

Priority Applications (7)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2032608P true 2008-01-10 2008-01-10
PCT/US2009/030741 WO2009089529A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2009-01-12 Led lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US12/826,774 US8408748B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2010-06-30 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US13/855,391 US9016901B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2013-04-02 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US14/638,406 US9267649B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2015-03-04 LED lamp
US15/015,834 US20160273715A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-02-04 Led lamp
US15/370,723 US20170102112A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-12-06 Led lamp

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15/370,723 US20170102112A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-12-06 Led lamp
US16/381,591 US10753547B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2019-04-11 LED lamp
US16/802,298 US20200191337A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2020-02-26 Led lamp

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15/015,834 Continuation US20160273715A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-02-04 Led lamp

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US16/381,591 Continuation US10753547B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2019-04-11 LED lamp

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20170102112A1 true US20170102112A1 (en) 2017-04-13

Family

ID=40853489

Family Applications (7)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/826,774 Active 2030-01-13 US8408748B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2010-06-30 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US13/855,391 Active US9016901B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2013-04-02 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US14/638,406 Active US9267649B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2015-03-04 LED lamp
US15/015,834 Abandoned US20160273715A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-02-04 Led lamp
US15/370,723 Abandoned US20170102112A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-12-06 Led lamp
US16/381,591 Active 2029-01-30 US10753547B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2019-04-11 LED lamp
US16/802,298 Pending US20200191337A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2020-02-26 Led lamp

Family Applications Before (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/826,774 Active 2030-01-13 US8408748B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2010-06-30 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US13/855,391 Active US9016901B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2013-04-02 LED lamp replacement of low power incandescent lamp
US14/638,406 Active US9267649B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2015-03-04 LED lamp
US15/015,834 Abandoned US20160273715A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2016-02-04 Led lamp

Family Applications After (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US16/381,591 Active 2029-01-30 US10753547B2 (en) 2008-01-10 2019-04-11 LED lamp
US16/802,298 Pending US20200191337A1 (en) 2008-01-10 2020-02-26 Led lamp

Country Status (11)

Country Link
US (7) US8408748B2 (en)
EP (1) EP2227925B1 (en)
JP (2) JP2011510490A (en)
KR (1) KR20100102643A (en)
CN (1) CN101940061A (en)
AU (1) AU2009203998B2 (en)
BR (1) BRPI0907418A2 (en)
CA (1) CA2710542C (en)
MX (1) MX2010007552A (en)
NZ (1) NZ586388A (en)
WO (1) WO2009089529A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160377279A1 (en) * 2015-06-24 2016-12-29 Lediamond Opto Corporation Replaceable optical module lamp
US20180328544A1 (en) * 2017-05-12 2018-11-15 Ledvance Gmbh Glass lamps containing COBs with integrated electronics
GB2563475A (en) * 2018-03-01 2018-12-19 Broseley Ltd Dimmable light source

Families Citing this family (83)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10340424B2 (en) 2002-08-30 2019-07-02 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC Light emitting diode component
US10267506B2 (en) 2010-11-22 2019-04-23 Cree, Inc. Solid state lighting apparatuses with non-uniformly spaced emitters for improved heat distribution, system having the same, and methods having the same
US8118447B2 (en) 2007-12-20 2012-02-21 Altair Engineering, Inc. LED lighting apparatus with swivel connection
NZ586388A (en) 2008-01-10 2012-10-26 Goeken Group Corp Lamp having leds connected in series in filament pattern
US8360599B2 (en) 2008-05-23 2013-01-29 Ilumisys, Inc. Electric shock resistant L.E.D. based light
US9022612B2 (en) * 2008-08-07 2015-05-05 Mag Instrument, Inc. LED module
US8901823B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2014-12-02 Ilumisys, Inc. Light and light sensor
US7938562B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2011-05-10 Altair Engineering, Inc. Lighting including integral communication apparatus
US8324817B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2012-12-04 Ilumisys, Inc. Light and light sensor
US8214084B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2012-07-03 Ilumisys, Inc. Integration of LED lighting with building controls
US8653984B2 (en) 2008-10-24 2014-02-18 Ilumisys, Inc. Integration of LED lighting control with emergency notification systems
US8593040B2 (en) 2009-10-02 2013-11-26 Ge Lighting Solutions Llc LED lamp with surface area enhancing fins
AU2010300448B8 (en) * 2009-10-02 2015-10-29 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC Light emitting diode (LED) based lamp
US9103507B2 (en) 2009-10-02 2015-08-11 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC LED lamp with uniform omnidirectional light intensity output
US9217542B2 (en) * 2009-10-20 2015-12-22 Cree, Inc. Heat sinks and lamp incorporating same
US9243758B2 (en) 2009-10-20 2016-01-26 Cree, Inc. Compact heat sinks and solid state lamp incorporating same
US9030120B2 (en) * 2009-10-20 2015-05-12 Cree, Inc. Heat sinks and lamp incorporating same
WO2011052834A1 (en) 2009-10-26 2011-05-05 (주)에어텍시스템 Constant-current-drive led module device
US20110121726A1 (en) * 2009-11-23 2011-05-26 Luminus Devices, Inc. Solid-state lamp
EP2360992A1 (en) 2010-02-11 2011-08-24 Goeken Group Corporation Direct AC drive for LED lamps
US8541958B2 (en) 2010-03-26 2013-09-24 Ilumisys, Inc. LED light with thermoelectric generator
CA2794541C (en) 2010-03-26 2018-05-01 David L. Simon Inside-out led bulb
BR112012028672A2 (en) * 2010-05-11 2017-12-05 Polybrite Int Inc replacement of incandescent light bulbs with high intensity led
WO2011143286A1 (en) * 2010-05-11 2011-11-17 Goeken Group Corporation Led replacement of directional incandescent lamps
DE102010023342A1 (en) * 2010-06-10 2011-12-15 Osram Opto Semiconductors Gmbh Light-emitting diode arrangement and light-emitting means, in particular with such a light-emitting diode arrangement
EP2593714A2 (en) 2010-07-12 2013-05-22 iLumisys, Inc. Circuit board mount for led light tube
WO2012049803A1 (en) * 2010-10-12 2012-04-19 パナソニック株式会社 Lamp
WO2012058556A2 (en) 2010-10-29 2012-05-03 Altair Engineering, Inc. Mechanisms for reducing risk of shock during installation of light tube
US8192051B2 (en) 2010-11-01 2012-06-05 Quarkstar Llc Bidirectional LED light sheet
US8870415B2 (en) 2010-12-09 2014-10-28 Ilumisys, Inc. LED fluorescent tube replacement light with reduced shock hazard
WO2012098476A1 (en) * 2011-01-20 2012-07-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Multi-functional heat sink for lighting products
US9806246B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2017-10-31 Cree, Inc. Ceramic-based light emitting diode (LED) devices, components, and methods
US9786825B2 (en) 2012-02-07 2017-10-10 Cree, Inc. Ceramic-based light emitting diode (LED) devices, components, and methods
US8410726B2 (en) 2011-02-22 2013-04-02 Quarkstar Llc Solid state lamp using modular light emitting elements
US8314566B2 (en) 2011-02-22 2012-11-20 Quarkstar Llc Solid state lamp using light emitting strips
JP2012181969A (en) * 2011-02-28 2012-09-20 Toshiba Lighting & Technology Corp Bulb type light-emitting element lamp, and lighting fixture
US8461752B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2013-06-11 Abl Ip Holding Llc White light lamp using semiconductor light emitter(s) and remotely deployed phosphor(s)
US8272766B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2012-09-25 Abl Ip Holding Llc Semiconductor lamp with thermal handling system
US8803412B2 (en) 2011-03-18 2014-08-12 Abl Ip Holding Llc Semiconductor lamp
US10030863B2 (en) 2011-04-19 2018-07-24 Cree, Inc. Heat sink structures, lighting elements and lamps incorporating same, and methods of making same
US9360202B2 (en) * 2011-05-13 2016-06-07 Lighting Science Group Corporation System for actively cooling an LED filament and associated methods
US8704432B2 (en) * 2011-05-25 2014-04-22 Seoul Semiconductor Co., Ltd. LED lamp
WO2013028965A2 (en) 2011-08-24 2013-02-28 Ilumisys, Inc. Circuit board mount for led light
ES2560833T3 (en) 2011-09-23 2016-02-23 Koninklijke Philips N.V. Lighting device with a circuit board assembly
US10378749B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2019-08-13 Ideal Industries Lighting Llc Lighting device comprising shield element, and shield element
WO2013131002A1 (en) 2012-03-02 2013-09-06 Ilumisys, Inc. Electrical connector header for an led-based light
US9538590B2 (en) 2012-03-30 2017-01-03 Cree, Inc. Solid state lighting apparatuses, systems, and related methods
US9410687B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2016-08-09 Cree, Inc. LED lamp with filament style LED assembly
US9500355B2 (en) 2012-05-04 2016-11-22 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC Lamp with light emitting elements surrounding active cooling device
WO2014008463A1 (en) 2012-07-06 2014-01-09 Ilumisys, Inc. Power supply assembly for led-based light tube
US9271367B2 (en) 2012-07-09 2016-02-23 Ilumisys, Inc. System and method for controlling operation of an LED-based light
US8835945B2 (en) 2013-01-11 2014-09-16 Lighting Science Group Corporation Serially-connected light emitting diodes, methods of forming same, and luminaires containing same
US9285084B2 (en) 2013-03-14 2016-03-15 Ilumisys, Inc. Diffusers for LED-based lights
AT13884U1 (en) * 2013-03-28 2014-11-15 Zumtobel Lighting Gmbh Printed circuit board with LEDs
JP2014216152A (en) * 2013-04-24 2014-11-17 東芝ライテック株式会社 Lighting device
US9267650B2 (en) 2013-10-09 2016-02-23 Ilumisys, Inc. Lens for an LED-based light
CA2937642A1 (en) 2014-01-22 2015-07-30 Ilumisys, Inc. Led-based light with addressed leds
WO2015142537A1 (en) * 2014-03-05 2015-09-24 Cree, Inc. Solid state lighting apparatuses,systems, and related methods
US9562677B2 (en) 2014-04-09 2017-02-07 Cree, Inc. LED lamp having at least two sectors
US9510400B2 (en) 2014-05-13 2016-11-29 Ilumisys, Inc. User input systems for an LED-based light
US9826581B2 (en) 2014-12-05 2017-11-21 Cree, Inc. Voltage configurable solid state lighting apparatuses, systems, and related methods
USD774474S1 (en) * 2015-02-04 2016-12-20 Xiaofeng Li Light emitting diodes on a printed circuit board
US10197230B2 (en) * 2015-03-12 2019-02-05 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC LED lamp with internal mirror
US20180172218A1 (en) * 2015-03-18 2018-06-21 Feit Electric Company, Inc. Omnidirectional light emitting diode filament holder
US10161568B2 (en) 2015-06-01 2018-12-25 Ilumisys, Inc. LED-based light with canted outer walls
JP2017011952A (en) * 2015-06-25 2017-01-12 株式会社デンソー Power conversion device
WO2017059234A1 (en) * 2015-09-30 2017-04-06 GE Lighting Solutions, LLC Led lamp platform
US9681511B1 (en) 2016-03-25 2017-06-13 New Energies & Alternative Technologies, Inc. LED driver circuits
US10270359B2 (en) 2016-03-25 2019-04-23 New Energies & Alternative Technologies, Inc. Multi-use driver circuits
US9681504B1 (en) 2016-06-14 2017-06-13 New Energies & Alternative Technologies, Inc. Driver circuits with multiple rectifiers
USD822890S1 (en) 2016-09-07 2018-07-10 Felxtronics Ap, Llc Lighting apparatus
CN106594559B (en) * 2016-12-16 2018-05-22 中山市美希灯饰有限公司 Simple LED astigmatism modulated structures
KR20180133159A (en) 2017-06-05 2018-12-13 삼성전자주식회사 Led lamp
USD846793S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2019-04-23 Flex Ltd. Lighting module locking mechanism
USD877964S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2020-03-10 Flex Ltd. Lighting module
USD862777S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2019-10-08 Flex Ltd. Lighting module wide distribution lens
USD833061S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2018-11-06 Flex Ltd. Lighting module locking endcap
USD872319S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2020-01-07 Flex Ltd. Lighting module LED light board
USD832494S1 (en) 2017-08-09 2018-10-30 Flex Ltd. Lighting module heatsink
USD832495S1 (en) 2017-08-18 2018-10-30 Flex Ltd. Lighting module locking mechanism
USD862778S1 (en) 2017-08-22 2019-10-08 Flex Ltd Lighting module lens
USD888323S1 (en) 2017-09-07 2020-06-23 Flex Ltd Lighting module wire guard
US10605412B1 (en) 2018-11-16 2020-03-31 Emeryallen, Llc Miniature integrated omnidirectional LED bulb

Family Cites Families (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5463280A (en) * 1994-03-03 1995-10-31 National Service Industries, Inc. Light emitting diode retrofit lamp
US6568834B1 (en) * 1999-03-04 2003-05-27 Goeken Group Corp. Omnidirectional lighting device
ES2289822T3 (en) 1998-09-17 2008-02-01 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. LED lamp.
JP4246333B2 (en) * 1999-10-29 2009-04-02 富士重工業株式会社 Vehicle lamp
DE20018435U1 (en) * 2000-10-27 2001-02-22 Shining Blick Entpr Co Light bulb with bendable lamp bulbs contained therein
JP4076329B2 (en) * 2001-08-13 2008-04-16 エイテックス株式会社 LED bulb
US6634770B2 (en) * 2001-08-24 2003-10-21 Densen Cao Light source using semiconductor devices mounted on a heat sink
EP1322139A1 (en) * 2001-12-19 2003-06-25 Toyoda Gosei Co., Ltd. LED lamp apparatus for vehicles
US20040008525A1 (en) 2002-07-09 2004-01-15 Hakuyo Denkyuu Kabushiki Kaisha: Fuso Denki Kougyou Kabushiki Kaisha LED electric bulb
JP2004134249A (en) * 2002-10-10 2004-04-30 Mitsubishi Electric Corp Lighting device
US6853151B2 (en) * 2002-11-19 2005-02-08 Denovo Lighting, Llc LED retrofit lamp
JP3716252B2 (en) 2002-12-26 2005-11-16 ローム株式会社 Light emitting device and lighting device
US7964883B2 (en) * 2004-02-26 2011-06-21 Lighting Science Group Corporation Light emitting diode package assembly that emulates the light pattern produced by an incandescent filament bulb
KR100689027B1 (en) * 2004-03-04 2007-03-02 주식회사 오토웰 LED lamp illuminator
US7086767B2 (en) * 2004-05-12 2006-08-08 Osram Sylvania Inc. Thermally efficient LED bulb
TWI263008B (en) * 2004-06-30 2006-10-01 Ind Tech Res Inst LED lamp
JP2006244725A (en) * 2005-02-28 2006-09-14 Atex Co Ltd Led lighting system
WO2006104553A1 (en) * 2005-03-25 2006-10-05 Five Star Import Group L.L.C. Led light bulb
TWM314293U (en) * 2007-01-24 2007-06-21 Unity Opto Technology Co Ltd Lamp bulb socket structure
US7726836B2 (en) 2007-11-23 2010-06-01 Taiming Chen Light bulb with light emitting elements for use in conventional incandescent light bulb sockets
NZ586388A (en) 2008-01-10 2012-10-26 Goeken Group Corp Lamp having leds connected in series in filament pattern
US7938562B2 (en) * 2008-10-24 2011-05-10 Altair Engineering, Inc. Lighting including integral communication apparatus

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160377279A1 (en) * 2015-06-24 2016-12-29 Lediamond Opto Corporation Replaceable optical module lamp
US20180328544A1 (en) * 2017-05-12 2018-11-15 Ledvance Gmbh Glass lamps containing COBs with integrated electronics
EP3404320A1 (en) * 2017-05-12 2018-11-21 LEDVANCE GmbH Led illumination means and led lamp
GB2563475A (en) * 2018-03-01 2018-12-19 Broseley Ltd Dimmable light source
GB2563475B (en) * 2018-03-01 2019-05-29 Broseley Ltd Dimmable light source

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP2227925A1 (en) 2010-09-15
US20200191337A1 (en) 2020-06-18
EP2227925B1 (en) 2017-06-28
US20130285547A1 (en) 2013-10-31
US10753547B2 (en) 2020-08-25
JP6050782B2 (en) 2016-12-21
US20100277069A1 (en) 2010-11-04
AU2009203998A1 (en) 2009-07-16
JP2011510490A (en) 2011-03-31
US8408748B2 (en) 2013-04-02
US20150240999A1 (en) 2015-08-27
JP2014167940A (en) 2014-09-11
EP2227925A4 (en) 2012-05-30
CA2710542C (en) 2016-05-17
NZ586388A (en) 2012-10-26
WO2009089529A1 (en) 2009-07-16
AU2009203998B2 (en) 2014-03-20
KR20100102643A (en) 2010-09-24
MX2010007552A (en) 2011-02-23
US9267649B2 (en) 2016-02-23
CN101940061A (en) 2011-01-05
US9016901B2 (en) 2015-04-28
US20160273715A1 (en) 2016-09-22
US20190264873A1 (en) 2019-08-29
CA2710542A1 (en) 2009-07-16
BRPI0907418A2 (en) 2019-03-06

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9781805B2 (en) LED tube lamp
US9826585B2 (en) LED tube lamp
US9398654B2 (en) Solid state lighting apparatus and methods using integrated driver circuitry
US9661715B2 (en) Solid state light emitting devices including adjustable melatonin suppression effects
US9980329B2 (en) Light emitting diode (LED) tube lamp
DE102014111746B4 (en) Light source and lighting device
US20160270166A1 (en) Light emiting diode (led) tube lamp capable of adapting to different driving environments
US20180216785A1 (en) Light sources incorporating light emitting diodes
US9458999B2 (en) Lighting devices comprising solid state light emitters
US9049768B2 (en) Light emitting diode replacement lamp
US8836245B2 (en) Solid state lamp using modular light emitting elements
US10240725B2 (en) LED tube lamp
US8981677B2 (en) Lighting devices and methods for lighting
US8841864B2 (en) Tunable LED lamp for producing biologically-adjusted light
US9488767B2 (en) LED based lighting system
US9820341B2 (en) LED tube lamp having mode switching circuit and auxiliary power module
US8866414B2 (en) Tunable LED lamp for producing biologically-adjusted light
Branas et al. Solid-state lighting: A system review
US10098197B2 (en) Lighting devices with individually compensating multi-color clusters
TWI532947B (en) Lighting device and method of making
US9144129B2 (en) Switchable luminance LED light bulb
US8593044B2 (en) Modular architecture for sealed LED light engines
US9441793B2 (en) High efficiency lighting device including one or more solid state light emitters, and method of lighting
EP2468072B1 (en) White light color changing solid state lighting and methods
US9030103B2 (en) Solid state light emitting devices including adjustable scotopic / photopic ratio

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: GOEKEN GROUP CORP., ILLINOIS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:JANIK, RAYMOND G.;SCIANNA, CARLO;SIGNING DATES FROM 20100626 TO 20100628;REEL/FRAME:040539/0091

Owner name: HS PATENT ACQUISITION, LLC, NEVADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GOEKEN GROUP CORP.;REEL/FRAME:040539/0108

Effective date: 20150220

Owner name: FEIT ELECTRIC COMPANY, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HS PATENT ACQUISITION, LLC;REEL/FRAME:040539/0005

Effective date: 20150616

STPP Information on status: patent application and granting procedure in general

Free format text: NON FINAL ACTION MAILED

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION