US2016842A - Feathering propeller - Google Patents

Feathering propeller Download PDF

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US2016842A
US2016842A US728155A US72815534A US2016842A US 2016842 A US2016842 A US 2016842A US 728155 A US728155 A US 728155A US 72815534 A US72815534 A US 72815534A US 2016842 A US2016842 A US 2016842A
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propeller
shaft
bearing
head
hub
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Expired - Lifetime
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US728155A
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Sveinsson Louis
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Sveinsson Louis
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B03SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS; MAGNETIC OR ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS FROM SOLID MATERIALS OR FLUIDS; SEPARATION BY HIGH-VOLTAGE ELECTRIC FIELDS
    • B03DFLOTATION; DIFFERENTIAL SEDIMENTATION
    • B03D1/00Flotation
    • B03D1/14Flotation machines
    • B03D1/16Flotation machines with impellers; Subaeration machines
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B03SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS; MAGNETIC OR ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS FROM SOLID MATERIALS OR FLUIDS; SEPARATION BY HIGH-VOLTAGE ELECTRIC FIELDS
    • B03DFLOTATION; DIFFERENTIAL SEDIMENTATION
    • B03D1/00Flotation
    • B03D1/14Flotation machines
    • B03D1/1493Flotation machines with means for establishing a specified flow pattern

Description

8, w35, L. 'svElNssoN FEATHERING PROPELLER Filed May 29, 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 mmm , L. svElNssoN FEATHERING PROPELLER Filed May 29, 1954 s sheets-sheet 2 @cih 8, 3935, L. svElNssoN FEATHERING PROPELLER 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 29, 1954 Patented Oct. 8, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT orties 6 Claims.

This invention relates to feathering propellers.

t is an important object of the invention to provide a novel construction of propeller in which the blades thereof may be manually rotated on their axis to vary the setting of the blades, from a remote point, during operation of the propeller.

t is a further object of the invention to provide a propeller of the character set forth, wherein automatic means is provided, operable independently of the manual means, for adjusting therpropeller blades.

It is a still further object of the invention to provide novel means, manually operable for tilting the propeller as a unit, as well as the provision of novel propeller blade construction for creating a simultaneous reverse whirling flow of iiuid during rotation of the propeller.

Additional objects, advantages and features of invention will be apparent from the following description, considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a sectional View of a propeller unit constructed in accordance with my invention.

Figure 2 is a cross section on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is ka cross section on the line 3 3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a cross section on the line 4--4 of ,y Figure 1.

Figure 5 is a detailed illustration of one of the propeller blades.

Figure 6 is a view illustrating the shape of the blade on sections therethrough, at the points designated by the construction lines.

Figure 7 is a View similar to Figure 1 illustrating a modification.

Figure 8 is a cross section on the line 8-8 of Figure '7.

Figure 9 is a cross section on the line 9-9 of Figure 7.

In many industries there has been created a demand for propellers in which the blades are feathered to increase or decrease the draft of liquid or air upon rotation of the propeller, and the present type of propeller was particularly designed for use in connection with a coal and slate separating apparatus, for which I have ap- ,plied for Letters Patent, by an application filed April 16th, 1934, Ser. No. 720,862, and while the structure here presented is admirably suited for the purposes set forth, I realize that the invention is subject to application in numerous situations, and I therefore do not coni-lne myself to the particular construction set forth, but reserve (Cl. 259-133) A as my own, all such modifications as fairly fall within the scope of the appended claims.

In carrying out the invention, as applied to a coal and slate separating apparatus, I have illustrated a wall Iii, representing a portion of 5'V a tank II employed in the apparatus. The wall is provided with a suitable aperture I2, around which there is bolted, as at I3, a housing I4. rIhe housing It, in the present instance, is shown as a cylindrical drum, the open end of which 10 registers with the aperture I2 of the wall. The opposite end of the housing I4 is defined by having the walls thereof disposed inwardly to form a cone-shaped bearing I5, and within the housing I4 and rockably journalled in the bearing I5, 15 I mount the propeller unit generally indicated by the reference character I6.

The propeller unit It has a bearing shell I'I rockably supported within the bearing I5, as indicated at i3, and houses a roller bearing I9 20 which in turn supports a hub 20 of a propeller head 2|.

The propeller head 2l may have any desired shape to support the required number of blades, and is hollow in order to accommodate mecha- 25 nism for effecting feathering action of the blades, as will be presently described. The head 2l is also preferably formed in two half sections 22-23 bolted together, as indicated at 24. Each section 22-23 is provided with the required number of radial hollow extensions 25 which, when mated together, define a hub 26 through which the axle portion 28 of a propeller blade 29 is journalled. The sections 22-23 are also provided with suitable ball races 3i) for anti-frictionally supporting the axle 28, and the inner extremity of the axle 28 is threaded as at 3i, and has engaged thereon a nut 32 which bears upon a washer 33 in seated engagement with an annular kerf formed in the sections 22--23. 40 In order to accunt for end thrusts which may occur in the axle 28, a ball race 34 is provided between the washer 33 and a seat 35 formed in the hub 25. A packing gland 36 and clamping ring 36a may be pro-vided, encircling the extensions 25, which will prevent ingress of grit or other foreign matter in the interior of the propeller unit, as well as prevent escape of lubricant, which is conducted 'to the several bearings through the oil ducts 31.

The washer 33 has a square or angular hole therethrough and the axle 28 is correspondingly shaped at the point of contact with the washer, so that the blade 29 may be rotated upon rotation of the washer, as will now be described, and reference is now invited to Figure 2 of the drawings. An arm 5l is integrally formed with the washer 33 extended at right angles thereto and is positioned within a `slot 58 formed in an arm 39 of an operating head 55.

The present construction of propeller unit embodies three propeller blades 29 and therefore, three sets of extensions 25 are involved, each of which are constructed as above described, and it will be understood that the number of blades involved is a matter of choice. Obviously, from the construction described, endwise movement of the head it will impart a partial rotation of the blades 29, and such endwise movement of the head is effected through the mechanism now to be described.

As clearly shown in Figure 1 of the drawings, the head it includes a shaft 4i journalled in the hub 2i), projecting a substantial distance outwardly thereof in the form of a guide, pintle 42. A shell 43 is bolted to the hub 25, as at 44, and within the shell there are pivotally mounted, as at 45, weight members 4t, each of which include a bill portion te@ engaged within respective pockets 4'! formed in the shaft 4I. It should be understood that the shell 43 and hub 2Q will rotate as a unit, and due to centrifugal action of the weights 46, endwise movement of the shaft 4| will occur, imparting partial rotation to the propeller blades, by virtue of its connection with the arms 39.

As shown, a thrust bearing 48 is positioned between the shell 43 and the roller bearing i9, and if desired, the bill members 45 may have a roller 50, for the purpose of reducing friction and wear.

The arms 39 are shown as separate members suitably bolted as at 5l, to attened portions formed on the shaft lil, and in order to prevent rotation of the shaft independently of the propeller unit 2l, the sections 122-23 are provided with channels 52 within which the extremities of the arms are engaged.

The shell 43 is provided with inwardly extended anges 53, acting as guide means for the weight members 45, and these flanges 53 stop short of the central medial portion of the shell where they merge with a pair of arms 54 extended in a plane parallel with the shaft 4i. A thrust bearing 55 is slidably mounted upon the arms 54, and the shell 43 is cut away as at 56 to permit the bearing 55 to slide thereinto a short distance, as would be required during manual adjustment of the blades. The pintle 42 is journalled in the bearing 55 as indicated at 5l, and a coiled spring 53 is seated between the end of the shaft 4l and the thrust bearing 55.

A drive shaft 59 is provided and includes a universal joint connected with the arms 54 and it Will be clearly seen that rotation of the drive shaft 55 will impart rotary motion to the propeller head 2i by virtue of itslconnection with the shell and that automatic adjustment of the blades 29 is brought about through movement of the weights 56. However, it is essential that manual setting of the blades be permitted, and I therefore provide a collar 5! in abutting relation with the thrust bearing 55, and preferably I interpose a ball-race 62 between the collar and bearing. The collar @i includes a ring gear 63 and a screw threaded body portion S4. A supporting ring 65 having been internally formed with screw threads is in engagement with the threads of the body B4, and upon the exterior of the ring 55, a bearing 66 is arranged. The bearing @E revolubly journals a shaft 5l which has keyed thereto a gear B8 in mesh with the ring gear 63, the other end of the shaft projecting exteriorly of the tank il and has xed thereto a hand wheel 59. Therefore, it will be understood that upon rotation of the shaft 57 the collar 6i will be correspondingly rotated, and inasmuch as the supporting ring is retained by guide-ways 'iii against rotation and endwise movements the collar BI will be advanced or retracted according to the direction of rotation of the shaft 6l. Assuming that the shaft 6l is rotated in a right hand direction, as seen in Figure 1, the collar 6| will be advanced in the direction of the propeller head 2 i, and such movement it will be seen will advance the shaft 4l, under compression of the spring 55. Endwise movement of the shaft 4i will impart a rotary movement of the propeller blades 29 by reason of the connection between the head 4S and the arms 3l. The opposite rotation of the shaft 51 will of course effect a reverse movement of the parts, with a corresponding reverse setting of the blades 29.

In order to secure a tilting action of the propeller as a unit, the supporting ring 65 has a pair of oppositely extended lugs li disposed in respective tracliways lli previously referred to. The trackways l@ are secured to the sides of the housing it, and are arcuately disposed with respect to the pivot points i8, so that upon movement of the hand lever 'l2 which is pivotally secured to the ring t5, as at 13, the ring will be caused to travel within the trackways 1G, the propeller unit i5 being swung upwardly or downwardly from a horizontal plane on the pivot points i8, which swinging movement is permitted by virtue of the universal joint 59 between the drive shaft 55 and the arms 54 of the propeller unit.

The lever l2 extends exteriorly of the tank Il, as shown and intermediate its length there is provided a fulcrum pin 74 disposed within a slot 'i5 formed in the lever.

It is desirable that a water-tight joint be provided between the bearing sleeve l1 and the bearing i5, and in the present instance I have illustrated a flexible boot lla constructed to lie flush upon the inner wall of the bearing l5 and held in place thereagainst by an annular flange l5a. The flange ld is suitably apertured, as is the boot, and bolts i3d inserted therethrough and in tapped apertures formed in the bearing will effectively secure the boot to the bearing in a watertight manner. The other end of the boot lla is recurved as at 19a to snugly circumscribe the sleeve il and is secured thereto by a clamp strap 25a. From the construction described, it will be apparent that water will be effectively prevented from entering through the housing I4 and yet permit free` rocking movements to position the propeller at desired angular settings.

As was set forth in my co-pending application Ser. No. 720,862 the propeller blades are constructed to provide a simultaneous whirling opposite flow of fluid, and in Figures 5 and 6 a detailed showing of one of the propeller blades is shown. The blade 28 it will be seen from a consideration of Figure 6 has its leading edge 16 nearest the hub of thepropeller, formed at an angle opposite to that of the edge 'il adjacent the tip of the propeller, and portions of the blade intermediate the hub and tip will be correspondingly formed, as indicated by the various cross sections indicated at A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. Thus, a propeller constructed in accordance with the above blade during rotation, it will be apparent that the leading edge 15 will tend to draw fluid toward the lit).

propeller at a point closely adjacent the ihub and ashort distance outwardly thereof while the leading edge 11 will ,force the fluid outwardly away from the propeller, thereby creating a push and pull of `the fluid, simultaneously.

In order to provide lubrication to the bearings |9 and 48, the shaft 4| and the pintle t2 have a bore 94a extending longitudinally therethrough from one end to the other, one 4end being closed by .a screw plug 51a which may be -readily removed for the purpose of replenishing the supply of lubricant.. Lateral ducts 91a are formed in the shaft 42 opening upon ports opposite respective bearings 9 and 48.

In Figures 7 to 9 I have illustrated a form of propeller in which the automatic features of ad- Justing the propeller blades is dispensed with, the adjustment being provided for by means which are entirely manual. In this form, the propeller head, blade mounting, and blade moving means are identical with the form first described and therefore the same reference numerals have been employed to designate .corresponding parts.

'Ihe tank a is provided with an opening 18 of a size to freely receive a cylindrical shell 19 therethrough and which is in screw threaded engagement with a plate 80 aligned with the aperture 18 and securely bolted, as at 8| to the tank lla. The shell 19 projects exteriorly of the tank and has fixed thereto a hand wheel 82, whereby the shell may be manually rotated. The opposite end of the shell is also provided with screw threads 83 upon which a packing gland collar 84 is engaged. As may be clearly seen in Figure 7, the collar 84 has seating engagement with a shoulder 85 of the propeller head 2|, and therefore it will be impossible for foreign matter, such as grit, gaining access into the interior of the shell.

The hub 2U' of the propeller is revolubly mounted within a roller bearing assembly 85 secured within the shell 19, and a thrust bearing assembly 81 is also mounted within the shell, interposed between the assembly 86 and the shoul- -der 85 of the propeller head. A similar thrust bearing assembly 88 is mounted Within the shell positioned between the bearing assembly 8% and a retaining plate 89, bolted as at 98, to the end of the hub 2l).v

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that inasmuch as the bearing assemblies 85, 81 and S8 are securely held within the shell against longitudinal movements, the propeller head 2| will also be held against such movement but free rotary movement of the head will be` permitted. In order to impart such rotary movement to the propeller 2|, the interior of the hub 28 is provided with a plurality of longitudinally extending splines 9| adapted to register with recesses 92 formed in the periphery of a drive shaft 93. The recesses SZ extend longitudinally of the shaft, and

yfrom this construction it will be clearly seen that with rotation of the shaft 93, the hub 29 and associated propeller will be rotated,` and that while undergoing such movements the shell 19 may have longitudinal movement imparted thereto by manipulation of the hand Wheel 82, by virtue of the spline andv recess connection between the drive shaft and hub.

The drive shaft 93 has a longitudinal bore 9d extending from the extremity enclosed within the propeller head to a point exteriorly of the tank la where it is joined by a lateral duct 95, closed by a screw plug 96. At points opposite the bearing assemblies 86, 81 and 8 8, lateral ducts 91 are formed in registry with ports 98 formed in the hub 2li. 'By the duct and port arrangement set forth, it will be understood that lubricant may be fed to the various bearings of the assemblies.

In order to effectively maintain the drive shaft j 93 against endwise or longitudinal movements, the shaft is provided with a ball member 99, antifrictionally supported as at |30 in a thrust block IUI. The block |0| may be suitably mounted upon a stationary upright m2, and it will be apparent that the block l0! in addition to preventing endwise movements, also adds stability to vthe drive shaft.

Any suitable drive means may be associated with the shaft 93, but in the present instance, I have shown a bevel gear |03 fixed to the shaft 93, in mesh with a similar gear |04 keyed to a power shaft m5.

When it is desired to vary the setting of the blades 9,1the hand wheel is rotated, causing a rotation of the shell 19. Due to the screw threaded engagement between the shell and plate 89., the shell will be caused to move endwise of the drive shaft 93 and inasmuch as the arms 31 of the washers 33 are engaged within the slots 38 of the head 48, the propellers 29 will be given a partial rotary movement, in one direction, or the other,

depending upon the direction of rotation of the hand Wheel 82.

I claim:

1. A feathering propeller .comprising a housing, a bearing mounting, a bearing rockably supported therein, a propeller head having a hub revolubly mounted in the bearing, oscillatable blades carried by the head, each blade having an arm, a shaft positioned within the hub, one end thereof being connected with respective arms, slots formed in the opposite end of the shaft, a casing fixed to the hub and rotatable therewith, the casing having arms extended therefrom, a drive shaft connected with the arms to impart rotary movement to the casing and hub, opposed trackways carried by the casing, a collar positioned around the arms and having lugs positioned within the vtrackways, a lever pivoted on the housing and connected with the collar to move the same through the trackways; the collar having internal screw threads, a sleeve in screw threaded engagement with the threads of the collar, a thrust bearing slidably supported by the last named arms and in abutting relation with the sleeve, a helical spring interposed between the first named shaft and the thrust bearing, means for rotating the sleeve and centrifugally acting weight members pivoted within the casing, each weight member having a bill portion positioned within respective slots of the shaft.

2. A feathering propeller comprising a longitudinally movable casing having`bearing means therein, a hollow propeller head associated with the casing in abutting relation thereto and having a hollow hub journalled in the bearing, propeller blades oscillatably mounted in the head, each blade having an arm, splines upon the hollow hub portion, a revoluble drive shaft extended through the casing and having a head member disposed with the hollow propeller head, said head having means for connection with the arms of the propeller blades, longitudinally extending slots formed on the periphery of the drive shaft and receiving the splines of the hub, means for rotating the shaft, and means for imparting longitudinal movement of the casing and the head with respect to the rotary shaft.

3. A feathering propeller comprising a longitudinally movable casing having bearing means at one end thereof, a hollow propeller head associated with the casing in abutting relation thereto and having a holloW hub revolubly journalled in the bearing, blades oscillatably mounted in the head, each blade having an arm, splines and slots upon the interior of the hub, a drive shaft extended through the casing, one end having a head member positioned Within the hollow propeller head, said head having apertures for reception of respective arms of the propeller blades, longitudinally extending splines and slots formed on the periphery of the drive shaft for interengagement With splines and slots of the hub, a thrust and supporting bearing for the other end of the shaft, a bevel gear xed to the shaft, a bevel gear in mesh therewith and having a driven shaft, a stationary bearing for the casing, said bearing having. internal screw threads, external screw threads on the casing Cooperative therewith, and a hand wheel on the casing for rotating the casing.

4. A feathering propeller comprising a bearing, a propeller head having a hub revolubly mounted in the bearing, oscillatable blades carried by the head, each blade having an angularly extended arm, a revoluble shaft extended through the bearing and into said head for operative connection With respective arms of the blades, means rotating the shaft, means for imparting longitudinal movements to the shaft upon rotary movement thereof, and means for rocking said bearlng.

6. A feathering propeller comprising a housing, a rockable bearing therein, a propeller head having a hub revolubly mounted in the bearing, oscillatable blades carried by the head, each blade having an arm, a shaft positioned Within the hub, one end thereof being connected with respective arms, automatic means at the opposite end of the Y shaft for imparting longitudinal movement to the shaft upon rotation thereof, a drive shaft having universal connection with the hub of the propeller head, means associated With the first named shaft for manually imparting longitudinal movement thereto, and means for tilting the rockable bearing.

LOUIS SVEINSSON.

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