US20160377262A1 - System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures - Google Patents

System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures Download PDF

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Publication number
US20160377262A1
US20160377262A1 US15/261,351 US201615261351A US2016377262A1 US 20160377262 A1 US20160377262 A1 US 20160377262A1 US 201615261351 A US201615261351 A US 201615261351A US 2016377262 A1 US2016377262 A1 US 2016377262A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
light
wavelength
emitting source
emitting
nm
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US15/261,351
Inventor
Michael R. Krames
Troy Trottier
Frank M. Steranka
William D. Houck
Arpan Chakraborty
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ECOSENSE LIGHTING Inc
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Soraa Inc
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Priority to US30119310P priority Critical
Priority to US35784910P priority
Priority to US201061424562P priority
Priority to US13/014,622 priority patent/US20110182056A1/en
Priority to US13/019,897 priority patent/US20110186874A1/en
Priority to US13/328,978 priority patent/US8740413B1/en
Priority to US14/256,670 priority patent/US8905588B2/en
Priority to US14/531,545 priority patent/US10147850B1/en
Application filed by Soraa Inc filed Critical Soraa Inc
Priority to US15/261,351 priority patent/US20160377262A1/en
Assigned to SORAA, INC. reassignment SORAA, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: HOUCK, WILLIAM D., TROTTIER, TROY, CHAKRABORTY, ARPAN, STERANKA, FRANK M., KRAMES, MICHAEL R.
Publication of US20160377262A1 publication Critical patent/US20160377262A1/en
Assigned to EcoSense Lighting, Inc. reassignment EcoSense Lighting, Inc. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SORAA, INC.
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V9/00Elements for modifying spectral properties, polarisation or intensity of the light emitted, e.g. filters
    • F21V9/08Elements for modifying spectral properties, polarisation or intensity of the light emitted, e.g. filters for producing coloured light, e.g. monochromatic; for reducing intensity of light
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/235Details of bases or caps, i.e. the parts that connect the light source to a fitting; Arrangement of components within bases or caps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V19/00Fastening of light sources or lamp holders
    • F21V19/006Fastening of light sources or lamp holders of point-like light sources, e.g. incandescent or halogen lamps, with screw-threaded or bayonet base
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V23/00Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices
    • F21V23/06Arrangement of electric circuit elements in or on lighting devices the elements being coupling devices, e.g. connectors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V7/00Reflectors for light sources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L25/00Assemblies consisting of a plurality of individual semiconductor or other solid state devices ; Multistep manufacturing processes thereof
    • H01L25/03Assemblies consisting of a plurality of individual semiconductor or other solid state devices ; Multistep manufacturing processes thereof all the devices being of a type provided for in the same subgroup of groups H01L27/00 - H01L51/00, e.g. assemblies of rectifier diodes
    • H01L25/04Assemblies consisting of a plurality of individual semiconductor or other solid state devices ; Multistep manufacturing processes thereof all the devices being of a type provided for in the same subgroup of groups H01L27/00 - H01L51/00, e.g. assemblies of rectifier diodes the devices not having separate containers
    • H01L25/075Assemblies consisting of a plurality of individual semiconductor or other solid state devices ; Multistep manufacturing processes thereof all the devices being of a type provided for in the same subgroup of groups H01L27/00 - H01L51/00, e.g. assemblies of rectifier diodes the devices not having separate containers the devices being of a type provided for in group H01L33/00
    • H01L25/0753Assemblies consisting of a plurality of individual semiconductor or other solid state devices ; Multistep manufacturing processes thereof all the devices being of a type provided for in the same subgroup of groups H01L27/00 - H01L51/00, e.g. assemblies of rectifier diodes the devices not having separate containers the devices being of a type provided for in group H01L33/00 the devices being arranged next to each other
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L27/00Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate
    • H01L27/15Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission
    • H01L27/153Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission in a repetitive configuration, e.g. LED bars
    • H01L27/156Devices consisting of a plurality of semiconductor or other solid-state components formed in or on a common substrate including semiconductor components with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission in a repetitive configuration, e.g. LED bars two-dimensional arrays
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/48Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the semiconductor body packages
    • H01L33/50Wavelength conversion elements
    • H01L33/501Wavelength conversion elements characterised by the materials, e.g. binder
    • H01L33/502Wavelength conversion materials
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/48Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the semiconductor body packages
    • H01L33/50Wavelength conversion elements
    • H01L33/501Wavelength conversion elements characterised by the materials, e.g. binder
    • H01L33/502Wavelength conversion materials
    • H01L33/504Elements with two or more wavelength conversion materials
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/48Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the semiconductor body packages
    • H01L33/50Wavelength conversion elements
    • H01L33/505Wavelength conversion elements characterised by the shape, e.g. plate or foil
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/48Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the semiconductor body packages
    • H01L33/52Encapsulations
    • H01L33/56Materials, e.g. epoxy or silicone resin
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L33/00Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof
    • H01L33/48Semiconductor devices with at least one potential-jump barrier or surface barrier specially adapted for light emission; Processes or apparatus specially adapted for the manufacture or treatment thereof or of parts thereof; Details thereof characterised by the semiconductor body packages
    • H01L33/58Optical field-shaping elements
    • H01L33/60Reflective elements
    • H05B33/0845
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H05ELECTRIC TECHNIQUES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05BELECTRIC HEATING; ELECTRIC LIGHTING NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H05B45/00Circuit arrangements for operating light emitting diodes [LED]
    • H05B45/10Controlling the intensity of the light
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/232Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings specially adapted for generating an essentially omnidirectional light distribution, e.g. with a glass bulb
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/20Light sources comprising attachment means
    • F21K9/23Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings
    • F21K9/233Retrofit light sources for lighting devices with a single fitting for each light source, e.g. for substitution of incandescent lamps with bayonet or threaded fittings specially adapted for generating a spot light distribution, e.g. for substitution of reflector lamps
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21KNON-ELECTRIC LIGHT SOURCES USING LUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING ELECTROCHEMILUMINESCENCE; LIGHT SOURCES USING CHARGES OF COMBUSTIBLE MATERIAL; LIGHT SOURCES USING SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES AS LIGHT-GENERATING ELEMENTS; LIGHT SOURCES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21K9/00Light sources using semiconductor devices as light-generating elements, e.g. using light-emitting diodes [LED] or lasers
    • F21K9/60Optical arrangements integrated in the light source, e.g. for improving the colour rendering index or the light extraction
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V29/00Protecting lighting devices from thermal damage; Cooling or heating arrangements specially adapted for lighting devices or systems
    • F21V29/50Cooling arrangements
    • F21V29/70Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks
    • F21V29/74Cooling arrangements characterised by passive heat-dissipating elements, e.g. heat-sinks with fins or blades
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21VFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS OF LIGHTING DEVICES OR SYSTEMS THEREOF; STRUCTURAL COMBINATIONS OF LIGHTING DEVICES WITH OTHER ARTICLES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F21V3/00Globes; Bowls; Cover glasses
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2101/00Point-like light sources
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2105/00Planar light sources
    • F21Y2105/10Planar light sources comprising a two-dimensional array of point-like light-generating elements
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2105/00Planar light sources
    • F21Y2105/10Planar light sources comprising a two-dimensional array of point-like light-generating elements
    • F21Y2105/12Planar light sources comprising a two-dimensional array of point-like light-generating elements characterised by the geometrical disposition of the light-generating elements, e.g. arranging light-generating elements in differing patterns or densities
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2113/00Combination of light sources
    • F21Y2113/10Combination of light sources of different colours
    • F21Y2113/13Combination of light sources of different colours comprising an assembly of point-like light sources
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F21LIGHTING
    • F21YINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES F21K, F21L, F21S and F21V, RELATING TO THE FORM OR THE KIND OF THE LIGHT SOURCES OR OF THE COLOUR OF THE LIGHT EMITTED
    • F21Y2115/00Light-generating elements of semiconductor light sources
    • F21Y2115/10Light-emitting diodes [LED]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01LSEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC SOLID STATE DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • H01L2924/00Indexing scheme for arrangements or methods for connecting or disconnecting semiconductor or solid-state bodies as covered by H01L24/00
    • H01L2924/0001Technical content checked by a classifier
    • H01L2924/0002Not covered by any one of groups H01L24/00, H01L24/00 and H01L2224/00

Abstract

An optical device includes a light source with at least two radiation sources, and at least two layers of wavelength-modifying materials excited by the radiation sources that emit radiation in at least two predetermined wavelengths. Embodiments include a first plurality of n radiation sources configured to emit radiation at a first wavelength. The first plurality of radiation sources are in proximity to a second plurality of m of radiation sources configured to emit radiation at a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength. The ratio between m and n is predetermined. The disclosed optical device also comprises at least two wavelength converting layers such that a first wavelength converting layer is configured to absorb a portion of radiation emitted by the second radiation sources, and a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb a portion of radiation emitted by the second radiation sources.

Description

  • This application is a continuation application of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/531,545, filed on Nov. 3, 2014, which is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 14/256,670, filed on Apr. 18, 2014, issued as U.S. Pat. No. 8,905,588, Dec. 19, 2014, which is a continuation application of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/328,978, filed on Dec. 16, 2011, issued as U.S. Pat. No. 8,740,413, on Jun. 3, 2014, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/424,562, filed on Dec. 17, 2010; and U.S. application Ser. No. 13/328,978 is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/019,987, filed on Feb. 2, 2011, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/301,193, filed on Feb. 3, 2010; and U.S. application Ser. No. 13/328,978 is a continuation-in-part application of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/014,622, filed on Jan. 26, 2011, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/357,849, filed on Jun. 23, 2010; each of which is incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present disclosure relates generally to light emitting devices and, more particularly, to techniques for using wavelength conversion materials with light emitting devices.
  • The present disclosure is directed to optical devices. The disclosure provides a light source that includes two or more layers of phosphor materials excited by radiation sources that emit radiations in two or more wavelengths, with at least one of the radiation wavelength less than 440 nm. In a specific embodiment where LED radiation sources are used, LED radiation sources that emit ultra-violet (UV), violet (V), or near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation are used to excite blue phosphor material. In various embodiments, red and green phosphor materials are used and the LED radiation sources are arranged in a specific pattern. In other embodiments red, green, and blue phosphor materials are used.
  • In the late 1800's, Thomas Edison invented the light bulb. The conventional light bulb, commonly called the “Edison bulb”, has been used for over one hundred years. The conventional light bulb uses a tungsten filament enclosed in a glass bulb sealed in a base, which is screwed into a socket. The socket is coupled to an AC power or DC power source. The conventional light bulb can be found commonly in houses, buildings, and outdoor lightings, and other areas requiring light. Unfortunately, drawbacks exist with the conventional Edison light bulb. That is, the conventional light bulb dissipates much thermal energy. More than 90% of the energy used for the conventional light bulb dissipates as thermal energy. Additionally, the conventional light bulb eventually fails due to evaporation of the tungsten filament.
  • Fluorescent lighting overcomes some of the drawbacks of the conventional light bulb. Fluorescent lighting uses an optically clear tube structure filled with a noble gas, and typically also contains mercury. A pair of electrodes is coupled between the gas and to an alternating power source through ballast to excite the mercury. Once the mercury has been excited, it discharges, emitting UV light. Typically, the optically clear tube is coated with phosphors, which are excited by the UV light to provide white light. Many building structures use fluorescent lighting and, more recently, fluorescent lighting has been fitted onto a base structure, which couples into a standard socket.
  • Solid state lighting techniques are also known. Solid state lighting relies upon semiconductor materials to produce light emitting diodes (LEDs). At first, red LEDs were used. Modern red LEDs use Aluminum Indium Gallium Phosphide (AlInGaP) semiconductor materials. Most recently, Shuji Nakamura pioneered the use of InGaN materials to produce LEDs emitting light in the blue color range for LEDs. The blue light LEDs led to innovations such as solid state white lighting, the blue laser diode, the Blu-Ray™ DVD player, and other developments. Blue-, violet-, or ultraviolet-emitting devices based on InGaN are used in conjunction with phosphors to provide white LEDs. Other colored LEDs have also been proposed.
  • One way of improving solid state light efficiency has been to use phosphor converted LEDs (pcLED) technology, where an LED emits radiation that excites phosphors, which in turn emit light. Unfortunately, conventional pcLEDs have been inadequate, especially for white light for general illumination applications. In particular, blue-excited pcLED configurations have the challenge that blue light leakage must be managed to provide a stable white output. This is difficult because blue light leakage depends on the peak emission wavelength, which shifts with drive current and operating temperature. V- or NUV-excited pcLEDs avoid this problem, but have performance disadvantages due to increased Stokes' loss, as well as cascading conversion loss, since much of the V or NUV light pumps blue phosphor, which then excites green and red phosphors, rather than direct excitation of the green and red phosphors.
  • Therefore, it is desirable to have improved techniques for phosphor-based LED devices.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY
  • The present disclosure is directed to optical devices. The disclosure provides a light source that includes two or more layers of phosphor materials excited by radiation sources that emit radiations in two or more wavelengths, with at least one of the radiation wavelengths less than 440 nm. In a specific embodiment where LED radiation sources are used, LED radiation sources that emit ultra-violet (UV), violet (V), or near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation are used to excite blue phosphor material. In various embodiments, red and green phosphor materials are used and the LED radiation sources are arranged in a specific pattern. In other embodiments, red, green, and blue phosphor materials are used.
  • In one embodiment, an optical device includes a submount having a surface. The device includes a first plurality n of radiation sources positioned on the surface configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength with a range between about 380 nm to 470 nm. The device also includes a second plurality m of radiation sources positioned on the surface configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength shorter than the first wavelength. The ratio between m and n is based on a selected wavelength. The device further includes a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The first wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 590 nm to 650 nm. The device includes a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The second wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 490 nm to 590 nm. The device additionally includes a third wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources. The third wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from about 440 nm to about 490 nm.
  • In another embodiment, an optical device includes a submount having a surface. The device also includes a first plurality n of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength with a range between about 380 nm to 470 nm. The device also includes a second plurality m of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength shorter than the first wavelength. The second plurality of radiation sources are positioned on the surface and arranged in a specific pattern. The ratio between m and n is based on a selected wavelength. The device also includes a first wavelength converting layer associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 590 nm to 650 nm configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The device further includes a second wavelength converting layer associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 490 nm to 590 nm configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The device also includes a phosphor pattern associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 440 nm to 490 nm overlaying the second plurality of radiation sources configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources. A further understanding of the nature and advantages of the present disclosure may be realized by reference to the latter portions of the specification and attached drawings.
  • In certain aspects, optical devices are provided comprising: an electrical connection to an external power source; a submount comprising a mounting surface; at least one first light emitting diode source, the at least one first light emitting diode source configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength within a range from about 430 nm to about 480 nm, wherein the at least one first light emitting diode source is disposed on the mounting surface, and wherein the at least one first light emitting diode source is electrically coupled to the electrical connection; at least one second light emitting diode source configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, wherein the at least one second light emitting diode source is disposed on the mounting surface; and a first wavelength-converting material positioned in an optical path of radiation from the at least one first light emitting diode source and configured to convert radiation from the first wavelength to radiation at a wavelength within a range from about 500 nm to about 600 nm; wherein the optical device is configured to output radiation from at least the first light emitting diode source, the at least one second light emitting diode source, and the first wavelength-converting material.
  • In certain aspects, optical devices are provided comprising: an electrical connection to an external power source; a submount having disposed thereon a reflective pattern to form a mounting surface; a plurality of first light emitting diode sources, at least some of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength within a range from about 430 nm to about 480 nm, wherein the plurality of first light emitting diode sources is disposed on the mounting surface, and wherein the plurality of first light emitting diode sources is electrically coupled to the electrical connection; at least one second light emitting diode source configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, wherein the at least one second light emitting diode source is disposed on the mounting surface; a first wavelength-converting material positioned in an optical path of radiation from at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources and configured to convert radiation from the first wavelength to radiation at a wavelength within a range from about 500 nm to about 600 nm; and a second wavelength-converting material positioned in an optical path of radiation from at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources and configured to convert radiation from the first wavelength to radiation at a wavelength within a range from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; wherein at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources is configured to excite emission from at least one of the first wavelength-converting material and the second wavelength-converting material; and wherein at least one of the at least one second light emitting diode source is configured to excite emission from at least one of the first wavelength-converting material and the second wavelength-converting material.
  • In certain aspects, lamps are provided comprising: a base, the base having at least one structural member to provide a mount point; an electrical connection to an external power source; a submount having disposed thereon a reflective pattern to form a mounting surface; a plurality of first light emitting diode sources, at least some of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength within a range from about 430 nm to about 480 nm, wherein the plurality of first light emitting diode sources is disposed on the mounting surface, and wherein the at least one first light emitting diode source is electrically coupled to the electrical connection; at least one second light emitting diode source configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, wherein the at least one second light emitting diode source is disposed on the mounting surface; a first wavelength-converting material positioned in an optical path of radiation from at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources and configured to convert radiation from the first wavelength to radiation at a wavelength within a range from about 500 nm to about 600 nm; and a second wavelength-converting material positioned in an optical path of radiation from at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources and configured to convert radiation from the first wavelength to radiation at a wavelength within a range from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; wherein at least one of the plurality of first light emitting diode sources is configured to excite emission from at least one of the first wavelength-converting material and the second wavelength-converting material; and wherein at least one of the at least one second light emitting diode source is configured to excite emission from at least one of the at least one second light emitting diode source, the first wavelength-converting material, and the second wavelength-converting material.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1A is a simplified diagram illustrating a chip-array-based pcLED apparatus with an RGB phosphor mix for generating white light, according to an embodiment of the disclosure.
  • FIG. 1B is a simplified diagram illustrating construction of a radiation source comprised of light emitting diodes, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 1C is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device embodied as a light source constructed using an array of LEDs juxtaposed with a cover member, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 1D is a simplified diagram illustrating an LED lamp having a base to provide a mount point for a light source, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 2 is a simplified diagram illustrating a chip-array-based apparatus 200 having green and red wavelength converting material, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 3A is a simplified diagram illustrating a conversion process, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 3B is a simplified diagram illustrating a conversion process, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 4 is a graph illustrating a light process chart by phosphor material, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 5 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 6 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 7 is a simplified graph illustrating performance of various embodiments of optical devices, according to embodiments of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 8 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having violet and blue LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 9 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having violet and patterned blue LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 10 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having violet and red LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 11 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having violet and red LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 12A is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having red, green, and blue LEDs disposed within recesses, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 12B is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having red, green, and blue LEDs disposed between barriers, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 13 is an exploded view of an LED lamp, according to some embodiments.
  • FIG. 14 is an illustration of an LED system comprising an LED lamp, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 15 is a block diagram of a system to perform certain operations to fabricate an optical device, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Various types of phosphor-converted (pc) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been proposed in the past. Conventional pcLEDs include a blue LED with a yellow phosphor. UV or V-based phosphor-converted (pc) LEDs exhibit certain advantages in performance (compared to blue-pumped pcLEDs) such as high color rendering (broadband spectrum comprising phosphor emission) and accurate color control (e.g., as the violet “pump” light contributes little to the chromaticity).
  • FIG. 1A is a simplified diagram illustrating a chip-array-based pcLED apparatus with an RGB phosphor mix for generating white light. As shown in FIG. 1A, the pcLED apparatus 100 includes three layers of phosphor materials: blue phosphor material 104, red phosphor material 103, and green phosphor material 102. The phosphor materials are excited by radiations emitted by LED devices (e.g., LED device 101). As an example, the LED devices are each nominally monochromatic and emit in a similar wavelength range.
  • FIG. 1B is a simplified diagram illustrating construction of a radiation source comprised of light emitting diodes. As shown, the radiation source 120 constructed on a submount 111 upon which submount is a layer of sapphire or other insulator 112, upon which, further, are disposed one or more conductive contacts (e.g., conductive contact 114 1, conductive contact 114 2), arranged in an array where each conductive contact is spatially separated from any other conductive contact by an isolation gap 116. FIG. 1B shows two conductive contacts in a linear array, however other arrays are possible, and are described herein. Atop the conductive contacts are LED devices (e.g., LED device 115 1, LED device 115 2, LED device 115 N, etc.). The LED device is but one possibility for a radiation source, and other radiation sources are possible and envisioned, for example a radiation source can be a laser device.
  • In a specific embodiment, the devices and packages disclosed herein include at least one non-polar or at least one semi-polar radiation source (e.g. an LED or laser) disposed on a submount. The starting materials can comprise polar gallium nitride containing materials.
  • The radiation source 120 is not to be construed as conforming to a specific drawing scale, and in particular, many structural details are not included in FIG. 1B so as not to obscure understanding of the embodiments. In particular, the dimensions of the isolation gap of FIG. 1B serves to separate the conductive contacts (e.g., conductive contact 114 1, conductive contact 114 2) one from another, and in some embodiments, the isolation is relatively wider, or deeper, or shorter or shallower. The isolation gap serves to facilitate shaping of materials formed in and around the isolation gap, which formation can be by one or more additive processes, or by one or more subtractive processes, or both. The aforementioned shaped materials serve as an isolation barrier. Further details are presented infra.
  • It is to be appreciated that the radiation sources illustrated in FIG. 1B can output light in a variety of wavelengths (e.g., colors) according to various embodiments of the present disclosure. Depending on the application, color balance can be achieved by modifying color generated by LED devices using a wavelength-modifying material (e.g., a phosphor material). In one embodiment, the phosphor material may be mixed with encapsulating material (e.g., silicone material) that distributes phosphor color pixels within a thin layer atop the array of LED devices. Other embodiments for providing color pixels can be conveniently constructed using a cover member (see FIG. 1C) that comprises deposits of one or more wavelength-modifying materials.
  • FIG. 1C is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 150 embodied as a light source 142 constructed using an array of LEDs juxtaposed with a cover member 140, the cover member having a mixture of wavelength converting materials distributed within the volume of the cover member, according to some embodiments. The wavelength converting materials can be distributed in a variety of configurations. For example, the light source 142 can include blue color emitting material at its corners, green color emitting material at its edges, and red color emitting material at its center. Individually, and together, these color pixels modify the color of light emitted by the LED devices. For example, the color pixels are used to modify the light from LED devices to appear as white light having a uniform broadband emission (e.g., characterized by a substantially flat emission of light throughout the range of about 380 nm to about 780 nm), which is suitable for general lighting. In one embodiment, “blank” pixels are used for later color tuning and the color of the light from LED devices is measured.
  • In various embodiments, color balance adjustment is accomplished by using pure color pixels, mixing phosphor material, and/or using a uniform layer of phosphor over LED devices. In one embodiment, color balance tuning is achieved by providing a color pattern on a cover member 140. Or, the cover member can be is made of glass material and function as a 405 nm reflection dichroic lens. Hermetic sealing techniques may be used to encapsulate the cover member within the optical device 150. A color tuning using cover member can also be achieved through light absorption and/or light reflection.
  • In one embodiment, a predeposited phosphor plate is attached to the cover member based on a predetermined pattern. For example, after positioning wavelength-modifying material in the vicinity of the light emitting devices, the color of the aggregate emitted light by the optical device 150 is measured. Based on the measured color, the positioning of the wavelength-modifying material is determined and used to balance the color of the aggregate emitted light. Various wavelength converting processes are discussed infra.
  • In an alternative embodiment, wavelength converting processes are facilitated by using one or more pixilated phosphor plates that are attached to the cover member. For example, the pixilated phosphor plates include color and, depending on the application, color patterns of the phosphor plate may be predetermined based on the measured color balance of the aggregate emitted light. In an alternative embodiment, the absorption plate, which is attached to the cover member, is used to perform color correction. In some situations, the absorption plate comprises color absorption material. For example, the absorbing and/or reflective material can be plastic, ink, die, glue, epoxy, and others.
  • In other embodiments, the phosphor particles are embedded in a reflective matrix (e.g., the matrix formed by conductive contacts). Such phosphor particles can be disposed on the substrate by deposition. In one specific embodiment, the reflective matrix comprises silver or other suitable material. Alternatively, one or more colored pixilated reflector plates (not shown) are attached to the cover member to adjust color balance of the LED devices. In some situations, materials such as aluminum, gold, platinum, chromium, and/or others are deposited on the pixilated reflector plates to provide color balance.
  • FIG. 1D is a simplified diagram illustrating an LED lamp 160 having a base to provide a mount point for a light source, according to some embodiments. It is to be appreciated that an LED lamp 160, according to the present disclosure, can be implemented for various types of applications. As shown in FIG. 1D, a light source (e.g., the light source 142) is a part of the LED lamp 160. The LED lamp 160 includes a base member 151. The base member 151 is mechanically connected to a heat sink 152. In one embodiment, the base member 151 is compatible with conventional light bulb socket and is used to provide electrical power (e.g., using an AC power source) to the one or more radiation emitting devices (e.g., one or more instances of light source 142).
  • FIG. 2 is a simplified diagram illustrating a chip-array-based apparatus 200 having green and red wavelength converting material. Compared to the device shown in FIG. 1A, only two layers of wavelength converting materials are used. This example shows a transparent (non-converting layer) as well as a layer of green wavelength converting materials 202 and a layer of red wavelength converting materials 204. The LED devices (e.g., LED device 201) comprising the array are blue-emitting. The combination of blue LED light emission and the green and red wavelength converting materials emission results in white light.
  • FIG. 3A is a simplified diagram illustrating a conversion process 300. As shown, a radiation source 301 is configured to emit radiation at violet, near ultraviolet, or UV wavelengths. The radiation emitted by radiation source 301 is absorbed by the phosphor materials (e.g., the blue phosphor material 302, the green phosphor material 303, and the red phosphor material 304). Upon absorbing the radiation, the blue phosphor material 302 emits blue light, the green phosphor material 303 emits green light, and the red phosphor material 304 emits red light. As shown, a portion (e.g., portion 310 1, portion 310 2) of the emissions from the blue phosphor are incident on the surrounding phosphors, and are absorbed by the green phosphor material and red phosphor material, which emits green and red light, respectively. This particular process of converted blue light being further absorbed and converted (e.g., in a cascade of emission and absorption) is considered a lossy process, and in some cases can be undesirable.
  • FIG. 3B is a simplified diagram illustrating a conversion process 350. As shown, a radiation source 351 is configured to emit radiation at a wavelength that is substantially in the blue spectrum. The radiation emitted by radiation source 351 is reflected by blue light emitting wavelength converting material 352 and absorbed by the green light emitting wavelength converting material 353 and red light emitting wavelength converting material 354. Upon absorbing the radiation, green light emitting wavelength converting material 353 emits green light, and the red light emitting wavelength converting material 354 emits red light. A portion of the converted blue light is absorbed by the green light emitting wavelength converting material and red light emitting wavelength converting material, which emits green and red light, respectively. This particular process of converted blue light being further absorbed and converted is considered a lossy process, and in some cases can be undesirable.
  • FIG. 4 is a graph illustrating a light process chart 400 by phosphor material. As shown in FIG. 4, radiation with a wavelength of violet, near violet, or ultraviolet from a radiation source is absorbed by the blue phosphor material, which in turn emits blue light. However, since the blue color light can also be absorbed by red and green phosphor, a portion of the blue light is converted to green or red light. As shown in FIG. 4, each phosphor is most effective at converting radiation at its particular range of wavelength. And, as shown, some of these ranges overlap. In particular, the wavelength range from about 380 nm to about 430 nm (shown as wavelength range 411) exhibits absorption by all three phosphors (e.g., blue, green, and red). However, the wavelength range from about 430 nm to about 500 nm (shown as wavelength range 419) exhibits absorption by substantially only two phosphors (e.g., green, and red). Thus, the effect of the lossy conversion processes (e.g., conversion process 300 and conversion process 350) in absorbing blue light from the radiation sources, and re-absorbing blue-emitted light from the wavelength converting materials, is reduced.
  • Yet, it remains a challenge with UV- or V-pumped embodiments (e.g., pcLEDs) where there remains a requirement for a short pump wavelength to excite a blue phosphor while reducing the lossy effects as heretofore described. Among other challenges, the short wavelength light is susceptible to optical loss in materials typically employed in the fabrication of LEDs including GaN semiconductor material, packaging material, contacts and metallization (especially Ag) material, and encapsulation material (e.g., silicone or epoxy). Furthermore, short wavelength LEDs that pump a blue phosphor may generate blue photons which subsequently pump lower-energy phosphors (e.g., green and red), as illustrated in FIG. 4. This cascading event is lossy, according to the quantum efficiency of the blue phosphor, thereby reducing color conversion efficiency. It is thus desirable to maintain the benefits of UV- and/or V-based LEDs while maintaining high conversion efficiency.
  • It is to be appreciated that embodiments of the present disclosure maintain the benefits of UV- and/or V-pumped pcLEDs while improving conversion efficiency. In one embodiment, an array of LED chips is provided, and is comprised of two groups. One group of LEDs has a shorter wavelength to enable pumping of a blue phosphor material. The second group of LEDs has a longer wavelength which may, or may not, excite a blue phosphor material, but will excite a green or longer wavelength (e.g., red) phosphor material. For example, the first group of LEDs might have an average emission wavelength of less than 405 nm, while the second group may have an average emission wavelength greater than 405 nm. The combined effect of the two groups of LEDs in the array is to provide light of desired characteristics such as color (e.g., white) and color rendering. Furthermore, the conversion efficiency achieved in the preferred embodiment will be higher than that of the conventional approach. In particular, the cascading loss of blue photons pumping longer-wavelength phosphors may be reduced by localizing blue phosphor to regions near the short-wavelength LEDs. In addition, the longer-wavelength pump LEDs will contribute to overall higher efficacy by being less susceptible to optical loss mechanisms in GaN, metallization, and packaging materials, as described above.
  • FIG. 5 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 5, an optical device 500 includes a submount 111 (not shown) that has a surface. A number of radiation sources are provided on the submount. According to various embodiments, two types of radiation sources are provided, and each type of radiation source is associated with a range of wavelength. For example, radiation sources include a first plurality of radiation sources that are configure to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength. More specifically, the first wavelength can have a range of between about 380 nm to 470 nm. In a specific embodiment, the first wavelength is characterized by a peak emission of about 420 nm to 470 nm. The first plurality of radiation sources is positioned on the surface, and the first plurality of radiation sources comprising n number of radiation sources. For example, the first plurality of radiation sources includes “long” violet LED devices 501 and 506.
  • The radiation sources also include a second plurality of radiation sources that are configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength. In exemplary embodiments, the second wavelength is shorter than the first wavelength. More specifically, the second wavelength is violet or ultraviolet. In a specific embodiment, the second plurality of radiation sources is characterized by a peak emission in the range of about 380 nm to about 430 nm. In a certain embodiment, the second wavelength is less than 390 nm. The second plurality of radiation sources is positioned on the surface of the submount. The second plurality of radiation sources includes m number of radiation sources. The ratio between the number m and the number n is predetermined based on a selected wavelength. Typically, for warm color temperatures, n is greater than m. The ratio of n to m can be 1:1, 2:1, 10:1, and other ratios. For example, the ratio can be based on a selected wavelength output for the optical device 500. As an example, the second plurality of radiation sources comprises LED devices 505 and 507.
  • Depending on the application, the arrangement of a first plurality and a second plurality of radiation sources can be based on various criteria. For example, particular patterns can be used to maximize the efficiency of the optical device 500.
  • The optical device 500 includes three wavelength converting layers overlaying the radiation sources: a first wavelength converting layer 503, a second wavelength converting layer 502, and a third wavelength converting layer 504. The first wavelength converting layer 503 is configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by both the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. More specifically, the first wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 590 nm to 650 nm. For example, the first wavelength converting layer comprises red phosphor material that is adapted to emit substantially red color light.
  • The second wavelength converting layer 502 is configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The second wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 490 nm to 590 nm. For example, the second wavelength converting layer comprises a green phosphor that is adapted to emit substantially green light.
  • The third wavelength converting layer 504 is configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources. The third wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 440 nm to 490 nm. For example, the third wavelength converting layer comprises a blue phosphor material that is adapted to emit substantially blue light.
  • Depending on the application, the optical device 500 may include other components as well. In certain embodiments, the optical device 500 includes a power source that is capable of selectively powering the radiation sources or LED devices. In a specific embodiment, the power source is configured to turn radiation sources on and off based on the desired color output. For example, by selectively turning off the radiation source of a specific wavelength, the color output of the optical device is changed. More particularly, a driving circuit can be configured to selectively power the first plurality of radiation devices while maintaining a constant power to the second plurality of radiation sources. Or, the driving circuit can be configured to tune to a ratio of energy being delivered to the first plurality of radiation sources as compared to energy delivered to the second plurality of radiation sources.
  • In certain embodiments, the power source is configured to turn off certain radiation sources for dimming purposes. The optical device 500 can also include other components such as a housing member, sealing material, transparent cover, encapsulating material, and others. And, in certain embodiments, patterned phosphor materials are used.
  • FIG. 6 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 600, according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 6, an optical device 600 includes a submount 111 (not shown) that has a surface. A number of radiation sources are provided on the submount. According to various embodiments, two types of radiation sources are provided, and each type of radiation source is associated with a range of wavelength. For example, radiation sources include a first plurality of radiation sources that are configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength. More specifically, the first wavelength can have a range of between about 380 nm to 470 nm. In a specific embodiment, the first wavelength is characterized by a peak emission at about 420 nm to 470 nm. The first plurality of radiation sources are positioned on the surface. The first plurality of radiation sources have an n number of radiation sources. For example, the first plurality of radiation sources includes LED devices 604 and 605.
  • The radiation sources of optical device 600 also include a second plurality of radiation sources that are configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength. In various embodiments, the second wavelength is shorter than the first wavelength. More specifically, the second wavelength is violet or ultraviolet. In a specific embodiment, the second plurality of radiation sources are characterized by a peak emission in the range of about 380 nm to about 430 nm. In certain embodiments, the second wavelength is less than 390 nm. The second plurality of radiation sources is positioned on the surface of the submount. The second plurality of radiation sources comprises m number of radiation sources. The ratio between m and n is predetermined based on a selected wavelength. Typically, n is greater than m. The ratio of n to m can be 1:1, 2:1, 10:1, and other ratios. For example, the ratio is based on a selected wavelength output for the optical device 500. As an example, the second plurality of radiation sources comprises short violet LED devices 603 and 606.
  • In various embodiments, the arrangement of the radiation sources is patterned. More specifically, the locations of the second plurality of radiation sources are predetermined and are covered and/or surrounded by a specific phosphor pattern (e.g., phosphor pattern 607 1, phosphor pattern 607 1). The phosphor pattern is configured to be proximal to instances from among the second plurality of radiation sources. More specifically, the phosphor pattern is more remote from the first plurality of radiation sources. The phosphor pattern is configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources. In various embodiments, the phosphor pattern is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from about 440 nm to about 490 nm. In a specific embodiment, the phosphor pattern comprises blue phosphor material. For example, the patterned blue phosphor material is used to convert violet or ultraviolet radiation to blue light. Among other things, the blue light converted by the patterned phosphor material can help create desired color balance and improve efficiency.
  • As shown, the optical device 600 also includes a first wavelength converting layer 601 configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The first wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 590 nm to 650 nm. For example, the first wavelength converting layer comprises red phosphor material that is adapted to emit substantially red color light.
  • The second wavelength converting layers 601 and 602 are configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources. The second wavelength converting layer is associated with a wavelength emission ranging from 490 nm to 590 nm. For example, the second wavelength converting layer comprises a green phosphor that is adapted to emit substantially green light.
  • As an example, the first and second wavelength converting layer can absorb radiation from both the first plurality and second plurality of radiation sources. Additionally, the first and second wavelength converting layers may also absorb emission from the phosphor pattern. It is to be appreciated that the embodiments of the present disclosure can provide efficiency gains over conventional techniques.
  • FIG. 7 is a simplified graph 700 illustrating performance of various embodiments of the optical devices described herein.
  • It is to be appreciated that the improvement in efficiency can be dramatic. The data shown in FIG. 7 indicates a +20% gain in conversion efficiency by pumping a tri-color phosphor mix with 405 nm radiating LEDs vs. 395 nm LEDs. In this comparison, the blue phosphor material is likely to be equally excited by both 395 nm and 405 nm LEDs, meaning the cascading loss of blue photons pumping green and/or red phosphors is still present. So, even higher gains are expected in cases for which a second group of LEDs is of a sufficiently long wavelength to not substantially pump the blue phosphor material.
  • FIG. 8 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 800 having violet and blue LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 8, violet LEDs and blue LEDs are arranged according to a predetermined pattern. In this configuration, green emitting and red emitting wavelength converting materials are used to convert radiation emitted by violet and blue LEDs. For example, the blue LEDs as shown are configured to provide blue color light, and as a result blue phosphor material is not needed for the optical system to produce white light.
  • One exemplary embodiment in accordance with the depiction of FIG. 8 comprises an optical device 800 comprising a submount having a surface, upon which surface is disposed a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 440 nm to about 500 nm (e.g., radiating blue light), the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, and the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources. A second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation is characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength (e.g., radiating violet light), the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, and the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, where a ratio between m and n is predetermined based on a selected wavelength. Further, this embodiment comprises two layers of wavelength converting material, namely a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm (e.g., red emissions), and a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm (e.g., green emissions).
  • FIG. 9 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 900 having violet and patterned blue LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 9, violet LEDs and blue LEDs are arranged according to a predetermined pattern. For example, violet LEDs are characterized by a wavelength emission ranging from about 380 nm to about 430 nm, and the blue LEDs are characterized by a wavelength of about 420 nm to 490 nm. In this configuration, green phosphor materials 902 and red phosphor materials 901 are used to convert radiation emitted by violet and blue LEDs. Moreover, the blue LEDs as shown are configured to provide blue color light, and as a result blue phosphor material is not needed for the optical system to produce white light. For example, the blue LEDs are provided at predetermined locations (e.g., predetermined location 910 1, predetermined location 910 2, and predetermined location 910 3) that are substantially remote from green and red phosphor material, which allows the blue LEDs to efficiently emit blue colored light that contributes to white light output. In some embodiments, the blue LEDs are provided at predetermined locations that are substantially surrounded by isolation barriers (e.g., isolation barrier 911 1, isolation barrier 911 2) such that the blue LEDs emit blue colored light that does not substantially interact with the green- and red-emitting wavelength converting materials.
  • FIG. 10 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 1000 having violet and red LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 10, violet LEDs and red LEDs are arranged according to a predetermined pattern. For example, violet LEDs are characterized by a wavelength emission ranging from about 380 nm to about 430 nm, and the red LEDs are characterized by a wavelength of about 590 nm to 650 nm. In this configuration, green and blue phosphor materials are used to convert radiation emitted by violet and red LEDs. For example, the red LEDs as shown are configured to provide red color light, and as a result red phosphor material is not needed for the optical system to produce white light. For example, red light combines with blue and green light from blue and green phosphor material to form white light.
  • FIG. 11 is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device 1100 having violet and red LEDs according to an embodiment of the present disclosure. As shown in FIG. 11, violet LEDs and red LEDs are arranged according to a predetermined pattern. For example, violet LEDs are characterized by a wavelength emission ranging from 380 nm to 430 nm, and the red LEDs are characterized by a wavelength of about 590 nm to 650 nm. In this configuration, green and blue phosphor materials are used to convert radiation emitted by violet and red LEDs. For example, the red LEDs as shown are configured to provide red color light, and as a result red phosphor material is not needed for the optical system to produce white light. In this example, red light combines with blue and green light from blue and green phosphor material to form white light.
  • In yet another embodiment, violet LEDs and red LEDs are arranged according to a predetermined pattern. For example, violet LEDs are characterized by a wavelength emission ranging from 380 nm to 430 nm, and the red LEDs are characterized by a wavelength of about 590 nm to 650 nm. In this configuration, green and blue wavelength-emitting materials are used to convert radiation emitted by violet LEDs. For example, the red LEDs as shown are configured to provide red color light, and as a result red wavelength-emitting material is not needed for the optical system to produce white light. For example, red light combines with blue and green light from blue and green wavelength-emitting material to form white light.
  • FIG. 12A is a simplified diagram 1200 illustrating an optical device having red, green, and blue radiation sources disposed within recesses. In embodiments wherein portions of the final white light spectrum are contributed by direct emission from radiation sources, it is desirable to avoid interaction of such direct emission with any wavelength converting materials (e.g., down-conversion materials, phosphors). For example, for blue-emitting radiation sources whose spectra are being combined with other radiation sources that are pumping to longer wavelength down-conversion media (e.g., to make broader spectrum light), the down-conversion media can be isolated from the optical path of the blue-emitting LEDs. And, providing such an isolation (e.g., using an isolation barrier) increases efficiency as there are losses (e.g., backscattered light into LED chip) associated with down-conversion. Instead, it is preferable to provide optical means (e.g., an isolation barrier) to reflect light from the radiation sources towards the desired optical far-field such that this reflected light does not substantially interact with down-conversion media.
  • One such an embodiment is shown in FIG. 12A. As shown, LEDs are placed into recessed regions in a submount (e.g., substrate or package) such that they are optically isolated from one another. Further, light from direct-emitting LEDs does not interact with down-conversion media and instead, is substantially directed into the desired emission pattern of the entire LED package. Conversely, light from the down-converted LEDs (e.g., down-converting LED 1204 1, down-converting LED 1204 2) is converted locally and directed to the final emission pattern. In addition to providing efficient light collection from the direct-emitting LEDs, this design avoids cascading down-conversion events (e.g., violet down-converted to green, and green down-converted to red) which can unnecessarily reduce overall efficiency since quantum yields of down-conversion media are less than 100%.
  • Light from the individual LEDs are combined together in the far field to provide a uniform broadband emission which is a combination of light from the direct-emitting and down-converting LED chips.
  • FIG. 12B is a simplified diagram illustrating an optical device having red, green, and blue LEDs disposed between barriers. In the embodiment of FIG. 12B, the same benefits pertaining to disposition of radiation sources in proximity to isolation barriers are provided by fabrication of the isolation barriers using an additive, rather than subtractive process. In an additive processes, the barrier is formed by techniques such as overmolding, deposition/lithography/removal, attachment of a barrier mesh, etc. In subtractive processes, the recesses are formed by techniques such as deposition/lithography/removal and other techniques well known in the art.
  • The radiation sources can be implemented using various types of devices, such as light emitting diode devices or laser diode devices. In certain embodiments, the LED devices are fabricated from gallium and nitrogen submounts, such as GaN submount. As used herein, the term GaN submount is associated with Group III-nitride based materials including GaN, InGaN, AlGaN, or other Group III containing alloys or compositions that are used as starting materials. Such starting materials include polar GaN submounts (e.g., submount 111 where the largest area surface is nominally an (h k l) plane wherein h=k=0, and l is non-zero), non-polar GaN submounts (e.g., submount material where the largest area surface is oriented at an angle ranging from about 80-100 degrees from the polar orientation described above towards an (h k l) plane wherein l=0, and at least one of h and k is non-zero), or semi-polar GaN submounts (e.g., submount material where the largest area surface is oriented at an angle ranging from about +0.1 to 80 degrees or 110-179.9 degrees from the polar orientation described above towards an (h k l) plane wherein l=0, and at least one of h and k is non-zero).
  • Wavelength conversion materials can be crystalline (single or poly), ceramic or semiconductor particle phosphors, ceramic or semiconductor plate phosphors, organic or inorganic downconverters, upconverters (anti-stokes), nano-particles and other materials which provide wavelength conversion. Major classes of downconverter phosphors used in solid-state lighting include garnets doped at least with Ce3+; nitridosilicates, oxynitridosilicates or oxynitridoaluminosilicates doped at least with Ce3+; chalcogenides doped at least with Ce3+; silicates or fluorosilicates doped at least with Eu2+; nitridosilicates, oxynitridosilicates, oxynitridoaluminosilicates or sialons doped at least with Eu2+; carbidonitridosilicates or carbidooxynitridosilicates doped at least with Eu2+; aluminates doped at least with Eu2+; phosphates or apatites doped at least with Eu2+; chalcogenides doped at least with Eu2+; and oxides, oxyfluorides or complex fluorides doped at least with Mn4+. Some specific examples are listed below:

  • (Ba,Sr,Ca,Mg)5(PO4)3(Cl,F,Br,OH):Eu2+, Mn2+

  • (Ca,Sr,Ba)3MgSi2O8:Eu2+, Mn2+

  • (Ba,Sr,Ca)MgAl10O17:Eu2+, Mn2+

  • (Na,K,Rb,Cs)2[(Si,Ge,Ti,Zr,Hf,Sn)F6]:Mn4+

  • (Mg,Ca,Zr,Ba,Zn)[(Si,Ge,Ti,Zr,Hf,Sn)F6]:Mn4+

  • (Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba,Zn)2SiO4:Eu2+

  • (Sr,Ca,Ba)(Al,Ga)2S4:Eu2+

  • (Ca,Sr)S:Eu2+,Ce3+

  • (Y,Gd,Tb,La,Sm,Pr,Lu)3(Sc,Al,Ga)5O12:Ce3+
  • a group:

  • Ca1−xAlx−xySi1−x+xyN2−x−xyCxy:A   (1);

  • Ca1−x−zNazM(III)x−xy−zSi1−x+xy+zN2−x−xyCxy:A   (2);

  • M(II)1−x−zM(I)zM(III)x−xy−zSi1−x+xy+zN2−x−xyCxy:A   (3);

  • M(II)1−x−zM(I)zM(III)x−xy−zSi1−x+xy+zN2−x−xy−2w/3CxyOw−v/2Hv:A   (4); and

  • M(II)1−x−zM(I)zM(III)x−xy−zSi1−x+xy+zN2−x−xy−2w/3−v/3CxyOwHv:A   (4a),
  • wherein 0<x<1, 0<y<1, 0≦z<1, 0≦v<1, 0<w<1, x+z<1, x>xy+z, and 0<x−xy−z<1, M(II) is at least one divalent cation, M(I) is at least one monovalent cation, M(III) is at least one trivalent cation, H is at least one monovalent anion, and A is a luminescence activator doped in the crystal structure.

  • Cex(Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba)y(Sc,Y,La,Gd,Lu)1−x−yAl(Si6−z+yAlz−y)(N10−zOz) (where x,y<1, y≧0 and z˜1)

  • (Mg,Ca,Sr,Ba)(Y,Sc,Gd,Tb,La,Lu)2S4:Ce3+

  • (Ba,Sr,Ca)xxSiyNz:Eu2+ (where 2x+4y=3z)

  • (Y,Sc,Lu,Gd)2−nCanSi4N6+nC1−n:Ce3+, (wherein 0≦n≦0.5)

  • (Lu,Ca,Li,Mg,Y) alpha-SiAlON doped with Eu2+ and/or Ce3+

  • (Ca,Sr,Ba)SiO2N2:Eu2+,Ce3+

  • (Sr,Ca)AlSiN3:Eu2+

  • CaAlSi(ON)3:Eu2+

  • (Y,La,Lu)Si3N5:Ce3+

  • (La,Y,Lu)3Si6N11:Ce3+
  • For purposes of the application, it is understood that when a phosphor has two or more dopant ions (i.e. those ions following the colon in the above phosphors), this is to mean that the phosphor has at least one (but not necessarily all) of those dopant ions within the material. That is, as understood by those skilled in the art, this type of notation means that the phosphor can include any or all of those specified ions as dopants in the formulation. Further, it is to be understood that nanoparticles, quantum dots, semiconductor particles, and other types of materials can be used as wavelength converting materials. The list above is representative and should not be taken to include all the materials that may be utilized within embodiments described herein. A wavelength converting material may include one or more of any of the listed phosphors.
  • FIG. 13 is an exploded view of an LED lamp, according to some embodiments. The exploded view illustrates an LED lamp 1300 with an MR-16 type design. As shown, a finned heat sink 1302 is provided and one or more optical devices 150 (e.g., light source 142) can be positioned on the surface. Also shown in the exploded view is a cover member 140, the cover member having a mixture of wavelength converting materials distributed within the volume of the cover member. An LED lamp 1300 can comprise an insertable reflector 1304, and a protective lens 1301.
  • For embodiments powered by an external power source (e.g., a power source from outside the lamp), a housing 1306 is provided. As shown, the housing 1306 is configured to provide an electrical connection to an external power source. Further, such a housing comprises an interior void, suitable for containing electrical components (e.g., a driver), possibly disposed on a printed circuit board.
  • FIG. 14 is an illustration of an LED system 1400 comprising an LED lamp 1410, according to some embodiments. The LED system 1400 is powered by an AC power source 1402, to provide power to a rectifier module 1416 (e.g., a bridge rectifier) which in turn is configured to provide a rectified output to an array of radiation emitting devices (e.g., a first array of radiation emitting devices, a second array of radiation emitting devices) comprising a light source 142. A current monitor module 1405 is electrically coupled to the first array and second array of radiation emitting devices such that the current monitor module can determine a first current level associated with the first array of radiation emitting devices and a second current level associated with the second array of radiation emitting devices; and a signal compensating module 1414 electrically coupled to the current monitor module 1405, the signal compensating module being configured to generate a first compensation factor signal based on a difference between the first current level and a first reference current level. As shown, the rectifier module 1416 and the signal compensating module (and other components) are mounted to a printed circuit board 1403. Further, and as shown, the printed circuit board 1403 is electrically connected to a power pin 1415 mounted within a base member 151, and the base is mechanically coupled to a heat sink 152. The heat sink and base provide mechanical stability for an insertable reflector 1304.
  • FIG. 15 depicts a block diagram of a system to perform certain functions to fabricate an optical device. As shown, FIG. 15 implements fabrication of an optical device, comprising one or more steps for: preparing a submount having a surface (see module 1510); disposing a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 440 nm to about 500 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources (see module 1520); disposing a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, where a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength (see module 1530); providing a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm (see module 1540); providing a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm (see module 1550).
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 380 nm to about 470 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 650 nm; and a third wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the third wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 440 nm to about 490 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation source is characterized by a peak emission of about 420 nm to about 470 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the second plurality of radiation source is characterized by a peak emission of about 380 nm to about 430 nm.
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device further comprises encapsulating material overlaying the first plurality of radiation sources, the encapsulating material comprising silicone and/or epoxy material.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources comprises a light emitting diode (LED).
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the ratio of the number n to the number m (n:m) is greater than the ratio 1:2.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the total emission color characteristic of the optical device is substantially white color.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the ratio of the number n to the number m (n:m) is about 1:1.
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device further comprises a driving circuit configured to selectively power the first plurality of radiation.
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device further comprises driving circuit configured to tune to a ratio of energy being delivered to the first plurality of radiation sources and energy delivered to the second plurality of radiation sources.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources are arranged according to a predetermined pattern.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 380 nm to about 470 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface and arranged according to a predetermined pattern, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm; and a phosphor pattern overlaying the second plurality of radiation sources, the phosphor pattern being configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the phosphor pattern being arranged according to the predetermined pattern, the phosphor pattern having a wavelength emission ranging from about 440 nm to about 490 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the second plurality of radiation sources comprises LED devices.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the second wavelength is less than 420 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first wavelength converting layer is emits a red color.
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device further comprises a housing.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources are fabricated from gallium and nitrogen containing material.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources are fabricated from a bulk submount.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the ratio of the number n to the number m (n:m) is about 1:1.
  • In certain embodiments, an optical device further comprises driving circuit configured to tune to a ratio of energy being delivered to the first plurality of radiation sources and energy delivered to the second plurality of radiation sources.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources are arranged according to a predetermined pattern.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 440 nm to about 500 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; and a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation source is characterized by a peak emission of about 480 nm to about 500 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the second plurality of radiation source is characterized by a peak emission of about 380 nm to about 420 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources comprises a light emitting diode (LED).
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the ratio of the number n to the number m (n:m) is greater than the ratio 22:2.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the ratio of the number n to the number m (n:m) is about 10:1.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises driving circuit configured to tune to a ratio of energy being delivered to the first plurality of radiation sources and energy delivered to the second plurality of radiation sources.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device the first plurality of radiation sources and the second plurality of radiation sources are arranged according to a predetermined pattern.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength being greater than 590 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than 440 nm, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 440 nm to about 500 nm; and a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength being greater than 590 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength of about 440 nm to about 500 nm, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; and a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm.
  • In certain embodiments of an optical device, the optical device comprises: a submount having a surface; a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength being greater than 590 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources; a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength of about 440 nm to about 500 nm, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; and a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm.
  • In certain embodiments, a lamp comprises: a base, the base having at least one structural member to provide a mount point; and an optical device, disposed on the mount point, the optical device comprising: a first plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a first wavelength, the first wavelength having a range of about 440 nm to about 500 nm, the first plurality of radiation sources being positioned on the surface, the first plurality of radiation sources having n number of radiation sources a second plurality of radiation sources configured to emit radiation characterized by a second wavelength, the second wavelength being shorter than the first wavelength, the second plurality of radiation source being positioned on the surface, the second plurality of radiation sources having m number of radiation sources, a ratio between m and n being predetermined based on a selected wavelength; a first wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the first wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 590 nm to about 650 nm; and a second wavelength converting layer configured to absorb at least a portion of radiation emitted by the second plurality of radiation sources, the second wavelength converting layer having a wavelength emission ranging from about 490 nm to about 590 nm.
  • In one or more preferred embodiments, various pattern and/or arrangement for different radiation sources can be used. The above description and illustrations should not be taken as limiting the scope of the present disclosure, which is defined by the appended claims.

Claims (30)

What is claimed is:
1. A light-emitting system comprising:
at least one first light-emitting source configured to emit a first radiation, said first radiation being blue light having a first wavelength;
at least one second light-emitting source configured to emit a second radiation, said second radiation being violet light having a second wavelength shorter than said first wavelength;
one or more wavelength-converting materials disposed to absorb at least a portion of said first or second radiations, and configured to emit a converted radiation having one or more wavelengths longer than said first or second wavelengths such that said system emits emitted light comprising a blend of two or more of said first, second and converted radiations; and
at least one driving circuit for selectively powering said at least one first and second light-emitting sources to adjust said blend of said emitted light.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to be controlled to vary power to said at least one first light-emitting source and said at least one second light-emitting source, respectively.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to selectively brighten, dim, or turn off at least one of said at least one first light-emitting source or said at least one second light-emitting source based on a selected output of said emitted light.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to vary power to one of said at least one first light-emitting source or said at least one second light-emitting source, while maintaining power to the other of said at least one first light-emitting source or said at least one second light-emitting source.
5. The system of claim 1 wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to power said at least one first light-emitting source or said at least one second light-emitting source based on a ratio of power being delivered to said at least one first light-emitting source to power being delivered to said at least one second light-emitting source.
6. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to power said at least one first light-emitting source and said at least one second light-emitting source such that said emitted light has essentially a constant luminance.
7. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to power said at least one first light-emitting source and said at least one second light-emitting source such that said emitted light has a color rendering index which is maintained above a predetermined value.
8. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to power said at least one first light-emitting source and said at least one second light-emitting source such that said emitted light has a color rendering index and a luminance which are varied according to predetermined values.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one driving circuit is configured to power, selectively, said at least one first light-emitting source and said at least one second light-emitting source at predetermined times.
10. The system of claim 1 wherein said emitted light comprises a blend of only said first and converted radiations or a blend of only said second and converted radiations.
11. The system of claim 1 wherein said wavelength-converting material is disposed in patterned shapes.
12. The system of claim 11, further comprising more than one patterned shapes, wherein said patterned shapes are optically isolated from each other.
13. The system of claim 12, where said optical isolation is provided by optical elements.
14. The system of claim 13, wherein said optical elements are reflective elements disposed between said patterned shapes.
15. The system of claim 1, wherein said wavelength-converting materials include a first material substantially emitting light in a range of about 500 nm to about 600 nm and a second material substantially emitting light in a range of about 600 nm to about 700 nm.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein said at least one first light-emitting source comprises a plurality of said first light-emitting sources, or said at least one second light-emitting source comprises a plurality of second light-emitting sources, said first and second light-emitting sources being configured with said first and second materials in at least one of a first pattern or a second pattern, in said first pattern, a first portion of said first light-emitting sources is patterned with said first material and a second portion of said first light-emitting sources is patterned with said second material, said first and second portions being different, and, in said second pattern, a third portion of said second light-emitting sources is patterned with said first material and a fourth portion of said second light-emitting sources is patterned with said second material, said third and fourth portions being different.
17. The system of claim 1 further comprising at least one third light-emitting source configured to emit light having a third wavelength within a range of about 600 nm to 660 nm.
18. The system of claim 1, wherein said at least one first light-emitting source has a wavelength of 430 nm to about 490; and wherein said at least one second light-emitting source has a wavelength of greater than 405 nm.
19. The system of claim 1, further comprising an optical element configured to suppress a fraction of said emitted light in a predetermined wavelength range.
20. The system of claim 19, wherein said optical element is one or more of a light-absorbing element, a light-reflecting element, or a wavelength-converting element.
21. The system of claim 19, wherein said optical element is positioned to selectively suppress a fraction of said emitted light.
22. A light-emitting system comprising:
at least one blue light-emitting source;
at least one violet light-emitting source;
one or more phosphors to absorb at least a portion of light from at least one of said blue or violet light-emitting sources, and emit light of one or more different wavelengths; and
one or more drivers for selectively driving said at least one blue and violet light-emitting sources, said one or more drivers being configured to brighten or dim said at least one blue light-emitting source relative to said at least one violet light-emitting source, or to turn off said at least one blue light-emitting source while powering said at least one violet light-emitting source.
23. The system of claim 22, wherein said blue light-emitting source has a wavelength of 420 nm to about 490; and wherein said violet light-emitting source has a wavelength of 380 nm to about 430 nm.
24. A method of using a light-emitting device, said device comprising at least one blue light-emitting source, at least one violet light-emitting source, one or more phosphors to absorb at least a portion of light from at least one of said blue or violet light-emitting sources and emit light of one or more different wavelengths, and one or more drivers for selectively driving a first electrical power into said blue light-emitting source, and a second electrical power into said violet light-emitting sources, said method comprising:
selectively driving said blue and said violet light-emitting sources during a first period according to a first ratio of said first power to said second power; and
selectively driving said blue and said violet light-emitting source during a second period according to a second ratio of said first power to said second power;
wherein said first ratio is larger than said second ratio.
25. The method of claim 24, wherein said device emits essentially white light during said first and second periods.
26. The method of claim 24, wherein selectively driving said blue and said violet light-emitting sources during said second period comprises decreasing said first power relative to said second power to obtain said second ratio.
27. The method of claim 26, wherein said second power remains essentially the same for said first and second ratios.
28. A method of varying light output using a light-emitting device, said device comprising at least one blue light-emitting source, at least one violet light-emitting source, one or more phosphors, said device emitting light having an emitted spectral power distribution (SPD), said method comprising:
operating said light-emitting device during a first period such that a first fraction of said SPD is in a wavelength range of about 430 nm to 490 nm; and
operating said light-emitting device during a second period such that a second fraction of said SPD is in said wavelength range,
wherein said second fraction is less than said first fraction.
29. The method of claim 28, wherein said light-emitting device comprises one or more drivers for selectively driving said blue and violet light-emitting sources, and wherein operating said light-emitting device during said second period comprises diming said at least one blue emitting source relative to said at least one violet light-emitting source, or turning off said at least one blue light-emitting source while powering said at least one violet light-emitting source.
30. The method of claim 28, wherein said light-emitting device further comprises an optical element configured to suppress a fraction of said first wavelength, and wherein operating said light-emitting device during said second period comprises using said optical element to block a portion of said first wavelength.
US15/261,351 2010-02-03 2016-09-09 System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures Pending US20160377262A1 (en)

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US30119310P true 2010-02-03 2010-02-03
US35784910P true 2010-06-23 2010-06-23
US201061424562P true 2010-12-17 2010-12-17
US13/014,622 US20110182056A1 (en) 2010-06-23 2011-01-26 Quantum Dot Wavelength Conversion for Optical Devices Using Nonpolar or Semipolar Gallium Containing Materials
US13/019,897 US20110186874A1 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-02-02 White Light Apparatus and Method
US13/328,978 US8740413B1 (en) 2010-02-03 2011-12-16 System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures
US14/256,670 US8905588B2 (en) 2010-02-03 2014-04-18 System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures
US14/531,545 US10147850B1 (en) 2010-02-03 2014-11-03 System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures
US15/261,351 US20160377262A1 (en) 2010-02-03 2016-09-09 System and method for providing color light sources in proximity to predetermined wavelength conversion structures

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