US20160143379A1 - Glove having a widened cuff and with finger regions that include a flexible hinge region - Google Patents

Glove having a widened cuff and with finger regions that include a flexible hinge region Download PDF

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Publication number
US20160143379A1
US20160143379A1 US15/010,467 US201615010467A US2016143379A1 US 20160143379 A1 US20160143379 A1 US 20160143379A1 US 201615010467 A US201615010467 A US 201615010467A US 2016143379 A1 US2016143379 A1 US 2016143379A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
region
glove
finger
defined
wrist
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US15/010,467
Inventor
James L. Hull
Baskaran Govindasamy
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Summit Glove Inc
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Summit Glove Inc
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US13/947,652 priority Critical patent/US9380794B2/en
Priority to US13/947,423 priority patent/US20150020284A1/en
Priority to US14/490,821 priority patent/US20160081407A1/en
Priority to US14/490,951 priority patent/US9370209B2/en
Priority to US14/624,047 priority patent/US9888733B2/en
Priority to US201562181967P priority
Application filed by Summit Glove Inc filed Critical Summit Glove Inc
Priority to US15/010,467 priority patent/US20160143379A1/en
Assigned to SUMMIT GLOVE INC. reassignment SUMMIT GLOVE INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GOVINDASAMY, Baskaran, HULL, JAMES L.
Publication of US20160143379A1 publication Critical patent/US20160143379A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/0044Cuff portions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/0003Gloves with ambidextrous shape
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/0055Plastic or rubber gloves
    • A41D19/0058Three-dimensional gloves
    • A41D19/0062Three-dimensional gloves made of one layer of material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/04Appliances for making gloves; Measuring devices for glove-making
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D2400/00Functions or special features of garments
    • A41D2400/44Donning facilities
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D2400/00Functions or special features of garments
    • A41D2400/70Removability

Abstract

An ambidextrous or hand specific glove with a widened cuff area to aid in donning or doffing the glove is disclosed, together with a former for fabricating the glove and a method of fabricating the same. The glove may further include a bead on the cuff to resist tearing when the glove is put on or taken off. The glove may be fabricated on a continuous, automated chain machine or a batch or semi-batch machine. While the cuff region on the former for fabricating the glove is elliptical in cross-section and is flared, the region of the former on which the end of the glove is fabricated is circular in cross-section and thus allows the beading process to be successfully undertaken. The thumb region and finger regions of the glove may each be provided with a flexible hinge region that enables a user to more easily bend their thumb and fingers.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a Continuation-in-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/490,821 filed Sep. 19, 2014 entitled “Glove with a Widened Cuff Area”.
  • This application is a Continuation-in-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/490,951 filed Sep. 19, 2014 entitled “Method of Fabricating a Glove with a Widened Cuff Area”.
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 62/181,967 filed Jun. 19, 2015 entitled “Safety Glove with Reinforced Rubber Fingertip”.
  • This application is a Continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 14/624,047 filed Feb. 17, 2015 entitled “Protective Device for Use with a Glove” which in turn is a Continuation-in-Part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/947,423 filed Jul. 22, 2013 entitled “Protective Device for Use with a Glove”.
  • This application is a Continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/947,652 filed Jul. 22, 2013 entitled “Method and System for Tracking Glove Failure”.
  • The specifications of each and every one of these applications is incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Technical Field
  • This invention relates generally to gloves. More particularly, this invention relates to dipped unsupported gloves. Specifically, the invention is directed to an ambidextrous or hand specific glove with a widened cuff area to aid in donning or doffing the glove; the glove may further include a bead on the cuff to resist tearing and may be fabricated on a continuous, automated chain machine or a batch or semi-batch machine because while the cuff region on the former for the glove is elliptical in cross-section and flared, the region of the former on which the end of the glove is fabricated is circular in cross-section and thus allows the beading process to be successfully undertaken. The glove further includes a flexible hinge region on one or more of the digit regions to aid in bending the bending regions of the glove during use.
  • 2. Background Information
  • Gloves are required to be worn in many industries to protect the hands of the workers. Particular industries require gloves which are made of nitrile, polychloroprene, or latex and which extend for a distance along a worker's wrist and forearm. Because of the length of the glove and the material from which the glove is fabricated, which tends to conform to the shape of the workman's hands, it can be quite difficult for a workman to put the glove on and/or take the glove off without damaging the glove. Additionally, the materials used to fabricate gloves may make it quite difficult for the user to bend their fingers and thumb.
  • SUMMARY
  • There is therefore a need in the industry for a glove which is readily able to be put on and removed and which is less inclined to break or become damaged during this procedure. There is a further need in the art for a glove that allows a wearer to bend their fingers and thumb easily and helps to maintain tactile sensitivity.
  • In one aspect, the invention may provide a glove comprising a palm region; a digit region extending outwardly from a first end of the palm region; a wrist region extending outwardly from a second end of the palm region and generally in an opposite direction to the digit region; and an end of the wrist region comprising a cuff that is disposed a distance remote from the palm region; and wherein the wrist region gradually increases in width from a first width proximate the palm region to a second width proximate the cuff.
  • In another aspect, the glove may provide a palm region; a digit region extending outwardly from a first end of the palm region; a wrist region extending outwardly from a second end of the palm region and generally in an opposite direction to the digit region; and a bead provided at an end of the wrist region, wherein the bead is of a greater thickness than the rest of the wrist region; and wherein the glove is a hand specific glove that is fabricated on a substantially continuous automated chain machine.
  • In another aspect, the glove may provide a palm region; a digit region extending outwardly from a first end of the palm region; a wrist region extending outwardly from a second end of the palm region and generally in an opposite direction to the digit region; an end of the wrist region comprising a cuff that is disposed a distance remote from the palm region; and wherein the wrist region gradually increases in width from a first width proximate the palm region to a second width proximate the cuff; and a bead provided on the cuff, wherein the bead is of a greater thickness than the rest of the wrist region. This glove may be an ambidextrous glove or a hand-specific glove.
  • In another aspect, the invention may provide a former for fabricating a glove, wherein the former comprises a base; a wrist extending outwardly from the base; a palm extending outwardly from the wrist; a digit region extending outwardly from the palm and remote from the wrist; and wherein the wrist includes a first region that is of a first cross-sectional shape and a second region that is of a second cross-sectional shape. The first region of the former is generally elliptical in cross-sectional shape and the second region of the former is generally circular in cross-sectional shape.
  • In another aspect, the invention may provide a method of fabricating a glove comprising providing a former that includes a palm, a thumb and four digit regions extending outwardly from the palm in a first direction, and a wrist that extends outwardly from the palm in a second direction; and wherein the wrist includes a first region that gradually increases in width from the palm outwardly in the second direction; dipping the former into a vat of liquid material; removing the former from the liquid material; drying a quantity of liquid material which remains on the former so as to form the glove; and removing the glove from the former. The method may further include providing a former where the wrist further includes a second section which extends outwardly from the first section; and wherein the second section is of a constant width and the constant width of the second section is of a size equal to a widest portion of the first section. Still further, the invention may provide that the first section is generally elliptical in cross-sectional shape and the second region is generally circular in cross-sectional shape.
  • In another aspect the glove may provide a palm region; a digit region extending outwardly from a first end of the palm region; wherein the digit region includes a thumb region and one or more finger regions; a wrist region extending outwardly from a second end of the palm region and generally in an opposite direction to the digit region; an end of the wrist region comprising a cuff that is disposed a distance remote from the palm region; and wherein the wrist region gradually increases in width from a first width proximate the palm region to a second width proximate the cuff; and a hinge region defined in one or more of the thumb region and finger regions.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A sample embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the invention is set forth in the following description, is shown in the drawings and is particularly and distinctly pointed out and set forth in the appended claims.
  • FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a first embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of a second embodiment of the glove;
  • FIG. 3 is a front elevational view of a third embodiment of a glove;
  • FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of a former for fabricating the gloves of FIGS. 1, 2, and 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a cross-section of the former taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4;
  • FIG. 6 is a cross-section of the former taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 4;
  • FIG. 6A is a front elevational view of the glove of FIG. 2 shown on the former of FIG. 4 and with the cuff of the glove in an initial position;
  • FIG. 6B is a front elevational view of the glove on the former showing the bottom edge of the cuff being rolled upwardly to form the bead;
  • FIG. 7 is a front elevational view of a fourth embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the present invention;
  • FIG. 8 is a front elevational view of a former for fabricating the glove of FIG. 7;
  • FIG. 9 is a cross-section of the former taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8;
  • FIG. 10 is a cross-section of the former taken along line 10-10 of FIG. 8;
  • FIG. 11 is an illustrative drawing of a method of manufacturing a glove in accordance with aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 12 is a front elevational view of a fifth embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the invention;
  • FIG. 13 is a cross-section through a finger region taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12 showing a hinge region formed in a portion of the circumference of the finger region;
  • FIG. 14 is a cross-section taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12 showing an alternative hinge region formed in the entire circumference of the finger region;
  • FIG. 15 is a cross-section taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12 showing the hinge region of FIG. 13 along with a flocking material or liner provided in the interior of the glove;
  • FIG. 16 is a cross-section taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12 showing a hinge region that is free of elastomeric bands;
  • FIG. 17 is a cross-section taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12 showing an alternative construction of the hinge region into first and second hinge regions that are separated from each other by a smooth zone;
  • FIG. 18 is a front elevational view of a sixth embodiment of an ambidextrous glove in accordance with an aspect of the present invention showing a widened cuff with a rolled rim and thumb and finger regions that include flexible hinge regions; and
  • FIG. 19 is a rear elevational view of a seventh embodiment of the glove.
  • Similar numbers refer to similar parts throughout the drawings
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 shows a glove 10 worn on an arm 12 of a workman. Glove 10 may be fabricated from nitrile or latex or any other material which causes glove 10 to generally conform to a hand of a person wearing glove. Glove 10 includes a digit region extending out from a first end of a palm region 16 generally in a first direction. The digit region includes a thumb region 14, an index finger region 18, a middle finger region 20, a ring finger region 22, and a little finger region 24. Glove 10 is an ambidextrous glove. This means that glove 10 may be readily worn on either of the left hand or the right hand. Because glove 10 is an ambidextrous glove, thumb region 14, index finger region 18, middle finger region 20, ring finger region 22, and little finger region 24 are all aligned along a common axis. In other words, if glove 10 is viewed from the side, all of the thumb region 14, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions 18, 20, 22, 24 will be located in the same plane.
  • A wrist and forearm region 26 (hereafter referred to as the wrist region) extends outwardly from a second end of palm region 16 and in generally the opposite direction to the digit region. Wrist region 26 terminates in an end region which will be further referred to herein as a cuff 28. Cuff 28 is disposed a distance remote from palm region 216. Although not illustrated herein, it will be understood that cuff 28 defines an opening into which the workman will be able to insert his or her hand. It will further be understood that wrist region 26 may be of a variety of different lengths as measured between a bottom end of palm region 16 and cuff. Thus, glove 10 may terminate closer to a workman's wrist or closer to the workman's elbow.
  • Wrist region 26 includes a first section that is located adjacent palm region 16 and a second section that extends outwardly from first section and is located further away from palm region 16. The second section includes cuff 28. Wrist region 26 gradually increases in width moving away from palm region 16 and towards cuff 28. Proximate palm region 16, wrist region 26 is of a first width “W1” and wrist region 26 gradually increases to a second width “W2”. Thus, wrist region 26 is narrowest proximate palm region 216 and is widest a distance remote therefrom. Wrist region 26 may include a first section which gradually increases in width to the widest width “W2”, and a second section which extends outwardly from the first section and is of a constant width “W2”. This increase in width makes it easier for the workman to put glove 10 on and to take glove 10 off. Width “W1” is of such a size that the first section of wrist region 16 is generally in abutting contact with the wearer's wrist and first portion of the wearer's forearm. Width “W2” is of such as a size that second section of wrist region 16 is spaced a distance away from the wearer's forearm 12 and is generally free of contact therewith. Consequently, a gap 27 will be created between the wearer's forearm 12 and the material of the glove 10. It is therefore easier for the wearer to insert a finger or thumb of the other hand into that gap 27 in order to grasp the material of glove 10 in order to pull glove 10 onto their hand or to pull glove off of their hand.
  • FIG. 1 shows that wrist region 26 gradually increases in width from proximate palm region 216 to proximate cuff 28. So, the width of cuff 28 is the second width “W2”. FIG. 2 shows a second embodiment of the ambidextrous glove 10 where the first section of wrist region 26 gradually increases in width from the first width “W1” to the second width “W2”. Second section of wrist region 26 starts where wrist region is of the second width “W2” and the second section terminates at cuff 28. However, from where wrist region 26 initially reaches the second width “W2” to the point where wrist region 26 terminates in cuff 28, the second section of wrist region 26 is of a substantially constant width, namely second width “W2”.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a third embodiment of the ambidextrous glove 10. In this embodiment, the second section of the wrist region 26 of glove 10 is rolled to form a bead 30. Bead 30 extends around the entire rim of cuff 28 and comprises a rolled and therefore thickened region which serves to strengthen cuff 28. Bead 30 is thicker than the rest of wrist section and this thicker and stronger bead 30 aids in resisting tears in cuff 28 and therefore wrist region 26 as glove 10 is pulled on or taken off.
  • In each of the first, second, and third embodiments of the glove 10, at least a portion of glove 10 will conform to the hand of the wearer. The portions of the glove 10 which will tend to conform to the hand of the wearer may include the thumb region 14, index finger region 18, middle finger region 20, ring finger region 22, little finger region 24, palm region 16, and at least part of the first section of wrist region 26. In these aforementioned locations, an interior surface of glove 10 will abut or be positioned adjacent the wearer's skin. The rest of glove 10, namely the parts of first section of wrist region 26 which are of a width that is greater than the wrist or forearm 12 of the wearer, will be spaced a distance away from the wearer's skin.
  • FIG. 4 shows a former 32 used for fabricating glove 10. Former 32 includes a base 34 which is secured in any one of a known manner to a batch machine, a semi-batch machine or a substantially continuous automated chain machine that is used for fabricating gloves. The batch machine, semi-batch machine and the automated chain machine are well known in the art and therefore will not be described further herein.
  • Former 32 includes a thumb 36 and four digits which extend outwardly from a palm 38. The digits include an index finger 40, a middle finger 42, a ring finger 44, and a little finger 46. A wrist and forearm (hereafter wrist) 48 extend between palm 38 and the base 34. Since former 32 is utilized for fabricating ambidextrous gloves, such as glove 10, thumb 36 and the index, middle, ring and little fingers 40, 42, 44, and 46 are all positioned so that they are aligned along a common axis. In other words, if viewed from the side, all of the thumb 36, the index, middle, ring, and little fingers 40, 42, 44, 46 will be located in the same plane.
  • Wrist 48 includes a first section 48 a that increases in width from a width “W1” to a width “W2”. The narrower width “W1” is provided adjacent palm 38 and the wrist 48 increases in width to width “W2” some distance from palm 38. That distance “L” may be varied in accordance with the overall length of glove 10 to be fabricated on former 32. So length “L” will be smaller if glove 10 will terminate proximate the workman's wrist and will be substantially longer if glove 10 is to terminate proximate the workman's elbow.
  • Wrist 48 further includes a second section 48 b that extends outwardly from one end of first section 48 a and is of a constant width. That constant width is of the same magnitude as the widest portion of first section 48 a. The width of second section 48 b is therefore “W2”. First and second regions 48 a, 48 b are different in another way and this can best be seen in FIGS. 5 and 6. First section 48 a is generally elliptical (FIG. 5) in cross-sectional shape while second section 48 b is generally circular (FIG. 6) in cross-sectional shape. This difference in cross-sectional shape makes it possible for former 32 to be engaged on a substantially continuous automated chain machine so that bead 30 may be readily and easily fabricated.
  • Previously known formers have wrists which are generally elliptical in shape along their entire length from the palm of the former to the base thereof. Thus, when gloves are fabricated on the previously known formers, it is difficult to generate a bead on the glove cuff because the elliptical shape causes the material of the glove to flap around and roll unevenly. This made it difficult for manufacturers using previously known formers to create a consistent product and, consequently, automated chain machines or batch machines could not be used to fabricate gloves which include a rolled cuff.
  • It has been recognized by the inventor that fabricating a former 32 to include a second section 48 b which is not of an elliptical cross-sectional shape but is instead of a circular cross-sectional shape, such as is illustrated in FIG. 6, makes it possible for the former 32 to be utilized in a substantially continuous automated chain machine or a batch machine or a semi-batch machine, in order to fabricate gloves 10, particularly gloves with a bead 30 on cuff 28.
  • During fabrication of glove 10, as illustrated in FIG. 6A, former 32 is dipped into vats of a material such as nitrile or latex so that glove 10 is ultimately formed on former. In the version of glove 10 illustrated in FIG. 6A, wrist region 26 is elongated and includes a first section 26 a that progressively widens outwardly from adjacent proximate palm region 16 to a distance remote therefrom. First section 26 a is formed on first section 48 a of former 32. Wrist region 26 further includes a second section 26 b that is of a substantially constant width, with that width being equivalent to the widest part of first section 26 a. Second section 26 b is formed on second section 48 b of former 32. At this point, glove 10 could be removed from former 32 and would be suitable for a workman to use as the cuff 28 and wrist region 26 are widened so that glove 10 is easy to put on and take off.
  • However, a bead 30 may, instead, be fabricated on second section 26 b. FIG. 6B shows how this is done. Former 32 is positioned so that spaced apart opposed rollers 50, 52 are brought into contact with the peripheral wall of second section 48 b of wrist region 48 of former 32. Rollers 50, 52 are caused to rotate in opposite directions “A” and “B” relative to each other. Additionally, rollers 50, 52 are moved in a direction “C” away from base 34 or former 32 is moved in the direction “C”. Rollers 50, 52 are initially placed in contact with second section 48 b of former 32 and then are gradually brought into contact with second section 26 b of glove 10. This combination of motion in addition to the contact of rollers 50, 52 with second section 26 b causes rollers 50, 52 to roll up a length of the material of second section 26 b, thereby gradually forming bead 30.
  • FIG. 7 shows a fourth embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the invention. Glove 110 is a hand-specific glove as opposed to ambidextrous glove 10 shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In particular, glove 110 is shaped to be worn on a workman's left hand. A glove to be worn on the workman's right hand will be a mirror image of glove 110. Glove 110 may be fabricated out of nitrile or latex or any other material which causes glove 10 to generally conform to a hand of a person wearing glove.
  • Glove 110 includes a digit region which extends outwardly generally in a first direction from a palm region 116. The digit region includes a thumb region 114, an index finger region 118, a middle finger region 120, a ring finger region 122, and a little finger region 124. Because glove 110 is a hand-specific glove, the index finger region 118, middle finger region 120, ring finger region 122, and little finger region 124, are all aligned along a common axis. In other words, when glove 110 is viewed from the side, four of the digits, namely the index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions 118, 120, 122, and 124 are all located in the same plane. However, unlike glove 10, the thumb region 114 of glove 110 is offset from that common axis or, when viewed from the side, thumb region 114 can be seen to be located in a different plane from the rest of the digits.
  • A wrist and forearm region 126 (hereafter referred to as the wrist region) extends outwardly from a second end of palm region 116 in the opposite direction to the digit region. Wrist region 126 terminates in a cuff 128. Although not illustrated herein, it will be understood that cuff 128 defines an opening into which the workman will be able to insert his or her hand. It will further be understood that wrist region 126 may be of a variety of different lengths as measured between a bottom end of palm region 116 and cuff 128. Thus, glove 110 may terminate closer to a workman's wrist or closer to the workman's elbow.
  • Cuff 128 includes a bead 130. Bead 130 extends around the entire rim of cuff 128 and comprises a rolled and thickened region which strengthens cuff 128. Bead 130 is thicker than the rest of wrist region 126. This thicker and stronger bead 130 aids in resisting tears in cuff 128 as glove 110 is pulled on or taken off. Bead 130 is fabricated in the same manner as bead 30 on glove 10. Thus, the hand-specific glove 110 shown in FIG. 7 may include a bead and be fabricated by a substantially continuous automated chain machine, or a batch machine, or a semi-batch machine as has been described previously herein with reference to glove 10.
  • In glove 110, thumb region 136, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions 140, 142, 144, 146, palm region 138 and a first section of wrist region 148 adjacent palm region 138 may be designed to conform to the shape of the wearer's hand and wrist. Thus, these regions of glove 110 tend to be in abutting contact with the wearer's hand and wrist. Wrist region 126 may widen as one moves away from palm region 116 and toward cuff 128. Thus, proximate palm region 116, wrist region 126 may be of a first width “W1” and proximate cuff 128, wrist region 126 may be of a second width “W2”. Width “W2” is greater than width “W1”. Width “W1” may cause the first section of wrist region 126 to come into abutting contact with the skin on wearer's wrist. Width “W2” is greater than the width of the wearer's forearm and, consequently a gap 127 is created between the skin on the wearer's forearm and the interior surface of glove 132. This increase in width or the gap 127 makes it easier for the workman to put glove 110 on and to take glove 110 off.
  • FIG. 8 shows a former 132 used for fabricating hand-specific glove 110. Former 132 includes a base 134 which is secured in any one of a known manner to a batch machine, a semi-batch machine or an automated chain machine that is used for fabricating gloves. Former 132 includes a thumb 136 and four digits which extend outwardly from a palm 138. The digits include an index finger 140, a middle finger 142, a ring finger 144, and a little finger 146. A wrist and forearm (hereafter wrist) 148 extend between palm 138 and the base 134. Index finger 140, middle finger 142, ring finger 144 and little finger 146 are all aligned along a common axis or, when viewed from the side, all of these aforementioned components are positioned in the same plane. Thumb region 136 is offset from common axis or, when viewed from the side, thumb region 136 can be seen to be positioned in a different plane relative to the other digits.
  • Wrist 148 may include a first region 148 a that increases in width from a width “W1” to a width “W2”. The narrower width “W1” is provided adjacent palm 138 and the wrist 48 increases in width to width “W2” some distance “L” from palm 138. That distance “L” may be varied in accordance with the overall length of glove 110 to be fabricated on former 132. So length “L” will be smaller if glove 110 will terminate proximate the workman's wrist and will be substantially longer if glove 110 is to terminate proximate the workman's elbow.
  • Wrist 148 may further include a second region 148 b that extends outwardly from one end of first region 148 a of wrist 148 and is of a constant width. That constant width is of the same size as the widest portion of first region 148 a. The width of second region 148 b is therefore “W2”. First and second regions 148 a, 148 b are different in another way and this can best be seen in FIGS. 9 and 10. First region 148 a is generally elliptical in cross-section shape while second region 148 b is generally circular in cross-sectional shape. This difference in shape makes it possible for former 132 to be engaged on a substantially continuous or continuous automated chain machine so that bead 130 may be readily and easily fabricated as has been described above with reference to glove 10. In particular, it is the second region 148 b of wrist 148 that is contacted by appropriate machinery and is rolled to form bead 130.
  • Referring now to FIG. 11, a method of fabricating a glove comprises:
  • providing a former 32 that includes a palm 38, a thumb 36 and four digit regions 40, 42, 44, 46 extending outwardly from palm 38 in a first direction, and a wrist 48 that extends outwardly from palm 38 in a second direction; and wherein wrist 48 includes a first region 48 that gradually increases in width from palm 38 outwardly in the second direction, i.e., the first region 48 a flares outwardly;
    • A. dipping former 32 into a vat 70 of liquid material 72, such as nitrile or latex;
    • B. removing former 32 from liquid material 72;
    • C. drying a quantity of liquid material 72 a which remains on former 32 so as to form the glove 10; and
    • D. removing glove 10 from former 32.
  • The step A. above of dipping former 32 may further include the step of engaging former 32 in a substantially continuous automated chain machine, a batch machine or a semi-batch machine. The selected one of the machines is represented in FIG. 11 by box 74. Former 32 is then dipped into the vat 70 which forms part of the selected machine 74.
  • The method may further include providing former 32 where the wrist 48 further includes a second section 48 b which extends outwardly from the first section 48 a; and wherein second section 48 b is of a constant width and the constant width of second section 48 b is of a size equal to a widest portion of the first section 48 a.
  • Additionally, the step A. of dipping includes dipping former 32 into vat 70 of liquid material 72 to a depth that both of the first and second sections 48 a, 48 b of wrist 48 on of former 32 will extend into the liquid material 72. The step of providing the former may further include providing the former where the first section 48 a is generally elliptical in cross-sectional shape; and the second section 48 b is generally circular in cross-sectional shape.
  • The method may further include forming a bead 30 at an end of the glove 10. This is accomplished by passing former 32 between two opposed rollers 50, 52 which rotate in opposite directions “A” and “B” relative to each other. Rollers 50, 52 or former 32 are moved in a direction “C” that will cause the rollers 50, 52 to ride along a length of second section 48 b of former 32. This means that the rollers move from a region of the second section 48 b that is free of drying liquid material 72 a to a section that includes a quantity of drying liquid material 72 a. Rollers 50, 52 move along the section that includes the quantity of drying liquid material 72 a to cause that drying liquid material to roll into the bead 30 which extends around a circumference of the former 32 and of glove 10. Finally, the method includes blowing a puff of air 76 into glove 10 while on former 32 in order to remove glove 10 from former 32.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 12 and 13, there is shown a front elevational view of a fifth embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the present invention, where the glove is generally indicated at 210. Glove 210 is an ambidextrous glove as opposed to a hand-specific glove. Glove 210 may be fabricated out of nitrile or latex or any other material which causes glove 210 to generally conform to a hand of a person wearing glove.
  • Glove 210 includes a digit region which extends outwardly generally in a first direction from a palm region 216. The digit region includes a thumb region 214, an index finger region 218, a middle finger region 220, a ring finger region 222, and a little finger region 224 that extend upwardly and outwardly from an upper end of palm region 216. Thumb region 214, index finger region 218, middle finger region 220, ring finger region 222, and little finger region 224, are all aligned along a common plane or axis. In other words, when glove 110 is viewed from the side, the thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions 214, 218, 220, 222, and 224 are all located in the same plane. A wrist and forearm region 226 (hereafter referred to as the wrist region) extends outwardly from a second end of palm region 216 in the opposite direction to the digit region. Wrist region 226 terminates in a lowermost end 228. Although not illustrated herein, it will be understood that lowermost end 228 defines an opening into which the workman will be able to insert his or her hand. It will further be understood that wrist region 226 may be of a variety of different lengths as measured between a bottom end of palm region 216 and lowermost end 228. Thus, glove 210 may terminate closer to a workman's wrist or closer to the workman's elbow.
  • In glove 210, thumb region 214, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions 218, 220, 222, 224, palm region 216 and a first section of wrist region 226 adjacent palm region 216 may be designed to conform to the shape of the wearer's hand and wrist. Thus, these regions of glove 210 tend to be in abutting contact with the wearer's hand and wrist. Wrist region 226 flares or widens outwardly as one moves away from palm region 216 and toward lowermost end 228. Thus, proximate palm region 216, wrist region 226 may be of a first width “W1” and proximate lowermost end 228, wrist region 226 may be of a second width “W2”. Width “W2” is greater than width “W1”. Width “W1” may cause the first section of wrist region 226 to come into abutting contact with the skin on wearer's wrist. Width “W2” is greater than the width of the wearer's forearm and, consequently a gap 227 may be created between the skin on the wearer's forearm and the interior surface of the glove at lowermost end 228. The gap 227 originates some distance upwardly from lowermost end 228 when glove 210 is worn. This increase in width or the gap 227 makes it easier for the workman to put glove 210 on and to take glove 210 off.
  • Glove 210 may be provided with a flexible hinge region 260 on one or more of the thumb region 214, index finger region 218, middle finger region 220, ring finger region 222 and/or little finger region 224. Each of the finger regions 218-224 and thumb region 214 may be similarly configured so as to be able to readily grip the user's finger or thumb while still being able to flex and bend easily. The following description will focus on little finger region 224 but it will be understood that the description applies equally to each of the thumb region 214 and index, middle and ring finger regions 218, 220 and 222.
  • Referring to FIGS. 12 and 13, little finger region 224 comprises a generally cylindrical peripheral wall 230 which is generally circular to elliptical in cross-sectional shape. Peripheral wall 230 bounds and defines an interior cavity 232 into which the user's little finger will be received. The user's little finger will include an upper knuckle that is disposed a short distance downwardly from a tip 224 a of little finger region 224. The user's little finger will further include a lower knuckle that will be positioned generally midway between tip 224 a and palm region 216. Peripheral wall 230 has a front surface 230 a and a back surface 230 b. Each of the front and back surfaces 230 a, 230 b may be generally C-shaped in cross-section. Front surface 230 a is configured to be disposed adjacent a front surface of the user's little finger and along a front portion of each of the left and right sides of the little finger. Back surface 230 b is configured to be disposed adjacent the rear surface of the user's little finger and adjacent a rear portion of each of the left and right sides thereof.
  • Still referring to FIGS. 12 and 13, rear surface 230 b of little finger region 224 is provided with a hinge region 260 therein. Hinge region 260 is provided to grippingly engage the rear surface of the user's little finger as will be hereafter described. Hinge region 260 originates a distance “D1” from tip 224 a of little finger region 224 and terminates a distance “D2” from palm region 216. Hinge region 260 may be longitudinally sufficiently long enough to extend from adjacent an upper region of the upper knuckle on the user's little finger to adjacent a lower region of the user's lower knuckle on their little finger. FIG. 13 shows the little finger region 224 in a curved position and the overall length of hinge region 260 is indicated by the reference character “L”. Length “L” is approximately two-thirds to three-quarters of the total length of little finger region 224, where the total length is measured from tip 224 a to palm region 216. Thus, hinge region 260 extends for the majority of the length of little finger region 224. The area of little finger region 224 between tip 224 a and the uppermost end of hinge region 260 will be located adjacent the user's fingernail. Thus, when glove 210 is worn on a user's hand, hinge region 260 will grippingly engage substantially the entire length of the flesh portion of the back surface of the user's little finger.
  • Hinge region 260 may comprise one or more folds 262 formed in the material used to fabricate glove 210 and a plurality of elastomeric bands 264 that are provided on the interior surface of little finger region 224. Adjacent folds 262 are separated from each other by a shallow trough 266. Each band 264 is seated in one of the folds 262 and projects for a distance into cavity 232. Each band 264 may be generally C-shaped when little finger region 224 is viewed in cross-section. Little finger region 224 has a longitudinal axis “Y” (FIG. 13) which extends from tip 224 a to palm region 216. (It will be understood that each of the thumb region 214 and other finger regions 220, 222, 224 has such a longitudinal axis extending from the tip of the respective thumb or finger region to palm region 216.) Each fold 262 and each band 264 may be disposed generally at right angles to this longitudinal axis. Each fold 262 and each band 264 may extend around about one half of the circumference of peripheral wall 230, i.e., about one half of the circumference of little finger region 224 when viewed in cross-section.) Alternatively, each fold 262 and each band 264 may extend around less than one half of the circumference of peripheral wall 230 or around more than one half of the circumference of peripheral wall. Still further, each fold 262 and each band 264 may extend around the entire circumference of the peripheral wall (FIG. 14). An interior surface of each band 264 is located in cavity 32 and is positioned for contact with the rear surface and a rear portion of each of the left and right sides of the user's little finger.
  • FIG. 13 shows that front surface 230 a of little finger region 224 is substantially smooth along the entire length thereof, where the length is measured from tip 224 a to palm region 216. A region of front surface 230 a opposed to hinge region 260 comprises a smooth zone that is free of elastomeric bands 264. The interior surface of this smooth zone will be positioned adjacent the front surface of the user's little finger when received in cavity 232.
  • When the user bends their little finger each fold 262 and 264 of hinge region 260 stretches longitudinally and becomes generally flattened, thus increasing the overall length of each fold 262 and associated band 264 (where that length is measured from one trough 266 to the adjacent trough 266) and thereby increasing the overall length of hinge region 260. Additionally, the curvature of each trough 240 is also flattened out. This overall increased length of hinge region 260 is longer than the length “L” (FIG. 13). Thus, when the user's little finger is bent, a greater surface area of hinge region 260 contacts the back surface of little finger, thereby increasing the gripping engagement therewith. The increased length of hinge region 260 also tends to reduce any resistance in glove 210 against the bending motion. This expanded state of hinge region 260 allows the little finger to bend easily at both knuckles while maintaining gripping contact with the back surface and parts of the sides of the user's little finger. When the user moves their finger from the bent position back to a straight position, the length of each fold 262 and associated band 264 is decreased. Because of the resilience of band 264, each fold 262 and the associated band 264 tend to return to their original unstretched position and length.
  • At the same time, the smooth zone on front surface 230 a becomes slightly wrinkled by the bending the user's little finger. FIG. 13 shows the original length of the smooth zone as being of a size “L1”. When the user's little finger is bent at both upper and lower knuckles, the overall length of the smooth zone is reduced in size to less than “L1”. Because bands 264 terminate a distance away from the smooth zone and generally away from the front portions of the sides of little finger region 224, there is substantially no excess build-up of the material of little finger region 224 as the user's little finger bends. Thus, the bending of the user's little finger tends not to be hampered. Additionally, because only front surface 230 a separates the user's little finger from objects gripped in the hand, the tactile sensitivity of the user's little finger is preserved. Still further, the provision of bands 264 only in hinge region 260 along back surface 230 b tends to create a pulling force on the sides of little finger region 224 and on the smooth zone thereof. This pulling force increases when the user's little finger is bent and this aids in keeping the material of the smooth zone in close contact with the front of user's little finger, thereby further preserving the tactile sensitivity of the user's finger even as glove 210 tends to stretch over a long period of use.
  • In thumb region 214, the hinge region 260 will tend to originate in a region that will be disposed adjacent a bottom end of the nail on the user's thumb and will terminate proximate palm region 216. In other words, hinge region 260 on thumb region 214 will extend for approximate two-thirds to three-quarters of the length of thumb region 214. Hinge region 260 furthermore will include a plurality of folds 262 and bands 264 which grippingly engage the back of the user's thumb (not shown) and rear portions of the sides thereof. Thumb region 214 will further include a smooth zone that is disposed opposite hinge region 260 and will abut the front of the user's thumb. Thus, the hinge region 260 will function in substantially the same manner in thumb region 214 as it does in finger regions 218-224.
  • FIG. 14, as indicated above, shows a little finger region 224 in which the folds 262, elastomeric bands 264 and troughs 266 all extend substantially around the entire circumference of the little finger region 224.
  • FIG. 15 shows an alternative construction of glove 210 in which a liner 270 is provided adjacent an interior surface of the some or all of glove 210. Liner 270 is illustrated as being located inwardly of the interior surfaces of folds 262, bands 264, and troughs 266. Liner 270 may be fabricated from any of a number of materials such as cotton. Liner 270 may also comprise a flocking material that is applied to the interior surface of glove 210. The flocking may be comprised of any material such as rayon. This flocking, particularly rayon flocking, may provide a mechanism for soaking up perspiration during use of the glove. Any other materials may be used as flocking or a lining and which will make the gloves more comfortable to wear.
  • FIG. 16 shows another alternative construction of glove 210. In this instance little finger region 224 is provided with folds 262 and troughs 266 but no elastomeric bands 264. FIG. 16 shows a construction in which folds 262 and troughs 266 extend only partially around the circumference of little finger region 224. It will be understood that these folds and troughs could instead extend around the entire circumference of little finger region 224. It will further be understood that flocking or some other liner could be applied on the interior surface of little finger region 224 and some or all of the rest of glove 210.
  • FIG. 17 shows yet another alternative construction of glove 210. In this instance little finger region 224 includes a first hinge region 260 a and a second hinge region 260 b that are spaced from each other by a smooth zone 268. First and second hinge regions 260 a, 260 b are positioned to be located adjacent the user's little finger's first and second knuckles respectively. The smooth zone 268 will be positioned in that part of the user's little finger that extends between their first and second knuckles. It will be understood that first and second hinge regions 260 a, 260 b may include folds 262, bands 264 and troughs 266 and these components may extend around only a part of the circumference of little finger region 224 or around the entire circumference thereof. Still further, first and second hinge regions 260 a, 260 b may be comprised only of folds 262 and troughs 266. Furthermore, flocking or some other type of lining may be applied to the interior surface of glove 210 including little finger region 224 whether elastomeric bands 264 are present or not and irrespective of whether the hinge regions 260 a, 260 b extend partially or entirely around the circumference of little finger region 260.
  • It will further be understood that hinge region 260 or first and second hinge regions 260 a, 260 b may include zones that include elastomeric bands 264 and other zones that are free of elastomeric bands 264.
  • FIG. 18 is a front elevational view of a sixth embodiment of an ambidextrous glove in accordance with an aspect of the present invention generally indicated at 310. Glove 310 extends downwardly for a distance along a user's wrist and forearm 312. Glove 310 includes a thumb region 314, a palm region 316, an index finger region 318, middle finger region 320, ring finger region 322 and a little finger region 324. Glove 310 further includes a wrist region 326 and a rolled cuff 328. Wrist region 326 is of a width “W1” proximate palm region 316 and is of a wider width “W2” proximate rolled cuff 328. Glove 310 is substantially identical in structure to the glove 10 shown in FIGS. 2-6 and is fabricated in substantially the same way. Glove 310 differs from glove 10 in that the thumb region 314 and finger regions 318-324 include hinge regions 360 that are substantially identical to any of the hinge regions 260 described and illustrated with reference to FIGS. 12-17. Glove 310 may also be provided with flocking or some other type of lining in its interior.
  • FIG. 19 is a rear elevational view of a seventh embodiment of a glove in accordance with an aspect of the present invention, generally indicated at 410. Glove 410 is designed to extend for a greater or lesser distance along the user's wrist and forearm 412. Glove 410 includes a thumb region 414, a palm region 416, an index finger region 418, middle finger region 420, ring finger region 422 and a little finger region 424. Glove 410 further includes a wrist region 426 and a rolled cuff 428. Wrist region 426 is of a width “W1” proximate palm region 416 and is of a wider width “W2” proximate rolled cuff 428. Glove 410 is substantially identical in structure to the glove 310 shown in FIG. 18 except in this instance the glove is a hand-specific glove. One or all of the thumb region 414 and finger regions 418-424 include hinge regions 460 that are substantially identical to any of the hinge regions 260 described and illustrated with reference to FIGS. 12-17. Glove 310 may also be provided with flocking or some other type of lining in its interior.
  • Any of the gloves described herein may also be provided with a texture or patterning on some or all of the exterior surface of the glove. A suitable texturing material could include a sand-type texturing material applied to the exterior surface or roughness or wrinkles or micro-texturing undulations formed in the surface. Suitable texturing patterns include but are not limited to a diamond pattern, a fan-shaped pattern, a fish-scale pattern, a honeycomb pattern, a pattern resembling pebbles, and a zig-zag pattern. The patterning or texturing material may be provided only on gripping surfaces of the glove, i.e., surfaces that will be involved when a user grips an object while wearing the glove. The patterning may include raised shapes that project for a distance outwardly from the exterior surface or may simply be flush with the exterior surface or formed therein.
  • Any of the aforementioned gloves may also include reinforced materials provided at the fingertips of the digit regions and thumb region and/or reinforcing provided in the thumb crotch i.e., in a section of the palm region positioned between the index finger region and thumb region. Still further, any of the aforementioned gloves may be fabricated from colored materials so that if parts of the glove break off during use then those broken parts of the glove may be more readily located and removed from foodstuffs and other products during the processing of which the gloves are worn.
  • In the foregoing description, certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness, and understanding. No unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirement of the prior art because such terms are used for descriptive purposes and are intended to be broadly construed. Moreover, the description and illustration set out herein are an example not limited to the exact details shown or described.

Claims (25)

1. A glove comprising:
a palm region;
a digit region extending outwardly from a first end of the palm region;
wherein the digit region includes a thumb region and one or more finger regions;
a wrist region extending outwardly from a second end of the palm region and generally in an opposite direction to the digit region;
an end of the wrist region comprising a cuff that is disposed a distance remote from the palm region; and wherein the wrist region gradually increases in width from a first width proximate the palm region to a second width proximate the cuff; and
a hinge region defined in one or more of the thumb region and finger regions.
2. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the hinge region includes one or more folds defined in the one or more of the thumb region and finger regions.
3. The glove as defined in claim 2, wherein the thumb region and the finger regions each have a longitudinal axis extending from a tip of the thumb region or the finger region to the palm region, and the one or more folds are oriented generally at right angles to the longitudinal axis.4.
4. The glove as defined in claim 2, wherein the thumb region and the finger regions each have a circumference; and the one or more folds extend partially around the circumference.
5. The glove as defined in claim 4, wherein the one or more folds extend for less than have of the circumference of the thumb region or finger region.
6. The glove as defined in claim 4, wherein the thumb region and the finger regions each have a circumference; and the one or more folds extend entirely around the circumference.
7. The glove as defined in claim 1, further comprising flocking or a lining provided on an interior surface of some or all of the digit regions, palm region, and wrist region of the glove.
8. The glove as defined in claim 2, further comprising an elastomeric band seated within at least some of the one or more folds.
9. The glove as defined in claim 1, further comprising:
a second hinge region provided in one or more of the thumb region and the finger regions of the glove; wherein the second hinge region is spaced a distance longitudinally away from the hinge region; and
a smooth zone provided in the glove between the hinge region and second hinge region; wherein the smooth zone is free of any folds.
10. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the hinge region includes at least two folds and a trough located between the two folds.
11. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the hinge region is defined in only a back surface of one or more of the thumb region and finger regions of the glove; wherein the hinge region originates a distance away from an upper end of the palm region; and wherein the hinge region comprises at least two folds having a gripping surface adapted to grip a back of the user's digit received in the one of the thumb or finger regions; and the at least two folds are disposed generally at right angles to a longitudinal axis where the longitudinal axis extends from a tip of the thumb or finger region to the palm region.
12. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the hinge region is generally C-shaped in cross-section.
13. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein each of the thumb region and finger regions has a length defined between a tip thereof and an upper end of the palm region of the glove; and wherein the hinge region extends for approximately two-thirds to three-quarters of the length.
14. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the thumb region and finger regions each define an interior cavity into which one of the user's digits is received; and wherein the hinge region includes at least two elastomeric bands that are positioned to project for a distance into the interior cavity.
15. The glove as defined in claim 14, wherein the at least two bands are generally C-shaped when viewed from a tip end of the respective thumb region or finger region.
16. The glove as defined in claim 14, wherein the thumb region or finger region further includes a smooth zone disposed opposite the hinge region; and
wherein the smooth zone is substantially free of elastomeric bands that project into the interior cavity; and wherein the smooth zone is adapted to be disposed adjacent a front surface and front portions of the sides of the user's digit received in the one of the respective thumb region or finger region.
17. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the hinge region includes a plurality of alternating gripping bands and troughs.
18. The glove as defined in claim 17, wherein each of the gripping bands has a length measured from a first adjacent trough to a second adjacent trough; and wherein the length of each of the gripping bands is adapted to increase when the user's digit is bent; and is adapted to decrease in size and return to an unstretched length when the user's digit is moved from a bent position to a straight position.
19. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the digit region comprises an index finger region, a middle finger region, a ring finger region, and a little finger region; and wherein the glove is an ambidextrous glove and the thumb, index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions are all aligned along a common axis.
20. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the digit region comprises an index finger region, a middle finger region, a ring finger region, and a little finger region; and wherein the glove is a hand-specific glove and the index finger, middle finger, ring finger, and little finger regions are all aligned along a common axis and the thumb region is offset relative to the common axis.
21. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the cuff is a rolled cuff.
22. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the glove is fabricated from nitrile or latex and at least part a first section of the wrist region adjacent the palm region is adapted to be positioned in abutting contact with a hand and a wrist of the wearer; and wherein a second section of the wrist region that includes the cuff is adapted to be spaced an increasing distance away from a wrist and forearm of the wearer of the glove as one moves from the palm region to the cuff.
23. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the wrist region includes a first section and a second section; and the first section originates proximate the palm region and extends outwardly for a distance therefrom; and the second section originates at an end of the first section and extends outwardly for a distance therefrom; and wherein the first section gradually increases in width and is narrowest proximate the palm region and is widest proximate the second section; and wherein the second section of the wrist region is of a substantially constant width; and that substantially constant width is equal in size to a widest portion of the first section of the wrist region.
24. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the glove is fabricated on a substantially continuous automated chain machine or on a batch machine or on a semi-batch machine.
25. The glove as defined in claim 1, wherein the cuff includes a bead provided at an end of the wrist region, wherein the bead is of a greater thickness than a remaining portion of the wrist region.
US15/010,467 2013-07-22 2016-01-29 Glove having a widened cuff and with finger regions that include a flexible hinge region Abandoned US20160143379A1 (en)

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US13/947,652 US9380794B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2013-07-22 Method and system for tracking glove failure
US13/947,423 US20150020284A1 (en) 2013-07-22 2013-07-22 Protective device for use with a glove
US14/490,821 US20160081407A1 (en) 2014-09-19 2014-09-19 Glove with a widened cuff area
US14/490,951 US9370209B2 (en) 2014-09-19 2014-09-19 Method of fabricating a glove with a widened cuff area
US14/624,047 US9888733B2 (en) 2013-07-22 2015-02-17 Protective device for use with a glove
US201562181967P true 2015-06-19 2015-06-19
US15/010,467 US20160143379A1 (en) 2013-07-22 2016-01-29 Glove having a widened cuff and with finger regions that include a flexible hinge region

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US20160366959A1 (en) * 2015-06-19 2016-12-22 Summit Glove Inc. Safety glove with fingertip protective member
US10143248B2 (en) * 2015-06-19 2018-12-04 Summit Glove Inc. Safety glove with fingertip protective member
USD778530S1 (en) * 2015-07-30 2017-02-14 Joshua Matthew Levine Glove with cape
USD782781S1 (en) * 2015-12-18 2017-04-04 Jill Jennings Pair of dishwashing gloves

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