US20160123683A1 - Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core - Google Patents

Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20160123683A1
US20160123683A1 US14/527,943 US201414527943A US2016123683A1 US 20160123683 A1 US20160123683 A1 US 20160123683A1 US 201414527943 A US201414527943 A US 201414527943A US 2016123683 A1 US2016123683 A1 US 2016123683A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
vortex
inlet
tube
heat exchanger
inducing structure
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14/527,943
Inventor
Meisam Mehravaran
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Ford Global Technologies LLC
Original Assignee
Ford Global Technologies LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Ford Global Technologies LLC filed Critical Ford Global Technologies LLC
Priority to US14/527,943 priority Critical patent/US20160123683A1/en
Assigned to FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC reassignment FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MEHRAVARAN, MEISAM
Publication of US20160123683A1 publication Critical patent/US20160123683A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F13/00Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing
    • F28F13/06Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing by affecting the pattern of flow of the heat-exchange media
    • F28F13/12Arrangements for modifying heat-transfer, e.g. increasing, decreasing by affecting the pattern of flow of the heat-exchange media by creating turbulence, e.g. by stirring, by increasing the force of circulation
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B29/00Engines characterised by provision for charging or scavenging not provided for in groups F02B25/00, F02B27/00 or F02B33/00 - F02B39/00; Details thereof
    • F02B29/04Cooling of air intake supply
    • F02B29/045Constructional details of the heat exchangers, e.g. pipes, plates, ribs, insulation, materials, or manufacturing and assembly
    • F02B29/0462Liquid cooled heat exchangers
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D1/00Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators
    • F28D1/02Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid
    • F28D1/04Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits
    • F28D1/053Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being straight
    • F28D1/0535Heat-exchange apparatus having stationary conduit assemblies for one heat-exchange medium only, the media being in contact with different sides of the conduit wall, in which the other heat-exchange medium is a large body of fluid, e.g. domestic or motor car radiators with heat-exchange conduits immersed in the body of fluid with tubular conduits the conduits being straight the conduits having a non-circular cross-section
    • F28D1/05366Assemblies of conduits connected to common headers, e.g. core type radiators
    • F28D1/05383Assemblies of conduits connected to common headers, e.g. core type radiators with multiple rows of conduits or with multi-channel conduits
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F1/00Tubular elements; Assemblies of tubular elements
    • F28F1/10Tubular elements and assemblies thereof with means for increasing heat-transfer area, e.g. with fins, with projections, with recesses
    • F28F1/40Tubular elements and assemblies thereof with means for increasing heat-transfer area, e.g. with fins, with projections, with recesses the means being only inside the tubular element
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F21/00Constructions of heat-exchange apparatus characterised by the selection of particular materials
    • F28F21/06Constructions of heat-exchange apparatus characterised by the selection of particular materials of plastics material
    • F28F21/067Details
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F9/00Casings; Header boxes; Auxiliary supports for elements; Auxiliary members within casings
    • F28F9/02Header boxes; End plates
    • F28F9/026Header boxes; End plates with static flow control means, e.g. with means for uniformly distributing heat exchange media into conduits
    • F28F9/028Header boxes; End plates with static flow control means, e.g. with means for uniformly distributing heat exchange media into conduits by using inserts for modifying the pattern of flow inside the header box, e.g. by using flow restrictors or permeable bodies or blocks with channels
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28DHEAT-EXCHANGE APPARATUS, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN ANOTHER SUBCLASS, IN WHICH THE HEAT-EXCHANGE MEDIA DO NOT COME INTO DIRECT CONTACT
    • F28D21/00Heat-exchange apparatus not covered by any of the groups F28D1/00 - F28D20/00
    • F28D2021/0019Other heat exchangers for particular applications; Heat exchange systems not otherwise provided for
    • F28D2021/008Other heat exchangers for particular applications; Heat exchange systems not otherwise provided for for vehicles
    • F28D2021/0082Charged air coolers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/14Technologies for the improvement of mechanical efficiency of a conventional ICE
    • Y02T10/146Charge mixing enhancing outside the combustion chamber

Abstract

A resonant charge air cooler is provided having internal structures for producing vortexes in the air flow, thus inducing turbulence and increasing heat transfer efficiency. The air cooler includes an inlet tank, an outlet tank and a plurality of tubes fluidly connecting the inlet and outlet tanks. The tubes include vortex-inducing structures such as dimples or grooves formed on their interior surfaces. A vortex-inducing structure such as wire mesh formed from a long wire, a wire grid or parallel wires on a frame is included in the inlet tank. By changing the geometry of the internal structures, turbulent eddies are created at very small length scales. Adjustment of the geometries results in vortexes that have almost the same size as those produced by the surface dimples or grooves formed on the walls of the tubes connecting the inlet and outlet tanks, whereby a resonance behavior occurs and heat transfer increases.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The disclosed inventive concept relates generally to charge air coolers for automotive vehicles. More particularly, the disclosed inventive concept relates to a resonant charge air cooler core having internal structures to create turbulence and thereby enhance heat transfer.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • It is increasingly common for internal combustion engines to be fitted with turbochargers or superchargers to force more air mass into the engine's intake manifold and combustion chamber. The increased amount of air mass is the result of the air being compressed by an air compressor driven by a turbine which is itself driven by an impeller associated with the exhaust system. While improving engine horsepower, the input of compressed air heats the intake manifold, thus causing a reduction in the density of the charge air.
  • To offset the increased temperature of the incoming air, charge air coolers have been provided upstream of the airflow. The typical charge air cooler (CAC) includes an air inlet tank, an air outlet tank, and a series of elongated and parallel cooling tubes fluidly connecting the air inlet tank to the air outlet tank.
  • While the technology for efficient charge air coolers continues to advance, the designers of these coolers are challenged by constraints on packaging. It is known that to achieve a high charge air cooler efficiency, charge air coolers should have a surface area that is large enough to provide sufficient surface area that proper cooling of the air flowing from the inlet tank to the outlet tank can take place. However, the size of the charge air cooler is very often restricted by the available space.
  • Restriction of available space is created by a number of factors. First, for maximum cooling efficiency, charge air coolers should receive “first air,” that is, they should be positioned in front of the radiator and other heat exchangers. Second, known components such as the active radar adjustment screw and the active grill shutter housing result in a very confined space for the charge air cooler. The minimal space available for the charge air cooler is in conflict with the need to provide a charge air cooler that is as large as possible.
  • Accordingly, as in so many areas of vehicle technology, there is room for improvement in the design of charge air coolers whereby maximum cooling can be achieved using a cooler that is of a smaller size, thereby being suitably sized for the confined areas known in today's vehicle.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The disclosed inventive concept overcomes the problems associated with known charge air coolers by providing maximum air cooling in a cooler being of a relatively small size. This result is generally achieved by providing structures internal to the charge air cooler that produce vortexes in the air flow, thus inducing turbulence and increasing heat transfer efficiency.
  • Recognizing that during different working conditions of the vehicle the flow may be laminar, transitional or turbulent, the flow is confirmed as being turbulent in most working conditions by providing a selected internal structure. The structures may be one of (or a combination of) a wire mesh, a wire grid or a frame having parallel wires provided in the inlet tank. By changing the geometry of the internal structure, turbulent eddies are created at very small length scales. The size of the eddies and the quality of the turbulence may be determined by the geometry of the internal structure.
  • By adjusting the geometry of the turbulence-inducing internal structure, turbulent eddies can be formed at very small length scales. The size of the eddies and quality of the turbulence may thus be determined by the geometry of the turbulence-inducing internal structure. Furthermore, by adding grooves or dimples on an interior surface of the charge air cooler, heat transfer is increased as a result of the vortexes produced and the intensified mixing. When the time scale of the fluid unsteadiness (that is, the turbulence eddies) and the time scale of grooves or dimples (the time required for the flow to pass the groove surface) coincide, the heat transfer conductance coefficient increases significantly. This behavior is similar to a resonance in structural or vibrational mechanics.
  • In order to make use of this resonant effect in the disclosed inventive concept, the resonant charge air cooler disclosed herein includes either a long wire squeezed into the inlet tank or, alternatively, a wire mesh screen provided at the inlet window of the tube. The geometry of such structures may be adjusted to impose vortexes that have almost the same size as those produced by the surface dimples or grooves formed on the walls of the tubes that connect the inlet and outlet tanks, whereby a resonance behavior occurs and heat transfer increases considerably. An increase in heat transfer allows for the reduction of the size of the charge air cooler without compromising cooling efficiency.
  • The above advantages and other advantages and features will be readily apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a more complete understanding of this invention, reference should now be made to the embodiments illustrated in greater detail in the accompanying drawings and described below by way of examples of the invention wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of a resonant charge air cooler illustrating an internal turbulence-generating structure according to a first embodiment of the disclosed inventive concept;
  • FIG. 1A is a sectional view of the interior of a tube illustrating a dimpled surface taken from line 1A of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 1B is a sectional view of the interior of a tube illustrating a grooved surface taken from line 1B of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a resonant charge air cooler illustrating an internal turbulence-generating structure according to a second embodiment of the disclosed inventive concept;
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of the wired mesh fitted to the second embodiment of the resonant charge air cooler according to the disclosed inventive concept;
  • FIG. 4 is a plan view of a frame having parallel wires positioned longitudinally relative to the long axis of the frame that may alternatively be fitted to the second embodiment of the resonant charge air cooler according to the disclosed inventive concept; and
  • FIG. 5 is a plan view of a frame having parallel wires positioned diagonally relative to the long axis of the frame that may alternatively be fitted to the second embodiment of the resonant charge air cooler according to the disclosed inventive concept.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • In the following figures, the same reference numerals will be used to refer to the same components. In the following description, various operating parameters and components are described for different constructed embodiments. These specific parameters and components are included as examples and are not meant to be limiting.
  • The resonant charge air cooler of the disclosed inventive concept is illustrated in its various embodiments in FIGS. 1 through 5. However, it is to be understood that the illustrated embodiments are suggestive and are not intended as being limiting.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a plan view of a resonant charge air cooler, generally illustrated as 10, is shown. The resonant charge air cooler 10 includes an inlet tank 12 having an inlet 14 and an inlet tank body 16. The inlet tank 12 may be made from any one of several materials, including a polymerized material (such as polypropylene or polyamide) or a metal or a combination of the two.
  • Perpendicular to and extending from the inlet tank body 16 and fluidly connected thereto are a plurality of coolant tubes 18. The number, shape and placement of the tubes 18 may be other than as illustrated.
  • The resonant charge air cooler 10 further includes an outlet tank 20 having an outlet 22 and an outlet tank body 24. Like the inlet tank 12, the outlet tank 20 may be made from any one of several materials, including a polymerized material or a metal or a combination of the two.
  • Brackets are preferably attached to the resonant charge air cooler 10 for fixing the resonant charge air cooler 10 to the heat exchanger (not shown), to a structure in the vehicle's engine compartment, or to both. A first set of brackets 26 and 26′ and a second set of brackets 28 and 28′ are preferably provided. The shape, placement and number of brackets may be varied beyond the illustrated brackets 26, 26′, 28 and 28′.
  • To create the appropriate vortex in the coolant tubes 18, the inner surfaces of the tubes 18 have structures formed thereon. The inner surfaces may be dimpled or grooved or may have another vortex-inducing structure formed thereon. FIGS. 1A and 1B illustrate two non-limiting examples of such structures.
  • Referring to FIG. 1A, a tube 18 is shown in partial cross-section. The tube 18 includes an interior surface 30. Formed on the interior surface 30 of the tube 18 are raised dimples 32. The shape, number and placement of the raised dimples 32 may each be varied other than as illustrated.
  • Vortex-initiating alternatives for the interior surface 30 of the tube 18 other than the raised dimples 32 shown in FIG. 1A are available. Instead of raised dimples 32, a series of grooves 34 may be formed in the interior surface 30. The grooves 34 may be perpendicular to the long axis of the tube 18 as illustrated or may be axially formed.
  • While the raised dimples 32 and the grooves 34 are provided to create vortices within the tube 18, an additional vortex-initiating structure is provided in relation to the inflowing air. Particularly, and referring to FIG. 1, one or more randomly-arranged wires 36 are “squeezed” into the inlet tank 12, thereby creating turbulence in the incoming air as it passes between the inlet 14 and the tubes 18. The randomly-arranged wires 36 may be made from a variety of materials and may be made in a variety of lengths and thicknesses.
  • The geometries of the raised dimples 32 and/or grooves 34 as well as the geometries of the randomly-arranged wires 36 may be modified in the resonant charge air cooler 10 to achieve maximum cooling within a minimal space. For example, the size, number and spacing of the raised dimples 32 and the number, depth and placement of the grooves 34 may be modified. In addition, the thickness, number, length and spacing of the randomly-arranged wires 36 may be modified. By adjusting these geometries, an optimum resonance behavior may be generated within the resonant charge air cooler 10 to thereby maximize heat transfer.
  • While FIG. 1 illustrates the use of the randomly-arranged wires 36 as a method for inducing vortices within the stream of incoming air as it passes through the inlet tank 12, other structures for inducing vortices within the incoming air are possible. A non-limiting example of such a structure is illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a plan view of a resonant charge air cooler according to an alternate embodiment, generally illustrated as 40, is shown. The resonant charge air cooler 40 includes an inlet tank 42 having an inlet 44 and an inlet tank body 46. The inlet tank 12 may be made from any one of several materials, including a polymerized material or a metal or a combination of the two.
  • Perpendicular to and extending from the inlet tank body 46 and fluidly connected thereto are a plurality of coolant tubes 48. The number, shape and placement of the tubes 18 may be other than as illustrated. Like the coolant tubes 18 shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B, the interior surfaces of the coolant tubes 48 have vortex-inducing structures such as raised dimples, grooves, or both formed thereon.
  • The resonant charge air cooler 40 further includes an outlet tank 50 having an outlet tank body 52 and an outlet 54. Like the inlet tank 42, the outlet tank 50 may be made from any one of several materials, including a polymerized material or a metal or a combination of the two.
  • Brackets are preferably attached to the resonant charge air cooler 40 for fixing the resonant charge air cooler 40 to the heat exchanger (not shown), to a structure in the vehicle's engine compartment, or to both. A first set of brackets 56 and 56′ and a second set of brackets 58 and 58′ are preferably provided. The shape, placement and number of brackets may be varied beyond the illustrated brackets 56, 56′, 58 and 58′.
  • To induce the appropriate vortex within the inlet tank 42, a wire grid 60 is fitted to an inner wall 62 of the inlet tank 42 to which the tubes 48 are fluidly connected. An exemplary version of the wire grid 60 is shown in FIG. 3. The wire grid 60 includes a plurality of individual wires 64 positioned in a first direction and a plurality of individual wires 66 positioned in a second direction such that the wires 64 and 66 are interwoven and thus interconnect.
  • As with the first embodiment of the resonant charge air cooler of the disclosed inventive concept illustrated in FIG. 1 and discussed in relation thereto, the geometries of the raised dimples 32 and/or grooves 34 as well as the geometries of the wire grid 60 may be modified in the resonant charge air cooler 40 to achieve maximum cooling within a minimal space. Again, as noted above, the size, number and spacing of the raised dimples 32 and the number, depth and placement of the grooves 34 may be modified. In addition, the thickness, number, length and spacing of the individual wires 64 and 66 may be modified. By adjusting these geometries, an optimum resonance behavior may be generated within the resonant charge air cooler 40 to thereby maximize heat transfer.
  • Structures alternative to the wire grid 60 may be used in conjunction with the resonant charge air cooler of the disclosed inventive concept illustrated in FIG. 2. One such alternative structure is illustrated in FIG. 4 in which a turbulence-inducing structure 70 is illustrated in plan view. The turbulence-inducing structure 70 includes a frame 72 having a series of parallel wires 74 attached thereto. It is to be understood that while the parallel wires 74 are illustrated as being positioned parallel to the long axis of the frame 72, the parallel wires 74 may be positioned perpendicular to the long axis of the frame 72.
  • As a variation of the turbulence-inducing structure 70 shown in FIG. 4, a turbulence-inducing structure 80 is illustrated in FIG. 5. The turbulence-inducing structure 80 has a frame 82 with wires 84 positioned diagonally with respect to the long axis of the frame 82 may be used.
  • The thicknesses of the wires 74 and 84 and the spacing between the wires 74 and 84 may be varied from the illustrations of FIGS. 4 and 5 respectively. Adjustment of such variables may again be made to generate optimum resonance behavior, thereby maximizing heat transfer.
  • The resonant charge air cooler of the disclosed inventive concept in its various embodiment overcomes the problems of known systems by providing maximum heat exchange in a minimum amount of space. It is to be understood that the resonant system disclosed herein has been discussed in relation to charge air coolers, the use of vortex-inducing structures in relation to the inlet tank and the tubes may be applied as well to other heat exchangers, including without limitation condensors, transmission coolers, and radiators.
  • While the preferred embodiments of the disclosed inventive concept have been discussed are shown in the accompanying drawings and are set forth in the associated description, one skilled in the art will readily recognize from such discussion, and from the accompanying drawings and claims that various changes, modifications and variations can be made therein without departing from the true spirit and fair scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A heat exchanger comprising:
an inlet tank having an inlet;
a vortex-inducing structure fitted within said inlet tank;
an outlet tank having an outlet;
a tube fluidly connecting said inlet tank and said outlet tank, said tube including an interior surface; and
a vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube.
2. The heat exchanger of claim 1 wherein said vortex-inducing structure fitted within said inlet tank is a wire.
3. The heat exchanger of claim 2 wherein said wire comprises a plurality of randomly-arranged wires.
4. The heat exchanger of claim 2 wherein said wire comprises a wire grid.
5. The heat exchanger of claim 4 wherein said wire grid is formed by a plurality of intersecting wires.
6. The heat exchanger of claim 1 wherein said wire comprises parallel wires positioned on a frame.
7. The heat exchanger of claim 1 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a plurality of raised dimples.
8. The heat exchanger of claim 1 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a plurality of grooves.
9. The heat exchanger of claim 1 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a combination of a plurality of raised dimples and a plurality of grooves.
10. A heat exchanger comprising:
an inlet tank;
an inlet vortex-inducing structure fitted within said tank, said inlet vortex-inducing structure being selected from the group consisting of randomly-arranged wires, intersecting wires, and parallel wires;
an outlet tank;
a tube fluidly connecting said inlet and outlet tanks, said tube including an interior surface; and
a tube vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface, said tube vortex-inducing structure being selected from the group consisting of dimples and grooves.
11. The heat exchanger of claim 10 wherein said wire grid is formed by a plurality of intersecting wires.
12. The heat exchanger of claim 10 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a combination of said randomly-arranged wires and said wire grid.
13. The heat exchanger of claim 10 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a combination of said dimples and a said grooves.
14. A method for cooling fluid in an internal combustion engine comprising:
forming a heat exchanger having an inlet tank, a vortex-inducing structure fitted within said tank, an outlet tank, a tube fluidly connecting said inlet and outlet tanks, said tube including an interior surface, said interior surface having a vortex-inducing structure formed thereon; and
adjusting the geometries of said vortex-inducing structures to obtain a preferred resonance within said heat exchanger when coolant flows therethrough.
15. The method for cooling fluid of claim 14 wherein said vortex-inducing structure fitted within said inlet tank is a wire.
16. The method for cooling fluid of claim 15 wherein said
wherein said wire comprises a plurality of randomly-arranged wires.
17. The method for cooling fluid of claim 15 wherein said wire comprises a wire grid defined by a plurality of intersecting wires.
18. The method for cooling fluid of claim 15 wherein said wire comprises parallel wires positioned on a frame.
19. The method for cooling fluid of claim 14 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a plurality of raised dimples.
20. The method for cooling fluid of claim 14 wherein said vortex-inducing structure formed on said interior surface of said tube is a plurality of grooves.
US14/527,943 2014-10-30 2014-10-30 Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core Abandoned US20160123683A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/527,943 US20160123683A1 (en) 2014-10-30 2014-10-30 Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/527,943 US20160123683A1 (en) 2014-10-30 2014-10-30 Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core
DE202015105743.1U DE202015105743U1 (en) 2014-10-30 2015-10-29 Inlet air through a turbulence generating grid mixing and a warmed surface having resonant intercooler core
CN201520860038.6U CN205135781U (en) 2014-10-30 2015-10-30 Heat exchanger

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20160123683A1 true US20160123683A1 (en) 2016-05-05

Family

ID=54768407

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/527,943 Abandoned US20160123683A1 (en) 2014-10-30 2014-10-30 Inlet air turbulent grid mixer and dimpled surface resonant charge air cooler core

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20160123683A1 (en)
CN (1) CN205135781U (en)
DE (1) DE202015105743U1 (en)

Families Citing this family (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE102016213588A1 (en) * 2016-07-25 2018-01-25 Ford Global Technologies, Llc Internal combustion engine with intercooling by air conditioning system
DE102016213949A1 (en) * 2016-07-28 2018-02-01 Mahle International Gmbh Charge air cooler tube of a charge air cooler

Citations (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2135432A (en) * 1934-03-31 1938-11-01 Edward R Brodton Vapor condenser
US3407875A (en) * 1966-03-02 1968-10-29 United Aircraft Prod Flow distributing means in heat exchangers
US4470452A (en) * 1982-05-19 1984-09-11 Ford Motor Company Turbulator radiator tube and radiator construction derived therefrom
US4702312A (en) * 1986-06-19 1987-10-27 Aluminum Company Of America Thin rod packing for heat exchangers
US4798241A (en) * 1983-04-04 1989-01-17 Modine Manufacturing Mixed helix turbulator for heat exchangers
US5992512A (en) * 1996-03-21 1999-11-30 The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger tube and method for manufacturing the same
US20020014326A1 (en) * 1999-07-14 2002-02-07 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Heat exchanger
US6453988B1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2002-09-24 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Heat exchanger and dimple tube used in the same, the tube having larger opposed protrusions closest to each end of tube
US20050217833A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2005-10-06 George Moser Heat exchanger and associated method
US20060075775A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2006-04-13 Mikhail Boiarski Efficient heat exchanger for refrigeration process
US20070209788A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Jianzhou Jing Heat exchanging tube with spiral groove
US20090056919A1 (en) * 2007-08-14 2009-03-05 Prodigy Energy Recovery Systems Inc. Heat exchanger
US20100044019A1 (en) * 2008-08-25 2010-02-25 Denso Corporation Heat exchanger
US20100162699A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-07-01 Dittmann Joerg Exhaust gas cooler
US20110000657A1 (en) * 2008-01-10 2011-01-06 Jens Ruckwied Extruded tube for a heat exchanger
US20110075787A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Searete Llc, A Limited Liability Corporation Of The State Of Delaware Heat exchanger, methods therefor and a nuclear fission reactor system
US7942137B2 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-05-17 Behr Gmbh & Co., Kg Heat exchanger
US20130213449A1 (en) * 2012-02-20 2013-08-22 Marlow Industries, Inc. Thermoelectric plate and frame exchanger
US20140150656A1 (en) * 2012-06-11 2014-06-05 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for turbulent, corrosion resistant heat exchangers
US20140166252A1 (en) * 2012-12-17 2014-06-19 Whirlpool Corporation Heat exchanger and method
US20150247680A1 (en) * 2012-09-25 2015-09-03 Mahle International Gmbh Flat pipe

Patent Citations (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2135432A (en) * 1934-03-31 1938-11-01 Edward R Brodton Vapor condenser
US3407875A (en) * 1966-03-02 1968-10-29 United Aircraft Prod Flow distributing means in heat exchangers
US4470452A (en) * 1982-05-19 1984-09-11 Ford Motor Company Turbulator radiator tube and radiator construction derived therefrom
US4798241A (en) * 1983-04-04 1989-01-17 Modine Manufacturing Mixed helix turbulator for heat exchangers
US4702312A (en) * 1986-06-19 1987-10-27 Aluminum Company Of America Thin rod packing for heat exchangers
US5992512A (en) * 1996-03-21 1999-11-30 The Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger tube and method for manufacturing the same
US20020014326A1 (en) * 1999-07-14 2002-02-07 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Heat exchanger
US6453988B1 (en) * 1999-07-28 2002-09-24 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Heat exchanger and dimple tube used in the same, the tube having larger opposed protrusions closest to each end of tube
US20050217833A1 (en) * 2002-04-25 2005-10-06 George Moser Heat exchanger and associated method
US20060075775A1 (en) * 2004-10-07 2006-04-13 Mikhail Boiarski Efficient heat exchanger for refrigeration process
US7942137B2 (en) * 2005-06-24 2011-05-17 Behr Gmbh & Co., Kg Heat exchanger
US20070209788A1 (en) * 2006-03-09 2007-09-13 Jianzhou Jing Heat exchanging tube with spiral groove
US20090056919A1 (en) * 2007-08-14 2009-03-05 Prodigy Energy Recovery Systems Inc. Heat exchanger
US20110000657A1 (en) * 2008-01-10 2011-01-06 Jens Ruckwied Extruded tube for a heat exchanger
US20100044019A1 (en) * 2008-08-25 2010-02-25 Denso Corporation Heat exchanger
US20100162699A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-07-01 Dittmann Joerg Exhaust gas cooler
US20110075787A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Searete Llc, A Limited Liability Corporation Of The State Of Delaware Heat exchanger, methods therefor and a nuclear fission reactor system
US20130213449A1 (en) * 2012-02-20 2013-08-22 Marlow Industries, Inc. Thermoelectric plate and frame exchanger
US20140150656A1 (en) * 2012-06-11 2014-06-05 7Ac Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for turbulent, corrosion resistant heat exchangers
US20150247680A1 (en) * 2012-09-25 2015-09-03 Mahle International Gmbh Flat pipe
US20140166252A1 (en) * 2012-12-17 2014-06-19 Whirlpool Corporation Heat exchanger and method

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN205135781U (en) 2016-04-06
DE202015105743U1 (en) 2015-11-17

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
DE102006041985B4 (en) Heat exchanger tube
EP1800078B1 (en) Air-cooled exhaust gas heat exchanger, in particular exhaust gas cooler for motor vehicles
US8020610B2 (en) Exhaust gas heat exchanger and method of operating the same
US20090301411A1 (en) Composite heat exchanger and composite heat exchanger system
CN102032829B (en) Fin structure
US7882708B2 (en) Flat pipe-shaped heat exchanger
US4332293A (en) Corrugated fin type heat exchanger
CN100559107C (en) Device for exchanging heat and internal-combustion engine with the same
US6729388B2 (en) Charge air cooler, especially for motor vehicles
JP3912080B2 (en) Exhaust heat exchanger
WO2003046457A1 (en) Heat exchanger
US10254056B2 (en) Heat exchanger
DE102007005370A1 (en) heat exchangers
US9605586B2 (en) Intake pipe for an internal combustion engine
PT2014892E (en) A heat exchanger arrangement
US20050098307A1 (en) Gas cooling device
US7942137B2 (en) Heat exchanger
CN101589284B (en) Multi-dimensional fluid heat exchanger
US7490661B2 (en) Heat exchanger
CN102606346B (en) Heat exchanger for an egr system
US8844504B2 (en) Heat exchanger and method of manufacturing the same
CN100370206C (en) Heat exchanger
DE102006018532A1 (en) heat exchangers
US20150129183A1 (en) Heat exchanger having a cooler block and production method
US7913750B2 (en) Louvered air center with vortex generating extensions for compact heat exchanger

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: FORD GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, MICHIGAN

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MEHRAVARAN, MEISAM;REEL/FRAME:034069/0052

Effective date: 20141027

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION