US20160038220A1 - Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures - Google Patents

Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures Download PDF

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US20160038220A1
US20160038220A1 US14/738,107 US201514738107A US2016038220A1 US 20160038220 A1 US20160038220 A1 US 20160038220A1 US 201514738107 A US201514738107 A US 201514738107A US 2016038220 A1 US2016038220 A1 US 2016038220A1
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tissue
jaw
position
treating
jaw members
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US14/738,107
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John R. Twomey
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Covidien LP
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Covidien LP
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Priority to US201462035751P priority
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Priority to US14/738,107 priority patent/US20160038220A1/en
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Assigned to COVIDIEN LP reassignment COVIDIEN LP CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE DATE OF ASSIGNOR'S SIGNATURE PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 035829 FRAME 0494. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE CORRECT DATE OF ASSIGNOR'S SIGNATURE IS 06/11/2015. Assignors: TWOMEY, JOHN R.
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1442Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps
    • A61B18/1445Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps at the distal end of a shaft, e.g. forceps or scissors at the end of a rigid rod
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/24Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets for use in the oral cavity, larynx, bronchial passages or nose; Tongue scrapers
    • A61B17/26Tonsillotomes, with or without means for stopping bleeding
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1442Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1442Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps
    • A61B18/1445Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps at the distal end of a shaft, e.g. forceps or scissors at the end of a rigid rod
    • A61B18/1447Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps at the distal end of a shaft, e.g. forceps or scissors at the end of a rigid rod wherein sliding surfaces cause opening/closing of the end effectors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/2926Details of heads or jaws
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B17/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods, e.g. tourniquets
    • A61B17/28Surgical forceps
    • A61B17/29Forceps for use in minimally invasive surgery
    • A61B2017/2926Details of heads or jaws
    • A61B2017/2932Transmission of forces to jaw members
    • A61B2017/2944Translation of jaw members
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00315Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body for treatment of particular body parts
    • A61B2018/00321Head or parts thereof
    • A61B2018/00327Ear, nose or throat
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/04Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating
    • A61B18/12Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by heating by passing a current through the tissue to be heated, e.g. high-frequency current
    • A61B18/14Probes or electrodes therefor
    • A61B18/1442Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps
    • A61B2018/1452Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps including means for cutting
    • A61B2018/1457Probes having pivoting end effectors, e.g. forceps including means for cutting having opposing blades cutting tissue grasped by the jaws, i.e. combined scissors and pliers

Abstract

A surgical instrument includes an end effector assembly having first and second jaw members each including a tissue-treating plate. The jaw members are movable between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plates thereof. One or both of the jaw members includes a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components. Each jaw component includes a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon. One or both of the jaw components is rotatable relative to the other between an aligned orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are substantially co-planar, and an angled orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are angled relative to one another. Rotation of the jaw component(s) from the aligned orientation to the angled orientation effects cutting of tissue grasped between the tissue-treating plates of the jaw members.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of, and priority to, U.S. Provisional Patent Application Nos. 62/035,764 and 62/035,751, both of which were filed on Aug. 11, 2014. This application is related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, filed on ______. The entire contents of each of the above applications are hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Technical Field
  • The present disclosure relates to surgical instruments and methods and, more particularly, to surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy procedures.
  • 2. Background of Related Art
  • The tonsils and adenoids are part of the lymphatic system and are generally located in the back of the throat. These parts of the lymphatic system are generally used for sampling bacteria and viruses entering the body and activating the immune system when warranted to produce antibodies to fight oncoming infections. More particularly, the tonsils and adenoids break down the bacteria or virus and send pieces of the bacteria or virus to the immune system to produce antibodies for fighting off infections.
  • Inflammation of the tonsils and adenoids (e.g., tonsillitis) impedes the ability of the tonsils and adenoids to destroy the bacteria resulting in a bacterial infection. In many instances, the bacteria remain even after treatment and serve as a reservoir for repeated infections (e.g., tonsillitis or ear infections).
  • A tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy may be performed when infections persist and antibiotic treatments fail. Persistent infection typically leads to enlarged tonsil tissue which may need to be removed since in many cases the enlarged tissue causes airway obstruction leading to various sleep disorders such as snoring or, in some cases, sleep apnea. Some individuals are also born with larger tonsils that are more prone to cause obstruction. An adenoidectomy may also be required to remove adenoid tissue when ear pain persists, or when nose breathing or function of the Eustachian tube is impaired. Often times, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures are performed at the same time.
  • SUMMARY
  • As used herein, the term “distal” refers to the portion that is being described which is further from a user, while the term “proximal” refers to the portion that is being described which is closer to a user. Further, to the extent consistent, any of the aspects described herein may be used in conjunction with any or all of the other aspects described herein.
  • In accordance with the present disclosure, a surgical instrument is provided including an end effector assembly having first and second jaw members. Each of the first and second jaw members includes one or more tissue-treating plates disposed thereon. The first and second jaw members are movable between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plates. One or both of the first and second jaw members includes a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components. Each of the first and second jaw components includes a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon. The tissue-treating plate portions cooperate to define the tissue-treating plate of the jaw member. One or both of the first and second jaw components is rotatable relative to the other between an aligned orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are substantially co-planar relative to one another, and an angled orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are angled relative to one another. Rotation of the first jaw component and/or the second jaw components from the aligned orientation to the angled orientation effects cutting of tissue grasped between the tissue-treating plates of the first and second jaw members.
  • In an aspect of the present disclosure, the tissue-treating plates define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
  • In another aspect of the present disclosure, the surgical instrument further includes an actuation assembly operably coupled to the end effector assembly. The actuation assembly includes an actuation member movable between a first position and a second position to rotate the jaw component(s) between the aligned orientation and the angled orientation.
  • In yet another aspect of the present disclosure, upon movement of the actuation member from the first position to the second position, the actuation member is inserted between the first and second jaw components to urge the jaw component(s) to rotate to the angled orientation.
  • In still another aspect of the present disclosure, the actuation assembly includes a trigger coupled to the actuation member. The trigger is selectively actuatable for moving the actuation member between the first position and the second position.
  • In still yet another aspect of the present disclosure, one or more biasing members is interdisposed between the first and second jaw components and to bias the jaw component(s) towards the aligned orientation.
  • In another aspect of the present disclosure, the tissue-treating plates are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
  • Another surgical instrument provided in accordance with the present disclosure includes an end effector assembly having first and second jaw members movable between a spaced-apart position, a first approximated position for grasping tissue therebetween, and a second approximated position. The first jaw member includes a body having first and second spaced-apart tissue-treating plate portions disposed thereon and an insulative member extending from the body between the first and second tissue-treating plate portions. The second jaw member includes a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components. Each jaw component includes a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon. The jaw components are movable relative to one another and the first jaw member between a first position, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions of the first and second jaw components are respectively aligned with the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member, and a second position, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions of the first and second jaw components are offset relative to the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member. Movement of the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position moves the insulative member between the first and second jaw components to urge the first and second jaw components from the first position to the second position to cut tissue grasped between the first and second jaw members.
  • In an aspect of the present disclosure, the tissue-treating plate portions define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
  • In another aspect of the present disclosure, one or more biasing members is interdisposed between the first and second jaw components to bias the first and second jaw components towards the first position.
  • In still another aspect of the present disclosure, the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member and the tissue-treating plate portions of the second jaw member are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
  • In yet another aspect of the present disclosure, a handle assembly operably coupled to the end effector assembly is provided. The handle assembly includes a movable handle movable between an initial position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position for moving the first and second jaw members between the spaced-apart position, the first approximated position, and the second approximated position, respectively.
  • In still yet another aspect of the present disclosure, the insulative member defines angled side surfaces configured to facilitate urging the first and second jaw components from the first position to the second position.
  • Another surgical instrument provided in accordance with the present disclosure includes an end effector assembly having first and second jaw members each including a jaw body having one or more tissue-treating plates disposed thereon. The jaw members are movable between a spaced-apart position and a first approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plates. The jaw members are further movable from the first approximated position to a second approximated position. Moving the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position transitions the jaw members from an aligned orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plates are aligned with one another, to an offset orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plates are offset relative to one another. Transitioning the jaw members from the aligned orientation to the offset orientation cuts tissue grasped between the tissue-treating plates.
  • In an aspect of the present disclosure, the tissue-treating plates define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
  • In another aspect of the present disclosure, one or more biasing members is provided for biasing the first and second jaw members towards the aligned orientation.
  • In still another aspect of the present disclosure, the tissue-treating plates are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
  • In yet another aspect of the present disclosure, each of the jaw members includes a proximal flange. The proximal flanges of the members are pivotably coupled to one another for movement of the first and second jaw members between the spaced-apart position, the first approximated position, and the second approximated position.
  • In still yet another aspect of the present disclosure, a protrusion extends from each of the proximal flanges. The protrusions are operably positioned relative to one another such that, upon movement of the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position, the protrusions contact one another and urge the proximal flanges apart from one another, thereby urging the jaw members from the aligned orientation to the offset orientation.
  • Another surgical instrument provided in accordance with aspects of the present disclosure includes an end effector assembly including first and second jaw members each defining a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components. The first and second jaw components of each of the jaw members include a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon. The jaw components of the first jaw member and the jaw components of the second jaw member are movable relative to one another between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw components and between the tissue-treating plate portions of the second jaw components. Further, the first jaw components of the jaw members and the second jaw components of the jaw members are movable relative to one another between an un-actuated position, wherein the first and second jaw components of each jaw member are disposed in close proximity to one another, and an actuated position, wherein the first and second jaw components of each jaw member are spaced further-apart from one another, to separate tissue grasped between the first jaw components from tissue grasped between the second jaw components.
  • In aspects, the tissue-treating plate portions define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
  • In aspects, the tissue-treating plate portions are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various aspects and features of the present disclosure are described herein with reference to the drawings wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a front, side, perspective view of an endoscopic surgical forceps configured for use in accordance with the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 2 is a front, side, perspective view of an open surgical forceps configured for use in accordance with the present disclosure;
  • FIG. 3A is a side, cut-away view of the proximal portion of the surgical forceps of FIG. 1, wherein a portion of the housing and some of the internal components thereof have been removed to unobstructively illustrate the handle, actuation, and drive assemblies of the forceps;
  • FIG. 3B is a perspective, cut-away view of the distal portion of the surgical forceps of FIG. 1, wherein the shaft has been removed to illustrate the drive bar, actuation assembly, and end effector assembly of the forceps;
  • FIG. 4A is a top view of one of the jaw members of the end effector assembly of FIG. 3B and the actuation assembly of FIG. 3A-3B, disposed in an un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 4B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 3B and the actuation assembly of FIG. 3A-3B, disposed in the un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 5A is a top view of jaw member of FIG. 3B and the actuation assembly of FIG. 3A-3B, disposed in an actuated condition;
  • FIG. 5B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 3B and the actuation assembly of FIG. 3A-3B, disposed in the actuated condition;
  • FIG. 6A is a top view of one of the jaw members of another end effector assembly provided in accordance with the present disclosure, disposed in an un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 6B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 6A, disposed in the un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 7A is a top view of the jaw member of FIG. 6A, disposed in an actuated condition;
  • FIG. 7B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the end effector assembly of FIG. 7A, disposed in the actuated condition;
  • FIG. 8A is a transverse, cross-sectional view of proximal flanges of the jaw members of another end effector assembly provided in accordance with the present disclosure, disposed in an un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 8B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the jaw bodies of the jaw members of the end effector assembly of FIG. 8A, disposed in the un-actuated condition;
  • FIG. 9A is a is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the proximal flanges of the jaw members of the end effector assembly of FIG. 8A, disposed in an actuated condition;
  • FIG. 9B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the jaw bodies of the jaw members of the end effector assembly of FIG. 8A, disposed in the actuated condition;
  • FIG. 10A is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the jaw bodies of another end effector assembly provided in accordance with the present disclosure, disposed in an un-actuated condition; and
  • FIG. 10B is a transverse, cross-sectional view of the jaw bodies of the jaw members of the end effector assembly of FIG. 10A, disposed in an actuated condition.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Turning to FIGS. 1 and 2, FIG. 1 depicts a handheld, shaft-based surgical forceps 10 and FIG. 2 depicts a hemostat-style forceps 10′. For the purposes herein, either forceps 10, forceps 10′, or any other suitable surgical instrument may be utilized in accordance with the present disclosure. Obviously, different electrical and mechanical connections and considerations apply to each particular type of instrument; however, the aspects and features of the present disclosure remain generally consistent regardless of the particular instrument used.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, forceps 10 generally includes a housing 20, a handle assembly 30, an actuation assembly 60, a rotating assembly 70, an activation switch 4, and an end effector assembly 100. Forceps 10 further includes a shaft 12 having a distal end 14 configured to mechanically engage end effector assembly 100 and a proximal end 16 that mechanically engages housing 20. Forceps 10 also includes cable 2 that connects forceps 10 to an energy source (not shown), e.g., a generator or other suitable power source, although forceps 10 may alternatively be configured as a battery-powered device. Cable 2 includes a wire (or wires) (not shown) extending therethrough that has sufficient length to extend through shaft 12 in order to provide energy to one or both tissue-treating plates 114, 124 (FIG. 3B) of jaw members 110, 120, respectively. Activation switch 4 is coupled to tissue-treating plates 114, 124 (FIG. 3B) of jaw members 110, 120, respectively, and the source of energy for selectively activating the supply of energy to jaw members 110, 120 for treating, e.g., cauterizing, coagulating/desiccating, and/or sealing, tissue.
  • With additional reference to FIGS. 3A and 3B, handle assembly 30 includes fixed handle 50 and a movable handle 40. Fixed handle 50 is integrally associated with housing 20 and handle 40 is movable relative to fixed handle 50. Movable handle 40 of handle assembly 30 is operably coupled to a drive assembly 140 that, together, mechanically cooperate to impart movement of one or both of jaw members 110, 120 about a pivot 103 between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position to grasp tissue between jaw members 110, 120. In particular, movable handle 40 is coupled to drive bar 142 via a drive mandrel 144 such that movement of movable handle 40 relative to housing 20 effects longitudinal translation of drive bar 142 through housing 20 and shaft 12. The distal end of drive bar 142 is coupled to one or both jaw members 110, 120 such that longitudinal translation of drive bar 142 relative to end effector assembly 100 pivots one or both of jaw members 110, 120 relative to one another. As shown in FIG. 1, movable handle 40 is initially spaced-apart from fixed handle 50 and, correspondingly, jaw members 110, 120 are disposed in the spaced-apart position. Movable handle 40 is depressible from this initial position to a depressed position corresponding to the approximated position of jaw members 110, 120. Further, a biasing member 146 may be disposed within housing 20 and positioned to bias drive bar 142 distally, thereby biasing jaw members 110, 120 towards the spaced-apart position. However, other configurations are also contemplated.
  • Actuation assembly 60 includes a trigger 62 coupled to housing 20 and movable relative thereto between an un-actuated position and an actuated position. More specifically, trigger 62 is operably coupled to an actuation bar 161 (e.g., similarly as with the coupling of movable handle 40 to drive bar 142) such that movement of trigger 62 relative to housing 20 effects longitudinal translation of actuation bar 161 through housing 20 and shaft 12. The distal end of actuation bar 161 is coupled to one or both jaw members 110, 120 such that longitudinal translation of actuation bar 161 effects transitioning of end effector assembly 100 between the un-actuated condition (FIGS. 4A and 4B) and the actuated condition (FIGS. 5A and 5B). Trigger 62, as shown in FIG. 1, is initially disposed in the un-actuated position and, correspondingly, end effector assembly 100 is disposed in the un-actuated condition (FIGS. 4A and 4B). Trigger 62 is selectively actuatable from this un-actuated position to an actuated position corresponding to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 100 (FIGS. 5A and 5B). Further, a biasing member 166 may be disposed within housing 20 and positioned to bias actuation bar 161 proximally, thereby biasing end effector assembly 100 towards the un-actuated condition and trigger 62 towards the un-actuated position. The operable distal components of actuation assembly 60 and the functions thereof are described in greater detail below.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, forceps 10′ is shown including two elongated shaft members 12 a, 12 b, each having a proximal end 16 a, 16 b, and a distal end 14 a, 14 b, respectively. Forceps 10′ is configured for use with an end effector assembly 100′ similar to end effector assembly 100 (FIGS. 1 and 3B). More specifically, end effector assembly 100′ includes first and second jaw members 110′, 120′ attached to respective distal ends 14 a, 14 b of shaft members 12 a, 12 b. Jaw members 110′, 120′ are pivotably connected about a pivot 103′. Each shaft member 12 a, 12 b includes a handle 17 a, 17 b disposed at the proximal end 16 a, 16 b thereof. Each handle 17 a, 17 b defines a finger hole 18 a, 18 b therethrough for receiving a finger of the user. As can be appreciated, finger holes 18 a, 18 b facilitate movement of the shaft members 12 a, 12 b relative to one another to, in turn, pivot jaw members 110′, 120′ from the spaced-apart position, wherein jaw members 110′, 120′ are disposed in spaced relation relative to one another, to the approximated position, wherein jaw members 110′, 120′ cooperate to grasp tissue therebetween.
  • One of the shaft members 12 a, 12 b of forceps 10′, e.g., shaft member 12 a, includes a proximal shaft connector 19 configured to connect the forceps 10′ to a source of energy (not shown), e.g., a generator. Proximal shaft connector 19 secures a cable 2′ to forceps 10′ such that the user may selectively supply energy to jaw members 110′, 120′ for treating tissue and for energy-based tissue cutting. More specifically, an activation switch 4′ is provided for supplying energy to jaw members 110′, 120′ to treat tissue upon sufficient approximation of shaft members 12 a, 12 b, e.g., upon activation of activation switch 4′ via shaft member 12 b.
  • Forceps 10′ further includes an actuation assembly 60′ including a trigger 62′ coupled to one of the shaft members, e.g., shaft member 12 b, and movable relative thereto between an un-actuated position and an actuated position for transitioning end effector assembly 100′ between an un-actuated condition and an actuated condition, similarly as with end effector assembly 100 (FIG. 3B).
  • With reference to FIG. 3B, end effector assembly 100 of forceps 10 (FIG. 1) is shown, although end effector assembly 100 may similarly be used in conjunction with forceps 10′ (FIG. 2), or any other suitable surgical instrument. For purposes of simplicity, end effector assembly 100 is described herein as configured for use with forceps 10 (FIG. 1). Further, end effector assembly 100 is initially generally described below with reference to FIG. 3B, followed by a more detailed description of the particular features and function thereof with reference to FIGS. 4A-5B. End effector assembly 100, and the various other configurations of end effector assemblies detailed below with respect to FIGS. 6A-10B, are suitable for use in performing tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy procedures, although such end effector assemblies may equally be applicable for use in other surgical procedures. Each of the various configurations detailed below with respect to FIGS. 6A-10B may incorporate the general features of end effector assembly 100 and may likewise be used with forceps 10 (FIG. 1), forceps 10′ (FIG. 2), or any other suitable surgical instrument. That is, the general features detailed with respect to end effector assembly 100 (FIG. 3B), are also applicable to the end effector assemblies of FIGS. 6A-10B, except where specifically contradicted.
  • Each jaw member 110, 120 of end effector assembly 100 includes a jaw frame having a proximal flange portion 111, 121, an outer insulative jaw housing 112, 122 disposed about the distal portion (not explicitly shown) of each jaw frame, and a tissue-treating plate 114, 124, respectively. Proximal flange portions 111, 121 are pivotably coupled to one another about pivot 103 for moving jaw members 110, 120 between the spaced-apart and approximated positions, although other suitable mechanisms for pivoting jaw members 110, 120 relative to one another are also contemplated. The distal portions (not explicitly shown) of the jaw frames are configured to support jaw housings 112, 122, and tissue-treating plates 114, 124, respectively, thereon.
  • Outer insulative jaw housings 112, 122 of jaw members 110, 120 support and retain tissue-treating plates 114, 124 on respective jaw members 110, 120 in opposed relation relative to one another. Tissue-treating plates 114, 124 are formed from an electrically conductive material, e.g., for conducting electrical energy therebetween for treating tissue, although tissue-treating plates 114, 124 may alternatively be configured to conduct any suitable energy, e.g., thermal, microwave, light, ultrasonic, etc., through tissue grasped therebetween for energy-based tissue treatment. As mentioned above, tissue-treating plates 114, 124 are coupled to activation switch 4 (FIG. 1) and the source of energy (not shown), e.g., via the wires (not shown) extending from cable 2 (FIG. 1) through forceps 10 (FIG. 1), such that energy may be selectively supplied to tissue-treating plate 114 and/or tissue-treating plate 124 and conducted therebetween and through tissue disposed between jaw members 110, 120 to treat tissue. Tissue-treating plates 114, 124 may define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue, as detailed below.
  • With additional reference to FIGS. 4A-5B, one of the jaw members of end effector assembly 100, e.g., jaw member 120, defines a bifurcated configuration including first and second jaw components 120 a, 120 b. First and second jaw components 120 a, 120 b of jaw member 120 extend longitudinally in side-by-side relation relative to one another and each includes a tissue-treating plate portion 124 a, 124 b that together form tissue-treating plate 124. Although shown as substantially equal, it is envisioned that jaw components 120 a, 120 b may define any suitable equal or unequal widths.
  • One of the jaw components of jaw member 120, e.g., jaw component 120 a, is rotatably coupled to proximal flange portion 121 of jaw member 120 via a rod 126, although it is also contemplated that both jaw components 120 a, 120 b be rotatable relative to proximal flange portion 121. Rod 126 extends longitudinally such that jaw component 120 a is rotatable between an aligned orientation, corresponding to the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 100, wherein tissue-treating plate portion 124 a and tissue-treating plate portion 124 b are substantially coplanar relative to one another (FIGS. 4A and 4B), and an angled orientation, corresponding to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 100, wherein tissue-treating plate portion 124 a is angled with respect to tissue-treating plate portion 124 b (FIGS. 5A and 5B). Further, one of the jaw components, e.g., jaw component 120 b, may define a cut-out 125 to permit rotation of jaw component 120 a relative thereto.
  • Actuator drive bar 161 of actuator assembly 60 (FIG. 3A) includes an actuator member 168 disposed at the distal end thereof that is configured for insertion between jaw components 120 a, 120 b to rotate jaw component 120 b relative to jaw component 120 a, thereby rotating tissue-treating plate portion 124 a relative to tissue-treating plate portion 124 b from the aligned orientation to the angled orientation. More specifically, actuator member 168 defines a wedge-like configuration and is configured for insertion between jaw components 120 a, 120 b at a position offset, e.g., above or below, relative to rod 126. As such, insertion of the wedge-like actuator member 168 jaw components 120 a, 120 b urges jaw component 120 a and tissue-treating plate portion 124 a thereof to rotate towards the angled orientation. Trigger 62 of actuator assembly 60 (FIG. 3A), as noted above, is selectively actuatable to advance actuator drive bar 161 and, thus, actuator member 168 between jaw components 120 a, 120 b to transition end effector assembly 100 to the actuated condition. One or more biasing members 129 may be disposed between jaw components 120 a, 120 b at a position offset relative to rod 126, on an opposite side of rod 126 as compared to actuator member 168 to bias jaw components 120 a, 120 b towards the aligned orientation, corresponding to the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 100.
  • In use, with end effector assembly 100 disposed in the un-actuated condition (FIGS. 4A and 4B) and jaw members 110, 120 disposed in the spaced-apart position, end effector assembly 100 is manipulated into position such that tissue to be treated and cut is disposed between jaw members 110, 120. With respect to tonsillectomy procedures, for example, end effector assembly 100 is positioned between the cavity wall tissue (or other tissue to remain) and the tonsil tissue (or other tissue to be removed). Once the desired position has been achieved, jaw members 110, 120 are moved to the approximated position, e.g., via moving movable handle 40 (FIG. 3A) to the depressed condition, to grasp tissue between tissue-treating plate 114 and tissue-treating plates 124 a, 124 b. Thereafter, tissue-treating plate 114 may be energized to a first electrical potential and tissue-treating plate portions 124 a, 124 b to a second, different electrical potential for conducting energy between plate 114 and plate portions 124 a, 124 b and through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
  • Once tissue has been treated the tissue to be removed, e.g., the tonsil tissue, is separated from the tissue to remain, e.g., the wall tissue. In order to separate the tissue, while maintaining jaw members 110, 120 in the approximated position grasping the previously treated tissue between the serrated tissue-treating plate 114 and plate portions 124 a, 124 b, trigger 62 (FIG. 3A) is moved from the un-actuated position to the actuated position. Actuation of trigger 62 (FIG. 3A) advances actuation drive rod 161 and actuation member 168 distally such that actuation member 168 is inserted between jaw components 120 a, 120 b to urge jaw component 120 a to rotate relative to jaw component 120 b from the aligned orientation, e.g., the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 100, to the angled orientation, e.g., the actuated condition of end effector assembly 100. As tissue-treating plate portion 124 a is rotated relative to tissue-treating plate portion 124 b and tissue-treating plate 114, the previously treated tissue grasped between jaw members 110, 120, which is substantially held in position via the serrated tissue-treating plate 114 and plate portions 124 a, 124 b, is cut in a dynamic shearing and/or ripping fashion, ultimately separating the tonsil tissue to be removed from the wall tissue to remain. The separated tonsil tissue may then be removed using end effector assembly 100, another grasping instrument, a suction device, or via other suitable method.
  • Turning to FIGS. 6A-7B, another embodiment of an end effector assembly is shown generally identified by reference numeral 200. End effector assembly 200 may be configured for use with forceps 10 (FIG. 1), forceps 10′ (FIG. 2), or any other suitable surgical instrument, except that actuation assembly 60, 60′ (FIGS. 1 and 2, respectively), need not be provided. Rather, as detailed below, end effector assembly 200 is configured for treating and cutting tissue by moving jaw members 210, 220 from a spaced-apart position to a first approximated position to grasp and treat tissue, and further to a second approximated position to cut tissue. With additional reference to FIG. 1 momentarily, this may be accomplished, for example, via moving movable handle 40 of forceps 10 from the initial position to a first compressed position corresponding to the first approximated position of jaw members 210, 220, and to then further to a second approximated position of jaw members 210, 220.
  • Each jaw member 210, 220 of end effector assembly 200 includes a jaw frame having a proximal flange portion 221 (although not shown, the proximal flange portion of jaw member 210 is similar proximal flange portion 221 of jaw member 220), an outer insulative jaw housing 212, 222 disposed about the distal portion (not explicitly shown) of each jaw frame, and a tissue-treating plate 214, 224, respectively. The proximal flange portion (not shown) of jaw member 210 and proximal flange portion 221 of jaw member 220 are pivotably coupled to one another for moving jaw members 210, 220 between the spaced-apart position, first approximated position (FIG. 6B), and second approximated position (FIG. 7B). The distal portions of the jaw frames are configured to support jaw housings 212, 222, and tissue-treating plates 214, 224, respectively, thereon. Tissue-treating plates 214, 224 are formed from an electrically conductive material, e.g., for conducting electrical energy therebetween for treating tissue, similarly as detailed above. Further, tissue-treating plates 214, 224 may define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue, as detailed below.
  • One of the jaw members of end effector assembly 200, e.g., jaw member 220, defines a bifurcated configuration including first and second jaw components 220 a, 220 b. First and second jaw components 220 a, 220 b of jaw member 220 extend longitudinally in side-by-side relation relative to one another and each includes a tissue-treating plate portion 224 a, 224 b of tissue-treating plate 224. One or more biasing members 229 may be disposed between jaw components 220 a, 220 b to bias jaw components 220 a, 220 b towards one another, corresponding to the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 200. As detailed below, when jaw members 210, 220 are moved to the second approximated position, jaw member 210 urges jaw components 220 a, 220 b apart from one another against the bias of biasing members 229, corresponding to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 200.
  • The other jaw member of end effector assembly 200, e.g., jaw member 210 includes a pair of spaced-apart, substantially planar tissue-contacting plate portions 214 a, 214 b that together define plate 214. Positioned between the spaced-apart plate portions 214 a, 214 b of jaw member 210 is an insulative member 218. More specifically, insulative member 218 extends longitudinally between plate portions 214 a, 214 b and towards jaw member 220. Insulative member 218 defines generally trapezoidal transverse cross-sectional configuration having angled sides 219 a, 219 b, although other configurations are also contemplated. Angled sides 219 a, 219 b permit the free end of insulative member 218 to extend partially between jaw components 220 a, 220 b of jaw member 220 in the first approximated position of end effector assembly 200 without effecting relative movement of jaw components 220 a, 220 b (the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 200). However, upon further approximation of jaw members 210, 220, e.g., to the second approximated position, insulative member 218 extends further between jaw components 220 a, 220 b such that angled sides 219 a, 219 b urge jaw components 220 a, 220 b apart from one another against the bias of biasing member 229 (the actuated condition of end effector assembly 200).
  • In use, with end effector assembly 200 disposed in the un-actuated condition (FIGS. 6A and 6B) and jaw members 210, 220 disposed in the spaced-apart position, end effector assembly 200 is manipulated into position such that tissue to be treated and cut is disposed between jaw members 210, 220. With respect to tonsillectomy procedures, for example, end effector assembly 200 is positioned between the cavity wall tissue (or other tissue to remain) and the tonsil tissue (or other tissue to be removed). Once the desired position has been achieved, jaw members 210, 220 are moved to the first approximated position to grasp tissue between tissue-treating plates 214, 224 and, more specifically, between tissue-treating plate portions 214 a, 214 b and tissue-treating plate portions 224 a, 224 b, respectively. In the first approximated position, jaw components 220 a, 220 b of jaw member 220 are disposed in close proximity to one another such that plate portions 214 a, 214 b and plate portions 224 a, 224 b, respectively, are aligned with one another. Thereafter, tissue-treating plate portions 214 a, 214 b may be energized to a first electrical potential and tissue-treating plate portions 224 a, 224 b to a second, different electrical potential for conducting energy therebetween and through tissue grasped between jaw members 210, 220 to treat tissue.
  • Once tissue has been treated, the tissue to be removed, e.g., the tonsil tissue, is separated from the tissue to remain, e.g., the wall tissue. In order to separate the tissue, jaw members 210, 220 are moved from the first approximated position to the second approximated position such that insulative member 218 is advanced between jaw components 220 a, 220 b of jaw member 220 and urges jaw components 220 a, 220 b apart from one another to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 200. Movement of jaw components 220 a, 220 b to the actuated condition moves tissue-treating plate portions 224 a, 224 b apart from one another and relative to tissue-treating plate portions 214 a, 214 b such that the previously treated tissue grasped between jaw members 210, 220, which is substantially held in position via the serrated tissue-treating plate portions 214 a, 214 b and 224 a, 224 b, respectively, is cut in a dynamic shearing and/or ripping fashion, ultimately separating the tonsil tissue to be removed from the wall tissue to remain. The separated tonsil tissue may then be removed using end effector assembly 200, another grasping instrument, a suction device, or via other suitable method.
  • Turning to FIGS. 8A-9B, another embodiment of an end effector assembly is shown generally identified by reference numeral 300. End effector assembly 300 may be configured for use with forceps 10 (FIG. 1), forceps 10′ (FIG. 2), or any other suitable surgical instrument, except that actuation assembly 60, 60′ (FIGS. 1 and 2, respectively), need not be provided. Rather, similarly as with end effector assembly 200 (FIGS. 6A-7B), and as detailed below, end effector assembly 300 is configured for treating and cutting tissue by moving jaw members 310, 320 from a spaced-apart position to a first approximated position to grasp and treat tissue, and further to a second approximated position to cut tissue.
  • Each jaw member 310, 320 of end effector assembly 300 includes a jaw frame having a proximal flange portion 311, 321, an outer insulative jaw housing 312, 322 disposed about the distal portion (not explicitly shown) of each jaw frame, and a tissue-treating plate 314, 324, respectively. Proximal flange portions 311, 321 are pivotably coupled to one another about a pivot 303 for moving jaw members 310, 320 between the spaced-apart position, first approximated position (FIG. 8B), and second approximated position (FIG. 9B). The distal portions of the jaw frames are configured to support jaw housings 312, 322, and tissue-treating plates 314, 324, respectively, thereon. Tissue-treating plates 314, 324 are formed from an electrically conductive material, e.g., for conducting electrical energy therebetween for treating tissue, similarly as detailed above. Further, tissue-treating plates 314, 324 may define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue, as detailed below.
  • As mentioned above, proximal flange portions 311, 321 are pivotably coupled to one another about pivot 303. More specifically, proximal flange portions 311, 321 are disposed about pivot 303 with at least some play therebetween to permit one or both of proximal flange portions 311, 321 to move towards and away from the other along pivot 303. A biasing member 305 may be disposed about pivot 303 and coupled between proximal flange portions 311, 321 to bias proximal flange portions 311, 321 towards one another, thereby biasing jaw members 310, 320 towards an aligned configuration, corresponding to the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 300. Biasing member 305 further serves to inhibit jaw splay during movement of jaw members 310, 320 between the spaced-apart position and the first approximated position.
  • Proximal flange portions 311, 321 of jaw members 310, 320 each further include an inwardly-extending protrusion 317, 327 defining a ramped surface 318, 328, respectively. Ramped surfaces 318, 328 are positioned to oppose one another and to slidably contact one another upon movement of jaw members 310, 320 from the first approximated position (FIG. 8A) to the second approximated position (FIG. 9A). More specifically, in the first approximated position, ramped surfaces 318, 328 are spaced-apart from one another (see FIG. 8A) and, as such, jaw members 310, 320 are biased to the aligned configuration, corresponding to the un-actuated condition of end effector assembly 300 (see FIG. 8B). Upon movement of jaw members 310, 320 to the second approximated position, ramped surfaces 318, 328 slidably contact one another and, due to the ramped configurations of protrusions 317, 327, increasingly urge proximal flange portions 311, 321 apart from one another (see FIG. 9A) to thereby move jaw members 310, 320 towards an offset configuration, corresponding to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 300 (see FIG. 9B).
  • In use, with end effector assembly 300 disposed in the un-actuated condition (FIGS. 8A and 8B) and jaw members 310, 320 disposed in the spaced-apart position, end effector assembly 300 is manipulated into position such that tissue to be treated and cut is disposed between jaw members 310, 320. With respect to tonsillectomy procedures, for example, end effector assembly 300 is positioned between the cavity wall tissue (or other tissue to remain) and the tonsil tissue (or other tissue to be removed). Once the desired position has been achieved, jaw members 310, 320 are moved to the first approximated position to grasp tissue between tissue-treating plates 314, 324. Thereafter, tissue-treating plate 314 may be energized to a first electrical potential and tissue-treating plate 324 to a second, different electrical potential for conducting energy therebetween and through tissue grasped between jaw members 310, 320 to treat, e.g., seal, tissue.
  • Once tissue has been treated, the tissue to be removed, e.g., the tonsil tissue, is separated from the tissue to remain, e.g., the wall tissue. In order to separate the tissue, jaw members 310, 320 are moved from the first approximated position to the second approximated position such that ramped surfaces 318, 328 slidably contact one another and urge proximal flange portions 311, 321 apart from one another to move jaw members 310, 320 to the actuated condition of end effector assembly 300. Movement of jaw members 310, 320 to the actuated condition moves tissue-treating plates 314, 324 relative to one another such that the previously treated tissue grasped between jaw members 310, 320, which is substantially held in position via the serrated tissue-treating plates 314, 324 is cut in a dynamic shearing and/or ripping fashion, ultimately separating the tonsil tissue to be removed from the wall tissue to remain. The separated tonsil tissue may then be removed using end effector assembly 300, another grasping instrument, a suction device, or via other suitable method.
  • Turning to FIGS. 10A and 10B, another embodiment of an end effector assembly is shown generally identified by reference numeral 400. End effector assembly 400 may be configured for use with forceps 10 (FIG. 1), forceps 10′ (FIG. 2), or any other suitable surgical instrument. End effector assembly 400 is configured for treating and cutting tissue by moving jaw members 410, 420 from a spaced-apart position to an approximated position (FIG. 10A) to grasp and treat tissue, and then by moving each jaw member 410, 420 from an un-actuated position to an actuated position (FIG. 10B) to cut tissue. Movement between the spaced-apart and approximated positions may be accomplished via moving movable handle 40 of forceps 10 (FIG. 1) from the initial position to a first compressed position, while moving movable handle 40 (FIG. 1) from the first compressed position to a second compressed position may be effected to both move jaw members 410, 420 to a further approximated position and move of each of jaw members 410, 420 from the un-actuated position to the actuated position, similarly as with end effector assemblies 200 or 300 (FIGS. 6A-7B and FIGS. 8A-9B, respectively). Alternatively, with jaw members 410, 420 disposed in the approximated position, each jaw member 410, 420 may be moved from the un-actuated position to the actuated position via actuation of trigger 62 (FIG. 3A), similarly as with end effector assembly 100 (FIGS. 4A-5B).
  • Each jaw member 410, 420 of end effector assembly 400 defines a bifurcated configuration including first and second jaw components 410 a, 410 b and 420 a, 420 b, respectively. First and second jaw components 410 a, 410 b and 420 a, 420 b of respective jaw members 410, 420 extend longitudinally in side-by-side relation relative to one another and each includes a tissue-treating plate portion 414 a, 414 b and 424 a, 424 b that cooperate to define the tissue-treating plates of jaw members 410, 420. Tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 414 b and 424 a, 424 b are formed from an electrically conductive material, e.g., for conducting electrical energy therebetween for treating tissue, similarly as detailed above. Further, tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 414 b and 424 a, 424 b may define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue, as detailed below.
  • As noted above, jaw members 410, 420 of end effector assembly 400 are configured to move between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position (FIG. 10A), and each jaw member 410, 420, with the jaw members 410, 420 disposed in the approximated position (FIG. 10A), is further configured to move between an un-actuated position (FIG. 10A) and an actuated position (FIG. 10B). As also noted above, in some embodiments, the actuated position of each of jaw members 410, 420 corresponds to a further approximated position of jaw members 410, 420. In either configuration, in the un-actuated position, jaw components 410 a, 410 b of jaw member 410 are positioned adjacent one another in close proximity to one another and, similarly, jaw components 420 a, 420 b of jaw member 420 are positioned adjacent one another in close proximity to one another. Upon movement of jaw members 410, 420 to the actuated position, jaw components 410 a, 410 b of jaw member 410 are moved apart from one another and, similarly, jaw components 420 a, 420 b of jaw member 420 are moved apart from one another.
  • In use, with jaw members 410, 420 initially disposed in the spaced-apart position, end effector assembly 400 is manipulated into position such that tissue to be treated and cut is disposed between jaw members 410, 420. With respect to tonsillectomy procedures, for example, end effector assembly 400 is positioned between the cavity wall tissue (or other tissue to remain) and the tonsil tissue (or other tissue to be removed). Once the desired position has been achieved, jaw members 410, 420 are moved to the approximated position to grasp tissue between the tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 414 b of jaw member 410 and the tissue-treating plate portions 424 a, 424 b of jaw member 420. More specifically, a first portion of tissue is grasped between tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 424 a and a second portion of tissue is grasped between tissue-treating plate portions 414 b, 424 b.
  • Thereafter, tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 414 b may be energized to a first electrical potential and tissue-treating plate portions 424 a, 424 b to a second, different electrical potential for conducting energy therebetween and through tissue grasped between jaw members 410, 420 to treat tissue. More specifically, both the first portion of tissue grasped between tissue-treating plate portions 414 a, 424 a and a second portion of tissue grasped between tissue-treating plate portions 414 b, 424 b are treated via the conduction of energy therethrough.
  • Once tissue has been treated, the tissue to be removed, e.g., the tonsil tissue, is separated from the tissue to remain, e.g., the wall tissue. In order to separate the tissue, jaw members 410, 420 are moved from the un-actuated position to the actuated position such that jaw components 410 a, 420 a are moved apart from respective jaw components 410 b, 420 b. Thus, as jaw members 410, 420 are moved from the un-actuated position to the actuated position, the first and second portions of previously-treated tissue are pulled apart from one another, ultimately such that the tissue disposed therebetween is ripped and/or torn, separating the first and second portions of previously-treated tissue from one another. With respect to tonsillectomy procedures, for example, moving jaw members 410, 420 from the un-actuated position to the actuated position separates the tonsil tissue to be removed from the wall tissue to remain. The separated tonsil tissue (or other tissue) may then be removed using end effector assembly 400, another grasping instrument, a suction device, or via other suitable method.
  • The various embodiments disclosed herein may also be configured to work with robotic surgical systems and what is commonly referred to as “Telesurgery.” Such systems employ various robotic elements to assist the surgeon and allow remote operation (or partial remote operation) of surgical instrumentation. Various robotic arms, gears, cams, pulleys, electric and mechanical motors, etc. may be employed for this purpose and may be designed with a robotic surgical system to assist the surgeon during the course of an operation or treatment. Such robotic systems may include remotely steerable systems, automatically flexible surgical systems, remotely flexible surgical systems, remotely articulating surgical systems, wireless surgical systems, modular or selectively configurable remotely operated surgical systems, etc.
  • The robotic surgical systems may be employed with one or more consoles that are next to the operating theater or located in a remote location. In this instance, one team of surgeons or nurses may prep the patient for surgery and configure the robotic surgical system with one or more of the instruments disclosed herein while another surgeon (or group of surgeons) remotely control the instruments via the robotic surgical system. As can be appreciated, a highly skilled surgeon may perform multiple operations in multiple locations without leaving his/her remote console which can be both economically advantageous and a benefit to the patient or a series of patients.
  • The robotic arms of the surgical system are typically coupled to a pair of master handles by a controller. The handles can be moved by the surgeon to produce a corresponding movement of the working ends of any type of surgical instrument (e.g., end effectors, graspers, knifes, scissors, etc.) which may complement the use of one or more of the embodiments described herein. The movement of the master handles may be scaled so that the working ends have a corresponding movement that is different, smaller or larger, than the movement performed by the operating hands of the surgeon. The scale factor or gearing ratio may be adjustable so that the operator can control the resolution of the working ends of the surgical instrument(s).
  • The master handles may include various sensors to provide feedback to the surgeon relating to various tissue parameters or conditions, e.g., tissue resistance due to manipulation, cutting or otherwise treating, pressure by the instrument onto the tissue, tissue temperature, tissue impedance, etc. As can be appreciated, such sensors provide the surgeon with enhanced tactile feedback simulating actual operating conditions. The master handles may also include a variety of different actuators for delicate tissue manipulation or treatment further enhancing the surgeon's ability to mimic actual operating conditions.
  • From the foregoing and with reference to the various figure drawings, those skilled in the art will appreciate that certain modifications can also be made to the present disclosure without departing from the scope of the same. While several embodiments of the disclosure have been shown in the drawings, it is not intended that the disclosure be limited thereto, as it is intended that the disclosure be as broad in scope as the art will allow and that the specification be read likewise. Therefore, the above description should not be construed as limiting, but merely as exemplifications of particular embodiments. Those skilled in the art will envision other modifications within the scope and spirit of the claims appended hereto.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A surgical instrument, comprising:
an end effector assembly including first and second jaw members, each jaw member including a tissue-treating plate disposed thereon, the first and second jaw members movable between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plates, at least one of the first and second jaw members including:
a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components, each of the first and second jaw components including a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon, the tissue-treating plate portions cooperating to define the tissue-treating plate of the jaw member, at least one of the first and second jaw components rotatable relative to the other between an aligned orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are substantially co-planar relative to one another, and an angled orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are angled relative to one another, wherein rotation of the at least one of the first and second jaw components from the aligned orientation to the angled orientation effects cutting of tissue grasped between the tissue-treating plates of the first and second jaw members.
2. The surgical instrument according to claim 1, wherein the tissue-treating plates define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
3. The surgical instrument according to claim 1, further including an actuation assembly operably coupled to the end effector assembly, the actuation assembly including an actuation member movable between a first position and a second position to rotate the at least one of the first and second jaw components between the aligned orientation and the angled orientation.
4. The surgical instrument according to claim 3, wherein the actuation assembly includes a trigger coupled to the actuation member, the trigger selectively actuatable for moving the actuation member between the first position and the second position.
5. The surgical instrument according to claim 1, further including at least one biasing member interdisposed between the first and second jaw components and configured to bias the at least one of the first and second jaw components towards the aligned orientation.
6. The surgical instrument according to claim 1, wherein the tissue-treating plates are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
7. A surgical instrument, comprising:
an end effector assembly including first and second jaw members movable between a spaced-apart position, a first approximated position for grasping tissue therebetween, and a second approximated position,
the first jaw member including:
a body having first and second spaced-apart tissue-treating plate portions disposed thereon and an insulative member extending from the body between the first and second tissue-treating plate portions,
the second jaw member including:
a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components, each of the first and second jaw components including a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon, the first and second jaw components movable relative to one another and the first jaw member between a first position, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions of the first and second jaw components are respectively aligned with the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member, and a second position, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions of the first and second jaw components are offset relative to the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member,
wherein movement of the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position moves the insulative member between the first and second jaw components to urge the first and second jaw components from the first position to the second position to cut tissue grasped between the first and second jaw members.
8. The surgical instrument according to claim 7, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
9. The surgical instrument according to claim 7, further including at least one biasing member interdisposed between the first and second jaw components and configured to bias the first and second jaw components towards the first position.
10. The surgical instrument according to claim 7, wherein the first and second tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw member and the tissue-treating plate portions of the second jaw member are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
11. The surgical instrument according to claim 7, further including a handle assembly operably coupled to the end effector assembly, the handle assembly including a movable handle movable between an initial position, a first actuated position, and a second actuated position for moving the first and second jaw members between the spaced-apart position, the first approximated position, and the second approximated position, respectively.
12. A surgical instrument, comprising:
an end effector assembly including first and second jaw members, each jaw member including a jaw body having a tissue-treating plate disposed thereon, the first and second jaw members movable between a spaced-apart position and a first approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plates, the first and second jaw members further movable from the first approximated position to a second approximated position, wherein moving the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position transitioning the jaw members from an aligned orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plates are aligned with one another, to an offset orientation, wherein the tissue-treating plates are offset relative to one another, and wherein transitioning the jaw members from the aligned orientation to the offset orientation cuts tissue grasped between the tissue-treating plates.
13. The surgical instrument according to claim 12, wherein the tissue-treating plates define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
14. The surgical instrument according to claim 12, further including at least one biasing member configured to bias the first and second jaw members towards the aligned orientation.
15. The surgical instrument according to claim 12, wherein the tissue-treating plates are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
16. The surgical instrument according to claim 12, wherein each of the first and second jaw members further includes a proximal flange, the proximal flanges of the first and second jaw members pivotably coupled to one another for movement of the first and second jaw members between the spaced-apart position, the first approximated position, and the second approximated position.
17. The surgical instrument according to claim 16, wherein a protrusion extends from each of the proximal flanges, the protrusions operably positioned relative to one another such that, upon movement of the first and second jaw members from the first approximated position to the second approximated position, the protrusions contact one another and urge the proximal flanges apart from one another, thereby urging the jaw members from the aligned orientation to the offset orientation.
18. A surgical instrument, comprising:
an end effector assembly including first and second jaw members each defining a bifurcated body having first and second jaw components, the first and second jaw components of each of the jaw members including a tissue-treating plate portion disposed thereon,
wherein the jaw components of the first jaw member and the jaw components of the second jaw member are movable relative to one another between a spaced-apart position and an approximated position for grasping tissue between the tissue-treating plate portions of the first jaw components and between the tissue-treating plate portions of the second jaw components, and
wherein the first jaw components of the jaw members and the second jaw components of the jaw members are movable relative to one another between an un-actuated position, wherein the first and second jaw components of each jaw member are disposed in close proximity to one another, and an actuated position, wherein the first and second jaw components of each jaw member are spaced further-apart from one another, to separate tissue grasped between the first jaw components from tissue grasped between the second jaw components.
19. The surgical instrument according to claim 18, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions define serrated configurations to facilitate grasping and cutting of tissue.
20. The surgical instrument according to claim 18, wherein the tissue-treating plate portions are adapted to connect to a source of energy for conducting energy through tissue grasped therebetween to treat tissue.
US14/738,107 2014-08-11 2015-06-12 Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures Abandoned US20160038220A1 (en)

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US14/738,107 US20160038220A1 (en) 2014-08-11 2015-06-12 Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures

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US14/738,201 US10045812B2 (en) 2014-08-11 2015-06-12 Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures
US14/738,107 US20160038220A1 (en) 2014-08-11 2015-06-12 Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures
PCT/US2015/037952 WO2016025093A1 (en) 2014-08-11 2015-06-26 Surgical instruments and methods for performing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy procedures

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US20180325584A1 (en) 2018-11-15

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