US20150258920A1 - Soldier support system in a vehicle - Google Patents

Soldier support system in a vehicle Download PDF

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Publication number
US20150258920A1
US20150258920A1 US14718012 US201514718012A US2015258920A1 US 20150258920 A1 US20150258920 A1 US 20150258920A1 US 14718012 US14718012 US 14718012 US 201514718012 A US201514718012 A US 201514718012A US 2015258920 A1 US2015258920 A1 US 2015258920A1
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Prior art keywords
strap
release
seat
soldier
assembly
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US14718012
Inventor
Kyle L. Greenwood
Rattaya C. Yalamanchili
James Buckner
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Black Mountain Ind Inc
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Black Mountain Ind Inc
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/24Seats specially adapted for vehicles for particular purposes or particular vehicles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/005Arrangement or mounting of seats in vehicles, e.g. dismountable auxiliary seats
    • B60N2/015Attaching seats directly to vehicle chassis
    • B60N2/01508Attaching seats directly to vehicle chassis using quick release attachments
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/02Seats specially adapted for vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable
    • B60N2/04Seats specially adapted for vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable the whole seat being movable
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/02Seats specially adapted for vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable
    • B60N2/04Seats specially adapted for vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable the whole seat being movable
    • B60N2/16Seats specially adapted for vehicles the seat or part thereof being movable, e.g. adjustable the whole seat being movable height-adjustable
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/24Seats specially adapted for vehicles for particular purposes or particular vehicles
    • B60N2/42Seats specially adapted for vehicles for particular purposes or particular vehicles the seat constructed to protect the occupant from the effect of abnormal g-forces, e.g. crash or safety seats
    • B60N2/4207Seats specially adapted for vehicles for particular purposes or particular vehicles the seat constructed to protect the occupant from the effect of abnormal g-forces, e.g. crash or safety seats characterised by the direction of the g-forces
    • B60N2/4242Seats specially adapted for vehicles for particular purposes or particular vehicles the seat constructed to protect the occupant from the effect of abnormal g-forces, e.g. crash or safety seats characterised by the direction of the g-forces vertical
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60NSEATS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR VEHICLES; VEHICLE PASSENGER ACCOMMODATION NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60N2/00Seats specially adapted for vehicles
    • B60N2/50Seat suspension devices
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60RVEHICLES, VEHICLE FITTINGS, OR VEHICLE PARTS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B60R22/00Safety belts or body harnesses in vehicles
    • B60R22/30Coupling devices other than buckles, including length-adjusting fittings or anti-slip devices

Abstract

A soldier support system and a method for protecting soldiers are disposed in a vehicle. In an embodiment, a soldier support system includes a seat assembly. The soldier support system also includes a single point release system. The single point release system includes a release assembly. In addition, the single point release system includes a first seat side strap and a second seat side strap. Moreover, the single point release system includes a first main support strap and a second main support strap. The single point release system further includes a first side restraint tether and a second side restraint tether.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation application that claims the benefit of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/474,800 filed on May 18, 2012, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not applicable.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to the field of vehicle restraint systems and more specifically to soldier restraint systems in a vehicle.
  • 2. Background of the Invention
  • Occupants of vehicles often need to be in an elevated position within the vehicle. For instance, in military vehicles, occupants of the military vehicles may need to expose the upper portion of the occupants' bodies outside of the vehicle. Such instances include the need to operate weaponry, improve vision outside of the military vehicle, and the like. Problems occur in such situations with fatigue involved with the individuals having to stand in such positions for long periods of time. Further problems include securing the occupant inside the vehicle during motion of the vehicle and also during a vehicle rollover to prevent injury of the occupant.
  • Consequently, there is a need for a restraint system to protect soldiers in a vehicle. Additional needs include an improved restraint system that secures an occupant in a vehicle and that also provides as seat to the occupant.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF SOME OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • These and other needs in the art are addressed in one embodiment by a soldier support system that includes a seat assembly. The soldier support system also includes a single point release system. The single point release system includes a release assembly. In addition, the single point release system includes a first seat side strap and a second seat side strap. Moreover, the single point release system includes a first main support strap and a second main support strap. The single point release system further includes a first side restraint tether and a second side restraint tether.
  • The foregoing has outlined rather broadly the features and technical advantages of the present invention in order that the detailed description of the invention that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages of the invention will be described hereinafter that form the subject of the claims of the invention. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that the conception and the specific embodiments disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other embodiments for carrying out the same purposes of the present invention. It should also be realized by those skilled in the art that such equivalent embodiments do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • For a detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings in which:
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a front view of a soldier restraint system having a seat assembly and a restraint harness belt;
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a perspective view of a seat assembly;
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a top view of a seat assembly;
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a perspective bottom view of a seat assembly;
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a mounting assembly and a release assembly;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a mounting assembly, mounting strap, and a release assembly;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a front view of a restraint harness belt;
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a front view of a soldier restraint system having a seat assembly, a restraint harness belt, and a shoulder harness;
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a front view of a restraint harness belt and a shoulder harness;
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a side view of a restraint harness belt and a shoulder harness;
  • FIG. 11 illustrates a back view of a restraint harness belt and a shoulder harness:
  • FIG. 12 illustrates an embodiment of a ratchet platform attachment means;
  • FIG. 13 illustrates a front perspective view of an embodiment of a solider restraint system having a single point release system;
  • FIG. 14 illustrates a bottom perspective view of an embodiment of a seat, harness belt and single point release system;
  • FIG. 15 illustrates a bottom view of an embodiment of a seat and single point release system;
  • FIG. 16 illustrates an embodiment of a release device;
  • FIG. 17 illustrates a perspective bottom view of an embodiment of a release assembly prior to the wire catch loop passing through the small ring and the large ring;
  • FIG. 18 illustrates a perspective bottom of an embodiment of the release assembly of FIG. 17 with the wire catch loop passing through the small ring and the large ring;
  • FIG. 19 illustrates a perspective view of an embodiment of main support strap, seat side strap, and side restraint tether attached to each other;
  • FIG. 20 illustrates an embodiment of the wire catch loop attaching the small ring; and
  • FIG. 21 illustrates an embodiment of the release wire attaching the wire catch loop.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of a soldier restraint system 5 that includes seat assembly 10 and restraint harness belt 15. Seat assembly 10 includes seat 20. Seat 20 may include any type of seat suitable for use in a vehicle. Seat 20 may also be composed of any material suitable for use in a vehicle. Without limitation, seat 20 may be composed of leather, plastic, nylon, and the like. In some embodiments, seat 20 includes a cushion. FIG. 2 illustrates a perspective view of an embodiment of seat 20. Seat 20 may have any configuration suitable for an individual (i.e., soldier) to sit upon. FIG. 3 illustrates a top view of an embodiment of seat 20. As illustrated, straps 40 are attached to seat 20. Straps 40 are attached to seat 20 by strap attachment means 50. Strap attachment means 50 include any means suitable for attaching straps 40 to seat 20. In embodiments as illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, strap attachment means 50 are brackets that allow straps 40 and seat 20 to swivel in relation to each other. Straps 40 may be composed of any material suitable for use in a vehicle such as nylon, leather; and the like. In some embodiments, straps 40 are suitably attached on opposing sides of seat 20 to provide balance to an individual sitting in seat 20. In embodiments as illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, two straps 40 are attached to seat 20. In alternative embodiments (not illustrated), more than two straps 40 are attached to seat 20. Mounting assemblies 30, 30′ attach soldier restraint system 5 to the interior of the vehicle.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a bottom perspective view of an embodiment of seat 20 in which seat 20 includes seat base strap 90. Seat base strap 90 includes base strap attachment means 95. Seat base strap 90 may be attached to bottom side 175 of seat 20 by any suitable means. In an embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 4, seat base strap 90 is attached to strap attachment means 50 and is disposed on bottom side 175. Base strap attachment means 95 includes any means suitable for securing seat 20 to another object such as the floor of the vehicle or a platform within the vehicle. In some embodiments, a strap (not illustrated) is secured to a platform in the vehicle and is attached to seat 20 at base strap attachment means 95. Sufficient tension is provided in the strap to prevent unwanted upward movement of seat 20 in the vehicle. For example, in an instance in which the vehicle rolls over, the tension in the strap attached to base strap attachment means 95 prevents seat 20 and an individual secured in seat 20 from harm by limiting the movement of seat 20. In an embodiment, seat base strap 90 has sufficient tension between the strap attachment means 50 to provide contact between seat base strap 90 and bottom side 175 and to not substantially lose the contact when secured to the strap.
  • In an embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 1, mounting assemblies 30, 30′ are secured inside the vehicle. In some embodiments, mounting assemblies 30, 30′ are secured to inside surfaces such as walls of the vehicle or a gun turret of the vehicle. FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 having mounting assemblies 30, 30′ on opposing sides of seat 20. In embodiments as illustrated in FIG. 1, one mounting assembly 30 has an attached release assembly 35. The attached release assembly 35 is attached to a strap 40 that attaches mounting assembly 30 to seat 20. Strap 40 may be secured to seat 20 by any suitable means. In an embodiment as illustrated, strap 40 is secured to seat 20 by strap attachment means 50. Strap attachment means 50 includes any means suitable for attaching a strap to a seat. In an embodiment as shown, strap attachment means 50 is a bracket that swivels. Without limitation, a bracket that swivels allows limited motion of seat 20. In some embodiments, strap 40 includes adjusting means 80. Adjusting means 80 is any means suitable for adjusting the length of strap 40 between release assembly 35 and seat 20. The other mounting assembly 30′ has an attached mounting strap 45 with a release assembly 35 attached on the opposing end of mounting strap 45 from mounting assembly 30′. In some embodiments, mounting strap 45 includes adjusting means 80. Seat 20 is attached to mounting assembly 30 by a strap 40 that attaches the release assembly 35 to seat 20. FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 that has two mounting assemblies 30, 30′ but it is to be understood that soldier restraint system 5 is not limited to two mounting assemblies 30, 30′ but in alternative embodiments (not illustrated) may have more than two mounting assemblies. Mounting assemblies 30, 30′ are secured in the vehicle at a sufficient height to suspend seat 20 at a desirable height in the vehicle (i.e., from the floor or a platform in the vehicle). Adjusting means 80 allow the length of straps 40, 45 to be adjusted to adjust the suspension height of seat 20. Straps 40 attach seat 20 to release assemblies 35 by attachment means 85. Attachment means 85 may include any suitable means for attaching a strap to an object such as a hook, bracket, latch, and the like. Straps 40, 45 have a sufficient tension to facilitate suspension of seat 20 but in some embodiments also have a sufficient tension to allow the individual to have a desirable amount of movement while secured in seat 20. For instance, in an embodiment in which soldier restraint system 5 is secured in the vehicle to allow the individual to sit in a gun turret of the vehicle, the soldier may have a desire to move about in the interior when operating a weapon in a combat situation or to view outside the vehicle. Mounting assemblies 30, 30′ may be secured in the vehicle at any degrees apart to provide a seat 20 of sufficient stability to allow an individual to sit in seat 20.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 in which one mounting assembly 30 has a release assembly 35 attached to the mounting assembly 30, and the other mounting assembly 30′ has a release assembly 35 attached with a mounting strap 45 attached in between the mounting assembly 30′ and the release assembly 35. Without limitation, the mounting assembly 30 has the release assembly 35 attached to provide a release assembly 35 at as sufficient proximity to the individual sitting in seat 20 to allow the individual to pull the release assembly 35 and quickly drop seat 20. Further, without limitation, the mounting assembly 30′ has the release assembly at a lower position in relation to seat 20 to provide a release assembly 35 at a sufficient proximity to other individuals in the vehicle to pull the release assembly 35 and quickly drop seat 20. For instance, soldier restraint system 5 may be mounted in a gun turret of the vehicle wherein the soldier secured in soldier restraint system 5 has the upper portion of the soldier's body exposed outside of the vehicle. In a combat situation, the soldier secured in soldier restraint system 5 may desire to quickly drop down in the vehicle for protection by the vehicle. In such a situation, the release assembly 35 attached to mounting assembly 30 provides a convenient release assembly 35 by which the soldier may pull and release seat 20, thereby allowing the soldier to drop into the vehicle for protection. The soldier may also pull the release assembly 35 attached to the mounting assembly 30′ with the mounting strap 45 in between, but, with seat 20 in an elevated position allowing the soldier to be positioned in the gun turret, the position of such release assembly 35 provides a convenient release for other soldiers in the vehicle to pull and release seat 20 to allow the soldier to drop into the vehicle for protection. For instance, the soldier may be injured and unable to pull a release strap 135, and such lower positioned release strap 135 allows the other soldiers to pull the release strap 135 and thereby allow the injured soldier to be quickly protected inside the vehicle. It is to be understood that soldier restraint system 5 is not limited, to release assembly 35 attached to one mounting assembly 30 and another release assembly 35 disposed at a lower position in relation to seat 20. Soldier restraint system 5 may have release assemblies 35 disposed at any position in relation to seat 20. In an alternative embodiment (not illustrated), a mounting assembly 30 and/or 30′ may have one release assembly 35 attached to the respective mounting assembly and at least one other release assembly 35 disposed between the one release assembly 35 and seat 20. In other alternative embodiments (not illustrated), both mounting assemblies 30, 30′ have a release assembly 35 attached to the respective mounting assembly 30, 30′. In some alternative embodiments (not illustrated), both mounting assemblies 30, 30′ have an attached release assembly 35 with a mounting strap 45 disposed between the respective mounting assembly and the release assembly 35. It is to be understood that when one release assembly 35 is pulled to release seat 20 from the respective mounting assembly 30 or 30′, seat 20 remains secured to the other mounting assembly 30 or 30′, which protects the individual secured in soldier restraint system 5 in the event of a roll over or injury from other motion of the vehicle.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an embodiment of a mounting assembly 30 with release assembly 35 attached. For illustration purposes only, mounting assembly 30 is shown in an exploded view. Mounting assembly 30 may include any suitable method for securing a strap to a wall. For instance, mounting assembly 30 may include nails, hooks, screws, adhesives, studs, magnets, and the like. In an embodiment as illustrated, mounting assembly 30 includes a bond stud 100, which secures bracket 125 of release assembly 35 within the vehicle. In an embodiment in which bond stud 100 secures bracket 125 to a steel surface inside the vehicle, the surface of the steel may be prepared and then bond stud 100 may be allowed to cure on the steel. In some embodiments, a bushing 105 slides over bond stud 100. Other embodiments also include mounting assembly 30 including other securing means such as washer 110, lock washer 115, and nut 120. Without limitation, with mounting assembly 30 including bond stud 100, the vehicle surface does not need to be welded or drilled to secure seat 20, which provides a reinforced substrate strength and facilitates corrosion resistance. Further, without limitation, welding or drilling on armor plate steel may compromise the integrity of the armor system.
  • As shown in FIG. 5, release assembly 35 includes latch and base release 130 and release strap 135. In the embodiment as shown, mounting assembly 30 secures release assembly 35 by securing bracket 125 to the vehicle, with the bracket 125 attached to latch and base release 130 by tether 25. Release assembly 35 has another bracket 125 on the opposing end of release assembly 35 to secure release assembly 35 to strap 40 (not illustrated). A sufficient pulling force applied to release strap 135 releases latch and base release 130, releasing strap 40 from mounting assembly 30. Without limitation, release assembly 35 provides a quick release mechanism. Strap 40 may be re-attached to mounting assembly 30 by re-connecting latch and base release 130 together. In an embodiment, release strap 135 has a reflector 140. Reflector 140 includes any reflective material that is suitable for attachment to a strap 40 and for use in a military vehicle. Without limitation, reflector 140 improves the visibility of release strap 135. It is to be understood that release assembly 35 is not limited to the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5 but may include any other mechanisms suitable for allowing such a quick release. In an embodiment, release assembly 35 is a quick release mechanism of the type referred to as an ejector hook for use in the parachute industry.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an embodiment in which mounting assembly 30′ is attached to mounting strap 45 with release assembly 35 attached to mounting strap 45 on the opposing end from mounting assembly 30′. For illustration purposes only; mounting assembly 30 is shown in an exploded view. In an embodiment as shown, mounting strap 45 has a length that is adjustable by adjusting means 80. Bond stud 100 passes through bracket 125 to secure mounting strap 45, with the opposing end of mounting strap 45 secured to release assembly 35. As shown in FIG. 1, strap 40 is secured to the opposing end of release assembly 35 from mounting strap 45.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an embodiment of restraint harness belt 15 in which restraint harness belt 15 has belt strap 60 and bracket 125. Belt strap 60 has bracket 125 secured to one end and belt release 145 secured to the opposing end of belt strap 60. Belt release 145 is any mechanism suitable for receiving bracket 125 and securing ends 180 and 185 together. It is to be understood that restraint harness belt 15 is not limited to bracket 125 and belt release 145 but may include any other suitable means for attaching ends 180 and 185 together. In an embodiment as shown, belt strap 60 has an adjustable length, which allows belt strap 60 to be adjusted to the waist of the individual to suitably secure the individual in soldier restraint system 5. In an embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 7, pull strap 75 is attached to the release mechanism of belt release 145. A suitable pulling three applied to belt strap 75 activates the release mechanism and releases bracket 125 from belt release 145. Without limitation, belt strap 75 provides a quick release of restraint harness belt 15 and allows the individual to exit restraint harness belt 15 quickly. In an embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 7, restraint harness belt 15 has belt pad 65. Belt pad 65 may have any configuration and size suitable for providing a cushion between the individual and bracket 125 and belt release 145 when secured to each other.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 in which restraint harness belt 15 is attached to seat assembly 10 by tethers 55. The tethers 55 may be secured to any suitable part of seat assembly 10. In an embodiment, tethers 55 are secured to straps 40 and/or seat 20. Tethers 55 are also secured to belt strap 60. Tethers 55 may be secured to belt strap 60 at any suitable location. In an embodiment, tethers 55 are slidably attached to belt strap 60, which allows the location of tethers 55 to be adjusted. Without limitation, adjusting the location of tethers 55 on belt strap 60 allows their location to be adjusted to take into account an adjustment in the length of belt strap 60. Tethers 55 may be secured to seat assembly 10 by any suitable means. In an embodiment, tethers 55, straps 40, and mounting strap 45 have sufficient tension to maintain the desired suspension of seat 20 to secure the individual within soldier restraint system 5 but also to allow the individual a desired amount of ability to conduct desired tasks (i.e., operate a weapon in the gun turret, lean over, turn body to view outside vehicle, and the like).
  • FIG. 8 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 in which shoulder harness 150 is attached to restraint harness belt 15. FIG. 9 illustrates a front view of shoulder harness 150 attached to restraint harness belt 15. Shoulder harness 150 includes shoulder harness straps 170. FIG. 10 illustrates a side view of an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 having shoulder harness 150. In an embodiment as illustrated, shoulder harness 150 has two shoulder harness straps 170 that are each attached to the front side 190 and back side 195 of restraint harness belt 15. Each shoulder harness strap 170 passes over the shoulder of the individual. Shoulder harness straps 170 have a tension sufficient to secure the individual within soldier restraint system 5 but that also allows the individual to conduct desired tasks. In some embodiments, the width between shoulder harness straps 170 is adjustable. Without limitation, adjusting the width between shoulder harness straps 170 allows the shoulder width of different individuals to be taken into account. The width may be adjusted by any suitable means. In embodiments as illustrated, belt strap 60 passes through loops 200 in each shoulder harness strap 170 to allow adjustment of the width. It is to be understood that shoulder harness 150 is not limited to two shoulder harness traps 170 but in alternative embodiments (not illustrated) may also include more than two shoulder harness straps 170. In embodiments as illustrated, shoulder harness straps 170 each have a release assembly 35. In an embodiment, the release assemblies 35 have release straps 135. In some embodiments, the release assemblies 35 are located ill the front of shoulder harness straps 170. Without limitation, locating the release assemblies 35 in the front of shoulder harness straps 170 allows the individual to release the shoulder harness 150, with the release straps 135 allowing a quick release. In alternative embodiments (not illustrated), only one of the shoulder harness straps 170 has a release assembly 35. In some embodiments as illustrated, shoulder harness straps 170 have buckle pads 165, which are disposed between the individual and release assembly 35. Buckle pads 165 may have any configuration and size suitable for providing a cushion between the individual and release assembly 35 when secured to each other. In some embodiments, shoulder harness 150 also includes back supports 160. FIG. 11 illustrates a back view of shoulder harness 150 and restraint harness belt 15 showing back supports 160. Shoulder harness 150 may have any desirable number of back supports 160. In embodiments as illustrated, shoulder harness 150 has a back support 160 in an upper region of shoulder harness 150 and a back support 160 in a lower region of shoulder harness 150. Without limitation, such locations of back supports 160 provide support for the upper and lower back of the individual. Back supports 160 may be composed of any suitable material. In some embodiments as illustrated, shoulder harness straps 170 also have shoulder pads 155. Without limitation, shoulder pads 155 provide a cushion to the shoulders of the individual.
  • In an embodiment, soldier restraint system 5 further includes soldier restraint, attachment means 205. FIG. 12 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint attachment means 205. Soldier restraint attachment means 205 includes any means suitable for attachment to seat assembly 10, restraint harness belt 15, or shoulder harness 150. In alternative embodiments, soldier restraint attachment means 205 may be attached to an individual (i.e., soldier) disposed in soldier restraint system 5. In an embodiment as illustrated in FIG. 12, soldier restraint attachment means 205 includes retractor strap 240, strap retractor 250 and release hook 210. Strap retractor 250 is a device suitable for retracting retractor strap 240 and for allowing extraction of retractor strap 240 from strap retractor 250. In embodiments, strap retractor 250 retracts retractor strap 240 upon strap thresholds being identified as achieved. Strap thresholds include any suitable criteria for retraction of retractor strap 240. In an embodiment, the strap thresholds include angle, acceleration, or any combination thereof. In embodiments, the strap thresholds are adjustable. For instance, without limitation, the strap thresholds may be adjusted according to the terrain or use of soldier restraint system 5. The angle may be any desirable angle. It is to be understood that angle refers to a degree of tilt of the vehicle in which soldier restraint system 5 is secured. In embodiments, the angle is above about 33 degrees, alternatively above about 40 degrees, and alternatively above about 43 degrees. In some embodiments, soldier restraint system 5 includes an angle sensor mechanism. The angle sensor mechanism may be disposed at any suitable location on the vehicle or on soldier restraint system 5. In embodiments, strap retractor 250 includes the angle sensor mechanism. The angle sensor mechanism may include any type of sensor that determines the angle of tilt of the vehicle. The acceleration may include any desirable acceleration of the extraction of retractor strap 240 from strap retractor 250. In embodiments, strap retractor 250 includes a sensor that determines the acceleration of the extraction of retractor strap 250. As an example, without limitation, the strap threshold for strap retractor 250 is set to above about 43 degrees. Upon the angle sensor mechanism sensing the vehicle exceeding an angle of about 43 degrees, strap retractor 250 retracts retractor strap 240 and thereby retracts the individual (i.e., soldier). Without limitation, an example of strap retractor 250 is a seat belt retractor (i.e., a seat belt retractor used in automobiles but with sufficient strength to retract the individual). Retractor strap 240 includes any suitable type of strap. For instance, in an embodiment, retractor strap 240 includes a long, narrow strip of pliant material such as webbing. In alternative embodiments not illustrated), retractor strap 240 is a cable. In an embodiment, retractor strap 240 passes through strap ring 245 before entering and after exiting strap retractor 250. Without limitation, strap ring 245 facilitates extraction and retraction of retractor strap 240. A release hook 210 is attached to the end of retractor strap 240 opposite strap retractor 250. Release hook 210 includes any type of hook suitable for attaching to the individual or to soldier restraint system 5. In an embodiment as illustrated, release hook 210 is a quick release hook with a swivel. In some embodiments, soldier restraint attachment means 205 includes release strap 220. Release strap 220 is attached to release hook 210, and a sufficient pulling force on release strap 220 releases release hook 210. In an embodiment, release strap 220 includes a visual 225. Visual 225 includes any means for increasing visibility of release strap 220. In an embodiment, visual 225 includes fluorescent material. Visual 225 is secured to release strap 220 by any suitable means such as by stitching 230. In an embodiment, release strap 220 also includes grip 235 at the end of release strap 220 opposite the end of release strap 220 attached to release hook 210. In an embodiment, soldier restraint attachment means 205 includes strap adjustment 215. Strap adjustment 215 includes any means suitable for attaching release hook 210 to retractor strap 240 such as VELCRO, which is a registered trademark of Velcro Industries N.V.
  • In an embodiment (not illustrated), soldier restraint system 5 includes a release system. The release system includes a release sensor and releasable attachments. The release sensor may be disposed at any suitable location within or on the vehicle. In an embodiment, the release sensor is disposed inside the vehicle. In embodiments, the release sensor is disposed in the floor of the vehicle. In an embodiment, the release sensor includes a transmitter. The transmitter sends a signal to the releasable attachments when the release sensor senses a desired tilt of the vehicle. In an embodiment, the signal is for the releasable attachments to release from their attachment to the vehicle. The release sensor may be any suitable type of sensor for sensing tilt. In an embodiment, the release sensor is an angle sensor mechanism. In an embodiment, the tilt is the degree of tilt of the vehicle. The tilt may be any suitable degrees. In embodiments, the tilt is an angle (i.e., tilt of the vehicle) above about 33 degrees, alternatively above about 40 degrees, and alternatively above about 43 degrees. The releasable attachments are attachable to the vehicle. The releasable attachments are attachable to the vehicle by any suitable means. In an embodiment, the releasable attachments are attachable to the vehicle by magnetic induction. The releasable attachments are attachable to the inside or outside of the vehicle. In embodiments, the releasable attachments are attachable to the inside of the vehicle. Each releasable attachment has a releasable attachment strap that is secured to the releasable attachment and that is attachable to seat assembly 10, restraint harness belt 15, or shoulder harness 150. In alternative embodiments, the releasable attachment strap is attachable to an individual (i.e., soldier) disposed in soldier restraint system 5. The releasable attachment strap is a long, narrow strip of pliant material such as webbing. In alternative embodiments, the releasable attachment strap is a cable. In an embodiment of operation of the release system, the release sensor senses a tilt of the vehicle. If the tilt is at or above a desired tilt, the release sensor transmitter sends a signal to the releasable armaments to release from the attachment to the vehicle. In an embodiment, strap retractor 250 then retracts retractor strap 240 and thereby retracts the individual (i.e., soldier). In embodiments, the release system includes two releasable attachments. In alternative embodiments, the release system has one releasable attachment or more than two releasable attachments.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates an embodiment of soldier restraint system 5 having seat assembly 10, shoulder harness 150, and single point release system 700. As shown in FIGS. 13-15, embodiments of single point release system 700 include seat side straps 705, main support straps 720, side restraint tethers 730, and release assembly 715. Without limitation, single point release system 700 allows a solider disposed in soldier restraint system 5 to separate from seat assembly 10 by actuating only one release mechanism (e.g., release device 710). Further, without limitation, single point release system 700 facilitates egress (i.e., emergency egress) of a soldier from seat assembly 10 and/or sections of the vehicle (or egress from the vehicle).
  • In an embodiment as shown in FIGS. 13-15, release assembly 715 includes release device 710, release assembly strap 740, large rings 725, small rings 745, and wire catch loops 750. In embodiments as shown, release assembly strap bracket 780 is attached to opposing longitudinal sides of release assembly strap 740. In embodiments, release assembly strap 740 is secured to the underside of seat 20. Release assembly strap 740 is secured to seat 20 by any suitable means such as by sewing, adhesive, tacking, and the like. Single point release system 700 has two main support straps 720, with each main support strap 720 having a large ring 725 disposed at an end. Large ring 725 refers to a ring having any diameter suitable for a small ring 745 to pass therethrough and that remains suitable for use with soldier restraint system 5. Small ring 745 refers to any ring having any diameter suitable for small ring 745 to pass through a large ring 725 and that remains suitable for use with soldier restraint system 5. Single point release system 700 also has two small rings 745 attached to release assembly strap 740 and disposed on opposing sides of base strap attachment means 95 from each other. Small rings 745 may be attached to release assembly strap 740 by small ring flap 805. Small ring flap 805 may include any suitable means for attaching small ring 745 to release assembly strap 740. In an embodiment, small ring flap 805 is webbing.
  • In embodiments as shown in FIGS. 14-16, release assembly 715 includes release device 710. Release device 710 includes handle 735 and release wire 760. In embodiments as shown, release device 710 has wire ends 795 on the opposing side of release device 710 from handle 735, which in embodiments are unattached to each other. Release wire 760 may be any flexible wire. In embodiments, release wire 760 is a steel braided cable. In some embodiments, release wire 760 is coated with a plastic coating. Without limitation, the coating, facilitates prevention of release wire 760 from catching on seat 20. In some alternative embodiments (not illustrated), release assembly 715 includes more than one release device 710. In other alternative embodiments (not illustrated), handle 735 is attached to more than release wire 760. In an alternative embodiment (not illustrated), release wire 760 is attached to more than one handle 735.
  • In embodiments as shown in FIGS. 14 and 15, release device 710 includes crimps 765. Crimps 765 attach the portions of release wire 760 that are proximate to handle 735 to each other. Crimps 765 refer to any device suitable for attaching the portions of release wire 760 to each other. In an embodiment, release device 710 has wire guides 770 on each portion of release wire 760, with wire guides 770 disposed between crimping 760 and small rings 745. In such an embodiment, a portion of each portion of release wire 760 is disposed within a wire guide 770.
  • FIG. 17 illustrates an embodiment of single point release system 700 in which wire catch loop 750 has not attached small ring 745 and large ring 725 to each other. FIG. 18 illustrates an embodiment of single point release system 700 in which wire catch loop 750 has attached small ring 745 and large ring 725 to each other.
  • FIG. 19 illustrates an embodiment of single point release system 700 in which main support strap 720, single restraint tether 730, and seat side strap 705 are in a partially sub-assembled stage before attachment to each other. Single restraint tether 730 has a single restraint tether bracket 785 (i.e., D ring) on an end of single restraint tether 730. Seat side strap 705 has a seat side strap bracket 790 (i.e., D ring) on an end of seat side strap 705.
  • FIG. 20 illustrates an embodiment of release assembly 715 in which wire catch loop 750 has passed through large ring 725, small ring 745, and strap opening 775 (i.e., grommet). In such embodiment, small ring flap 805 has been lifted to facilitate the passing of release wire 760 through wire catch loop 750. FIG. 21 illustrates an embodiment in which release wire 760 has passed through wire catch loop 750. In embodiments, small ring flap 805 includes small ring flap attachment means 800. Small ring flap attachment means 800 may include any means suitable for releasable attachment of an end of small ring flap 805 to release assembly strap 740. In some embodiments, small ring flap attachment means 800 includes a button, pin, VELCRO (i.e., hook and loop system), or the like. In embodiments as shown, small ring flap attachment means 800 is a hook and loop system.
  • In embodiments of preparation of soldier restraint system 5 for single point release system 700 as shown in FIGS. 13-21, each wire end 795 is fed through a wire guide 770. The end of main support strap 720 with large ring 725 is fed through side restraint tether bracket 785 and seat side strap bracket 790. Main support strap 720 with large ring 725 is then looped underneath seat 20 a sufficient distance to allow small ring 745 to pass through large ring 725. In embodiments, small ring 745 is folded back towards the middle of seat 20. Wire catch loop 750 is then fed through small ring 745 towards seat 20 and then through strap opening 775, with the end portion of wire catch loop 750 then disposed on the opposing side of strap opening 775 from small ring 745 and largo ring 725. Release wire 760 is then fed through the end portion of wire catch loop 750 that is disposed on the opposing side of strap opening 775. Small ring, flap 805 is then attached to seat 20 by small ring flap attachment means 800. In embodiments, single point release system 700 includes repeating such steps on the opposing longitudinal side of seat 20. After such steps are complete for both longitudinal sides of seat 20, embodiments of single point release system 700 include feeding release wire 760 further through wire guides 770, with wire ends 795 being disposed underneath release assembly strap 740 (i.e., disposed between seat 20 and release assembly strap 740).
  • In embodiments of operation of single point release system 700 as shown in FIGS. 13-21 after assembly, the soldier or an individual disposed in soldier restraint system 5 may grasp handle 735. The soldier may then pull handle 735 outward and away from seat 20, which pulls release wire 760 out of the end portion of wire catch loop 750. Wire catch loop 750 is then released when release wire 760 is no longer disposed in the end portion of wire catch loop 750, which releases large ring 725 as small ring 745 passes back outward through large ring 725. Large ring 725 (and main support strap 720) may then pass back through seat side strap bracket 790 and side restraint tether bracket 785. The soldier may then be released from seat 20. In embodiments, preparation of soldier restraint system 5 for single point release system 700 may then proceed as disclosed in embodiments herein.
  • The vehicle in which soldier restraint system 5 is secured may include any vehicle such as a truck, car, military vehicle, helicopter, air plane, and the like. In an embodiment, the vehicle is a military vehicle.
  • It is to be understood that soldier restraint system 5 is not limited to soldiers but may be used for any type of individual.
  • Although the present invention and its advantages have been described in detail, it should be understood that various changes, substitutions and alterations may be made herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A soldier support system in a vehicle, comprising:
    a seat assembly; and
    a single point release system, comprising:
    a first main support strap and a second main support strap; wherein the first main support strap and the second main support strap have a large ring and a small ring;
    a release assembly; and
    a release device, wherein the release device comprises a handle and a release wire.
  2. 2. The soldier support system of claim 1, wherein the release device comprise a wire guide, and wherein a portion of the release wire is disposed in the wire guide.
  3. 3. The soldier support system of claim 1, further comprising a first wire catch loop and a second wire catch loop.
  4. 4. The solider support system of claim 3, wherein the first wire catch loop is passable through the large ring and small ring of the first main support strap.
  5. 5. The soldier support system of claim 4, wherein the second wire catch loop is passable through the large ring and small ring of the second main support strap.
  6. 6. The soldier support system of claim 5, wherein the release wire is passable through the first wire catch loop and the second wire catch loop.
  7. 7. The soldier support system of claim 6, wherein actuation of the handle in a direction away from the seat assembly pulls the release wire to a position in which no portion of the release wire is disposed in the first wire catch loop and the second wire catch loop.
  8. 8. The soldier support system of claim 1, wherein actuation of the release assembly allows an individual disposed in the seat assembly to be separated from the seat assembly.
  9. 9. The soldier support system of claim 1, further comprising a release assembly strap.
  10. 10. The soldier support system of claim 9, wherein the release assembly strap comprises a first release assembly strap bracket and a second release assembly strap bracket disposed on opposing longitudinal sides of the release assembly strap.
  11. 11. The soldier support system of claim 9, wherein the release assembly strap comprises a first small ring and a second small ring.
  12. 12. The soldier support system of claim 11, wherein the a first seat side strap and a second seat side strap each comprise a seat side strap bracket, and wherein a first side restraint tether and a second side restraint tether each comprise a side restraint tether bracket, and wherein a first main support strap and a second main support strap each comprise a large ring.
  13. 13. The soldier support system of claim 12, wherein an end of each of the first main support strap and the second main support strap is attached to the seat assembly.
  14. 14. The soldier support system of claim 13, wherein an end of the first main support strap comprising the large ring is passable through the seat side strap bracket of the first seat side strap and through the side restraint tether bracket of the first side restraint tether.
  15. 15. The soldier support system of claim 14, wherein an end of the second main support strap comprising the large ring is passable through the seat side strap bracket of the second seat side strap and through the side restraint tether bracket of the second side restraint tether.
  16. 16. The soldier support system of claim 15, wherein the first small ring is passable through the large ring of the first main support strap, and wherein the second small ring is passable through the large ring of the second main support strap.
  17. 17. The soldier support system of claim 1, wherein the release assembly is disposed on a bottom side of the seat assembly.
  18. 18. The soldier support system of claim 17, wherein a ring flap and a second ring flap are attached to the bottom side of the seat assembly.
  19. 19. The soldier support system of claim 1, wherein the release wire is a steel braided cable, and wherein the steel braided cable is coated with a plastic coating.
  20. 20. The solider support system of claim 1, wherein the release wire is attached to a plurality of handles.
US14718012 2012-05-18 2015-05-20 Soldier support system in a vehicle Abandoned US20150258920A1 (en)

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US9463770B2 (en) * 2012-06-13 2016-10-11 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Army Personnel restraint seat belt
US9540025B1 (en) * 2014-10-08 2017-01-10 Barry Glenn Chapman Child restraint system

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US20130307312A1 (en) 2013-11-21 application

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Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GREENWOOD, KYLE L.;YALAMANCHILI, RATTAYA C.;BUCKNER, JAMES;SIGNING DATES FROM 20120720 TO 20120731;REEL/FRAME:038286/0286