US20150245368A1 - Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management - Google Patents

Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20150245368A1
US20150245368A1 US14708476 US201514708476A US2015245368A1 US 20150245368 A1 US20150245368 A1 US 20150245368A1 US 14708476 US14708476 US 14708476 US 201514708476 A US201514708476 A US 201514708476A US 2015245368 A1 US2015245368 A1 US 2015245368A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
mobile wireless
control channel
wireless devices
group
number
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US14708476
Inventor
Gaurav R. NUKALA
Venkatasubramanian Ramasamy
Giri Prassad Deivasigamani
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Apple Inc
Original Assignee
Apple Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/08Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria
    • H04W72/085Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria using measured or perceived quality
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B7/00Radio transmission systems, i.e. using radiation field
    • H04B7/02Diversity systems; Multi-antenna system, i.e. transmission or reception using multiple antennas
    • H04B7/04Diversity systems; Multi-antenna system, i.e. transmission or reception using multiple antennas using two or more spaced independent antennas
    • H04B7/0413MIMO systems
    • H04B7/0417Feedback systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B7/00Radio transmission systems, i.e. using radiation field
    • H04B7/02Diversity systems; Multi-antenna system, i.e. transmission or reception using multiple antennas
    • H04B7/04Diversity systems; Multi-antenna system, i.e. transmission or reception using multiple antennas using two or more spaced independent antennas
    • H04B7/0413MIMO systems
    • H04B7/0452Multi-user MIMO systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/0001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff
    • H04L1/0009Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff by adapting the channel coding
    • H04L1/001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff by adapting the channel coding applied to control information
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/004Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received by using forward error control
    • H04L1/0056Systems characterized by the type of code used
    • H04L1/007Unequal error protection
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/004Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received by using forward error control
    • H04L1/0072Error control for data other than payload data, e.g. control data
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L5/00Arrangements affording multiple use of the transmission path
    • H04L5/0001Arrangements for dividing the transmission path
    • H04L5/0014Three-dimensional division
    • H04L5/0023Time-frequency-space
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L5/00Arrangements affording multiple use of the transmission path
    • H04L5/003Arrangements for allocating sub-channels of the transmission path
    • H04L5/0053Allocation of signaling, i.e. of overhead other than pilot signals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W24/00Supervisory, monitoring or testing arrangements
    • H04W24/08Testing, supervising or monitoring using real traffic
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/06Selective distribution of broadcast services, e.g. multimedia broadcast multicast service [MBMS]; Services to user groups; One-way selective calling services
    • H04W4/08User group management
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/0406Wireless resource allocation involving control information exchange between nodes
    • H04W72/042Wireless resource allocation involving control information exchange between nodes in downlink direction of a wireless link, i.e. towards terminal
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/044Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on the type of the allocated resource

Abstract

Transmission capacity for a control channel sent to multiple mobile wireless devices in a wireless network is increased by transmitting the control channel using multi user multiple input multiple output transmissions (MU MIMO). Received signal quality measured at mobile wireless devices in a radio sector are communicated to a radio node and used to determine one or more sets of mobile wireless devices to share transmission of control channel elements on the same time and frequency resource element. The radio node indicates the use of MU MIMO and the selection of precoding matrices to each of the mobile wireless devices in the each set of mobile wireless devices.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The described embodiments generally relate to methods and apparatuses for control channel communication between mobile wireless devices and a wireless network. More particularly, the present embodiments describe increasing capacity of a control channel between a radio access portion of a wireless network a multiple mobile wireless devices using multi-user multiple-input multiple-output communication.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Wireless networks continue to evolve to support new services and increased transmission rates as new communication technologies develop and standardize. A representative wireless network for a wireless network service provider can include support for one or more releases of the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) wireless communication standard and LTE-Advanced wireless communication standard. This representative wireless network can support packet switched connections (voice or data) through an LTE or LTE-Advanced network.
  • An LTE (LTE-Advanced) wireless network can support high rate packet communication to multiple mobile wireless devices simultaneously within a geographic area. The radio frequency spectrum used for communication to the multiple mobile wireless devices can be shared among the multiple mobile wireless devices using an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission method. A transceiver (transmitter/receiver) in a mobile wireless device can adapt to radio frequency spectral variation using the OFDM transmission method, which can divide the occupied radio frequency spectrum into a set of parallel narrower bandwidth and lower data rate communication sub-channels transmitted on parallel subcarriers, and each sub-channel can experience approximately flat frequency spectrum fading. An OFDM communication system can divide transmissions into a series of successive OFDM symbols in time, with each OFDM symbol providing multiple sub-channels centered at different frequencies simultaneously. A transmission “resource element” (RE) can be considered a unit of transmission capacity on a single sub-channel within a single OEDM symbol, and, the wireless network can allocate multiple RE across multiple sub-channels among multiple wireless devices dynamically over time. The wireless network can regularly broadcast control information about the allocation of the RE to the multiple wireless devices within a geographic area served by a radio frequency access system of the wireless network. The control information itself can be transmitted using a subset of the total available RE, and the number of RE available to support communication of control information can limit the total number of mobile wireless devices that can be connected simultaneously to the wireless network.
  • Communication systems can be sensitive to errors that can occur in the control information received at the wireless devices, and the wireless network can use different rates of error correction coding to protect the control information during transmission and reception by the mobile wireless device in the presence of noise and interference. Received signal quality at a mobile wireless device can vary significantly based on the location of the mobile wireless device with respect to a transmitting radio frequency access system located in an access network portion of the wireless network and also based on the amount of noise and interference received by the mobile wireless device. Mobile wireless devices located at a greater distance, such as nearer the edge of a geographic coverage area of the access network transmitter, can receive weaker signals than mobile wireless devices located closer to the access network transmitter. As the control information can be broadcast simultaneously to all of the multiple wireless devices served by the access network transmitter, the transmit power used for control channel transmissions can be the same for the different multiple wireless devices, while the amount of error correction coding applied can be varied to better protect transmissions to the different mobile wireless devices. Specifically more RE can be allocated for communication of control information to mobile wireless devices with lower received signal quality, and fewer RE can be allocated to control channel messages sent to mobile wireless devices with higher received signal quality. The same RE can be allocated to multiple mobile wireless devices by sharing the same frequency band/time slot occupied by the RE using a form of spatial division multiplexing. Multi-user multiple input multiple output (MU-MIMO) transmission methods can be applied to transmissions of the control information to share selected RE among multiple mobile wireless devices and to increase the total number of mobile wireless devices that can be simultaneously supported by a radio sector of the wireless network.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DESCRIBED EMBODIMENTS
  • In one embodiment, a method of increasing transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network is described. The method includes at least the following steps. In a first step, a radio node in a radio access network of the wireless network estimates a received downlink signal quality for each mobile wireless device in a plurality of mobile wireless devices connected to the radio node. The radio node selects a first set of mobile wireless devices in the plurality of mobile wireless devices. Each selected mobile wireless device has an estimated downlink signal quality exceeding a first threshold. The radio node transmits simultaneously to the first set of mobile wireless devices on the control channel through a plurality of antennas using multi-user (MU) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission. In a representative embodiment, the radio node assigns at least two mobile wireless devices in the first set of mobile wireless devices to a first control channel element that occupies a first set of time and frequency resource elements in a transmission time interval. The transmission capacity of the control channel is limited by the number of control channel elements scheduled for each transmission time interval.
  • In another embodiment, a mobile wireless device including a receiver and a configurable processor is described. The receiver is configured to receive and decode signals transmitted on a first control channel. The receiver is also configured to receive an indicator transmitted on a separate second control channel. The transmitted indicator indicates when transmissions on the first control channel are encoded using MU MIMO transmission. The receiver is further configured to switch decoding of signals received on the first control channel between using and not using MU MIMO transmission based on the indicator. The processor is configured to calculate a downlink signal quality for transmissions received from a radio node in a wireless network. The processor is also configured to transmit the calculated downlink signal quality using channel quality indicators to the radio node in the wireless network. The wireless network determines to use MU MIMO transmission on the first control channel based at least in part on the communicated calculated downlink signal quality.
  • In a further embodiment, non-transitory computer program product encoded in a non-transitory computer readable medium for increasing transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network is described. The non-transitory computer program product in a radio node in a radio access network of the wireless network includes the following non-transitory computer program code. Non-transitory computer program code for estimating a received downlink signal quality for each mobile wireless device in a plurality of mobile wireless devices connected to the radio node. Non-transitory computer program code for selecting a first set of mobile wireless devices in the plurality of mobile wireless devices, each selected mobile wireless device having an estimated downlink signal quality exceeding a first threshold. Non-transitory computer program code for transmitting simultaneously to the first set of mobile wireless devices on the control channel through a plurality of antennas using multi-user (MU) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission.
  • Although described in terms of an LTE or LTE-Advanced network, the embodiments disclosed herein can be extended to other wireless networks that can support multi-user multiple-input multiple-output transmissions as well.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The described embodiments and the advantages thereof may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates components of a generic wireless communication network.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates components of a LTE wireless communication network.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates components of an OFDM transmission frame in an LTE wireless network.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates constituent components of a transmission time interval for OFDM transmissions in the LTE wireless network.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates several architectures for select components in a mobile wireless device that supports receive diversity.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an organization of resource elements for transmission on multiple antennas within a transmission time interval across multiple subcarriers.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates transmission paths for a multiple input multiple output. transmission.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates multiple mobile wireless devices arrayed in a radio sector for a radio access subsystem in the LTE wireless network.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a representative method to increase transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates another representative method to increase transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED EMBODIMENTS
  • In the following description, numerous specific details are set forth to provide a thorough understanding of the concepts underlying the described embodiments. It will be apparent, however, to one skilled in the art that the described embodiments may be practiced without some or all of these specific details. In other instances, well known process steps have not been described in detail in order to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the underlying concepts.
  • The examples and embodiments provided below describe various methods and apparatuses for increasing control channel capacity in a wireless network for communication with multiple wireless mobile devices. More specifically, methods and apparatuses are described that use multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU MIMO) transmission in an LTE network. It should be understood, however, that other implementations of the same methods and apparatuses can apply to mobile wireless devices used in other types of wireless networks that support MU MIMO transmission.
  • Mobile wireless devices continue to evolve and offer more advanced features that can benefit from higher data throughput rates. The 3GPP LTE and LTE-Advanced communication protocols standardize packet communication to provide a broad variety of services varying from high speed data to basic voice communication. The LTE protocols use a flexible communication method known as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) that divides the occupied frequency spectrum into multiple parallel low rate sub-channels. A downlink transmitted OFDM symbol can contain information intended for multiple users by assigning different sub-channels to different users in the OFDM symbol. Assignments of individual sub-channels for one or a set of OFDM symbols can be communicated using a control channel broadcast to all wireless mobile devices connected to a particular radio sector of a radio access subsystem in a wireless network. As the performance of a mobile wireless device can be particularly sensitive to errors on a control channel, on which errant control message can affect multiple data packets, the control channel can be protected using various levels of error correction capability. Mobile wireless devices that are located in areas of weak signal quality can require greater levels of error protection for the control channel than those mobile wireless devices with strong signal quality. Higher levels of error protection can require more bandwidth to communication the same amount of information; and thus, mobile wireless devices having weaker signal quality can require greater allocations of control channel resources. The total number of control channel resources for allocation among all mobile wireless devices simultaneously served by the radio access subsystem within a geographical area covered by a radio sector can be limited in number. As such, the total number of mobile wireless devices that can be served simultaneously can be limited by the total amount of control channel resources available.
  • The LTE and LTE-Advanced communication protocols include provisions for transmission and reception of signals between the radio access subsystem and the mobile wireless device using multiple antennas. Transmission techniques known as multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) can be used to increase the capacity and/or improve the reliability of transmission. One MIMO transmission technique known as spatial multiplexing can allow control channel communication to be shared among multiple users on the same sub-channels in the same OFDM symbol, i.e. to re-use the same frequency/time resources for multiple independent mobile wireless devices. Transmissions to one mobile wireless device can be separated by transmission to another mobile wireless device by sending the transmissions on multiple antennas at the same time and in the same frequency band. The different transmissions can be separated from one another by each receiver in the mobile wireless devices by using multiple receive antennas and sophisticated signal processing techniques. Transmissions to other mobile wireless devices can be considered “noise” with respect to the “signal” transmission intended for a particular mobile wireless device. The receiver in the mobile wireless device can separate the “signal” from the “noise” when the mobile wireless device receives sufficiently high quality signals. By using such techniques, the capacity of the control channel can also be increased, i.e. the number of mobile wireless devices that can served simultaneously can be increased. Determining with which mobile wireless device to use MIMO spatial multiplexing can be based on knowledge of the respective received signal quality at the multiple mobile wireless devices. Devices with higher receive signal quality can share the same frequency/time resources more readily than those mobile wireless devices that have lower receive signal quality. Control elements in the radio access subsystem of the wireless network that communicates with the mobile wireless devices can determine to which mobile wireless devices to use MIMO spatial multiplexing (and in which OFDM frequency subchannels and time symbols to use MIMO as well.) The use of MIMO spatial multiplexing on the control channel can be communicated in advance to the mobile wireless devices and can be adapted as receive signal quality changes over time.
  • These and other embodiments are discussed below with reference to FIGS. 1-10. However, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that the detailed description given herein with respect to these figures is for explanatory purposes only and should not be construed as limiting.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a representative generic wireless communication network 100 that can include multiple mobile wireless devices 102 connected by radio links 126 to radio sectors 104 provided by a radio access network 128. Each radio sector 104 can represent a geographic area of radio coverage emanating from an associated radio node 108 using a radio frequency carrier at a selected frequency. Radio sectors 104 can have different geometric shapes depending on antenna configuration, such as radiating outward in an approximate circle or hexagon from a centrally placed radio node 108 or cone shaped for a directional antenna from a corner placed radio node 108. Radio sectors 104 can overlap in geographic area coverage so that the mobile wireless device 102 can receive signals from more than one radio sector 104 simultaneously. Each radio node 108 can generate one or more radio sectors 104 to which the mobile wireless device 102 can connect by one or more radio links 126.
  • In some wireless networks 100, the mobile wireless device 102 can be connected to more than one radio sector 104 simultaneously. The multiple radio sectors 104 to which the mobile wireless device 102 is connected can come from a single radio node 108 or from separate radio nodes 108 that can share a common radio controller 110. A group of radio nodes 108 together with the associated radio controller 110 can be referred to as a radio access subsystem 106. Typically each radio node 108 in a radio access subsystem 106 can include a set of radio frequency transmitting and receiving equipment mounted on an antenna tower, and the radio controller 110 connected to the radio nodes 108 can include electronic equipment for controlling and processing transmitted and received radio frequency signals. The radio controller 110 can manage the establishment, maintenance and release of the radio links 126 that connect the mobile wireless device 102 to the radio access network 128. Each mobile wireless device 102 connected to the radio access subsystem 106 can be located at a different distance from the radio node 108 from which it can receive radio frequency signals for the radio links 126. The radio controller 110 and/or the radio node 108 can control monitor and control the strength of transmitted and received signals to each mobile wireless device 102 to manage performance of the radio link 126 connections. The radio access subsystem 106 can use a combination of signal strength, data rate encoding, error correction capability and multiple antenna transmission to improve the performance of signal reception at the mobile wireless device 102 in the presence of variable noise and interference in the wireless network 100.
  • The radio access network 128, which provides radio frequency air link connections to the mobile wireless device 102, connects also to a core network 112 that can include a circuit switched domain 122, usually used for voice traffic, and a packet switched domain 124, usually used for data traffic. Radio controllers 110 in the radio access subsystems 106 of the radio access network 128 can connect to both a circuit switching center 118 in the circuit switched domain 122 and a packet switching node 120 in the packet switched domain of the core network 112. The circuit switching center 118 can route circuit switched traffic, such as a voice call, to a public switched telephone network (PSTN) 114. The packet switching node 120 can route packet switched traffic, such as a “connectionless” set of data packets, to a public data network (PDN) 116.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a representative Long Term Evolution (LTE) wireless network 200 architecture designed as a packet switched network exclusively. A mobile terminal 202 can connect to an evolved radio access network 222 through radio links 226 associated with radio sectors 204 that emanate from evolved Node B's (eNodeB) 210. The eNodeB 210 includes the functions of both the transmitting and receiving base stations (such as the radio node 108 in the generic wireless network 100) as well as the radio access network subsystem radio controllers (such as the radio controller 110 in the generic wireless network 100). The equivalent core network of the LTE wireless network 200 is an evolved packet core network 220 including serving gateways 212 that interconnect the evolved radio access network 222 to public data network (PDN) gateways 216 that connect to external internet protocol (IP) networks 218. Multiple eNodeB 210 can be grouped together to form an evolved UTRAN (eUTRAN) 206. The eNodeB 210 can also be connected to a mobility management entity (MME) 214 that can provide control over connections for the mobile terminal 202.
  • The radio links 226 between the eNodeB 210 in the eUTRAN 206 of the evolved radio access network 222 can include transmissions that use multiple antennas at the transmitting end, at the receiving end and/or at both ends. Transmission and reception using multiple antennas can improve signal reception in the presence of variable noise and interference between the mobile terminal 202 and the eNodeB 210 with the radio sector 204. Multiple antenna transmission can occur in several different forms, including transmit diversity, single user spatial diversity and multiple user spatial diversity. With transmit diversity, the same information can be sent through two different paths, which can provide redundancy for recovering the information at the receiver of the mobile terminal 202. With single user spatial diversity, different information can be sent through two different paths, which provides for increased throughput to an individual mobile terminal 202. With multiple user spatial diversity, different information can be sent to different mobile terminals 202, thereby increasing the aggregate amount of information that can be transmitted to a set of mobile terminals 202. The number of mobile terminals 202 that can served simultaneously by the eUTRAN 206 in the evolved radio access network 222 can depend on the available transmission capacity to send control information to the set of mobile terminals 202. As will be described further herein, the transmission capacity for control information can be increased through spatial diversity by using multiple user multiple input multiple output transmissions with multiple antennas in the LTE network 200.
  • Transmission on the LTE network 200 can use a form of orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) in the downlink direction, i.e. from the eNodeB 210 to the mobile terminal 202, and single carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) in the uplink direction. With OFDMA, data can be transmitted on multiple parallel sub-channels, each sub-channel centered at a different sub-carrier frequency, to multiple mobile terminals 202 at the same time. The allocation of sub-channels to the multiple mobile terminals 202 can vary for different OFDM symbols, and control information can be transmitted to the mobile terminals 202 to indicate the allocation of radio frequency resources over time. Each mobile terminal 202 can be allocated a number of sub-channels for a specified period of time, i.e. a set of frequencies across a number of successive OFDM symbols. Allocation of the radio frequency resources can be scheduled by the eNodeB 210 in the eUTRAN 206 of the evolved radio access network 222.
  • LTE transmissions can be organized into a succession of OFDM symbols 308 as illustrated in FIG. 3. An LTE frame 302 can span a period of 10 ms and can include 10 transmission timer intervals (TTI) 304 that each span a time period of 1 ms. Each TTI 304 can include two time slots 306 that each span 0.5 ms, and each time slot 306 can include seven OFDM symbols 308. The OFDM symbol 308 as shown in FIG. 3 can include a cyclic prefix 310 that can provide a time domain guard interval to minimize inter-symbol interference between successive OFDM symbols 308.
  • Each OFDM symbol 308 can include data transmitted on multiple sub-channels, each sub-channel on a separate frequency. An aggregate of a set of sub-channels (sub-carriers) for a set of successive OFDM symbols can be considered a resource block 406 as shown in FIG. 4. In a representative embodiment, the resource block 406 can include a set of twelve adjacent frequency subcarriers during a time slot 306 of seven OFDM symbols 308. Two successive resource blocks can span a transmission time interval (TTI) 306 and can include fourteen OFDM symbols 308 divided into a set of control 402 OFDM symbols and a set of data 404 OFDM symbols. The total number of frequency sub-carriers used for an OFDM symbol can depend on the bandwidth allocated. With a sub-carrier spacing of 15 kHz, each resource block 406 can span 180 kHz of bandwidth, and the total bandwidth occupied can depend on the number of available resource blocks 406. For example, an LTE transmission system that uses fifty resource blocks 406 can span a bandwidth of 9 MHz (lowest to highest sub-carrier center frequency) and can fit within a 10 Mhz radio frequency total bandwidth (including side lobes).
  • Each transmission on a single frequency subcarrier within a single OFDM symbol 308 can be considered an individual resource element (RE) 408 of a physical layer transmission. In general, the RE 408 can be referred to as a frequency/time resource. The resource elements 408 in the data portion 404 of a TTI 304 can be allocated among multiple mobile terminals 202, and the allocation of the RE 408 an be communicated to the mobile terminals 202 using resource elements 408 in the control portion 402 of the TTI 304. Four different resource elements 408 within a single OFDM symbol 308 can form a resource element group (REG) 410, and nine different REGs 410 can form a control channel element (CCE). A physical downlink control channel (PDCCH) message in the LTE transmission system to one of the mobile terminals 202 can use one, two, four or eight CCEs depending on a format selected for the PDCCH message. The PDCCH message format can be based on received downlink signal quality conditions measured at the mobile terminal 202 and reported to the eNodeB 210 of the LTE wireless network 200. With a high receive signal quality at the mobile terminal 202, one CCE can suffice for the PDCCH message, while with a low receive signal quality, up to eight CCE can be required to minimize decoding errors of the PDCCH message at the mobile terminal 202.
  • The total number of mobile terminals 202 that can be supported simultaneously in a given TTI 304 can depend on the available signal quality at each of the mobile terminals 202 and on the number of OFDM symbols 308 available for control channel transmission. For each TTI 304, a total of fourteen OFDM symbols 308 can be available and can be divided between control transmission and data transmission. One, two or three OFDM symbols 308 of the fourteen total OFDM symbols 308 in the TTI 304 can be used for control 402, while the remaining OFDM symbols 308 in the TTI 304 can be used for data 404. Some of the resource elements 408 in each resource block 406 can be reserved to carry reference signals 412, as indicated by select RE 408 labeled with the letter “R” in the resource block 408 of FIG. 4. The reference signal 412 resource elements 408 can provide a pre-determined known signal to which the mobile terminal 202 can locate and synchronize as well as characterize the downlink communication channel to the mobile terminal 202 from the eNodeB 210 in the evolved radio access network 222 of the wireless network 200. Within a resource block 406, which can have three OFDM symbols available for control 402 channel transmissions, two of the thirty six resource elements 408 can be used for reference signals 412. As a minimum allocation of one CCE (36 RE) can be required for control channel communication for each mobile terminal 202 for a given TTI 304, even with three OFDM symbols 308 assigned for transmission of control 402 information, a maximum of less than fifty independent mobile terminals 202 can be accommodated in an LAE transmission system that occupies 10 MHz of frequency bandwidth. Each mobile terminal 202 that requires more than one CCE; for control channel transmissions, i.e. when a mobile terminal 202 can have poor receive radio frequency signal quality and can require 2, 4 or 8 CCE, can reduce the total number of mobile terminals 202 that can be supported simultaneously per TTI 304, As LTE systems can be expected to transport both high speed data and numerous lower rate voice connections, increasing the number of mobile terminals 202 that can be simultaneously supported in each TEl 304 can prove beneficial.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates select elements for several different architectures that can be used in a mobile wireless device 102 (or mobile terminal 202). A mobile terminal 202 can include multiple antennas to improve downlink received signal performance, such as increased robustness in the presence of noise and interference as well as higher data rates. The architecture for a mobile terminal 202 can include an application processor (AP) 502, one or more transceivers and multiple antennas. In a first architecture 500, the mobile terminal 202 can include one transceiver 504 connected to the AP 502 and also connected to two antennas. The AP 502 of the mobile terminal 202 can initiate and terminate connections with the wireless network 200 in response to application level services active in the mobile terminal 202. The AP 502 can provide “higher layer” processing that can establish packet level connections through the wireless network 200, while the transceiver 504 can provide “lower layer” signal processing that can translate the higher layer packet messages into a format suitable for transmission over the radio links 226 in the radio sector 204 supported by the eNodeB 210 of the eUTRAN 206 in the evolved radio access network 222. The transceiver 504 can receive downlink transmissions from the eNodeB 210 through one of the two antennas, e.g. by selecting among the antennas having a stronger signal strength or a higher signal quality, or through both antennas simultaneously and combine the received signals to improve signal reception.
  • In a basic form of diversity, the mobile terminal 202 with configuration 500 can receive signals transmitted by a single antenna at the eNodeB 210 through one of the antennas, either antenna 0 or antenna 1, where the antenna used is switched into service by the mobile terminal 202 (switch not shown). This form of diversity can be considered “antenna diversity” in which one of the antennas can provide better performance, e.g. based on signal strength and/or signal quality, and the antenna used can be chosen dynamically for a connection. Alternatively, when the transceiver 504 in the mobile terminal 202 can process signals from both antennas simultaneously, the transceiver 504 can combine signals transmitted on each of the different frequency sub-channels in an OFDM symbol to improve signal strength and/or signal quality throughout a received frequency spectrum. This combining of signals received through multiple antennas simultaneously can be considered “receiver diversity”. With these basic forms of diversity, the receive signal quality reported to the eNodeB 210 in the wireless network 200 can be higher than without diversity, and the number of CCE assigned for PDCCH transmissions can be lower, thereby freeing up some CCE to be used for other mobile terminals 202.
  • A more advanced form of diversity can use simultaneous transmission through multiple antennas at the eNodeB 210 and simultaneous reception through multiple antennas at the mobile terminal 202. This form of diversity can be referred to as multiple input multiple output (MIMO) transmission and can be used to increase transmission data rates to a single mobile terminal 202, i.e. single user (SU) MIMO or to transmit data simultaneously to multiple mobile terminals 202, i.e. multiple user (MU) MIMO. Sharing the same frequency/time resources using MU MIMO across multiple mobile terminals 202 can increase the number of mobile terminals 202 that can be served simultaneously by the limited number of CCE available per TTI 304, thereby increasing the capacity of control channel communication in the LTE system. The number of transmit and receive antennas used for MIMO can be two, as shown for the architecture 500, as well as four as shown for architecture 520 or even more (not shown). The LTE and LTE-Advanced communication protocols include options for one, two, four and eight antenna configurations. The mobile terminal 202 can determine the number of transmit antennas used by the eNodeB 210 in the wireless network 200 by using the transmitted reference signals 412.
  • While the description herein covers several different architectures for mobile terminals 202 that can use multiple antennas with one or more transceivers, some mobile wireless devices 102 can include multiple receivers to support connections to wireless networks that offer different wireless communication protocols. The evolution of wireless network deployment can result in periods of overlapping technologies that use different wireless communication protocols that can require different transceivers, The architecture 540 for a mobile wireless terminal 102 shown in FIG. 4 includes a first transceiver 504 that can support multiple antenna communication and a second transceiver 542 that can support single antenna communication. The description provided herein outlined in terms of a mobile wireless terminal 102 having multiple antennas and a single transceiver block 504 can apply equally to dual transceiver mobile wireless terminals 102. In some embodiments, the single transceiver block 504 can also include multiple parallel transceivers or configurable blocks that can support reception through multiple antennas in parallel. No loss of generality is intended by the depiction of a “single” transceiver block 504 as shown for architecture 504 of the mobile wireless terminal 102 in FIG. 5.
  • With MEMO transmission, the eNodeB 210 in the wireless network 200 can send signals through multiple antennas. FIG. 6 illustrates how reference signals 412 can be divided between two different antennas of the eNodeB 210. The resource blocks 610 for one TTI 304 output by a first antenna 0 can include reference signals 412 in select frequency/time resource elements 408 and can exclude sending signals in other resource elements 408 (labeled as “unused” RE 602). Similarly the resource blocks 620 for one TTI 304 output by a second antenna 1 can include reference signals 412 in the same frequency/time resource elements 408 that were “unused” by the first antenna 0. Thus, distinct reference signals 412 can be transmitted by each antenna, and the mobile terminal 202 can measure transmission channel characteristics for each antenna separately using the distinct reference signals 412.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates four distinct transmission paths that can be characterized by the mobile terminal 202 using reference signals 412 sent from transmit (TX) processing 702 at the eNodeB 210. Receive (RX) processing 704 in the mobile terminal 202 can be used to receive reference signals 412 transmitted by TX antenna 0 at the eNodeB 210 through each of the receive antennas separately. The TX0/RX0 transmission path can be characterized separately from the TX0/RX1 transmission path by the RX processing 704 of the mobile terminal 202 using reference signals 412 transmitted in specific time/frequency resource elements 408 by the TX antenna 0. Similarly the TX1/RX1 and TX1/RX0 transmission paths can be characterized separately using reference signals 412 transmitted in a different set of frequency/time resource elements 408 by the TX antenna 1 to RX antenna 0 and RX antenna 1. As the reference signals from TX antenna 0 and TX antenna 1 can be sent in separate time/frequency resource elements 408 as shown in FIG. 6, the separate transmission paths can be characterized independently. Once the transmission paths are characterized, constituent component transmissions for each of two different transmitting antennas can be determined from the linear combinations of the transmitted signals received at each antenna. MIMO transmission as shown in FIG. 7 can be used to increase the amount of information transmitted to an individual mobile terminal 202 by sending twice the amount of data using the two transmitting antennas simultaneously for the same frequency/time resource element. MIMO transmission can also be used to transmit to two different mobile terminals 202, e.g. by increasing the data throughput rate, with half of the data used for One mobile terminal 202 and the other half of the data used for another mobile terminal 202 simultaneously.
  • The LTE and LTE-Advanced communication protocols specify several different MIMO transmission methods that can be applied to downlink data channels; however, for downlink control channels only a transmit diversity method is specified. Transmit diversity can improve signal integrity but does not directly share the same frequency/time radio frequency resource element between multiple users. By applying MU MIMO for control channel communication from the eNodeB 210, the wireless network 200 can increase the capacity of the control channel and thereby serve more mobile terminals 202 simultaneously. Using MU MIMO and two spatially separated transmitting antennas, the eNodeB 210 can transmit two parallel control channel data streams simultaneously to two different mobile terminals 202 sharing the same frequency/time resource elements. Each of the parallel control channel data streams can be separately encoded so that control channel data intended for one mobile terminal 202 can be separated from control channel data intended for another mobile terminal 202. This encoding at the eNodeB 210 can be referred to as “precoding” and can map control channel data streams into suitable control channel data symbols for transmission by the multiple antennas.
  • In a representative embodiment, the control channel data stream for one mobile terminal 202 can be precoded using one “rank 1” vector, while the control channel data stream for a second mobile terminal 202 can be precoded using a separate “rank 1” vector. A representative set of four different “rank 1” vectors from which to select precoding vectors for each mobile terminal 202 can include the following complex valued vectors:
  • { 1 2 [ 1 1 ] , 1 2 [ 1 - 1 ] , 1 2 [ 1 j ] , 1 2 [ 1 - j ] , }
  • where the upper entry in each vector can signify the precoding applied for data transmitted on a first antenna and the lower entry in each vector can signify the precoding applied for data transmitted on a second antenna. Each mobile terminal 202 in a set of mobile terminals that can share frequency/time resources through MU MIMO can be assigned a different one of the precoding vectors and can use that knowledge to correctly decode signals received through its two antennas and to reconstruct its own intended original data stream. When using four transmit antennas, the set of precoding vectors can include vectors of length four instead of length two as shown above for two transmit antennas.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a partition 800 of a radio sector 104 for a wireless network 100 into three distinct regions nominally based on distance from a radio access subsystem 106 of the wireless network 100. A set of mobile wireless devices 102 in a far region 806 can be located at a farthest distance from the radio access subsystem 106, and signals transmitted by the radio access subsystem 106 to a mobile wireless device 102 in the far region 806 can incur significant amounts of attenuation. As such, mobile wireless devices 102 in the far region can have the weakest receive signal strength and/or the weakest signal quality of mobile wireless devices 102 served by the radio access subsystem 106 in the radio sector 104 of the wireless network 100. As mobile wireless devices 102 can report periodically a channel quality indicator (CQI) to the radio access subsystem 106, and the radio access subsystem 106 can categorize the mobile wireless devices 102 based on the CQI (or other performance information) to determine the number of CCE to assign for a downlink control channel (e.g. the physical downlink control channel PDCCH) to each mobile wireless device 102 served by the radio access subsystem 106.
  • For mobile wireless devices with a relatively high signal strength and/or high signal quality, e.g. located in a near region 802 relatively close to the radio access subsystem 106, a minimum of only one CCE can be used for the control channel information. As the number of mobile wireless devices 102 in the radio sector that can be served simultaneously can be limited by the total number of CCE available, the radio access subsystem 106 can group together one or more sets of mobile wireless devices 102 located in the near region 802 of the radio sector 104. Each mobile wireless device 102 in the set can have comparable signal strength and/or signal quality and can share one CCE among of the set of mobile wireless devices 102 in the near region 802 using MU MIMO transmission for the control channel information. When transmitting from the radio access system 106 with two antennas to mobile wireless devices 102 having two antennas, the radio access subsystem 106 can pair up mobile wireless devices 102 in the near region 802 in sets of two mobile wireless devices 102 with comparable signal strength/quality. When transmitting with four antennas to mobile wireless devices 102 that can receive MU MIMO transmissions with four antennas, the radio access subsystem 106 can group the mobile wireless devices 102 in the near region 802 into sets of up to four mobile wireless devices 102 to share a single ME.
  • The radio access subsystem 106 can use different strategies to add control channel capacity with MU MIMO transmission depending on one or more factors such as the number of mobile wireless devices 102 associated with the radio access subsystem 106, the number of mobile wireless devices 102 actively connected to the radio access subsystem 106, the number of transmit antennas at the radio access subsystem 106, the number of receive antennas at each of the mobile wireless devices 102, measured receive signal strength and/or signal quality communicated from each mobile wireless device 102 to the radio access subsystem 106, and selection and use of MU MIMO on data channels for a particular mobile wireless device 102.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a representative method 900 to increase transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network 100. The method can be executed at a radio node 108 in a radio access network 128 of the wireless network 100. In step 902, the radio node 108 can estimate downlink signal quality for a plurality of mobile wireless devices 102. In a representative embodiment, the downlink signal quality can be reported by one or more of the plurality of mobile wireless devices 102 to the radio node 108 using channel quality feedback indicators. In step 904, the radio node 108 can select a set of mobile wireless devices 102 each having an estimated downlink signal quality that exceeds a first pre-determined threshold. In a representative embodiment, the first pre-determined threshold can be set the wireless network 100 and can be communicated to the mobile wireless device 102. In step 906, the radio node 108 can transmit simultaneously to the set of mobile wireless devices 102 on the control channel using MU MIMO transmission. In a representative embodiment, at least two of the mobile wireless devices 102 in the set of mobile wireless devices 102 can be assigned to a common control channel element (CCE) that occupies a set of time and frequency resource elements during a transmission time interval for the control channel. The transmission capacity of the control channel can be limited by the number of control channel elements that can be scheduled for each transmission time interval. In a representative embodiment, the radio node can transmit an indication to the mobile wireless device 102 when MU MIMO transmission is used for transmission of the control channel. The number of mobile wireless devices 102 that share a common CCE using MU MIMO transmission can depend on the estimated receive downlink signal quality. Higher receive downlink signal quality can support sharing of the common CCE among more mobile wireless devices 102 simultaneously than lower receive downlink signal quality.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates another representative method 1000 to increase transmission capacity for a control channel in a wireless network 100. The method can be executed at a mobile wireless device 102 in the wireless network 100. In step 1002, the mobile wireless device 102 can calculate a received downlink signal quality. In step 1004, the mobile wireless device 102 can transmit the calculated downlink signal quality using channel quality indicators to a radio node 108 in the wireless network 100. In step 1006, the mobile wireless device 102 can receive and decode signals on a first control channel. In step 1008, the mobile wireless device 102 can receive an indicator on a second control channel that can indicate when transmissions on the first control channel can use MU MIMO. In step 1010, the mobile wireless device can switch decoding of signals received on the first control channel between using and not using MU MIMO based on the received indicator from the wireless network 100. In a representative embodiment, the mobile wireless device 102 can receive from the wireless network 100 notification of an assigned rank one pre-coding matrix used for MU MEMO transmission on the first control channel. The mobile wireless device 102 can decode the signals received on the first control channel using the assigned rank one pre-coding matrix.
  • In a representative embodiment, the first control channel, on which the mobile wireless device 102 can receive MU MIMO transmissions, and the second control channel, on which the mobile wireless device 102 can receive indications when transmissions on the first control channel use MU MIMO transmissions, can be the same physical control channel. An exemplary physical control channel can be the PDCCH control channel. The mobile wireless device 102 can receive the physical control channel initially without using MU MIMO and can switch to using MU MIMO based on a message transmitted in the physical control channel. The message can indicate a switch to MU MIMO transmission at a particular frame. Messages in the physical control channel can use MU MIMO transmission from that particular indicated frame onward until a subsequent message can indicate a switch to not use MU MIMO transmission. In another embodiment, the mobile wireless device 102 can detect when MU MIMO transmission is used and can appropriately decode the received transmissions on the PDCCH control channel based on the detection. In another embodiment, the mobile wireless device 102 can decode transmissions on the PDCCH control channel trying different transmission modes, such as with MU MIMO and without MU MIMO, to achieve a best decoding of the PDCCH control channel.
  • In another representative embodiment, the first control channel and the second control channel can be separate physical control channels. Separate physical control channels can be, for example, a first PDCCH and a second PDCCH. Messages on the first control channel can switch between using and not using MU MIMO based on messages transmitted on the second control channel. The second control channel can use a fixed transmission method with high reliability, such as with transmission diversity.
  • In another representative embodiment, the first control channel and the second control channel can be separate logical channels on the same physical control channel. Separate logical channels can be two different logical channels that share the same PDCCH. A PDCCH can use multiple control channel elements (CCEs) that span multiple time/frequency resource elements, a two different blocks of time/frequency resource elements that are used by the PDCCH can be grouped into separate control channels (effectively separate control sub-channels within the PDCCH control channel).
  • The various aspects, embodiments, implementations or features of the described embodiments can be used separately or in any combination. Various aspects of the described embodiments can be implemented by software, hardware or a combination of hardware and software.
  • The foregoing description, for purposes of explanation, used specific nomenclature to provide a thorough understanding of the described embodiments. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the specific details are not required in order to practice the described embodiments. Thus, the foregoing descriptions of the specific embodiments described herein are presented for purposes of illustration and description. They are not target to be exhaustive or to limit the embodiments to the precise forms disclosed. It will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that many modifications and variations are possible in view of the above teachings.
  • The advantages of the embodiments described are numerous. Different aspects, embodiments or implementations can yield one or more of the following advantages. Many features and advantages of the present embodiments are apparent from the written description and, thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, the embodiments should not be limited to the exact construction and operation as illustrated and described. Hence, all suitable modifications and equivalents can be resorted to as falling within the scope of the invention.

Claims (21)

  1. 1-23. (canceled)
  2. 24. A method, comprising:
    at a base station:
    estimating a received downlink signal quality for each mobile wireless device of a plurality of mobile wireless devices connected to the base station;
    determining a number of control channel elements to be transmitted to each mobile wireless device based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device;
    grouping a portion of the plurality of mobile wireless devices into a first group based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device and a number of receive antennas for each mobile wireless device; and
    transmitting control channel information comprising the number of control channel elements to each of the first group of mobile wireless devices, wherein the control channel information is simultaneously transmitted to each of the first group of mobile wireless devices using the same frequency and time resource elements based on multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) transmissions.
  3. 25. The method of claim 24, wherein the base station is an LTE or LTE-Advanced compliant base station.
  4. 26. The method of claim 24, further comprising:
    grouping a portion of the plurality of mobile wireless devices into a second group based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device and the number of receive antennas for each mobile wireless device; and
    transmitting control channel information comprising the number of control channel elements to each of the second group of mobile wireless devices, wherein the control channel information is simultaneously transmitted to each of the second group of mobile wireless devices using the same frequency and time resource elements based on multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) transmissions.
  5. 27. The method of claim 26, wherein the base station transmits one of a same number of control channel elements to the first group and second group of mobile wireless devices or a different number of control channel elements to the first group and second group of mobile wireless devices.
  6. 28. The method of claim 26, wherein the first group of mobile wireless devices has one of a same number of receive antennas as the second group of wireless devices or a different number of receive antennas as the second group of wireless devices.
  7. 29. The method of claim 26, wherein the received downlink signal quality of the first group of mobile wireless devices exceeds a first predetermined threshold and the received downlink signal quality of the second group of mobile wireless devices exceeds a second predetermined threshold, wherein the first and second predetermined thresholds are one of a same value and a different value.
  8. 30. The method of claim 24, wherein the number of control channel elements is one of 1, 2, 4 or 8.
  9. 31. The method of claim 24, wherein the number of receive antennas is one of 2, 4, 6 or 8.
  10. 32. The method of claim 24, wherein the number of receive antennas for each of the first group of mobile wireless devices is the same.
  11. 33. A base station, comprising:
    a processor;
    a transceiver;
    a plurality of antennas; and
    a non-transitory computer readable storage medium comprising a set of instructions that are executable by the processor, wherein the instructions causes the processor to:
    estimate a received downlink signal quality for each mobile wireless device of a plurality of mobile wireless devices connected to the base station;
    determine a number of control channel elements to be transmitted to each mobile wireless device based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device;
    group a portion of the plurality of mobile wireless devices into a first group based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device and a number of receive antennas for each mobile wireless device; and
    transmit, via the transceiver and one or more of the plurality of antennas, control channel information comprising the number of control channel elements to each of the first group of mobile wireless devices, wherein the control channel information is simultaneously transmitted to each of the first group of mobile wireless devices using the same frequency and time resource elements based on multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) transmissions.
  12. 34. The base station of claim 33, wherein the base station is an LTE or LTE-Advanced compliant base station.
  13. 35. The base station of claim 33, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to:
    group a portion of the plurality of mobile wireless devices into a second group based on the received downlink signal quality of each mobile wireless device and the number of receive antennas for each mobile wireless device; and
    transmit, via the transceiver and one or more of the plurality of antennas, control channel information comprising the number of control channel elements to each of the second group of mobile wireless devices, wherein the control channel information is simultaneously transmitted to each of the second group of mobile wireless devices using the same frequency and time resource elements based on multi-user multiple-input multiple-output (MU-MIMO) transmissions.
  14. 36. The base station of claim 33, wherein the number of receive antennas is one of 2, 4, 6 or 8.
  15. 37. The base station of claim 33, wherein the base station transmits the control channel information on a number of the plurality of antennas that corresponds to the number of receive antennas of the first group of mobile wireless devices.
  16. 38. The base station of claim 33, wherein the transceiver comprises a plurality of transceivers, wherein a first of the plurality of transceivers has one corresponding antenna and a second of the plurality of transceivers has more than one corresponding antenna.
  17. 39. The base station of claim 33, wherein the control channel information is transmitted via a physical downlink control channel (PDCCH).
  18. 40. The base station of claim 33, wherein the base station estimates the received downlink signal quality for each mobile wireless device based on a channel quality indicator (CQI) received from each mobile wireless device.
  19. 41. A mobile wireless device, comprising:
    a processor;
    a transceiver;
    a plurality of antennas; and
    a non-transitory computer readable storage medium comprising a set of instructions that are executable by the processor, wherein the instructions causes the processor to:
    receive an indicator that indicates transmissions on a control channel are encoded using MU MIMO transmission;
    receive and decode signals transmitted on a the control channel, wherein the signals on the control channel comprise a number of control channel elements corresponding to a received downlink signal quality for the mobile wireless device and wherein the number of control channel elements are simultaneously transmitted to at least one other mobile wireless device using the same frequency and time resource elements.
  20. 42. The mobile wireless device of claim 41, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to:
    receive a further indicator that indicates transmissions on the control channel are encoded using a transmission scheme that is different from MU MIMO transmission; and
    switch decoding of signals received on the control channel to the transmission scheme.
  21. 43. The mobile wireless device of claim 41, wherein the instructions further cause the processor to:
    calculate a downlink signal quality for transmissions received from a base station of a wireless network; and
    transmit, via the transceiver and one or more of the plurality of antennas, the downlink signal quality using channel quality indicators to the base station of the wireless network.
US14708476 2011-09-27 2015-05-11 Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management Pending US20150245368A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13246810 US9031033B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2011-09-27 Wireless radio access network control channel capacity management
US14708476 US20150245368A1 (en) 2011-09-27 2015-05-11 Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14708476 US20150245368A1 (en) 2011-09-27 2015-05-11 Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13246810 Continuation US9031033B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2011-09-27 Wireless radio access network control channel capacity management

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150245368A1 true true US20150245368A1 (en) 2015-08-27

Family

ID=47178280

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13246810 Active 2031-11-29 US9031033B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2011-09-27 Wireless radio access network control channel capacity management
US14708476 Pending US20150245368A1 (en) 2011-09-27 2015-05-11 Wireless Radio Access Network Control Channel Capacity Management

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13246810 Active 2031-11-29 US9031033B2 (en) 2011-09-27 2011-09-27 Wireless radio access network control channel capacity management

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (2) US9031033B2 (en)
WO (1) WO2013048909A1 (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160037352A1 (en) * 2014-08-04 2016-02-04 Qualcomm Incorporated Techniques for configuring uplink channel transmissions using shared radio frequency spectrum band
US10111235B2 (en) * 2016-02-15 2018-10-23 Spidercloud Wireless, Inc. Methods for centralized channel selection across different cells in a radio access network

Families Citing this family (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2761771A4 (en) * 2011-09-29 2015-06-24 Intel Corp Higher order mu-mimo for lte-a
US9186793B1 (en) * 2012-08-31 2015-11-17 Brain Corporation Apparatus and methods for controlling attention of a robot
US9900064B2 (en) * 2012-10-03 2018-02-20 Sckipio Technologies S.I Ltd Hybrid precoder
US9467527B2 (en) 2013-04-02 2016-10-11 Vidscale, Inc. Radio access network cache
US20160255626A1 (en) * 2013-10-31 2016-09-01 Sony Corporation Network element and method of communicating using a plurality of controls channels modules
US9987743B2 (en) 2014-03-13 2018-06-05 Brain Corporation Trainable modular robotic apparatus and methods
US9533413B2 (en) 2014-03-13 2017-01-03 Brain Corporation Trainable modular robotic apparatus and methods
US9426946B2 (en) 2014-12-02 2016-08-30 Brain Corporation Computerized learning landscaping apparatus and methods
US9840003B2 (en) 2015-06-24 2017-12-12 Brain Corporation Apparatus and methods for safe navigation of robotic devices
US9749830B2 (en) * 2015-12-01 2017-08-29 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Methods and apparatus to provide a communication service in a remote location

Citations (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6496543B1 (en) * 1996-10-29 2002-12-17 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for providing high speed data communications in a cellular environment
US20030108009A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-06-12 Petersen Carl R. Wireless connection controller
US20030125031A1 (en) * 2001-12-28 2003-07-03 Jae Sung Lim Method for managing resources differentially in partitioned service zone of cell in wireless mobile communication system
US20040023671A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-05 Interdigital Technology Corporation Method for enhanced mobile assisted positioning
US20040233918A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-11-25 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson Multi-user diversity forwarding
US20050271174A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2005-12-08 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method of synchronization for packet based, OFDM wireless systems with multiple receive chains
US20060149475A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Kellum Carroll C Determining relative spatial information between vehicles
US20060146755A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Ntt Docomo Inc. MIMO communication system and method capable of adaptive user scheduling
US20070060098A1 (en) * 2005-08-03 2007-03-15 Innerwireless Radio frequency location determination system and method with wireless mesh sensor networks
US20070207807A1 (en) * 2006-03-02 2007-09-06 Adrian Duda Method and system for speed estimation in a network
US20070225023A1 (en) * 2006-03-22 2007-09-27 Lucent Technologies Inc. Methods of performing live monitoring of a wireless communication network
US20080080465A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2008-04-03 Nokia Corporation Transmission time interval allocation for packet radio service
US20080153507A1 (en) * 2006-12-20 2008-06-26 Pouya Taaghol Mobile station localization apparatus, systems, and methods
US20080273479A1 (en) * 2007-05-02 2008-11-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for transmitting and receiving control channels by restricting a set of the control channels in a wireless communication system
US20080280625A1 (en) * 2005-09-13 2008-11-13 James David Larsen Position Determination of Mobile Stations in a Wireless Network
US20090161599A1 (en) * 2006-04-07 2009-06-25 Jacobus Cornelius Haartsen Method, user equipment and radio base station for random access in a cellular telecommunications system technical field of the invention
US20090247186A1 (en) * 2008-03-28 2009-10-01 University Of South Carolina Dynamic Localization Using Geographical Information Systems
US20100056163A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-04 Schmidt Jeffrey C System and method for planning a wireless network
US20100093280A1 (en) * 2008-10-15 2010-04-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Bluetooth connection method and apparatus
US20100103832A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2010-04-29 Fujitsu Limited Feedback Apparatus, Feedback Method, Scheduling Apparatus, And Scheduling Method
US20100159833A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-06-24 At&T Mobility Ii Llc Headset Locator Device
US20100330918A1 (en) * 2009-06-26 2010-12-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Interference management
US20110002227A1 (en) * 2009-07-06 2011-01-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Multiuser scheduling in wlan systems
US20110032894A1 (en) * 2008-02-29 2011-02-10 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Mobile communication system, base station apparatus, user apparatus and method
US20110065400A1 (en) * 2008-05-12 2011-03-17 Nokia Corporation Integrated antenna array and rf front end module
US20110068981A1 (en) * 2009-09-18 2011-03-24 TEECOM Design Group Apparatus and Method for Constructing and Utilizing a Beacon Location Database
US20110075620A1 (en) * 2007-06-11 2011-03-31 Su Young Jang Method for controlling data and signal in a mobile communication system
US20110217989A1 (en) * 2008-11-07 2011-09-08 Gabor Fodor Method and arrangement in a communication system
US20120207099A1 (en) * 2011-02-11 2012-08-16 Nokia Corporation DL control channel structure enhancement

Family Cites Families (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7706824B2 (en) * 2002-09-27 2010-04-27 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Requesting and controlling access in a wireless communications network
US8059609B2 (en) 2006-03-20 2011-11-15 Qualcomm Incorporated Resource allocation to support single-user and multi-user MIMO transmission
US8948092B2 (en) * 2007-03-21 2015-02-03 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for receiving a control channel in a mobile communication system
EP2170177A4 (en) 2007-07-24 2015-05-06 Abatis Med Tech Ultrasonic tourniquet system
US7907677B2 (en) 2007-08-10 2011-03-15 Intel Corporation Open loop MU-MIMO
US20100035555A1 (en) * 2008-08-05 2010-02-11 Interdigital Patent Holdings, Inc. Method and apparatus for implementing multi-cell cooperation techniques
JP5455912B2 (en) 2008-08-12 2014-03-26 パナソニック株式会社 The base station apparatus, terminal apparatus, and the transmission method
EP2371070A1 (en) 2008-11-26 2011-10-05 Nokia Siemens Networks Oy Transmission mode selection based on radio link quality and radio load on the air interface
KR101523985B1 (en) * 2008-12-12 2015-05-29 삼성전자주식회사 Method and Apparatus for detecting control channel element using channel quality indicator
US8320479B2 (en) * 2009-02-25 2012-11-27 Alcatel Lucent Ranking and grouping of transmissions in communication system
US9622228B2 (en) * 2009-05-04 2017-04-11 Qualcomm Incorporated Data and control multiplexing in wireless communications
WO2011099765A3 (en) 2010-02-12 2011-12-29 Lg Electronics Inc. Method for transmitting control information and apparatus for the same
CN102869106B (en) * 2011-07-07 2018-04-10 中兴通讯股份有限公司 Pdcch adaptive adjustment method and apparatus

Patent Citations (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6496543B1 (en) * 1996-10-29 2002-12-17 Qualcomm Incorporated Method and apparatus for providing high speed data communications in a cellular environment
US20030108009A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-06-12 Petersen Carl R. Wireless connection controller
US20030125031A1 (en) * 2001-12-28 2003-07-03 Jae Sung Lim Method for managing resources differentially in partitioned service zone of cell in wireless mobile communication system
US20040023671A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-02-05 Interdigital Technology Corporation Method for enhanced mobile assisted positioning
US20040233918A1 (en) * 2003-04-11 2004-11-25 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson Multi-user diversity forwarding
US20050271174A1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2005-12-08 Texas Instruments Incorporated Method of synchronization for packet based, OFDM wireless systems with multiple receive chains
US20060146755A1 (en) * 2004-12-30 2006-07-06 Ntt Docomo Inc. MIMO communication system and method capable of adaptive user scheduling
US20060149475A1 (en) * 2005-01-05 2006-07-06 Kellum Carroll C Determining relative spatial information between vehicles
US20070060098A1 (en) * 2005-08-03 2007-03-15 Innerwireless Radio frequency location determination system and method with wireless mesh sensor networks
US20080280625A1 (en) * 2005-09-13 2008-11-13 James David Larsen Position Determination of Mobile Stations in a Wireless Network
US20070207807A1 (en) * 2006-03-02 2007-09-06 Adrian Duda Method and system for speed estimation in a network
US20070225023A1 (en) * 2006-03-22 2007-09-27 Lucent Technologies Inc. Methods of performing live monitoring of a wireless communication network
US20090161599A1 (en) * 2006-04-07 2009-06-25 Jacobus Cornelius Haartsen Method, user equipment and radio base station for random access in a cellular telecommunications system technical field of the invention
US20080080465A1 (en) * 2006-09-29 2008-04-03 Nokia Corporation Transmission time interval allocation for packet radio service
US20080153507A1 (en) * 2006-12-20 2008-06-26 Pouya Taaghol Mobile station localization apparatus, systems, and methods
US20080273479A1 (en) * 2007-05-02 2008-11-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for transmitting and receiving control channels by restricting a set of the control channels in a wireless communication system
US20110075620A1 (en) * 2007-06-11 2011-03-31 Su Young Jang Method for controlling data and signal in a mobile communication system
US20100103832A1 (en) * 2007-08-31 2010-04-29 Fujitsu Limited Feedback Apparatus, Feedback Method, Scheduling Apparatus, And Scheduling Method
US20110032894A1 (en) * 2008-02-29 2011-02-10 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Mobile communication system, base station apparatus, user apparatus and method
US20090247186A1 (en) * 2008-03-28 2009-10-01 University Of South Carolina Dynamic Localization Using Geographical Information Systems
US20110065400A1 (en) * 2008-05-12 2011-03-17 Nokia Corporation Integrated antenna array and rf front end module
US20100056163A1 (en) * 2008-09-04 2010-03-04 Schmidt Jeffrey C System and method for planning a wireless network
US20100093280A1 (en) * 2008-10-15 2010-04-15 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Bluetooth connection method and apparatus
US20110217989A1 (en) * 2008-11-07 2011-09-08 Gabor Fodor Method and arrangement in a communication system
US20100159833A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-06-24 At&T Mobility Ii Llc Headset Locator Device
US20100330918A1 (en) * 2009-06-26 2010-12-30 Qualcomm Incorporated Interference management
US20110002227A1 (en) * 2009-07-06 2011-01-06 Qualcomm Incorporated Multiuser scheduling in wlan systems
US20110068981A1 (en) * 2009-09-18 2011-03-24 TEECOM Design Group Apparatus and Method for Constructing and Utilizing a Beacon Location Database
US20120207099A1 (en) * 2011-02-11 2012-08-16 Nokia Corporation DL control channel structure enhancement

Non-Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
Wikipedia, "Free-space path loss" 29 July 2016 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free-space_path_loss *
Wikipedia, "Hata model," 30 October 2017, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hata_model *
Wikipedia, "Log-distance path loss model," 18 October 2016, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log-distance_path_loss_model *

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20160037352A1 (en) * 2014-08-04 2016-02-04 Qualcomm Incorporated Techniques for configuring uplink channel transmissions using shared radio frequency spectrum band
US9867187B2 (en) * 2014-08-04 2018-01-09 Qualcomm Incorporated Techniques for configuring uplink channel transmissions using shared radio frequency spectrum band
US10111235B2 (en) * 2016-02-15 2018-10-23 Spidercloud Wireless, Inc. Methods for centralized channel selection across different cells in a radio access network

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
WO2013048909A1 (en) 2013-04-04 application
US9031033B2 (en) 2015-05-12 grant
US20130077597A1 (en) 2013-03-28 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20110170435A1 (en) Method for processing csi-rs in wireless communication system
US20120252474A1 (en) Sounding Reference Signal Configuration
US20110149942A1 (en) Method of Transmitting Data in Multiple Antenna System
US20090201872A1 (en) Segment sensitive scheduling
US20100067464A1 (en) Base station, mobile station, radio communication system, and communication control method
US20070026810A1 (en) Channel quality indicator for time, frequency and spatial channel in terrestrial radio access network
EP2056515A1 (en) Methods, apparatuses, system and related computer program product for resource allocation
US20110090986A1 (en) Method for transmitting data in wireless communication system
US20120051265A1 (en) Method and Apparatus of Configuring Sounding Reference Signal for Coordinated Multi-Point Transmission
US20070097908A1 (en) Scalable frequency band operation in wireless communication systems
US20080056183A1 (en) Wireless resource allocation methods and apparatus
US20100195748A1 (en) Method and system for reference signal pattern design in resource blocks
US20070097909A1 (en) Scalable frequency band operation in wireless communication systems
US20100142461A1 (en) Base station, communication terminal, transmission method, and reception method
US20130223294A1 (en) Methods and Apparatus for Operating Wireless Devices
US7457588B2 (en) Channel quality indicator for time, frequency and spatial channel in terrestrial radio access network
US20130242951A1 (en) Synchronization method for distributed antenna system and apparatus using the same
US20120201187A1 (en) Method for transceiving a downlink reference signal, and base station and user equipment using same
US20120236798A1 (en) Method and Apparatus for Transmitting Physical Signals
US20150280888A1 (en) Flexible mimo resource allocation through cross-correlation nulling and frequency domain segmented receiver processing
US20130195035A1 (en) Mobile terminal device and radio base station apparatus
US20130265955A1 (en) Method and apparatus for transmitting/receiving channels in mobile communication system supporting massive mimo
US9049611B2 (en) Backhaul radio with extreme interference protection
US20110235730A1 (en) Method for transmitting and receiving downlink reference signals in a wireless communication system having multiple antennas
US20100080269A1 (en) Method of transmitting reference signals for cooperative wireless communication system and method of allocating radio resources for relay-based wireless communication system