US20150209107A1 - Cooled microwave denervation catheter configuration - Google Patents

Cooled microwave denervation catheter configuration Download PDF

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Publication number
US20150209107A1
US20150209107A1 US14/605,556 US201514605556A US2015209107A1 US 20150209107 A1 US20150209107 A1 US 20150209107A1 US 201514605556 A US201514605556 A US 201514605556A US 2015209107 A1 US2015209107 A1 US 2015209107A1
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Prior art keywords
catheter
balloon
lumen
antenna
portion
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Abandoned
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US14/605,556
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Eric N. Rudie
Philip J. Haarstad
Stanley E. Kluge
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Denervx LLC
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Denervx LLC
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Priority to US14/605,556 priority patent/US20150209107A1/en
Publication of US20150209107A1 publication Critical patent/US20150209107A1/en
Assigned to Denervx LLC reassignment Denervx LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: KLUGE, STANLEY E., RUDIE, ERIC N., HAARSTAD, PHILIP J.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/1815Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using microwaves
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00005Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe
    • A61B2018/00011Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe with fluids
    • A61B2018/00023Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe with fluids closed, i.e. without wound contact by the fluid
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00005Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe
    • A61B2018/00011Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe with fluids
    • A61B2018/00029Cooling or heating of the probe or tissue immediately surrounding the probe with fluids open
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00053Mechanical features of the instrument of device
    • A61B2018/00214Expandable means emitting energy, e.g. by elements carried thereon
    • A61B2018/0022Balloons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B2018/00053Mechanical features of the instrument of device
    • A61B2018/00273Anchoring means for temporary attachment of a device to tissue
    • A61B2018/00279Anchoring means for temporary attachment of a device to tissue deployable
    • A61B2018/00285Balloons
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B18/00Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body
    • A61B18/18Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves
    • A61B18/1815Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using microwaves
    • A61B2018/183Surgical instruments, devices or methods for transferring non-mechanical forms of energy to or from the body by applying electromagnetic radiation, e.g. microwaves using microwaves characterised by the type of antenna
    • A61B2018/1846Helical antennas

Abstract

A cooled microwave denervation catheter includes a catheter body having at least one fluid passage and an interior lumen therein, a balloon in communication with the at least one fluid passage to receive cooling fluid to inflate the balloon, and a microwave antenna catheter configured to be inserted into the interior lumen of the catheter body. The microwave antenna catheter has a distal end configured to engage a taper of the interior lumen, thereby positioning the microwave antenna in a desired location of the interior lumen.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/931,420 filed Jan. 24, 2014 for “Cooled Microwave Denervation Catheter Configuration” by E. Rudie et al., which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present disclosure is directed to catheter configurations for cooled microwave denervation.
  • SUMMARY
  • A cooled microwave denervation catheter includes a catheter body having at least one fluid passage and an interior lumen therein, the interior lumen having a first portion in a first axial region, a second portion in a second axial region, and a taper between the first portion and the second portion, the second portion having a smaller diameter than the first portion. A balloon communicates with the at least one fluid passage to receive cooling fluid for inflating the balloon into a shape that surrounds the catheter body at the first portion of the interior lumen, the cooling fluid having a temperature that is less than basal body temperature. A microwave antenna catheter is configured to be inserted into the interior lumen of the catheter body, the microwave antenna catheter including a coaxial cable and a microwave antenna connectable to a microwave generator to supply power to the microwave antenna to cause microwave energy to be emitted from the microwave antenna. A distal end of the microwave antenna catheter is configured to engage the taper between the first portion and the second portion of the catheter body upon insertion into the interior lumen, thereby positioning the microwave antenna in the first portion of the interior lumen.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 depicts a cooled microwave denervation catheter embodiment wherein the treatment catheter is separated into a first catheter and an antenna catheter.
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1, with the antenna catheter positioned within a lumen and advanced until the distal end of the antenna catheter engages a taper.
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged and shaded view of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1, with the antenna catheter placed within the first catheter.
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross section of the middle section of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross section of a portion of the middle section of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 7 is an enlarged cross section of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 8 depicts another cooled microwave denervation catheter embodiment in which the treatment catheter is separated into a first catheter and a second catheter.
  • FIG. 9 depicts the distal portion of the first catheter shown in FIG. 8 with the second catheter placed within it.
  • FIG. 10 is another view of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 11 is a cross section of multi lumen tubing showing cooling lumens and also a guide wire/antenna cable lumen.
  • FIG. 12 is a shaded drawing of the distal end of the first catheter shown in FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 13 depicts alternate cooled microwave denervation catheter shaft embodiments that can be used in conjunction with any embodiment that requires an antenna cable lumen, inflow cooling fluid lumen, outflow cooling fluid lumen, and a guide wire lumen or a subset of these.
  • FIG. 14 depicts a cooled microwave denervation catheter embodiment in which two balloons are used to occlude the body lumen, center the antenna within the body lumen, and create a chamber within which coolant is circulated.
  • FIG. 15 depicts a cooled microwave denervation catheter embodiment in which a guide catheter is equipped with an occluding/locating balloon inflated through a port via a lumen within a multi lumen tube, to locate guide catheter just proximal to a treatment site adjacent to the body lumen.
  • FIG. 16 depicts a dual balloon cooled microwave denervation catheter embodiment wherein the treatment catheter includes a microwave antenna mounted within a balloon.
  • FIG. 17 is another view of the catheter shown in FIG. 16.
  • FIG. 18A and FIG. 18B are alternate views of the catheter shown in FIG. 16.
  • FIG. 19 depicts the distal end of another embodiment of a cooled microwave denervation catheter.
  • FIG. 20 depicts the distal end of a further embodiment of a cooled microwave denervation catheter.
  • FIGS. 21-23 depict a dual catheter embodiment of a cooled microwave denervation catheter similar to that depicted in FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 24 depicts an alternate cross section for the shaft of the catheter shown in FIGS. 21-23.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The present disclosure is directed to catheter configurations for cooled microwave denervation. In certain embodiments, denervation is performed by positioning a catheter carrying a microwave antenna within a body vessel/lumen adjacent targeted nerves being treated, circulating cooling fluid around the microwave antenna in thermal contact with the inner wall of the body vessel/lumen, supplying power to the microwave antenna to cause microwave energy to be emitted from the microwave antenna toward the targeted nerves. The power supplied to the microwave antenna and the cooling fluid circulated around the microwave antenna are controlled to cause the targeted nerves to be heated to a temperature sufficient to cause thermal damage while the wall of the body vessel/lumen is maintained at a temperature where thermal damage does not occur. Various embodiments of cooled microwave denervation catheter configurations are described herein and shown in FIGS. 1-24.
  • FIG. 1 depicts an embodiment wherein the treatment catheter is separated into two catheters. The first catheter 10 has distal end 12, middle portion 14 and proximal end 16. Distal end 12 includes cooling balloon 20 adapted to communicate with lumens for inflow and outflow. The lumens exit the catheter through inlet connector 22 and outlet connector 24 on manifold 30. Catheter 10 also contains lumen 44 (shown in FIG. 2) extending from tip port 26 to proximal port 28 on manifold 30 through which a guide wire or antenna catheter 50 may be inserted. The second catheter, antenna catheter 50, contains microwave antenna 56 connected through coaxial cable 58 to a suitable connector, 60, such as a subminiature version A (SMA) connector, connected on the proximal end 54 of antenna catheter 50. Antenna 56 may be any embodiment as described in U.S. application Ser. No. 14/032,013 filed Sep. 19, 2013, which is hereby incorporated by reference.
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of distal end 12 of catheter 10. Inner tube member 32 forms lumen 44 within which antenna catheter 50 or a guide wire may be inserted. Taper 40 serves to transition the diameter of lumen 44 to match tip orifice 26. Taper 40 also serves to align antenna catheter 50 correctly within cooling balloon 20. A cooling lumen 37 (shown in FIGS. 5 and 6) is formed in the annular space between tube member 32 and tube member 34. Coolant flows into lumen 37 and exits into balloon 20 through proximal exchange port 35 formed when outer tube member 38 ends. Inner tube member 34 extends to the distal end of balloon 20 and forms distal coolant exchange port 39 into which coolant flows and into lumen 36 formed by the annular space between inner and outer tube member. Distal exchange port 39 is located near the distal end of balloon 20 to ensure that coolant is circulated within substantially the entire length of cooling balloon 20. Tube member 38 serves as the outer wall of catheter 10 and forms a cooling lumen in the annular space between tube member 34 and tube member 38. Radio opaque markers 46 are positioned about tube member 34 and are used to facilitate location of catheter 10 within renal artery under fluoroscopic guidance.
  • FIG. 3 is an enlarged view of distal end 12 of catheter 10 with antenna catheter 50 positioned within lumen 44 and advanced until distal end 52 of antenna catheter 50 engages taper 40. Antenna 56 is shown correctly positioned within balloon 20.
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged and shaded view of distal end 12 of catheter 10 with antenna catheter 50 placed within catheter 10. Shading of balloon 20 and catheter tubing helps to visualize the tubing walls.
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross section of the middle section 14 of catheter 10. Coolant flows in the annular spaces 37 and 36 between tube members 32, 34 and 38. The inner lumen 44, central to tube member 32, may contain guide wire 70 to facilitate introduction, or antenna catheter 50 for treatment. The guide wire 70 and antenna catheter 50 are each represented by the same circular cross section. However, they may be of different diameters and only one of them will be present at a time.
  • FIG. 6 is an enlarged cross section of the middle of section 14 of catheter 10. However, this drawing has inner lumen 44 empty. Central lumen 44, tubing members 32, 34 and 38 and annular space 37 and 36 are the same as in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 7 is an enlarged cross section of distal end 12 of catheter 10. Radio opaque markers 46 are more clearly visible within balloon 20 and are used to guide location of balloon 20 within the treatment location.
  • In an exemplary operation of the embodiment represented in FIGS. 1-7, catheter 10 is advanced over a guide wire 70 to the desired treatment location. Radio opaque marker bands 46 help the operator position the cooling balloon catheter 10 in the desired location via fluoroscopy. The guide wire 70 is then removed, leaving the cooling balloon catheter 10 in place. The antenna catheter 50 is then inserted into the central lumen 44 of catheter 10 and advanced until distal end 52 of microwave catheter 50 engages taper 40 and thereby locates antenna 56 within balloon 20 in order to precisely target the treatment location. Denervation treatment is then executed by applying coolant flow and microwave power in accordance with the U.S. application Ser. No. 14/032,013 referenced above. Once the treatment period is complete, coolant is discontinued, balloon 20 is deflated, and both the cooling balloon catheter 10 and microwave catheter 50 are removed.
  • It can be appreciated that one advantage of this embodiment is that the number of lumens required to perform the treatment is reduced. This is a result of the guide wire 70 and antenna catheter 50 sharing the same lumen at different times during the procedure. Additionally, the lumen size available to the guide wire is much larger. Typical guide wire diameters for vascular interventions may be 0.014″, 0.018″, 0.035″ and 0.038″. Since the diameter of the antenna catheter 10 in a preferred embodiment is greater than 0.038″, central lumen 44 may in some embodiments accommodate guide wire sizes as large as 0.038. These larger guide wire sizes can be an advantage in providing support to the delivery of the cooling balloon catheter in comparison with the use of 0.014″ or 0.018″ guidewires.
  • Embodiment DNX-001 B
  • FIG. 8 depicts another embodiment in which the treatment catheter is separated into two catheters. The first catheter 110 is a cooling balloon catheter that contains a microwave antenna within the cooling balloon 120 in the distal portion 112. Connection manifold 130 is located on proximal portion 116 of catheter 110. Cooling connections 122 and 124 communicate through manifold 130 to cooling lumens within catheter 110 to the distal section 112. A guide wire may be inserted into orifice 128 and advanced through catheter 110, exiting orifice at tip 126 to facilitate placement of catheter 110 within a body at the desired treatment location.
  • Once catheter 110 is in the desired location, the guide wire may be removed and catheter 150 may be inserted into orifice 128. Catheter 150 contains coaxial cable 158 extending from contacts 159 located at distal portion 152 to microwave connector 160. Microwave connector 160 may be an SMA or other appropriate connector. Once catheter 150 is properly positioned within catheter 110, contacts 159 on catheter 150 mate with corresponding contacts 157 (shown in FIG. 9) located within catheter 110 to enable microwave excitation of antenna 156 (FIG. 9). Coolant may be circulated through lumens within 110 so that balloon 120 may be inflated and denervation treatment may commence. Once the treatment period is complete the cooling balloon with antenna and coaxial cable are removed.
  • FIG. 9 depicts distal portion 112 of catheter 110 with catheter 150 placed within. Antenna 156 is located within balloon 120 and is electrically connected to catheter 150 by contacts 157 and 159 to enable it to be energized by microwave current applied to connector 160 (FIG. 8) located on the proximal end of catheter 150. Coolant is circulated through manifold 130, lumens 136 and 137 and into balloon 120 through proximal and distal ports 135 and 139. Balloon 120 is inflated by this circulating coolant so that the body lumen containing treatment catheter 110 may be protected. With catheter 150 placed within catheter 110 and connected as described, denervation treatment may commence. Once the treatment period is complete the cooling balloon with antenna and coaxial cable are removed. Radio opaque marker bands may be used to help visualize location of balloon 120 within the body lumen adjacent to the region requiring treatment.
  • FIG. 10 is another view of distal end 112 of catheter 110. Antenna 156 is clearly located on multi lumen tube 138 (shown in cross-section in FIG. 11). Proximal and distal coolant ports 135 and 139 are more clearly visible as apertures in multi lumen tube 138 that enable communication with lumens 136 and 137 (FIG. 11). Radio opaque marker bands may be used to help visualize location of balloon 120 within the body lumen adjacent to the region requiring treatment.
  • FIG. 11 is a cross section of multi lumen tubing 138 showing cooling lumens 136 and 137 and also guide wire/antenna cable lumen 144.
  • FIG. 12 is a shaded drawing of distal end 112 of catheter 110. The location of antenna 156, and cooling ports 135 and 139 are visible.
  • In some embodiments, for optimal microwave energy transmission it may be desirable for the diameter of the microwave antenna to be significantly larger than the commonly used 0.035″ or 0.038″ guidewires. Mounting this larger antenna inside the balloon allows the lumen for guidewire and coaxial cable to be suited for 0.035″ or 0.038″ guidewire. Marker bands may not be necessary in this embodiment if the antenna is significantly radiopaque.
  • Shaft Embodiments
  • FIG. 13 depicts alternate shaft embodiments that can be used in conjunction with any embodiment that requires an antenna cable lumen 245, inflow cooling fluid lumen 236, outflow cooling fluid lumen 237, and a guide wire lumen 244 or a subset of these.
  • Embodiment DNX-005
  • FIG. 14 depicts an embodiment in which two balloons are used to occlude the body lumen, center the antenna within the body lumen, and create a chamber within which coolant is circulated. The catheter of this embodiment is advanced over guide wire 370 exiting the device at orifice 326 until proper position within the body lumen is achieved. Distal occlusion balloon 320 is attached to multi lumen tube 332 and is inflated through port 357. Proximal occlusion balloon 321 is attached to outer multi lumen tube 334 and is inflated through port 359. Both balloons center antenna 356 within chamber 361 formed by occluding balloons 320 and 321. Coolant is circulated through lumens within multi lumen tube 334 and enters chamber 361 through port 339. Coolant exits chamber 361 through port 335 and returns through lumens within multi lumen tube 334. Cooling of the body lumen is accomplished by direct heat exchange between coolant within chamber 361 and the body lumen. Microwave antenna 356 may then be energized to accomplish denervation.
  • Embodiment DNX-007
  • FIG. 15 depicts an embodiment in which guide catheter 472 is equipped with occluding/locating balloon 421 inflated through port 459 via a lumen within multi lumen tube 434, to locate guide catheter just proximal to a treatment site adjacent to the body lumen. Antenna catheter 450 is advanced over guide wire 470 exiting an orifice at tip 426, through guide catheter 472, until it is positioned within the body lumen at the treatment site. Proximal balloon 420 is inflated through port 457 via a lumen within multi lumen tube 432 and thereby centers antenna 456 within chamber 461 formed by balloons 420 and 421. Coolant may then be circulated through a lumen within multi lumen tube 432, through distal coolant port 439 and into chamber 461. The body lumen is cooled by direct contact with coolant along chamber 461. Coolant enters port 435 formed by the annular space between catheter 450 and the inner lumen of guide catheter 472. Since the cooling fluid is returned thru the guide catheter lumen by entering orifice 435 formed by the guide catheter inner lumen and the antenna catheter 450 outer shaft; catheter 450 does not require an outflow lumen. Therefore, the available cross sectional area of 450 may be allocated to a single, higher flow lumen.
  • In operation, the guide catheter 472 is first positioned just proximal to the treatment site using standard interventional techniques. Once the guide catheter is in position, the balloon 421 on the guide catheter can be inflated via port 459 to occlude the body lumen. This balloon can also help anchor the guide catheter in the body lumen for the entire procedure. Next, treatment catheter 450 is advanced through guide catheter 472 and into the desired body lumen to the desired treatment location. Distal balloon 420 may then be inflated via port 457. Coolant circulation may then be initiated, thus circulating coolant within chamber 461 from distal port 439 to proximal port 435 formed by the annulus between the outer shaft of 450 and the inner lumen of guide catheter 472. Cooling fluid will make direct contact with artery wall for optimal heat transfer effect.
  • Embodiment DNX-008
  • FIG. 16 depicts a dual balloon embodiment wherein the treatment catheter 550 includes microwave antenna 556 mounted within balloon 520. A second balloon 521 is mounted on guide catheter 572. On the proximal taper of the treatment catheter balloon 520 are apertures 535, which are small enough to allow the balloon to inflate during the treatment period but large enough to allow cooling fluid to leak therethrough under pressure. Accordingly, coolant enters balloon 521 through distal port 539 into balloon 520 where it circulates and cools the body lumen. Coolant exits balloon 520 through apertures 535 at the proximal taper and flows into chamber 561 formed by balloons 520 and 521. Coolant enters port 574 formed by the annular space between the outer shaft of catheter 550 and the inner lumen of guide catheter 572 where it is captured externally. Coolant balloon 520 also centers antenna 556 within the body lumen adjacent to the region be treated.
  • In operation, guide catheter 571 is first positioned in the body lumen using standard interventional techniques. Once the guide catheter is in position, balloon 521 is inflated via port 559 to locate the guide catheter and occlude the body lumen. Next, treatment catheter 550 is advanced through the guide catheter 572 into the body lumen and to the desired treatment location. Once there, balloon 520, is inflated by circulating cooling fluid as described above. Antenna 556 is then energized as described in U.S. application Ser. No. 14/032,013. Once treatment is finished, balloon 520 is deflated by discontinuing coolant circulation. Balloon 521 may then be deflated and catheter 550 and guide wire 572 may be repositioned to an additional treatment site or removed.
  • FIG. 17 is another view of catheter 550. Antenna 556 is mounted on catheter shaft 532 within balloon 520. Apertures on catheter shaft 532 form distal cooling port 539 that permits coolant to flow from the cooling lumen within shaft 523 and into balloon 520. Proximal cooling port 535 allows coolant to flow out of balloon 520. Orifice 526 located on distal tip of shaft 532 allows the guide wire to exit catheter 550. Radio opaque markers may be utilized if needed.
  • Embodiment DNX-008 B
  • FIG. 18A and FIG. 18B are alternate views of catheter 550. Catheter 550 may be placed into the desired body lumen using only guide wire guidance through port at distal tip 526, or it may be placed with a standard, single lumen guide catheter, or a combination of both. In this case, coolant exits port 535 formed by many small apertures sized to maintain balloon pressure under active coolant flow, and flows directly into the body lumen. The coolant flow rate and treatment duration are such that a relatively modest amount of coolant is discharged into the body lumen of the patient and is not harmful. This embodiment is similar to DNX-008 described above, but does not include a balloon on the distal end of the guide catheter. In the case of the body lumen being an artery or vein, cooling fluid will be discharged into the blood stream of the patient. A blood compatible fluid like sterile dextrose may be used in some embodiments.
  • Embodiment DNX-008 C
  • FIG. 19 depicts distal end of catheter 650. Balloon 620 functions as generally described in the preceding embodiments, except that apertures 635 in balloon 620 serve to discharge cooling fluid into the body lumen on the distal side of balloon 620. Depending on the body lumen being treated, it may be preferable to discharge cooling fluid either proximal or distal to cooling balloon 620. A coolant port may be located in the distal end of balloon 620 so that coolant along body lumen is optimally moving in order that cooling may be most effectively accomplished.
  • Embodiment DNX-008 D
  • FIG. 20 depicts distal end of catheter 750. Balloon 720 functions as generally described in the preceding embodiments, except apertures 735 in balloon 720 serve to discharge coolant both proximal and distal to balloon 720. Depending on the body lumen being treated, it may be preferable to discharge a smaller volume of fluid on each side of inflated balloon 720. In this case, a coolant port may be located in the center of the balloon or in another location to optimize cooling flow adjacent the body lumen being cooled.
  • Embodiment DNX-012
  • FIGS. 21, 22, and 23 depict a dual catheter embodiment similar to that depicted in FIG. 8. Cooling balloon/antenna catheter 810 includes central lumen 844 through which either a guide catheter or a coaxial cable catheter exits orifice 826 at the tip. Coaxial cable catheter 850 is initially separate from cooling balloon catheter 810, so that catheter 810 may be placed over a guide wire and positioned within body lumen adjacent the desired denervation site. Once placed, the guide wire is removed and coaxial cable catheter 850 is advanced within lumen 844 in catheter 810 so that contacts 859 on coaxial cable catheter engage with mating contacts, 857 within catheter 810. Coolant flows through a relatively large lumen 836 into balloon 820 through orifice 839 and into the interior of balloon 820. Coolant exits balloon 820 through apertures 835 on the proximal taper of the balloon and is discharged into body lumen as described above in previous embodiments.
  • Radio opaque markers 846 may be incorporated if helpful for placement.
  • As can be appreciated, apertures 835 on balloon 820 may be located on the proximal taper as shown in FIG. 22, on the distal taper like those shown in FIG. 19, or on both proximal and distal tapers as shown in FIG. 20. Alternately, the discharge holes may be located on the cylindrical wall of balloon 820. Coolant port 839 may be moved within balloon in order to ensure that coolant is moving along body lumen contact area so that cooling may be accomplished.
  • FIG. 24 depicts an alternate cross section for the shaft of catheter 810. In this figure, as in FIG. 23, the outer tubing wall is identified as 838. The cooling lumen is 836, and the antenna catheter/guide wire lumen is 844.
  • This concept combines the shared guidewire and coaxial cable lumen concept in DNX-001 with the cooling fluid holes in the balloon tapers as in DNX-008 B, C & D. The shaft of the treatment catheter requires only two lumens. One lumen is a shared lumen for guidewire and coaxial cable and the second lumen is for inflow of cooling fluid. The lumen configuration can be either a simple coaxial design or multilumen extrusion.
  • While the invention has been described with reference to an exemplary embodiment(s), it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalents may be substituted for elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. In addition, many modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation or material to the teachings of the invention without departing from the essential scope thereof. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiment(s) disclosed, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (1)

1. A cooled microwave denervation catheter comprising:
a catheter body having at least one fluid passage and an interior lumen therein, the interior lumen having a first portion in a first axial region, a second portion in a second axial region, and a taper between the first portion and the second portion, the second portion having a smaller diameter than the first portion;
a balloon in communication with the at least one fluid passage to receive cooling fluid for inflating the balloon into a shape that surrounds the catheter body at the first portion of the interior lumen, the cooling fluid having a temperature that is less than basal body temperature;
a microwave antenna catheter configured to be inserted into the interior lumen of the catheter body, the microwave antenna catheter including a coaxial cable and a microwave antenna connectable to a microwave generator to supply power to the microwave antenna to cause microwave energy to be emitted from the microwave antenna, wherein a distal end of the microwave antenna catheter is configured to engage the taper between the first portion and the second portion of the catheter body upon insertion into the interior lumen, thereby positioning the microwave antenna in the first portion of the interior lumen.
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