US20150150336A1 - Pronation correction - Google Patents

Pronation correction Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20150150336A1
US20150150336A1 US14622127 US201514622127A US2015150336A1 US 20150150336 A1 US20150150336 A1 US 20150150336A1 US 14622127 US14622127 US 14622127 US 201514622127 A US201514622127 A US 201514622127A US 2015150336 A1 US2015150336 A1 US 2015150336A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
foot
calcaneus
footwear
metatarsal
portion
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US14622127
Inventor
Kevin B. Lawlor
Original Assignee
Kevin B. Lawlor
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B5/00Footwear for sporting purposes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/141Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form with a part of the sole being flexible, e.g. permitting articulation or torsion
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/38Built-in insoles joined to uppers during the manufacturing process, e.g. structural insoles; Insoles glued to shoes during the manufacturing process
    • A43B13/41Built-in insoles joined to uppers during the manufacturing process, e.g. structural insoles; Insoles glued to shoes during the manufacturing process combined with heel stiffener, toe stiffener, or shank stiffener
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/26Footwear adjustable as to length or size
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/142Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the medial arch, i.e. the navicular or cuneiform bones
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1425Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the ball of the foot, i.e. the joint between the first metatarsal and first phalange
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/143Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the lateral arch, i.e. the cuboid bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1435Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the joint between the fifth phalange and the fifth metatarsal bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/144Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the heel, i.e. the calcaneus bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1455Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties
    • A43B7/1465Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form with special properties with removable or adjustable pads to allow custom fit
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1495Footwear with arch-supports of the bracelet type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/14Special medical insertions for shoes for flat-feet, club-feet, or the like

Abstract

Overpronation of a foot is limited and corrected by a footwear article that acts on a foot in motion to act in relation to foot stepping by use of vertical restraints to move the calcaneus bone in a medial direction and shift pressure of the stepping foot and pull the first metatarsal laterally and shifting pressure off the first medial side to its lateral side.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of my co-pending application Ser. No. 13/949,651 filed 24 Jul. 2013; which is a continuation of Ser. No. 13/355,622 filed 23 Jan. 2013; provisional application Ser. No. 61/1649,373 filed 20 Oct. 2011; and my PCT application Ser. No. PCT/US12/54075 filed 7 Sep. 2012 and also claim priority from my co-pending provisional patent application Ser. No. 61/933,910 filed Feb. 14, 2014. The full contents of all said applications are incorporated by reference as though stated at length herein. Appendix A to this application is a copy of US PTO patent application publication US2014/0059887, i.e. my above cited application Ser. No. 13/949,651 filed Jul. 24, 2013 and Appendix B hereto is a copy of my provisional application 61/939,910, filed Feb. 14, 2014. These are provided for convenience of examining this application.
  • FIELD AND BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to footwear with usage in correcting over-pronation difficulties and for other purposes.
  • The varieties of human feet have characteristics that often times fall into identifiable groups. People often identify themselves by their assumed deficit. The most common ways to identify people with pronation propensities are as either overpronators or an oversupinators. The more common is the overpronator. A degree of pronation is good for humans. Most people have pronating and that does not cause discomfort. Some people have feet that overpronate. This is a degree of pronation on the medial side at the ankle between foot and the leg bones that is generally assumed to be beyond about 15 degrees of pronation. For those whose feet do cause discomfort from overpronation there are a multitude of devices in the marketplace. The most common are foot orthotics placed inside footwear to diffuse, mitigate and or eliminate the discomfort. Whether over the counter or prescribed by a podiatrist such orthotics do not provide a corrective function for overpronation. Customary prescribed orthotics for overpronation build up material on the medial side, as opposed to the lateral side of an orthotic device. This device is placed inside footwear and can be moved by the user to different footwear. This buildup of material is often called a medial “post”.
  • Runners who overpronate often wear motion control running sneakers. Motion control sneakers often have areas of firmer material on the medial side of the foot than on the lateral to make that side of the foot harder to compress. It is thought this type of footwear may retard pronation on the medial side of the foot. Many types of footwear have a stiff plastic material under the medial arch of the foot. The premise of providers is that the connection of the rear of the foot to the forefoot by this stiff plastic may decrease the amount of collapse on the medial side of the shoe by the arch of the foot. However, motion control footwear does not provide a corrective function for the foot.
  • Each individual human foot adapts to bipedal walking in its own way. Currently whatever way a foot adapts to walking is unique to the individual. Interventions to correct adaption are limited and only occur when bipedal walking is greatly impeded. As a result there large variety of non-corrective devices for limited foot pain. Relief may be limited as the foot adapts to the orthotic, but may return as these devices are non-corrective. Consumers often try many different ones in hopes of eliminating recurring foot pain. These include a wide variety of over the counter models and those orthotics prescribed by professionals.
  • Pronation includes a rocking of the calcaneus as it touches down. A point on the rear of the foot initiates the rocking and the calcaneus with talus bone above in combination bow out. The two leg bones above them are the top part of the bow. If the medial bowing is over 15 degrees it is considered over-pronation.
  • This bowing point between the talus bone and the leg bones can be considered a fulcrum point, as in a see-saw. The posting effect of orthotics does not lift the foot at the fulcrum, but lifts by elevating the medial side under the foot. With these orthotics some weight is shifted laterally. This has remarkable results for those who can benefit from this weight shift that may even decrease the angle of pronation. Realignment of the foot for over-pronators by over the counter or prescribed orthotics provides a viable solution for many, but seems to be limited to orthotics with arch support and or posts only. Providing a similar function to the over-pronating that does not benefit from these orthotics is beneficial.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • An approach for overpronators used in the present invention is to limit the calcaneus from shifting too much laterally during touch down impact. It is possible to hold the rear of the calcaneus from moving laterally with a non-invasive device or even over time move it medially. If this can be done the weight is placed more laterally. If the weight at touch down at the rear of the calcaneus were moved further towards the lateral the result in the rear calcaneus as (this can lessen) the angle of pronation. Further changes are required to augment this shift. The move of the weight of the calcaneus more towards the lateral side can shift it closer to the weight placement of non-pronators. Further, the shift in weight placement to the lateral can shift the fulcrum of the see-saw of the wobbly calcaneus and talus combination further towards the medial and decrease the angle of pronation.
  • With the shift of weight to the lateral and the move of the calcaneus more toward the medial side the performance of the calcaneus changes. This new distribution of weight and position of the calcaneus may assume an action similar to orthotic posts prescribed by professionals and orthotics sold over the counter to consumers. As this shift is to the bone of the foot it does not wear out as might an orthotics.
  • Further a movement of the calcaneus to the medial side may elevate it medially as well, mimicking the action of the elevated orthotic post. With a medially elevated calcaneus the weight of a footstep of the foot may shift more towards the lateral side. This shift may begin a lessening of pronation in the overpronator.
  • The height and angle of this elevation provides a force that effects the bones around it that may have been lower before the elevation. The weight is shifted towards the lateral as with a post. In the correction, when the calcaneus moves to the medial the resulting elevation is not under the foot, as with a post or motion control footwear, it is at the fulcrum of the see-saw. Further as the calcaneus bone lifts it twists the subtalar axis towards the lateral by shifting the position of the talus. The twisting pushes the navicular bone on the medial side laterally and those in front of it; the cuneiform and metatarsals as well. It pushes the cuneiform and metatarsals in different degrees to the lateral and maybe the first metatarsal stays the same, moves laterally or medially. The unpredictability of the movement of the metatarsals indicates the idea of achieving bipedal balance later in the evolutionary process through their interaction with the calcaneus as the action of the foot triangulates. The length of the longest metatarsal, the fifth, on the lateral side possibly makes it the most important for balance. Giving it a stronger position in bipedalism. An early problem with bipedalism was the upper leg and torso pushing the calcaneus towards the lateral. With this device, as with the digging in of the calcaneo-cuboid joint in bipedalism the calcaneus begins to exert more opposability with the subtalar axis and the placement of the talus. When this happens the journey to bipedalism can move forward. If this happens with the device the movement of the calcaneus is far enough towards the medial it shifts weight towards the lateral and it can better bear the weight above it. This may find the rear of the foot in what may be called a neutral position. This can result in a foot correction that is similar to non-corrective solutions already in place for over-pronation. Unlike posting in prescribed orthotics there is a shift in the placement of the bones of the foot, not just a raising of a medial portion or portions of the foot. Similar to posting with the invention the arch area is raised, but from within the bone structure, rather than under the foot. The lifting is at the fulcrum of the see-saw. As the lifting is done with the calcaneus bone it is more permanent that with man-made materials. The lifting brings about favorable changes that may lead to a lessening of pronation in over-pronators. This shifting of the calcaneus towards the medial has consequences and may need further action to the foot in motion to adapt the footstep to this correction.
  • Among these consequences is a shift of the remainder of the foot farther towards the lateral side. Similar to a portion at the lateral calcaneus and the medial a portion of the device may be placed beside the first and fifth metatarsals. This may require a further exploration and understanding of human evolution towards bipedalism that developed in a similar way.
  • The device can follow a similar track taken by evolution and also begin at the rear of the foot and then move the remainder of the foot laterally. Evolution took over a million years of this approach to achieve the extraordinary result of human bipedalism. A human lifetime is relatively inconsequential in relation to changes occurring in evolutionary time. Evolutionary changes in individual humans do not necessarily manifest at the same time. These differences are often found in the variety of configurations of the human foot. The human foot contains twenty six bones and it must be remembered our ancestors the ape, gorilla and chimpanzee foot often contained the same amount of bones. These same twenty six bones provided them with entirely different functions than us humans. Later on in evolutionary time there were varieties of homo sapiens ancestors including species of australopithecines with the same amount of bones that were unable to make the jump to bipedalism similar to humans.
  • The journey of the device begins at the calcaneus and the evolutionary shift to bipedalism began with the calcaneus and cuboid hone on the lateral side of the foot. The locking of this joint called the calcaneo-joint began many changes in the primate foot over an evolutionary timeframe of a million years that resulted in human bipedalism. Emulating evolution one can begin at the calcaneo-cuboid joint. Moving the calcaneus to the medial side would require a stiffening of footwear at the lateral side that is greater than the stiffness of the material on the medial of the device opposite the lateral. A stiffening of the material at the lateral side of the foot may bio-mimicry the action of the locking calcaneo-cuboid joint that began human bipedalism.
  • As apes, gorillas and chimpanzee became less arboreal the muscles associated with the grasping of the opposable first and second, third metatarsals weakened. Their position weakened further as primates left the trees and the strong muscles needed for grasping with their feet diminished further. The evolutionary locking action of the calcaneo-cuboid joint towards bipedalism occurred through the weakening of the muscles. Diagonally opposite to the grasping of the opposable first and second, third metatarsals of the ape, gorilla, chimpanzee primate foot is the force of the action of the locking calcaneo-cuboid joint that, like the opposable first and second, third metatarsals of the apes dug in, strengthened and eventually determined the outcome of human bipedalism.
  • In front of the cuboid bone on the lateral side is the base of the fifth metatarsal. Opposite it on the medial side is the first metatarsal. The shift to human hipedalism required a reconfiguring of the human foot to more of a triangular shape. Through the motion of first and fifth metatarsals to both bear weight and retain balance they led the way to this shift through there interactivity, and with that of the calcaneus and calcaneo-cuboid joint moved toward human bipedalism.
  • The three points; the calcaneus, the first and fifth metatarsals make up the triangle of the human foot that resulted in human bipedalism. Evolution then developed three arches in the human foot. Over a million years evolution shifted these three arches upwards and over other bones to deposit weight, force and the need for balance at these three points of the foot. Similar to evolution the managing of the triangulation of these three points may have a positive effect on the anatomy of a human foot that may not have achieved the maximum benefits of evolution's struggle to human bipedalism.
  • Other objects, features and advantages will he apparent from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows a top view of the bone structure of the foot indicating the direction of foot correction;
  • FIG. 2 displays a novel footwear structure from the lateral rearfoot to the medial forefoot;
  • FIG. 3 display a novel footwear structure from lateral rearfoot to medial midfoot;
  • FIG. 4 displays FIG. 2 with FIG. 3 over it with adjustments; and
  • FIG. 5 displays a novel footwear structure at two areas on the lateral and two on the medial side of the foot;
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Similar to the evolutionary journey to human bipedalism devices of the invention apply compression and tension, push and pill to bring about changes to the overpronator's foot. Changes and corrections to the foot are achieved over time by footwear of the invention. The invention corrects the overpronator's foot by moving the rearfoot medially and foot portions forward of it laterally. Shown in FIG. 1, is line 282 with arrowhead 282A pointing the direction of the foot correction. Along 282 is rearfoot arrowhead 283 pointing the medial direction of vector force on the overpronator's foot. On the lateral side of the foot medial pushing vector force 283 pushes the forefoot 284 laterally with a twisting on or about 285 in the midfoot. The vector force of footwear pushing the rear of the calcaneus to the medial interrupts the usual forward foot gait. The medial vector force also pushes forward along line 282 engaging a twist on or about point 285 not usual to the overpronator's gait. This forces the talus bone 279 in FIG. 1 to shift. The twist about point 285 pushes the navicular 280 laterally and then three cuneiform bones 281, and metatarsals 31, 32, 36, 37, 38 laterally and medially.
  • The dashed line 57 in FIG. 2 parallel to 282 also shows twist 285 and uses the same oppositional forces shown in FIG. 1, arrows 283, 284 in footwear. Footwear of the invention uses oppositional forces across the foot shown in dashed line 57 arrows to provide a correction to the overpronator's foot.
  • In FIG. 2 shown is footwear of the invention—a sole insert 286 extends diagonally vis-à-vis the foot and having vertical tab extension of that sole insert, i.e. substantially rigid tabs 21 and 59 restraining respectively, medial and lateral movements. At rearfoot impact vertical tab 59 beside the calcaneus and horizontal 286 under the calcaneus move the calcaneus medially and sole portions 285 at midfoot along crossing line 57. The twist on or about 285 pulls up sole portion 286. On the medial side of 285 sole portion 286 continues to pull up and move laterally. This continues to vertical tab 21. Footwear portion 21 beside the first metatarsal is pulled laterally by the vector force along 286. Vertical tab 21 pushes the first metatarsal 32 laterally and the other metatarsals 38, 37, 36, 31 laterally as well. By moving the foot laterally it moves weight, compressive pressure off the medial and onto lateral side of the foot.
  • Taking weight off the medial side of the overpronator's foot is traditionally done by orthotic posts external to the foot and prescribed by a professional. Posts raise up the medial side of the foot. They tilt the medial side up higher than the lateral. Footwear of the invention shifts weight, compressive pressure off the medial and onto the lateral. Footwear of the invention and orthotic posts both shift weight laterally. The weight is moved laterally in the foot by the action of footwear of the invention. This action can be continued and gradually diminish the overpronation with the corrective footwear and eliminate the need for a device.
  • The pull up of sole portion 286 provides support to the medial arch. The pull up of the footwear provides a correction to the overpronator's foot by lifting the medial arch and forefoot areas inside the foot. The footwear acting on the foot bones provides a correction to the overpronator's foot by moving portions of it up at the midfoot like an external material medial arch support. Footwear replaces manufactured medial arch supports external to the foot by providing a foot correction inside the foot gradually over time. The footwear engages the whole foot in the correction by utilizing the naturally occurring oppositional force along 57 crosswise across the foot. Wearing the corrective footwear over time allows the continual pushing of the calcaneus medially by footwear 59, 286, 21 to provide a foot correction. Using a prescribed orthotic may relieve pain, but does not provide a foot correction.
  • Footwear of the invention provides a foot correction for overpronators. In FIG. 2 the corrections include: (1) the pull up of 286 supporting the midfoot, medial forefoot and first metatarsal 32; (2) the response of the lateral shift of 286, 21 on the midfoot and forefoot is to push them laterally; (3) the response of 286, 21 back to 59 beside the calcaneus 30, lateral 286 is to pull them in tension medially. The upward pull of 286 supporting midfoot, forefoot and first metatarsal is a foot correction of the invention as well. This can occur without 21. Adjustable portions can be added to 59, 286, 21 to gradually push and pull the foot laterally.
  • FIG. 3, shows a variant of the invention. At rearfoot impact lateral vertical tab 59 beside the calcaneus moves the calcaneus medially. Horizontal sole portion 287 engages the twist on or about 285 at midfoot along 57. Footwear portion 287, responds to the calcaneus' medial movement by pulling up vertically and moving laterally. Relatively vertical footwear portion 288 beside medial midfoot arch pulls up and lateral. The vector force of the footwear on the rearfoot calcaneus moves it to the medial and the opposing vector force of the footwear on the medial midfoot arch pills it up and shifts it to the lateral. The footwear acting on the foot bones provide a correction to the overpronator's foot. In FIG. 3 responses of footwear of the invention providing a foot correction by the invention include: (1) the vertical pull up of lateral 287, 288 supporting the midfoot and medial arch; (2) the response of the lateral shift of 287, 288 on the midfoot arch is to pull it laterally; (3) the response of 287, 288 back to 59, 287 is to pull them in tension medially. The upward pull of 287 supporting the midfoot arch is a foot correction of the invention as well. This can occur without 288. Adjustable portions can be added to 59, 287, 288 to gradually push and pull them laterally.
  • FIG. 4 shows footwear of the invention with FIG. 2 structure above FIG. 3. It is understood FIG. 3 can be above FIG. 2 structure. Footwear features of FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 mentioned above are applicable to FIG. 4. Footwear is along crossing line 57. Vertical tab 59 beside the lateral calcaneus pushes it medially. Relatively horizontal sole inserts 286, 287 move forward under the foot with a twisting action on or about axis 285. Footwear portion 286 moves forward of 287 and under the first metatarsal and to 21 beside it. FIG. 3, footwear portion 287 moves to medial midfoot portion 287 under the medial arch and to 288 beside it. The combination of FIG. 2 above and FIG, 3 under increases the thickness of the material in the rearfoot where FIG. 2 covers FIG. 3. This addition of material may improve the ability of the lateral footwear 59, 286, 287 to move the rearfoot medially. The lesser material in comparison at the midfoot arch and first metatarsal may provide more tension, flexibility at the medial midfoot and forefoot. FIG. 4 footwear shows adjustable portions 289, 290. Footwear shows two plugs 289 protruding upward from 287 in FIG. 3. Two of the eight holes 290 in 286 in FIG. 2 contain the plugs. FIG. 4 is adjustable allowing the wearer to move it farther forward, backward and to the lateral side. It is understood rearfoot lateral 59 can be part of one or the other of FIG. 2 or FIG. 3. It is understood footwear can have adjustable portions along line 57 at the calcaneus 30, medial arch and 21 at the first metatarsal 32. FIG. 2 can be combined with FIG. 3 into a single piece device with and or without an adjustable portion. It is understood there are many ways to make footwear of the invention adjustable.
  • The material used in footwear of the invention i.e. horizontal sole inserts with vertical tab extension thereof integral therewith, the tabs extending from about 0.5 to 2 inches from the horizontal sole portion and in any event sized and sufficiently rigid to perform the patent functions and is generally a hard material. The combined oppositional forces of the invention push bones in compression and absorb shock to the foot pulling in tension. The material must be able to direct bones of the foot with compression, absorb shock and respond in tension. Commonly available Carboplast brand and other brands of carboplastic sheets (thermoformable fiber reinforced plastic sheets) are examples of suitable material. The material thickness can be in a range from approximately 1.5 mm to approximately 4 mm. The layering of material in FIG. 4 appropriately increases the thickness at lateral rearfoot impact where direction and control of compressive force is needed. At the medial arch and forefoot the single layers of material there appropriately provide more flexibility to absorb shock and respond in tension. Thickness of material, flexibility and rigidity can be determined according to the compressive vector forces on the footwear required to impart a correction to the overpronator's foot while allowing the material to respond in tension. The structural design and light weight thin material usage of the footwear in the present invention is in contrast to footwear materials that provide cushioning.
  • Unlike the parent application all footwear of the present invention including FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5 utilize the vector force of rearfoot impact on rearfoot lateral footwear portions to activate a footwear correction for the foot.
  • FIGS. 2, 3 are different from my parent applications cited above at paragraph [0001] as there only two features are placed diagonally across the foot along crossing line 57 in different zones; FIG. 2 in rearfoot and forefoot, FIG. 3 in rearfoot and midfoot. FIG. 4 is different from the parent application as there three features are placed diagonally across the foot along crossing line 57 in different rearfoot, midfoot and forefoot. The parent application with two features are in the forefoot zone only. The parent application has no footwear portions at the midfoot medial.
  • Using only two diagonal features allows this invention to apply impact force to the rearfoot feature along crossing line 57 to exert control on the opposite sides, across the foot to shift the foot hones. The impact force redirects foot portions along crossing line 57 to provide a gradual correction over time to the overpronator's foot. In the parent application there two features are only in the forefoot.
  • FIG. 5 in the present invention uses rearfoot impact along crossing lines 57, 58 to, in part spread the foot laterally and push it laterally rather than contain, hold and sustain the foot as the parent application does. The use of three or more features in the parent application relies on sustaining the footwear rather than correcting with vector force.
  • Reference is made to the footwear invention described in this application may be considered and compared in relation to the footwear described in my prior U.S. patent applications, Ser. No. 13/949,651 filed 24 Jul. 2013; Ser. No. 13/355,622 filed 23 Jan. 2013; provisional application Ser. No. 61/649,373 filed 20 Oct. 2011; and my PCT application Ser. No. PCT/US12/54075 filed 7 Sep. 2012 and provisional application 61/939,910 filed Feb. 14, 2014, the content of all of which are incorporated by reference as though stated at length herein. See Appendix A and Appendix B hereto.
  • FIG. 5 shows what may be called a “cross” or “X” shape of diagonal dashed lines 57, 58. The “cross” or “X” shape 57, 58 with two headed arrows indicates countering diagonal forces across the foot. Footwear portions along crossing line 57 are 59, 293, 21 and are under footwear portions 60, 294, 50 along crossing line 58. It is understood 57 can be above 58. On or about 285 in FIGS. 2, 3, 4 under the foot in FIG. 5 is placed adjustable portions 291, 292, Footwear portions 58 octagonal polygon hole 292 is placed over 57 octagonal polygon plug 291 as an adjustable to place footwear at different angles to provide a foot correction for the overpronator. It is understood there are many ways to provide an adjustment to footwear of the invention. The dashed lines 57, 58 are in opposition to each other. Their opposing forces are used to advantage to work together in FIG. 5 to provide a foot correction to the overpronator's foot. Along crossing line 57 lateral rearfoot vertical footwear 59 at the calcaneus pushes medially and along 293 forcing forefoot vertical footwear 21 to push laterally. Along crossing line 58 medial rearfoot vertical footwear 60 at the calcaneus pushes medially to accommodate the medial push of 59. Footwear portion 294's medial push along 58 forces forefoot vertical footwear 50 to push laterally accommodating the lateral push of 21. Crossing line 57 provides the compressive force to move the foot laterally and crossing line 58 accommodates 57 in the rearfoot 60 and forefoot 50. Crossing line 57 requires relatively greater strength of material than 58.
  • As the foot correction begins and continues adjustments can be made to the lateral side of the footwear as the forefoot moves laterally. The fifth metatarsal 31 with the cuboid 40 adjusts balance and acts in tension, milling the rest of the forefoot laterally. In the invention, lateral portion 50 in FIG. 5 of the footwear can push the fifth metatarsal 31 in FIG. 1 towards the lateral. The fifth metatarsal 31 then pulls the remainder of the metatarsals laterally. During the foot correction footwear accommodations are made at the fifth metatarsal 31 and overpronators achieve a new balance. Forward lateral footwear portion of 50 in FIG. 1 by the base of the fifth metatarsal 31 is twisted and shifted toward the lateral. This increases the angle of portion 50 to accommodate the movement of the metatarsals laterally and the increased foot action at this triangulation point as the foot correction continues. The rearward part of 50 is not twisted and shifted as much at the base of the fifth metatarsal 31. When in use rearward portion of 50 at the base of fifth metatarsal 31 pushes the base of the fifth metatarsal 31 at a wider vector force angle that assists the shaft and the head of the fifth metatarsal 31 to pull out to the lateral. This lateral push at the base of the fifth 31 by the rearward footwear portion of 50 forces the fifth metatarsal 31 to pull with it in tension the other metatarsals laterally to achieve a new balance for the overpronator's foot.
  • It will now be apparent to those skilled in the art that other embodiments, improvements, details, and uses can be made consistent with the letter and spirit of the foregoing disclosure and within the scope of this patent, which is limited only by the following claims, construed in accordance with the patent law, including the doctrine of equivalents.

Claims (8)

What is claimed is:
1. A footwear system for compensation and correction of overpronation of a user's foot constructed and arranged to limit shifting of a user's calcaneus bone in any given step/impact of the foot and over the course of multiple usage to move the calcaneus position medially and elevate it and to move the weight-center of the foot laterally, thereby lessening the angle of pronation.
2. The system of claim 1 implemented by a footwear horizontal sole insert, with vertical extension tabs of the sole insert positioned adjacent and constructed in relation to foot stepping restraining movement at the first metatarsal and medial movement of the calcaneus bone all such restraint including forces through the sole insert portion.
3. The system of claim 2 wherein the horizontal sole insert restrains the foot by a medial first metatarsal vertical tab and a lateral vertical tab adjacent the calcaneus bone, the vertical tabs being extensions of and integral with the horizontal sole portion.
4. The system of claim 3 as implemented by a diagonal horizontal sole portion insert between a vertical tab at a medial side of a first metatarsal bone and a lateral vertical tab adjacent to the calcaneus bone and restraining movement thereof.
5. The system of claim 1 as implemented by an overlying pair of diagonal horizontal shoe insert portions,
(a) one such portion with vertical extension tabs of the sole insert positioned adjacent and constructed in relation to foot stepping restraining movement at the first metatarsal and lateral movement of the calcaneus bone all such restrained including forces through sole insert portion; and
(b) one such portion wherein the sole insert the foot from a fifth metatarsal tab or a lateral tab adjacent the calcaneus bone.
6. The article of claim 5 and further comprising means for adjusting cross angle sole portions.
7. The system of claim 5 as implemented by overlaying two diagonal horizontal sole portions at a user's first metatarsal bone and calcaneus bone,
(a) the sole portion with vertical tab extension at a user's first metatarsal bone and calcaneus bone,
(b) a second portion with vertical tab extensions at a user's fifth metatarsal and calcaneus bones.
8. The article of claim 7 further comprising means for adjusting cross angle of the sole portion.
US14622127 2011-09-08 2015-02-13 Pronation correction Abandoned US20150150336A1 (en)

Priority Applications (5)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201313355622 true 2013-01-23 2013-01-23
US13949651 US20140059887A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2013-07-24 Footwear support structures
US201461939910 true 2014-02-14 2014-02-14
US201461933910 true 2014-02-14 2014-02-14
US14622127 US20150150336A1 (en) 2013-01-23 2015-02-13 Pronation correction

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14622127 US20150150336A1 (en) 2013-01-23 2015-02-13 Pronation correction

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13949651 Continuation US20140059887A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2013-07-24 Footwear support structures

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20150150336A1 true true US20150150336A1 (en) 2015-06-04

Family

ID=53267153

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13949651 Abandoned US20140059887A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2013-07-24 Footwear support structures
US14622127 Abandoned US20150150336A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2015-02-13 Pronation correction

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13949651 Abandoned US20140059887A1 (en) 2011-09-08 2013-07-24 Footwear support structures

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20140059887A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20170181495A1 (en) * 2015-12-28 2017-06-29 Trustees Of Boston University Method and Apparatus to Assist Foot Motion About the Pronation Axis

Families Citing this family (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP2790543A4 (en) * 2011-12-13 2015-12-30 Equipower Sports Ltd Footwear for use in specialized activities
US9750302B2 (en) * 2013-08-13 2017-09-05 Heel-It, Llc Orthotic insert device
US9578920B2 (en) * 2014-05-13 2017-02-28 Ariat International, Inc. Energy return, cushioning, and arch support plates, and footwear and footwear soles including the same
US20150366290A1 (en) * 2014-06-24 2015-12-24 Nike, Inc. Stability Structure
US20170224049A1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2017-08-10 Karl Stien Footwear with tapered heel and methods of manufacture and measurement
EP3097809A1 (en) * 2015-05-27 2016-11-30 Baak GmbH & Co. KG Shoe sole with reinforcement
US20170127759A1 (en) * 2015-11-05 2017-05-11 Kristina Diemer Orthopedic Boot Liner

Citations (53)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US545006A (en) * 1895-08-20 Insole for shoes
US564767A (en) * 1896-07-28 William schneider
US850862A (en) * 1906-04-11 1907-04-16 Hezekiah C Welch Arch-supporting shoe.
US1728243A (en) * 1927-05-04 1929-09-17 Marshalek Alois Arch support
US2081474A (en) * 1935-10-23 1937-05-25 William C Burns Cuboid-metatarsal arch support
US2161565A (en) * 1938-06-10 1939-06-06 Severino A Freda Arch supporter
US2383583A (en) * 1943-01-08 1945-08-28 Morris L Becker Foot corrective appliance
US2435776A (en) * 1946-03-23 1948-02-10 George W Geilear Arch supporting insole
US2546408A (en) * 1950-03-07 1951-03-27 Florida L Riggs Insole-type appliance
US2628440A (en) * 1951-02-12 1953-02-17 Charles P Leydecker Foot balancing means
US2660814A (en) * 1951-11-03 1953-12-01 James J Ritchey Orthopedic device
US2680919A (en) * 1951-12-03 1954-06-15 Florida L Riggs Insole-type appliance
US2857689A (en) * 1956-10-19 1958-10-28 Lorraine A Van Ostrom Corrective foot support
US4360027A (en) * 1981-06-29 1982-11-23 Bruce Friedlander Thin, light-weight flexible orthopedic device
US4759357A (en) * 1987-01-28 1988-07-26 Gerard Allart Podiatric orthesis for orientation of the calcaneus and subtalar bones
US4955148A (en) * 1989-04-14 1990-09-11 Rigoberto Padilla Foot support assembly
USD347315S (en) * 1993-09-01 1994-05-31 Nike, Inc. Bladder for a shoe sole
US5647145A (en) * 1995-06-05 1997-07-15 Russell; Brian Sculptured athletic footwear sole construction
US5713143A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-02-03 Kendall Orthotics Orthotic system
US6070342A (en) * 1998-11-16 2000-06-06 Brown; Dennis N. Contoured insole for footwear
US6173511B1 (en) * 1995-12-26 2001-01-16 Ronald Perrault Orthosis for footwear with positional self-adjustment
US6315786B1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2001-11-13 Partnership Of Arthur H. Smuckler, James Grimes, Niko Efstathiou And Charles A. Sarris Device for treating heel pain
US20020014024A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2002-02-07 Gardiner Roy J.W. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US6345455B1 (en) * 2000-05-25 2002-02-12 Greer Reed Biomedical, Llc Orthotic arch support including self-adjusting arch curve and method of using orthotic
US20020050078A1 (en) * 1999-03-02 2002-05-02 Dietrich Stephan Johannes Karl Shoe with external torsion stability element
US6460275B1 (en) * 2001-02-28 2002-10-08 W. Scott Bennett Orthotic insert
US6502330B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2003-01-07 Loic David Sole for footwear
US6594922B1 (en) * 1999-04-26 2003-07-22 Paul A. Mansfield Medial/lateral counter foot stabilizer
US6732456B2 (en) * 2002-03-20 2004-05-11 Shakil Hussain Shoe inserts with built-in step indicating device
US20040181976A1 (en) * 2003-03-19 2004-09-23 Paul Copeskey Mass producible custom-made shoe inserts
US20060086004A1 (en) * 2004-10-25 2006-04-27 Banyan Licensing Lc Molded foot support
US7041075B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2006-05-09 James Sullivan Orthotic foot devices for bare feet and methods for stabilizing feet
US20060236564A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Cryos Technologies Inc. Orthotic with dynamically self-adjusting stabiliser for footwear
US20070193071A1 (en) * 2006-02-17 2007-08-23 Andre Gilmore First metatarsal head lift orthotic
US20070261272A1 (en) * 2003-10-21 2007-11-15 John Hurd Engaging Element Useful for Securing Objects, Such as Footwear and Other Foot-Receiving Devices
US20070283597A1 (en) * 2006-06-13 2007-12-13 Logan Brent E Arch support independent of footwear
US20080047166A1 (en) * 2006-08-24 2008-02-28 Jeffrey Conforti Arch support with ribbed surface
US20080313927A1 (en) * 2006-08-24 2008-12-25 Body Tech Laboratories, Llc Arch support with a patterned surface
US20090307927A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-12-17 Ashton Industries, Inc. Children's Progressive Development Orthotic System
US20100212189A1 (en) * 2009-02-26 2010-08-26 Brian Ebel Foot pad for relieving pain
US20100269371A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2010-10-28 Geoffrey Alan Gray Orthotic shoe insert for high-heeled shoes
US20110277354A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2011-11-17 Msd Consumer Care, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US20110289802A1 (en) * 2010-05-26 2011-12-01 Clough James G Shoe appliance with an orthopedic device
US8117770B2 (en) * 2007-06-29 2012-02-21 Wong Darrell L Footwear device
US20120042546A1 (en) * 2009-05-20 2012-02-23 Stephanie Cosgrove Orthotic Device and Method of Manufacture
US8196318B2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2012-06-12 Align Footwear, Llc Triplanar support system for footwear
US20130008050A1 (en) * 2011-07-07 2013-01-10 Michel Marc Shoe Insole
US20130061496A1 (en) * 2011-09-08 2013-03-14 Kevin B. Lawlor Footwear support structures
US20130125419A1 (en) * 2010-12-28 2013-05-23 Superfeet Worldwide, Inc. Footwear with orthotic midsole
US20130160331A1 (en) * 2011-12-23 2013-06-27 Park Global Footwear Inc. Shoe Insole or Midsole with a Tri-Dome Configuration for Foot Rehabilitation
US8800168B1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2014-08-12 Robert Propét Customizable insole
US8850721B2 (en) * 2010-02-25 2014-10-07 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with arch member
USD748387S1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2016-02-02 Stable Step LLC Insole

Family Cites Families (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6119373A (en) * 1996-08-20 2000-09-19 Adidas International B.V. Shoe having an external chassis
US20020174568A1 (en) * 2001-04-30 2002-11-28 Roger Neiley Footwear fit system
US20020162250A1 (en) * 2001-05-02 2002-11-07 Campbell Todd Duncan Unitary orthotic insert and orthopedic insole
US7625349B2 (en) * 2002-12-16 2009-12-01 Daniel Bleau Biomechanical custom made foot orthosis and method for making the same
US8216162B2 (en) * 2004-04-02 2012-07-10 Applied Biokinetics, Llc System for treatment of plantar fasciitis
US7299567B2 (en) * 2004-06-17 2007-11-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with sole plate
US7647709B2 (en) * 2005-05-19 2010-01-19 Danner, Inc. Footwear with a shank system
US7594345B2 (en) * 2005-10-12 2009-09-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having sole with ribbed structure
EP2540183A3 (en) * 2006-10-20 2013-07-10 ASICS Corporation Structure for front foot portion of a shoe sole
US8938889B2 (en) * 2007-03-06 2015-01-27 Deckers Outdoor Corporation Footwear
WO2008144446A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2008-11-27 The North Face Apparel Corp. Supporting plate apparatus for shoes
US8001704B2 (en) * 2007-10-09 2011-08-23 Nike, Inc. Footwear with a foot stabilizer
US8327560B2 (en) * 2008-04-16 2012-12-11 Nike Inc. Footwear with support plate assembly
DE102009028627A8 (en) * 2009-08-18 2011-06-01 Adidas Ag Outsole and sport shoe
US20110078922A1 (en) * 2009-10-02 2011-04-07 Nike, Inc. Thermoforming upper process with reinforcement
US8356428B2 (en) * 2009-10-20 2013-01-22 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with flexible reinforcing plate
US8302329B2 (en) * 2009-11-18 2012-11-06 Nike, Inc. Footwear with counter-supplementing strap
US20130061494A1 (en) * 2011-09-13 2013-03-14 Danner, Inc. Footwear with sole assembly having midsole plate and heel insert and associated methods
JP5465814B1 (en) * 2012-05-10 2014-04-09 株式会社アシックス Shoe sole with the outsole and midsole

Patent Citations (53)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US545006A (en) * 1895-08-20 Insole for shoes
US564767A (en) * 1896-07-28 William schneider
US850862A (en) * 1906-04-11 1907-04-16 Hezekiah C Welch Arch-supporting shoe.
US1728243A (en) * 1927-05-04 1929-09-17 Marshalek Alois Arch support
US2081474A (en) * 1935-10-23 1937-05-25 William C Burns Cuboid-metatarsal arch support
US2161565A (en) * 1938-06-10 1939-06-06 Severino A Freda Arch supporter
US2383583A (en) * 1943-01-08 1945-08-28 Morris L Becker Foot corrective appliance
US2435776A (en) * 1946-03-23 1948-02-10 George W Geilear Arch supporting insole
US2546408A (en) * 1950-03-07 1951-03-27 Florida L Riggs Insole-type appliance
US2628440A (en) * 1951-02-12 1953-02-17 Charles P Leydecker Foot balancing means
US2660814A (en) * 1951-11-03 1953-12-01 James J Ritchey Orthopedic device
US2680919A (en) * 1951-12-03 1954-06-15 Florida L Riggs Insole-type appliance
US2857689A (en) * 1956-10-19 1958-10-28 Lorraine A Van Ostrom Corrective foot support
US4360027A (en) * 1981-06-29 1982-11-23 Bruce Friedlander Thin, light-weight flexible orthopedic device
US4759357A (en) * 1987-01-28 1988-07-26 Gerard Allart Podiatric orthesis for orientation of the calcaneus and subtalar bones
US4955148A (en) * 1989-04-14 1990-09-11 Rigoberto Padilla Foot support assembly
USD347315S (en) * 1993-09-01 1994-05-31 Nike, Inc. Bladder for a shoe sole
US5647145A (en) * 1995-06-05 1997-07-15 Russell; Brian Sculptured athletic footwear sole construction
US5713143A (en) * 1995-06-06 1998-02-03 Kendall Orthotics Orthotic system
US6173511B1 (en) * 1995-12-26 2001-01-16 Ronald Perrault Orthosis for footwear with positional self-adjustment
US20020014024A1 (en) * 1997-12-24 2002-02-07 Gardiner Roy J.W. Rehabilitative shoe insole device
US6070342A (en) * 1998-11-16 2000-06-06 Brown; Dennis N. Contoured insole for footwear
US20020050078A1 (en) * 1999-03-02 2002-05-02 Dietrich Stephan Johannes Karl Shoe with external torsion stability element
US6594922B1 (en) * 1999-04-26 2003-07-22 Paul A. Mansfield Medial/lateral counter foot stabilizer
US6502330B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2003-01-07 Loic David Sole for footwear
US6315786B1 (en) * 1999-07-20 2001-11-13 Partnership Of Arthur H. Smuckler, James Grimes, Niko Efstathiou And Charles A. Sarris Device for treating heel pain
US6345455B1 (en) * 2000-05-25 2002-02-12 Greer Reed Biomedical, Llc Orthotic arch support including self-adjusting arch curve and method of using orthotic
US6460275B1 (en) * 2001-02-28 2002-10-08 W. Scott Bennett Orthotic insert
US6732456B2 (en) * 2002-03-20 2004-05-11 Shakil Hussain Shoe inserts with built-in step indicating device
US7041075B2 (en) * 2002-11-27 2006-05-09 James Sullivan Orthotic foot devices for bare feet and methods for stabilizing feet
US20040181976A1 (en) * 2003-03-19 2004-09-23 Paul Copeskey Mass producible custom-made shoe inserts
US20070261272A1 (en) * 2003-10-21 2007-11-15 John Hurd Engaging Element Useful for Securing Objects, Such as Footwear and Other Foot-Receiving Devices
US20060086004A1 (en) * 2004-10-25 2006-04-27 Banyan Licensing Lc Molded foot support
US20060236564A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Cryos Technologies Inc. Orthotic with dynamically self-adjusting stabiliser for footwear
US8196318B2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2012-06-12 Align Footwear, Llc Triplanar support system for footwear
US20070193071A1 (en) * 2006-02-17 2007-08-23 Andre Gilmore First metatarsal head lift orthotic
US20070283597A1 (en) * 2006-06-13 2007-12-13 Logan Brent E Arch support independent of footwear
US20080047166A1 (en) * 2006-08-24 2008-02-28 Jeffrey Conforti Arch support with ribbed surface
US20080313927A1 (en) * 2006-08-24 2008-12-25 Body Tech Laboratories, Llc Arch support with a patterned surface
US20110277354A1 (en) * 2006-09-21 2011-11-17 Msd Consumer Care, Inc. Cushioned orthotic
US8117770B2 (en) * 2007-06-29 2012-02-21 Wong Darrell L Footwear device
US20090307927A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-12-17 Ashton Industries, Inc. Children's Progressive Development Orthotic System
US20100212189A1 (en) * 2009-02-26 2010-08-26 Brian Ebel Foot pad for relieving pain
US20100269371A1 (en) * 2009-04-28 2010-10-28 Geoffrey Alan Gray Orthotic shoe insert for high-heeled shoes
US20120042546A1 (en) * 2009-05-20 2012-02-23 Stephanie Cosgrove Orthotic Device and Method of Manufacture
US8850721B2 (en) * 2010-02-25 2014-10-07 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with arch member
US20110289802A1 (en) * 2010-05-26 2011-12-01 Clough James G Shoe appliance with an orthopedic device
US20130125419A1 (en) * 2010-12-28 2013-05-23 Superfeet Worldwide, Inc. Footwear with orthotic midsole
US8800168B1 (en) * 2011-06-15 2014-08-12 Robert Propét Customizable insole
US20130008050A1 (en) * 2011-07-07 2013-01-10 Michel Marc Shoe Insole
US20130061496A1 (en) * 2011-09-08 2013-03-14 Kevin B. Lawlor Footwear support structures
US20130160331A1 (en) * 2011-12-23 2013-06-27 Park Global Footwear Inc. Shoe Insole or Midsole with a Tri-Dome Configuration for Foot Rehabilitation
USD748387S1 (en) * 2013-04-24 2016-02-02 Stable Step LLC Insole

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20170181495A1 (en) * 2015-12-28 2017-06-29 Trustees Of Boston University Method and Apparatus to Assist Foot Motion About the Pronation Axis

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20140059887A1 (en) 2014-03-06 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6477791B2 (en) Shoe with stability element
US2616190A (en) Walking angle corrective footwear
US7484319B2 (en) Shoe insole
US20040154188A1 (en) Footwear with dual-density midsole and deceleration zones
US20090090027A1 (en) Footwear with a Foot Stabilizer
US6964120B2 (en) Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US20120036740A1 (en) Sole structure with traction elements
US4731939A (en) Athletic shoe with external counter and cushion assembly
US20110252671A1 (en) Kinematic Shoe Sole and Shoe Having Kinematic Shoe Sole
US4638576A (en) Athletic shoe with external counter and cushion assembly
US2811791A (en) Weight distributing shoe shank
US20120260535A1 (en) Outsole with Extendable Traction Elements
US5826351A (en) Shoe sole and shoe and sandal including the sole
US20090019729A1 (en) Footwear sole construction
US20140047740A1 (en) Reactive shoe
WO1992018024A1 (en) Shoes sole structures
US2154997A (en) Arch support
US5388351A (en) Cuboid-navicula navicular support
US9750304B2 (en) Article of footwear having talonavicular support
US7444767B2 (en) Article of footwear with midsole having higher density peripheral portion
US2959875A (en) Slip-proof sock lining for shoes
US20110258879A1 (en) Footwear insole
US8079159B1 (en) Footwear
US9737111B2 (en) Removable shoe insert for corrective sizing
US20080016724A1 (en) Dynamic sole