US20150101503A1 - Mesh network controller - Google Patents

Mesh network controller Download PDF

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Publication number
US20150101503A1
US20150101503A1 US14/512,206 US201414512206A US2015101503A1 US 20150101503 A1 US20150101503 A1 US 20150101503A1 US 201414512206 A US201414512206 A US 201414512206A US 2015101503 A1 US2015101503 A1 US 2015101503A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
controller
rfd
rfds
wireless
control
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Abandoned
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US14/512,206
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Robert Brown
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WMD TECH
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WMD TECH
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Publication date
Priority to US201361889394P priority Critical
Application filed by WMD TECH filed Critical WMD TECH
Priority to US14/512,206 priority patent/US20150101503A1/en
Publication of US20150101503A1 publication Critical patent/US20150101503A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F42AMMUNITION; BLASTING
    • F42DBLASTING
    • F42D1/00Blasting methods or apparatus, e.g. loading or tamping
    • F42D1/04Arrangements for ignition
    • F42D1/045Arrangements for electric ignition
    • F42D1/05Electric circuits for blasting

Abstract

A mesh network controller for remote control of devices such as remote firing devices. The controller includes remote firing devices which have a relay capability that allow a controller to communicate with remote firing devices beyond the range of its direct communication. This is accomplished by a signal being relayed from RFDs to RFDs with the signal going in two directions.

Description

    PRIORITY/CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/889,394, filed Oct. 10, 2014 the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The presently disclosed technology relates to wireless control of explosive, and more particularly to wireless control of multiple explosive charge by relaying control signals.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In the world of explosive devices which are triggered remotely, controllers are used for wireless communication with an RFD (Remote Firing Device). The controller includes a transmitter and the RFD includes a receiver of the wireless signal. The RFD can initiate an explosion by use of a mechanism which generates a high voltage arc, which initiates an explosive train from the arc. This is called a non-electric type of RFD. Another type of RFD is one which is called an electric RFD, which is basically providing enough electrical energy to heat up a filament similar to that of a light bulb which is embedded in sensitive explosives, and when it is activated it creates a detonation in the explosives. A typical way that current controllers and RFDs are operated is in which a controller wirelessly communicates with a single or multiple RFDs. By use of a current technology controller, all of the RFD's can be activated simultaneously, causing multiple explosions at different locations. The controller can also be used to activate one RFD at a time.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • The purpose of the Abstract is to enable the public, and especially the scientists, engineers, and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection, the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The Abstract is neither intended to define the inventive concept(s) of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor is it intended to be limiting as to the scope of the inventive concept(s) in any way.
  • The disclosed technology is a controller for use with devices used in remotely controlling explosive initiation. The disclosed technology is an improvement over prior art systems, and involves a controller and multiple RFD's which are linked together by a secure encrypted mesh network. In the disclosed technology, a controller can wirelessly communicate with a number of RFD's. Each of the RFD's in the system can also communicate back to the controller to verify arming or readiness or strength of signal, and other data. Each of the RFD's is also in constant communication with the other RFD's, so each RFD has both a transmitter and receiver. Each of the components relay communication through each other or whichever unit has the strongest signal. Since all of these devices are wireless, they can be separated on the field of operation and only linked together by the wireless communication. Where this can come in handy is where the controller is going to be used to operate three RFD's, and it can only get a radio lock on one of them. However, it is possible that the one contacted RFD is close enough to the other two RFDs to relay a communication from the controller to the other two or more RFD's in the field and back. Thus, the controller can activate RFD's in which it is not in direct radio contact. It might be blocked by the terrain, a building, a berm of land, solid rock around a tunnel, or other structure which might impede the wireless communication. As long as the controller can connect with one RFD, and that RFD can connect to another, and the second RFD can connect to a third, they can all be controlled by the controller and relay communications back.
  • The controller also has the capability of firing each RFD with synchronized electronically adjustable precise timing intervals. When the command to fire is sent to each the RFDs it also can carry additional instructions specifying when and how each RFD will fire. The command may be to fire one at a time, all at the same time or a very precisely synchronized delay between each RFD. Current technology uses pyrotechnic time delays either built into the detonators or as part of the firing train leading up to the detonators to accomplish different firing intervals.
  • Another use of the mesh network controller is to extend the range at which the explosion can be set. For instance if the range of the controller to the RFD is 500 feet, by using multiple RFD's which are in wireless communication back and forth with each other, that range can be extended indefinitely, such as to a mile or more, by laying out a track of RFD's set at a maximum distance for contact apart. This track of RFD's can also snake a route through culverts, around the corners of buildings, behind hills, into mines, and in other ways extend the range and communication capabilities of the controller. Since all of these RFD's are capable of receiving and transmitting signals between the controllers and other RFD's, if one RFD becomes damaged, other RFD's in the system can automatically connect up the gap, and bridge the gaps in communication within the network so that the remaining RFD's can be controlled remotely.
  • The mesh network controller can take control of any available or non-paired RFDs, even those controlled by another controller, at any time through a secure encrypted pairing process. If an RFD is already paired to a controller the owner controller will have to release control or share control of the RFD before it will be available for use with another controller. If a controller has taken control over one or several RFDs it has the ability to either transfer control over to another controller, release the RFDs back to an unpaired condition or share control with another controller. Shared control can be either both controllers can have exactly the same operational control over the RFDs or a limited level of shared control where the subordinate controller has reduced capabilities such as limited or no sharing ability, or in order to fire the RFDs with the subordinate controller certain criteria must be met on the primary owning controller first.
  • The mesh network controller and its associated RFD's can also be part of a larger system in which other devices are controlled and linked together by the controller and the RFD's. Devices which can be part of this system can include x-ray machines which are utilized to send x-rays through a suspected bomb for instance, and dosimeters which are placed behind the suspected bomb. The controller can be set to activate the x-ray machine and send pulses through the suspected bomb until a pre-selected level of energy has been received at the dosimeter. In this way it is known that the film which is between the x-ray machine and the dosimeter has received enough energy to create an x-ray image which may be read. The x-ray film can also be in wireless communication with the controller, and the x-ray image (digital) from the film can be wirelessly transmitted to the controller for further review and decision making and saving the digital image. The controller and the RFD's can also be part of a network in which drones are wirelessly linked to the controller and the controller is linked to other controllers. The multiple controllers can be operated by users who are working together to control RFD's, x-rays, dosimeters and drones in a certain geographical area. The first controller may control all of the assets in that area, but when the second controller gets in position, the first controller can transfer control of all the RFD's, x-rays, dosimeters and drones to the second controller. If a drone is traveling from one area to another the second controller can transfer control of the drone to a third controller and so on, so that a person with the best vantage point can utilize the assets of the team, including RFD's, drones, x-rays, film, and dosimeters.
  • Still other features and advantages of the presently disclosed and claimed inventive concept(s) will become readily apparent to those skilled in this art from the following detailed description describing preferred embodiments of the inventive concept(s), simply by way of illustration of the best mode contemplated by carrying out the inventive concept(s). As will be realized, the inventive concept(s) is capable of modification in various obvious respects all without departing from the inventive concept(s). Accordingly, the drawings and description of the preferred embodiments are to be regarded as illustrative in nature, and not as restrictive in nature.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a diagram of the mesh network of the disclosed technology.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS
  • While the presently disclosed inventive concept(s) is susceptible of various modifications and alternative constructions, certain illustrated embodiments thereof have been shown in the drawings and will be described below in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intention to limit the inventive concept(s) to the specific form disclosed, but, on the contrary, the presently disclosed and claimed inventive concept(s) is to cover all modifications, alternative constructions, and equivalents falling within the spirit and scope of the inventive concept(s) as defined in the claims.
  • Shown in FIG. 1 is a diagram showing the parts of the mesh controller network. The disclosed mesh controller network is shown as numeral 10. Included in the system is user controller device 12, which is shown in FIG. 1 which can be two independent controllers. A wireless signal 14 is sent from either of these controller devices 12, and is received by remote firing devices 16. A wireless network 18 is shown to symbolize the interconnected nature of the remote firing devices 16 and the wireless controller device 12. Shown in FIG. 1 is a signal blocking obstruction 20, which intercepts the wireless signal 14 and reflects it back away from the obstruction 20. On the opposite side of the obstruction 20 is an RFD 16, which is unable to receive a direct signal from the user controller device 12, due to the wireless obstruction 20. As shown in FIG. 1, a signal 14 is able to reach from the user controller device 12 to a remote firing device 16 which is off to one side of the obstruction 20. The wireless signal 14 is relayed from the available RFD 16 to reach the RFD 16 behind the obstruction. A third RFD is shown which is out of range of the user controller device 12, but the signal 14 can be relayed from the RFD behind the obstruction. The RFD most distant from the user controller device can relay a signal from the user controller device 20 to a drone 22, to extend control of the user controller device to devices which are beyond the reach of the user controller device 12. Control of the system and its assets can be transferred from the first wireless controller device to the second wireless controller device, by appropriate hand shaking and permissions. Each of the wireless signals 14 includes a back signal from the RFD so that signals from distant RFDs can be relayed back to the user controller device even though it is out of range of direct communication.
  • While certain exemplary embodiments are shown in the figures and described in this disclosure, it is to be distinctly understood that the presently disclosed inventive concept(s) is not limited thereto but may be variously embodied to practice within the scope of the following claims. From the foregoing description, it will be apparent that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure as defined by the following claims.

Claims (5)

I claim:
1. A wireless control system for remote firing devices, comprising:
a controller unit comprising a transmitter and a receiver of wireless signals, and an input port for defining RFD control instructions, and control logic and indicators for connecting to multiple RFDs in interconnected communication;
two or more RFDs, with each RFD with a connection to an explosives detonation device, a receiver for receiving signals from a controller or another RFD, and a transmitter for sending information to said controller or to other RFDs; wherein said controller can communicate with at least one RFD, and that RFD can communicate with at least on other RFD, and so on, so that said controller can control multiple RFDs through wireless connection with a single RFD.
2. The wireless control system of claim 1 in which said indicators show which RFDs are under the control of the controller.
3. The wire control system of claim 1 in which said input port allows a user to set detonation time delays for each of the RFDs under wireless control of the controller.
4. The wireless control system of claim which further comprises a handshake protocol and pass off protocol, so that communication with the controlled RFDs can be shared with another controller, either through the first controller, or through a signal passed from an RFD to the first controller, so that the controlled RFDs can be managed by the second controller.
5. The wireless control system of claim 1 in which the controller may control additional assets other than RFDs, selected from the list consisting of RFDs, drones, X ray sensors, x ray sending units, and PAN firing devices.
US14/512,206 2013-10-10 2014-10-10 Mesh network controller Abandoned US20150101503A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

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US201361889394P true 2013-10-10 2013-10-10
US14/512,206 US20150101503A1 (en) 2013-10-10 2014-10-10 Mesh network controller

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150048930A1 (en) * 2012-03-26 2015-02-19 Panasonic Corporation Remote control system
US9655034B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-05-16 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Transaction sensitive access network discovery and selection
US9961625B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2018-05-01 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Network edge based access network discovery and selection
US10129706B2 (en) 2015-06-05 2018-11-13 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Context sensitive communication augmentation
US10162351B2 (en) 2015-06-05 2018-12-25 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Remote provisioning of a drone resource
US10470241B2 (en) 2016-11-15 2019-11-05 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Multiple mesh drone communication

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7929270B2 (en) * 2005-01-24 2011-04-19 Orica Explosives Technology Pty Ltd Wireless detonator assemblies, and corresponding networks
US8134822B2 (en) * 2006-09-19 2012-03-13 Mas Zengrange (Nz) Ltd Remote initiator for the remote initiation of explosive charges
US8474379B2 (en) * 2004-01-16 2013-07-02 Rothenbuhler Engineering Co. Remote firing device with diverse initiators
US9181790B2 (en) * 2012-01-13 2015-11-10 Los Alamos National Security, Llc Detonation command and control

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8474379B2 (en) * 2004-01-16 2013-07-02 Rothenbuhler Engineering Co. Remote firing device with diverse initiators
US7929270B2 (en) * 2005-01-24 2011-04-19 Orica Explosives Technology Pty Ltd Wireless detonator assemblies, and corresponding networks
US8134822B2 (en) * 2006-09-19 2012-03-13 Mas Zengrange (Nz) Ltd Remote initiator for the remote initiation of explosive charges
US9181790B2 (en) * 2012-01-13 2015-11-10 Los Alamos National Security, Llc Detonation command and control

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150048930A1 (en) * 2012-03-26 2015-02-19 Panasonic Corporation Remote control system
US9361789B2 (en) * 2012-03-26 2016-06-07 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Remote control system
US9655034B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-05-16 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Transaction sensitive access network discovery and selection
US10028211B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2018-07-17 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Transaction sensitive access network discovery and selection
US9961625B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2018-05-01 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Network edge based access network discovery and selection
US10542487B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2020-01-21 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Network edge based access network discovery and selection
US10129706B2 (en) 2015-06-05 2018-11-13 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Context sensitive communication augmentation
US10162351B2 (en) 2015-06-05 2018-12-25 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Remote provisioning of a drone resource
US10470241B2 (en) 2016-11-15 2019-11-05 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Multiple mesh drone communication

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