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US20150080659A1 - Systems and Methods for Introducing and Applying a Bandage Structure Within a Body Lumen or Hollow Body Organ - Google Patents

Systems and Methods for Introducing and Applying a Bandage Structure Within a Body Lumen or Hollow Body Organ Download PDF

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Publication number
US20150080659A1
US20150080659A1 US14548707 US201414548707A US2015080659A1 US 20150080659 A1 US20150080659 A1 US 20150080659A1 US 14548707 US14548707 US 14548707 US 201414548707 A US201414548707 A US 201414548707A US 2015080659 A1 US2015080659 A1 US 2015080659A1
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Prior art keywords
structure
bandage
body
delivery
chitosan
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Pending
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US14548707
Inventor
Kenton W. Gregory
Amanda Dayton (formerly Senrud)
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Providence Health System - Oregon d/b/a Providence St Vincent Medical Center
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Providence Health System - Oregon d/b/a Providence St Vincent Medical Center
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F15/00Auxiliary appliances for wound dressings; Dispensing containers for dressings or bandages
    • A61F15/005Bandage applicators
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B1/00Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor
    • A61B1/273Instruments for performing medical examinations of the interior of cavities or tubes of the body by visual or photographical inspection, e.g. endoscopes; Illuminating arrangements therefor for the upper alimentary canal, e.g. oesophagoscopes, gastroscopes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/02Adhesive plasters or dressings
    • A61F13/0246Adhesive plasters or dressings characterised by the skin adhering layer
    • A61F13/0253Adhesive plasters or dressings characterised by the skin adhering layer characterized by the adhesive material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/02Prostheses implantable into the body
    • A61F2/04Hollow or tubular parts of organs, e.g. bladders, tracheae, bronchi or bile ducts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2/958Inflatable balloons for placing stents or stent-grafts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F2/00Filters implantable into blood vessels; Prostheses, i.e. artificial substitutes or replacements for parts of the body; Appliances for connecting them with the body; Devices providing patency to, or preventing collapsing of, tubular structures of the body, e.g. stents
    • A61F2/95Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts
    • A61F2/962Instruments specially adapted for placement or removal of stents or stent-grafts having an outer sleeve
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/22Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons containing macromolecular materials
    • A61L15/28Polysaccharides or their derivatives
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F2013/00089Wound bandages
    • A61F2013/00357Wound bandages implanted wound fillings or covers

Abstract

Systems and methods provide intraluminal delivery of a bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ, e.g., for treating an injured gastrointestinal tract or an esophageal hemorrhage in a non-invasive way using endoscopic visualization. The systems and methods can be sized and configured to apply a chitosan bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ, to take advantage of the mucoadhesive, antimicrobial, hemostatic, and potential accelerated wound healing properties of the chitosan material.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation of copending patent application Ser. No. 12/004,297, filed Dec. 20, 2007, which itself is a continuation of patent application Ser. No. 11/805,543 filed May 23, 2007, now abandoned, which claims the benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/802,654 filed 23 May 2006.
  • [0002]
    This application is related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/084,688, filed on Mar. 17, 2005, entitled “Systems and Methods for Hemorrhage Control and/or Tissue Repair.”
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The invention is generally directed to systems and methods to introduce and deploy tissue bandage structures within a body lumen or hollow body organ, such, e.g., as within the gastrointestinal tract.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0004]
    Currently, there exists no overwhelmingly accepted treatment for gastrointestinal, specifically esophageal bleeding with etiology such as; esophageal ulcers, esophagitis, Mallory Weis tears, Booerhave's syndrome, esophageal varices, anastornosis, fistula, and endoscopic procedures.
  • [0005]
    Electro-cautery and sclerotherapy are two existing treatments for esophageal hemorrhage; however both run a risk of perforation to the esophagus. Electro-cautery requires a large amount of pressure to be applied to the wall of the esophagus and also inherently damages tissue. Sclerotherapy consists of injecting a hardening agent in to the area of the injury with a needle. Clipping is another method of treatment; it consists of a two or three-pronged clip that can be inserted into the mucosa of the esophagus to constrict the area of the bleeding. If applied correctly, clipping is effective in controlling hemorrhage, however clips are difficult to deploy. Often, the clip is not inserted deep enough into the mucosa and sloughs off before the desired time.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    The invention provides systems and methods for applying a bandage structure within a body lumen or a hollow body organ, e.g., for treating an injured gastrointestinal tract or an esophageal hemorrhage.
  • [0007]
    Another aspect of the invention includes systems and methods for placing a bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ in a non-invasive way using endoscopic visualization.
  • [0008]
    The systems and methods do not involve the use of any sharp edges or points. The systems and methods do not involve the use of a point pressure, as existing treatment options require. Only moderate circumferential pressure is required to apply the bandage structure. The systems and methods adapt well to tools and techniques usable by gastroenterologists.
  • [0009]
    The systems and methods can be sized and configured to apply a chitosan bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ, to take advantage of the mucoadhesive, antimicrobial, hemostatic, and potential accelerated wound healing properties of the chitosan material. Drug delivery and cell therapy with a chitosan bandage structure as a delivery matrix are also made possible.
  • [0010]
    Other features and advantages of the invention shall be apparent based upon the accompanying description, drawings, and claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 is a plane view of an intraluminal delivery system for introducing and applying a bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 is perspective view of the bandage structure that is sized and configured for deployment by the system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0013]
    FIGS. 3 to 5 show the rolling of the bandage structure into a low profile condition prior to deployment by the system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0014]
    FIGS. 6 to 9 show the placement of a rolled bandage structure upon the expandable delivery structure that forms a part of the system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0015]
    FIGS. 10 to 13 show the use of the delivery system shown in FIG. 1 for introducing and applying a bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 14 shows an optional over-tube that can be used in association with the system shown in FIG. 1.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 15 shows the system shown in FIG. 1 hack-loaded into the working channel of an endoscope.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0018]
    Although the disclosure hereof is detailed and exact to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, the physical embodiments herein disclosed merely exemplify the invention, which may be embodied in other specific structure. While the preferred embodiment has been described, the details may be changed without departing from the invention, which is defined by the claims.
  • I. The Intraluminal Delivery System
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1 shows an intraluminal delivery system 10 for introducing and applying a bandage structure 12 within a body lumen or hollow body organ. The delivery system 10 includes a bandage structure 12 and a delivery device 14 that is sized and configured to deliver and deploy the bandage structure 12 at a targeted tissue region within a body lumen or hollow body organ. The delivery device 14 is sized and configured to deploy the bandage structure 12 while preventing it from contacting tissue lining the body lumen or hollow body organ until the desired time of deployment. The delivery device 14 not only provides a barrier between the bandage structure 12 and tissue within the body lumen or hollow body organ during introduction, but also provides a means to deploy the bandage structure 12 into contact with the tissue at the desired time.
  • [0020]
    As shown in FIG. 1, the delivery device 14 can be sized and configured to accommodate passage over a guide wire 32. In this way, the delivery device 14 can be introduced over the guide wire 32 under direct visualization from an endoscope 50, as FIG. 10 shows. In this arrangement, the guide wire 32 runs next to the endoscope 50 and therefore leaves the working channel of the endoscope 50 free. In an alternative arrangement (see FIG. 15), the delivery device 14 can be sized and configured to be back-loaded through the working channel 52 of an endoscope 50. The working channel 52 of the endoscope 50 thereby serves to guide the delivery device 14 while providing direct visualization.
  • [0021]
    A. The Tissue Bandage Structure
  • [0022]
    The size, shape, and configuration of the bandage structure 12 shown in FIG. 1 can vary according to its intended use, which includes taking into account the topology and morphology of the site to be treated and the age/status of the patient (e.g., adult or child). The tissue bandage structure 12 is desirably flexible and relatively thin so that it can be rolled or folded upon itself for deployment in a low profile condition, as FIGS. 2 to 5 show. The tissue bandage structure 12 can be rectilinear, elongated, square, round, oval, or a composite or complex combination thereof. The shape, size, and configuration of tissue bandage structure 12 can be specially formed and adapted to the topology and morphology of the site of application, by cutting, bending, or molding in advance of use.
  • [0023]
    The tissue bandage structure 12 desirably includes an active therapeutic surface 36 for contacting tissue. The active surface 36 desirably comprises a biocompatible material that reacts in the presence of blood, body fluid, or moisture to become a strong adhesive or glue. The material of the active surface 36 can, alone or in combination with adhesive features, possess other beneficial attributes, for example, anti-bacterial and/or anti-microbial and/or anti-viral characteristics, and/or characteristics that accelerate or otherwise enhance coagulation and the body's defensive reaction to injury.
  • [0024]
    In one embodiment, the material of the active surface 36 of the tissue bandage structure 12 comprises a hydrophilic polymer form, such as a polyacrylate, an alginate, chitosan, a hydrophilic polyamine, a chitosan derivative, polylysine, polyethylene imine, xanthan, carrageenan, quaternary ammonium polymer, chondroitin sulfate, a starch, a modified cellulosic polymer, a dextran, hyaluronan or combinations thereof. The starch may be of amylase, amylopectin and a combination of amylopectin and amylase.
  • [0025]
    In a preferred embodiment, the biocompatible material of the active surface 36 comprises a non-mammalian material, which is most prefrably poly [β-(1-4)-2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranose, which is more commonly referred to as chitosan.
  • [0026]
    The chitosan material is preferred because of the special properties of the chitosan. The chitosan active surface 36 is capable of adhering to a site of tissue injury along a body lumen in the presence of blood, or body fluids, or moisture. The presence of the chitosan active surface 36 stanches, seals, and/or stabilizes the site of tissue injury, while establishing conditions conducive to the healing of the site.
  • [0027]
    The chitosan material that is incorporated into the active surface 36 can be produced in conventional ways. The structure or form producing steps for the chitosan material are typically carried out from a chitosan solution employing techniques such as freezing (to cause phase separation), non-solvent die extrusion (to produce a filament), electro-spinning (to produce a filament), phase inversion and precipitation with a non-solvent (as is typically used to produce dialysis and filter membranes) or solution coating onto a preformed sponge-like or woven product. The filament can be formed into a non-woven sponge-like mesh by non-woven spinning processes. Alternately, the filament may be produced into a felted weave by conventional spinning and weaving processes. Improved compliance and flexibility can be achieved by mechanical manipulation during or after manufacture, e.g., by controlled micro-fracturing by rolling, bending, twisting, rotating, vibrating, probing, compressing, extending, shaking and kneading; or controlled macro-texturing (by the formation of deep relief patterns) by thermal compression techniques. The tissue bandage structure 12 can also comprise a sheet of woven or non-woven mesh material enveloped between layers of the chitosan material.
  • [0028]
    The active surface 36 that includes chitosan material presents a robust, permeable, high specific surface area, positively charged surface. The positively charged surface creates a highly reactive surface for red blood cell and platelet interaction. Red blood cell membranes are negatively charged, and they are attracted to the chitosan material. The cellular membranes fuse to chitosan material upon contact. A clot can be thrmed very quickly, circumventing immediate need for clotting proteins that are normally required for hemostasis. For this reason, the chitosan material is effective for both normal as well as anti-coagulated individuals, and as well as persons having a coagulation disorder like hemophilia. The chitosan material also binds bacteria, endotoxins, and microbes, and can kill bacteria, microbes, and/or viral agents on contact.
  • [0029]
    B. The Delivery Device
  • [0030]
    As FIG. 1 shows, the delivery device 14 includes a multi-lumen catheter tube 16 having a proximal end 18 and a distal end 20. The distal end 20 carries an expandable structure 22, which in the illustrated embodiment takes the form of an inflatable balloon. Other non-inflatable, but nevertheless expandable or enlargeable structures, can be used. The proximal end carries an actuator 30 and a coupling 24 which are manipulated in synchrony during operation of the expandable structure 22, as will be described in greater detail later.
  • [0031]
    The catheter tube 16 can be formed of conventional polymeric materials and include an interior lumen (not shown) that accommodates passage of a guide wire 32. The lumen also passes through the center of the expandable structure 22 as well. This makes it possible to guide the intraluminal deployment of the expandable structure 22 to an injury site within a body lumen or hollow body organ targeted for treatment.
  • [0032]
    The catheter tube 16 includes another lumen that communicates with the interior of the balloon 22. The proximal end 18 of the catheter tube 16 includes a coupling 24 for coupling an inflation device 26, such as a syringe or the like (see FIG. 1), in communication with the interior of the expandable structure 22. Operation of the inflation device 26 conveys an appropriate inflation medium (e.g., saline) into the expandable structure 22 to cause it to expand.
  • [0033]
    The catheter tube also includes a movable sheath 28. The sheath 28 comprises a material that is flexible and impermeable to water. A push-pull wire 30 is coupled to the sheath 28, which extends through another lumen within the catheter tube 16 and is coupled to an actuator 30 on the proximal end 18 of the catheter tube 16. Pushing on the actuator 30 advances the sheath 28 distally over the expandable structure 22 (as shown in phantom lines in FIG. 1). Pulling on the actuator 30 withdraws the sheath 28 proximally and free of the expandable structure 22 (as shown in solid lines in FIG. 1).
  • [0034]
    In use, the tissue bandage structure 12 is sized and configured to be carried about the expandable structure 22 in a generally collapsed condition during introduction within the body lumen or hollow body organ (see FIG. 10). The tissue bandage structure is also sized and configured to be enlarged in response to expansion of the expandable structure 22 (see FIG. 12) for placement into contact with tissue in the body lumen or hollow body organ.
  • [0035]
    FIGS. 2 to 5 show a representative embodiment of a flexible chitosan bandage structure 12 that can be readily deployed using the delivery device 14 in the manner just described. The bandage structure 12 includes an inert, non-stick, water impermeable coating 34 on a side opposite to the active chitosan surface 36. In use, it is the active chitosan surface 36 that is placed into contact with tissue. The inert, non-stick, water impermeable coating 3.4 makes it possible to roll or fold the chitosan surface 34 about the expandable structure 22 for deployment without sticking or adhering to the expandable structure 22 or itself.
  • [0036]
    Prior to intraluminal introduction of the delivery device 14 (see FIGS. 6 and 7), the sheath 28 is withdrawn, and the chitosan bandage structure 12 is mounted about the expandable structure 22, with the active chitosan surface 36 facing outward. In the illustrated embodiment, this is accomplished by wrapping the chitosan bandage structure 12 around the expandable structure 22, with the non-stick coating 34 facing the expandable structure 22. This corresponds to the generally collapsed condition described above, which provides a low profile condition for intraluminal introduction of the chitosan bandage structure 12.
  • [0037]
    In this arrangement, the flexible bandage structure 12 (see FIGS. 2 to 5) has a rectangular shape with a tab 40 at one end. To secure the bandage in a rolled position about the expandable structure 22 (as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7), the tab can be inserted into a slit 42 formed in the chitosan bandage structure 12. The frictional force between the tab 40 and the walls of the slit 42 are sufficient to hold the bandage structure 12 in a rolled position. However, when pressure is applied from within the rolled bandage structure 12 (as is shown in FIG. 12 and will be described later), the tab 40 slides out of the slit 42 and the bandage structure 12 unfurls. Alternatively, the tab 40 and slit 42 can be replaced by a biodegradable tape with a perforation that will be more reliable in preventing premature deployment or unfurling of the bandage structure 12.
  • [0038]
    Prior to intraluminal introduction, the sheath 28 is advanced over the bandage structure 12 that has been wrapped about the expandable structure 22 (see FIGS. 8 and 9). As FIG. 9 shows, the distal end of the sheath 28 is closed by a frangible or otherwise releasable securing device 44. The securing device 28 holds the distal end of the sheath 28 closed.
  • [0039]
    The securing device 44 can be variously constructed. It can, e.g., comprise a removable slip-knot that releases when the sheath is withdrawn, or a tearable perforated tab that tears when the sheath is withdrawn, or a ring that slides off or breaks when sheath is withdrawn.
  • [0040]
    In this position, the sheath 28 prevents contact between the active chitosan surface 36 and the mucosa during introduction until the instance of application. The sheath 28 protects the bandage structure 12 from becoming moist until the sheath 28 is moved proximally to reveal the bandage structure 12.
  • [0041]
    Prior to insertion into the body lumen (see FIG. 8), the expandable structure 22 is desirably partially enlarged by introduction of the inflating media (e.g., to about 0.25 atm) to create bulbous forms on each side of the bandage structure 12 as shown in FIG. 8. This partial expansion prevents the bandage structure 12 from migrating from the center of the expandable structure 22 during the introduction, but does not otherwise unfurl the bandage structure 12, which remains in the generally collapsed condition.
  • [0042]
    As will also be described later, when it is desired to deploy the bandage structure 12, the sheath 28 is withdrawn (see FIG. 11) and subsequent expansion of the expandable structure 22 (see FIG. 12) provides enough force to unfurl the bandage structure 12 into contact with an interior wall of the body lumen or hollow body organ.
  • II. Use of the Delivery System
  • [0043]
    The delivery system 10 makes possible the deployment of a chitosan bandage structure 12 within a body lumen or hollow body organ under endoscopic visualization, e.g., to treat an injury of the esophagus or other area of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • [0044]
    As FIGS. 6 to 9 show, the chitosan bandage structure 12 can be wrapped and secured around the expandable structure 22 and enclosed during introduction with the removable sheath 28. The delivery device 12 can be deployed either over a guide wire 32 alongside an endoscope 50 (as FIG. 10 shows) or through the working channel of an endoscope (as FIG. 15 shows). Once the chitosan bandage structure 12 is positioned correctly over an injury site, the removable sheath 28 is pulled back (see FIG. 11) to uncover the chitosan bandage structure 12 for deployment. Subsequent expansion of the expandable structure 22 (see FIG. 12) expands and unfurls the chitosan bandage structure, holding it against the mucosa circumferentially at the site of injury. After an appropriate holding time (e.g., about three minutes), the expandable structure 22 is collapsed, and the delivery device 14 is withdrawn (see FIG. 13), leaving the chitosan bandage structure 12 at the injury site. During the entire procedure, the endoscope 50 provides direct visualization.
  • [0045]
    As the chitosan bandage structure 12 unfurls, it covers a circumferential section of the body lumen or hollow body organ and adheres to it. The properties of the active chitosan surface 36 serve to moderate bleeding, fluid seepage or weeping, or other forms of fluid loss, while also promoting healing. Due to the properties of the chitosan, the active surface 36 can also form an anti-bacterial and/or anti-microbial and/or anti-viral protective barrier at or surrounding the tissue treatment site within a body lumen or hollow body organ. The active surface 36 (whether or not it contains a chitosan material) can also provide a platform for the delivery of one or more therapeutic agents into the blood stream in a controlled release fashion. Examples of therapeutic agents that can be incorporated into the active surface 36 of the bandage structure 12 include, but are not limited to, drugs or medications, stem cells, antibodies, anti-microbials, anti-virals, collagens, genes, DNA, and other therapeutic agents; hemostatic agents like fibrin; growth factors; Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP); and similar compounds.
  • [0046]
    The system 10 thereby makes possible an intraluminal delivery method that (i) locates and identifies the site of injury using an endoscope 50 and correlating video monitor; (ii) passes a guide wire 32 into the site of injury; (iii) positions the distal end of the delivery device 14 over the guide wire 32 (see FIG. 10) at the site of injury while viewing the area with the endoscope 50, which is positioned alongside the catheter tube 14; (iv) when positioned over the site of injury, as confirmed by the endoscope 50, pulls the actuator 30 on the proximal end of the catheter tube 14 (see FIG. 11) to withdraw the sheath 28 (also thereby breaking or otherwise releasing the security device 44) to unsheath and expose the chitosan bandage structure 12; (v) expands the expandable structure 22 (e.g., inflate the balloon) for a prescribed period (e.g., about three minutes) (see FIG. 12) to unfurl the bandage structure 12 and hold the active surface 36 of the bandage structure 12 against mucosa; (vi) after the prescribed holding period, collapses the expandable structure 22 (e.g. deflate the balloon) and removes the delivery device 12 and guide wire 32 (see FIG. 13), while continuing to monitor with the endoscope 50, if desired.
  • [0047]
    Various modifications of the above-described method can be made. For example (see FIG. 14), between (ii) and (iii), an over-tube 52 may be inserted in the body lumen to serve as a delivery sheath as well as a further water impermeable barrier between the device and the mucosa. As another example (see FIG. 15), the actuator 30 and coupling 24 can be separated from the proximal end of the catheter tube 14, and the catheter tube 14 back-loaded (proximal end first) through the working channel 52 of an endoscope 50. Once back-loaded, the proximal components are re-connected to the catheter tube 14. This arrangement uses the working channel 52 of the endoscope as a delivery sheath, instead of or in combination with a guide wire and/or an over-tube.
  • [0048]
    The shape, shape, and configuration of the expandable body and the bandage structure 12 can modified to accommodate varying anatomies encountered within a body lumen or hollow body organ, such as the gastrointestinal tract. This expands the possible use of the delivery system 110 greatly. For example, in esophagogastrectomies, an anastomosis between the stomach and the esophagus is created where an asymmetric expandable structure 22 and a bandage structure 12 can be deployed by the system 10 to cover the suture lines of the anastomosis. In addition, the size and shape of the expandable structure 22 can be altered to accommodate deployment of a bandage structure 12 in the duodenum or stomach.
  • [0049]
    The intraluminal delivery method as described utilizes the catheter-based delivery device 12, as described, to introduce a flexible, relatively thin chitosan bandage structure 12, as described, in an low profile condition and covered with a water impermeable layer to a targeted treatment site within a body lumen or hollow body organ, e.g. to treat esophageal injury. The delivery method prevents the active chitosan surface 36 of the bandage structure 12 from contacting the mucosa until the bandage structure 12 positioned in a desired position over the injury,
  • III. Conclusion
  • [0050]
    It has been demonstrated that a therapeutic bandage structure can be introduced and deployed within a body lumen or hollow body organ using an intraluminal delivery system 10 under endoscopic guidance.
  • [0051]
    It should be apparent that above-described embodiments of this invention are merely descriptive of its principles and are not to be limited. The scope of this invention instead shall be determined from the scope of the following claims, including their equivalents.

Claims (20)

    We claim:
  1. 1. An intraluminal or hollow body organ bandage structure delivery system comprising:
    a rolled chitosan bandage having a tab and a slit located on an outer surface, wherein the tab is slidably inserted into the slit to hold the bandage in a rolled position;
    an expandable structure supporting the bandage; and
    a removable sheath enclosing the bandage.
  2. 2. The delivery system of claim 1, wherein the outer surface of the bandage provides an active surface that reacts in the presence of body fluid to become adhesive.
  3. 3. The delivery system of claim 1, wherein the inner surface of the bandage provides a non-stick coating.
  4. 4. The delivery system of claim 3, wherein the inner surface of the bandage is water impermeable.
  5. 5. The delivery system of claim 1, wherein the removable sheath includes a releasable securing device.
  6. 6. The delivery system of claim 1, further comprising a multi-lumen catheter tube.
  7. 7. The delivery system of claim 1, further comprising endoscopic visualization.
  8. 8. The delivery system of claim 1, further comprising a guide wire.
  9. 9. A rolled chitosan bandage structure sized and configured to be deployed within a body lumen or hollow body organ, wherein said structure comprises on a first side an outer surface comprising chitosan and including a tab and a slit formed therein and, on a second opposite side, a non-stick coating.
  10. 10. The rolled chitosan bandage of claim 9, wherein the tab is slidably inserted into the slit.
  11. 11. The rolled chitosan bandage of claim 9, wherein the non-stick coating on the second opposite side of said structure is water impermeable.
  12. 12. A method for delivery of a bandage structure within a body lumen or hollow body organ, comprising:
    providing the delivery system of claim 1;
    positioning the delivery system within the body lumen or hollow body organ and relative to an injury site; and
    adhering the bandage to the injury site.
  13. 13. The method of claim 12, further comprising:
    expanding the expandable structure to apply pressure from within the bandage so that the tab slides out of the slit and the bandage unfurls.
  14. 14. The method of claim 12, further comprising:
    removing the expandable structure; and
    leaving the bandage adhered to the injury site.
  15. 15. A delivery system for delivering a rolled chitosan bandage structure sized and configured to be deployed within a body lumen or hollow body organ, wherein said bandage structure comprises on a first side an outer active chitosan surface and, on a second opposite side, a non-stick coating, the delivery system comprising a multi-lumen catheter tube having a proximal end and a distal end, the catheter tube comprising an interior lumen through which a guide wire is configured to pass, the distal end carrying an expandable structure through which the interior lumen extends, the bandage structure being carried about the expandable structure, and the catheter tube further comprising a removable sheath.
  16. 16. The delivery system of claim 15, further comprising endoscopic visualization.
  17. 17. The delivery system of claim 15, further comprising a push-pull wire.
  18. 18. The delivery system of claim 15, wherein the expandable structure is partially enlarged to create bulbous forms on each side of the bandage structure.
  19. 19. The delivery system of claim 15, wherein the sheath has a releasable securing device at the distal end.
  20. 20. The delivery system of claim 15, wherein the non-stick coating of the second opposite side of said bandage structure is water impermeable.
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CA2653175A1 (en) 2007-12-06 application
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US20080287907A1 (en) 2008-11-20 application
EP2026850A2 (en) 2009-02-25 application

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