US20150066228A1 - Building Management and Appliance Control System - Google Patents

Building Management and Appliance Control System Download PDF

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Publication number
US20150066228A1
US20150066228A1 US14/340,281 US201414340281A US2015066228A1 US 20150066228 A1 US20150066228 A1 US 20150066228A1 US 201414340281 A US201414340281 A US 201414340281A US 2015066228 A1 US2015066228 A1 US 2015066228A1
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Prior art keywords
power
appliance
communication
control unit
system
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Abandoned
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US14/340,281
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Eric Douglas Clifton
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PEAKNRG
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PEAKNRG
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Priority to US14/340,281 priority patent/US20150066228A1/en
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Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/28Arrangements for balancing of the load in a network by storage of energy
    • H02J3/32Arrangements for balancing of the load in a network by storage of energy using batteries with converting means
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05FSYSTEMS FOR REGULATING ELECTRIC OR MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G05F1/00Automatic systems in which deviations of an electric quantity from one or more predetermined values are detected at the output of the system and fed back to a device within the system to restore the detected quantity to its predetermined value or values, i.e. retroactive systems
    • G05F1/66Regulating electric power
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J13/00Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network
    • H02J13/0006Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/381Dispersed generators
    • H02J3/382Dispersed generators the generators exploiting renewable energy
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/0068Battery or charger load switching, e.g. concurrent charging and load supply
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L12/00Data switching networks
    • H04L12/28Data switching networks characterised by path configuration, e.g. local area networks [LAN], wide area networks [WAN]
    • H04L12/2803Home automation networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/42Protocols for client-server architectures
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/12Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load
    • H02J3/14Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load by switching loads on to, or off from, network, e.g. progressively balanced loading
    • H02J2003/143Household appliances management
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/12Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load
    • H02J3/14Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load by switching loads on to, or off from, network, e.g. progressively balanced loading
    • H02J2003/146Tariff based load management
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/12Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load
    • H02J3/14Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks for adjusting voltage in ac networks by changing a characteristic of the network load by switching loads on to, or off from, network, e.g. progressively balanced loading
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/381Dispersed generators
    • H02J3/382Dispersed generators the generators exploiting renewable energy
    • H02J3/383Solar energy, e.g. photovoltaic energy
    • H02J3/385Maximum power point tracking control for photovoltaic sources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J3/00Circuit arrangements for ac mains or ac distribution networks
    • H02J3/38Arrangements for parallely feeding a single network by two or more generators, converters or transformers
    • H02J3/381Dispersed generators
    • H02J3/382Dispersed generators the generators exploiting renewable energy
    • H02J3/386Wind energy
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/02Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the use of web-based technology, e.g. hyper text transfer protocol [HTTP]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/10Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications in which an application is distributed across nodes in the network
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02ATECHNOLOGIES FOR ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02A30/00Adapting or protecting infrastructure or their operation
    • Y02A30/60Planning or developing urban green infrastructure
    • Y02A30/62Integration of district energy or distributed or on-site energy generation, e.g. combined heat and power generation or solar energy, in city layout
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B10/00Integration of renewable energy sources in buildings
    • Y02B10/10Photovoltaic [PV]
    • Y02B10/14PV hubs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B70/00Technologies for an efficient end-user side electric power management and consumption
    • Y02B70/30Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies for improving the carbon footprint of the management of residential or tertiary loads, i.e. smart grids as climate change mitigation technology in the buildings sector, including also the last stages of power distribution and the control, monitoring or operating management systems at local level
    • Y02B70/32End-user application control systems
    • Y02B70/3258End-user application control systems characterised by the end-user application
    • Y02B70/3266The end-user application being or involving home appliances
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02B90/20Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies mediating in the improvement of the carbon footprint of the management of residential or tertiary loads, i.e. smart grids as enabling technology in buildings sector
    • Y02B90/22Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments
    • Y02B90/222Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments the elements or equipments being or involving energy storage units, uninterruptible power supply [UPS] systems or standby or emergency generators involved in the last power distribution stages
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
    • Y02E10/50Photovoltaic [PV] energy
    • Y02E10/56Power conversion electric or electronic aspects
    • Y02E10/58Maximum power point tracking [MPPT] systems
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E10/00Energy generation through renewable energy sources
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    • Y02E10/76Power conversion electric or electronic aspects
    • Y02E10/763Power conversion electric or electronic aspects for grid-connected applications
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E40/00Technologies for an efficient electrical power generation, transmission or distribution
    • Y02E40/70Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies for improving the carbon footprint of electrical power generation, transmission or distribution, i.e. smart grids as climate change mitigation technology in the energy generation sector
    • Y02E40/72Systems characterised by the monitoring, control or operation of energy generation units, e.g. distributed generation [DER] or load-side generation
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02EREDUCTION OF GREENHOUSE GAS [GHG] EMISSIONS, RELATED TO ENERGY GENERATION, TRANSMISSION OR DISTRIBUTION
    • Y02E70/00Other energy conversion or management systems reducing GHG emissions
    • Y02E70/30Systems combining energy storage with energy generation of non-fossil origin
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
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    • Y04S10/00Systems supporting electrical power generation, transmission or distribution
    • Y04S10/10Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated power network elements or equipment
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    • Y04S10/123Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated power network elements or equipment the elements or equipment being or involving energy generation units, including distributed generation [DER] or load-side generation the energy generation units being or involving renewable energy sources
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
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    • Y04S20/00Systems supporting the management or operation of end-user stationary applications, including also the last stages of power distribution and the control, monitoring or operating management systems at local level
    • Y04S20/10System characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments
    • Y04S20/12System characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments the elements or equipments being or involving energy storage units, uninterruptible power supply [UPS] systems or standby or emergency generators involved in the last power distribution stages
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
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    • Y04S20/00Systems supporting the management or operation of end-user stationary applications, including also the last stages of power distribution and the control, monitoring or operating management systems at local level
    • Y04S20/20End-user application control systems
    • Y04S20/22End-user application control systems characterised by the aim of the control
    • Y04S20/222Demand response systems, e.g. load shedding, peak shaving
    • Y04S20/224Curtailment; Interruptions; Retail price-responsive demand
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
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    • Y04S20/00Systems supporting the management or operation of end-user stationary applications, including also the last stages of power distribution and the control, monitoring or operating management systems at local level
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    • Y04S20/242End-user application control systems characterised by the end-user application the end-user application being or involving home appliances
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    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T307/00Electrical transmission or interconnection systems
    • Y10T307/50Plural supply circuits or sources
    • Y10T307/505One source floats across or compensates for other source
    • Y10T307/511With intervening converter
    • Y10T307/516Storage battery or accumulator-type source

Abstract

The building management and appliance control system of the present invention includes an appliance control unit capable of monitoring and regulating the energy use of connected appliances based on information gathered from an energy cloud. The energy cloud is a network of remote server clients hosted on the Internet used to store, manage, and process energy data which are in communication with utility providers and third party systems. The appliance control unit includes a control system which communicates between and controls the overall function of the modules within the unit such as the user interface input, communication interface, power control unit, and battery unit. The appliance control unit uses all of the information available from the energy cloud to determine the optimum time to operate the attached appliances and when and how fast to charge the battery unit to ensure adequate power for the appliances at all times.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • The present application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/859,167, filed on Jul. 26, 2013, entitled “Building Management and Appliance Control System,” and currently co-pending.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to energy management systems. This present invention relates more particularly, but not exclusively, to a building management and appliance control system configured to provide consistent power at all times independent of the dynamic fluctuations in available power from the power grid.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The world's traditional electrical network—simple and linear, with centralized energy production—is undergoing a transformation to a much more complex, interconnected, and interactive model: the Smart Grid. However, for this network to become intelligent, users will require connectivity, simplicity, and security, all without compromising end user lifestyle.
  • Fluctuating usage has long been an issue for electrical utility providers. Increased energy demand (peaks) creates problems that can range from overloaded transformers, quickly spinning up generators that try meet demand, or potential blackout situations. Low demand (valleys) also has its issues, creating the need for sub-stations that sit idle in anticipation of the next energy peak.
  • This constant bate has created concepts like “Time of Use” pricing, “Dynamic Pricing” and “Demand Response”. These complex programs have proven to not be as effective as hoped. Potential “solutions” expect consumers to change their routine or suffer the consequences of higher energy pricing or increased temperatures in their homes, requiring them to pay attention and to make some very difficult decisions, ultimately sacrificing either price or comfort. Other attempts to change consumer behavior have consisted of in home displays (IHD) or grid-tied/demand response thermostats, coupled with energy monitoring. These devices offer complicated options to an already complicated issue and have yet to offer any significant long-term value.
  • At PeakNRG, (PNRG) our goal is to create low-cost products that shift residential energy demand from peak times to off peak times, without negatively impacting consumer's time of use or comfort. We aim to simplify energy management for consumers while helping to achieve the utilities goals for a stabilized smart grid.
  • Over the past decade, utilities have tried incentivizing consumers to conserve, with most programs generating weak results. The current trend is to increase rates during high usage periods or penalize consumers with escalating rates depending on the total monthly usage. The most recent tactics has cost utilities significantly and the increasing program complexity causes utilities to question if the conservation efforts are really what are necessary to help stabilize the electrical grid.
  • Battery storage is slated to become an integral part of the Smart Grid. In the past, batteries have had a difficult time gaining traction for various reasons. Due to the recent electric car movement, battery technology has finally begun to move toward being more efficient, stable, environmentally friendly, and cost effective. With the growing desire of the government to become free of fossil fuel, utilities are beginning to focus on large-scale storage projects.
  • Smart grid monitoring and control; PNRG will enable utilities to monitor overall load shifting of micro loads while supporting advanced Demand Response (DR) capabilities. PNRG servers will enable utilities to take advantage of PNRG's advanced algorithms, shifting peak demand to off-peak times, without inconveniencing consumers. Addressing distributed micro-loads in addition to the traditional centralized large-scale storage, utilities will be able to gain a very predictable and stable grid without negatively impacting their customers.
  • In addition to external storage, it would be advantageous to provide appliances that not only control how and when it receives power to store, but can also return unused power to the grid before the next charging cycle. It would be further advantageous to provide such appliances that are easy to use and are comparatively cost effective. An even further advantage is to provide a system that can be used with existing appliances to make the system even more cost effective for the home user.
  • By providing an ordinary resident the tools he or she needs to maximize their conservation efforts, overall consumption of electricity in the community will decrease. In addition to reducing costs associated with appliance operation, it would be advantageous to provide capabilities in the appliance system allowing it to communicate with a central control system, to provide a local user interface for programming and controlling the appliance, and to provide a system that monitors the appliance and reports the current status and power levels of the appliance.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The budding management and appliance control system of the present invention is a system consisting of energy storage units, such as batteries, that may power appliances. In a preferred embodiment, the system consists of an appliance control unit, which in turn controls the charge and discharge of an energy storage unit, which in the preferred embodiment is a battery unit. The battery unit may be used independently, the battery unit may run parallel with the power grid, or the battery unit may be bypassed and the appliance may receive power directly from the power grid. The appliance control unit is capable of monitoring and regulating the energy use of connected appliances based on information gathered from an energy cloud. The appliance control unit includes a control system which communicates between and controls the overall function of the modules within the unit such as the user interface input, communication interface, power control unit, and battery unit. The energy cloud is a network of remote server clients hosted on the Internet used to store, manage, and process energy data which are in communication with utility providers and third party systems. The appliance control unit uses all of the information available from the energy cloud to determine the optimum time to operate the attached appliances and when and how fast to charge the battery unit to ensure adequate power for the appliances at all times.
  • In areas where the power grid suffers from blackouts and brownouts, or is generally unreliable, the system of the present invention ensures adequate power is available to run the appliance through the use of the battery unit or running the battery unit in parallel with the power grid. In areas where the main source of power is alternative energy, such as solar or wind, power may not be available during night time or times of no wind, the system of the present invention ensures that power is available as well. To ensure the battery unit of the system can provide the needed power, the system of the present invention charges the battery at an optimum time based on the information received through the energy cloud to avoid excess energy cost, over burdening the local power utilities, and inefficient energy use among other factors. The system of the present invention allows for charging of the batteries when power is present and then allows the power to be used at a later time, regardless of the presence of utility provided power.
  • The system can charge the batteries by way of a trickle charge, a normal charge, or a fast charge, depending on various factors during the charging cycle such as available power, current power demand on utility providers, and cost of power. The system contemplates the use of lead-acid batteries, Lithium Ion batteries, and Nickel Metal Hydride batteries. However, the system can be used with other energy storage technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. Some utilities charge more for power used during peak times and less during off-peak times. The system of the present invention allows for the shifting of grid power usage to off-peak times when the cost of power is cheaper. If the batteries need to be charged during peak times, the system may use a trickle charge to help reduce energy costs. During off-peak times, or when power is available from a local source, such as solar or wind, the system may use a normal charge or a fast charge. Additionally, if the system has stored power remaining before the next cycle to charge the batteries, the system may return the power to grid so it can be used elsewhere. Further, during peak times and the battery unit is not being utilized by the user, the stored electricity can be returned to the power grid to relieve the burden on local utility providers producing energy. In some areas, the user will receive credit for the returned power, thereby reducing the user's utility costs.
  • The initial target for the system of the present invention are refrigerators, dishwashers, washing machines, dryers, TV set-top boxes, audio-video equipment, and emergency power supplies. Future product targets are pool pumps, well pumps, recirculation pumps, and HVAC systems, however other products are fully contemplated and are only limited by the ability to connect power storage and control systems such as the system of the present invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The nature, objects, and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to those skilled in the art after considering the following detailed description in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which like reference numerals designate like parts throughout, and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of the system of the present invention showing the appliance control unit, appliances, the energy cloud, and other entities that may communicate with the energy cloud, such as a utility provider;
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an alternative embodiment of the present invention showing the control system separated from the power system but still housed on the same chassis. In this embodiment, the system may return power to the grid through the use of an inverter;
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram of another alternative embodiment of the present invention showing control system housed in a separate chassis from the power unit; and
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram of another alternative embodiment of the present invention showing the power units integrated into the appliances.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring initially to FIG. 1, a system-level block diagram of the present invention is shown and generally designated 100. System 100 includes an appliance control unit 102 that receives grid power 104. Grid power 104 can be supplied by traditional electric power utilities, solar panels, wind turbines, hydro-electric generators, geothermal power, and any other source of electrical power. The appliance control unit 102 is in communication with an energy cloud 150, which in turn is in communication with the utility provider 152, a remote server client 154, and a third party 156. The appliance control unit 102 is also in communication with appliances 120, 130, and 140, respectively.
  • Internally, appliance control unit 102 includes a control system 106, a timer/clock 108, a user interface 110, a communication interface 112, a power control unit 114, an energy storage unit 116, and memory 118. The control system 106 of the present invention may include a central processing unit, multiple microprocessors, and various other computing components to help accomplish the control of the overall operation of the appliance control unit 102. The control system 106 is in communication with the timer/clock 108, the user interface input 110, the communication interface 112, the power control unit 114, the energy storage unit 116, and the memory 118 to enable communication between each module. Control system 106 controls the overall operation of the appliance control unit 102, including the coordination of the other internal modules with each other.
  • Timer/clock 108 provides the timing for each module and ensures that each module's timing is synced to the timer/clock 108. This enables the accurate interaction of the modules with each other. The timer/clock 108 also has a system clock to provide accurate current system time in human units for the appliance control unit 102. Based on the current system time provided by the timer/clock 108, the appliance control unit 102 can sync itself to various external systems which have also synced itself to current system time to allow proper communication such as the cloud 150, the utility provider 152, remote client server 154 and third party 156.
  • The user interface 110 provides the user with the ability to interface with the appliance control unit 102 to set the various parameters associated with the appliance management system 100. The user can interface through a keypad, a touchscreen, a Bluetooth connected device, or an application that resides on an external computing device such as a home computer, a tablet, or a smartphone.
  • Communication interface 112 allows the appliance control unit 102 to communicate with other appliance control units 102, the utility providers 152, the remote server client 154, third party 156, appliance 120, appliance 130, and appliance 140. The communication between the appliance control unit 102 and the various external systems allows the appliance control unit 102 to control when power is stored, applied, and returned to the grid based on the information gathered from communication with each individual external system in conjunction with the information from its own appliance control unit 102.
  • The communication methods incorporated into communication interface 112 includes, but is not limited to, broadband wired communication, broadband wireless communication Bluetooth, WiFi, and other wireless communication systems. In a preferred embodiment, the Zigbee communication standard is used. Zigbee is a specification for a suite of high level communication protocols using small, low power digital radios based on the IEEE 802.15.4-2003 standard. In addition, Zigbee coordinators can also be provided to facilitate communication within the Zigbee communication link, and to interface to a wired or wireless broadband communication system. While this communication protocol is particularly well suited for the resource management and control system of the present invention, it is to be appreciated that other existing wireless, wired, and power line communication (PLC) protocols may be used alone or in combination, or a proprietary communication protocol may be incorporated herein without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • The appliance control unit 102 also contains memory 118 that provides storage for programs, status history, usage history, and maintenance history. The memory 118 can be any form of data storage known in the industry including, but not limited to, traditional hard drives, solid-state storage devices, and flash memory.
  • Power control unit 114 may include a central processing unit, multiple microprocessors, and various other computing components to help accomplish the control of the operation of the charge and discharge of the energy storage unit 116 based on the programming of the control system 106. The power control unit 114 is in communication with the control system 106, the timer/clock 108, the user interface input 110, the energy storage unit 116, and the memory 118. The energy storage unit 116 consists of any power storage technology known in the industry, including Lithium Ion batteries, nickel metal hydride batteries, and lead-acid batteries. It is contemplated that the energy storage unit 116 may be an alternative energy storage unit such as liquid metal batteries, a hydrogen fuel cell, or any other now known or future energy storage unit.
  • The power control unit 114 controls the delivery of power of the energy storage unit 116 to the appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively. The power control unit 114 has the capability to switch between several different power delivery modes. The power control unit 114 may provide all the power needed from the energy storage unit 116, utilize the energy storage unit 116 to supplement available grid power 104 in a parallel manner, or the energy storage unit 116 may be bypassed to utilize grid power 104 only. This ensures that the appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively, may perform at optimum levels irrespective of the available grid power 104. The power control unit 114 also controls the charging of the energy storage unit 116. The power control unit 114 also has the capability to switch between various charging modes having various charge rates and charging cycles. The charging modes may use algorithm charge curves, use constant voltage, or use constant current based on the specifications of the energy storage unit 116. The power control unit 114 may switch between preset modes such as a trickle charge, a normal charge, or a fast charge or may be programmable by the user through the user interface input 110. Further, the charge modes may be dynamic and change in response to the controls from the power control unit 114 and the control system 106.
  • The power control unit 114 also provides alerts and status updates such as battery charge status, battery health, and power load. Additionally, the power control unit 114 monitors the efficiency of a connected appliance 120, 130, 140 respectively, remote diagnostics, and maintenance alerts, and makes the information available to the control system 106 and also reports the information to the user interface 110 for the user and to the energy cloud 150. The alerts and status updates can be displayed on the user interface 110, on the power control unit 114, or they can be reported externally to the appliance control unit 102, which will display the information on the user interface 110 or send the information to the user via a portable web application, email, or text message.
  • Another advantage of the system of the present invention is power conditioning for extended appliance protection and operation. This concept works similar to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) commonly used with computers and servers. The power control unit 114 will provide instantaneous power to compensate for a reduced input voltage condition, i.e. brownout or blackout, by supplying power from the energy storage unit 116 to the appliance 120, 130, 140. Additionally, the power control unit 114 will minimize if not eliminate, voltage surges, such as from lightning strikes and power return after a blackout or brownout, which could permanently damage a piece of equipment.
  • The appliance control unit 102 also interfaces with the energy cloud 150. The energy cloud 150 is a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet and used to store, manage, and process energy data in place of local servers or personal computers. For the purposes of the present invention, the energy cloud 150 includes information from utility providers 152, remote client servers 154, third parties 156 and other appliance control units 102 connected to the energy cloud 150.
  • Web services software of the remote server client 154 exchanges data between utility provider 152 back-end systems and home area networks with an attached appliance control unit 102 via the energy cloud 150. The remote server client 154 works with smart grid communications, enterprise software, and metering solutions to deliver insight to both utility providers 152 and appliance control units 102. The remote server client 154 of the present invention optimizes load management data by collecting granular customer usage data associated with each appliance control unit 102 and their associated appliance 120, 130, 140 respectively. It quantifies usage and maintenance logs for reporting, feedback, and scheduling into the utility providers 152 load management, demand response, or other back-end systems. The remote server client 154 is capable of scalable load management, which tracks and manages customer actions. It can update an entire network of home area network devices with over-the-air software upgrades.
  • The energy cloud 150 also communicates with third parties 156. These third parties 156 are typically the designers and manufacturers of power instrumentation and control systems. Typical third parties 156 are O-Power®, Honeywell®, Metasys®, Schneider Electric®, and NEST®. The information supplied allows the third parties 156 to continually monitor and update the performance of not only the energy cloud 150 and grid power 104, but also the individual appliance control units 102 and any connected appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively. The utility providers 152 provides utility based information such as brown out conditions, black out conditions, notifications regarding current power conditions, power line status, metrics associated with power production and consumption. Utility providers 152 may also provide demand based data and control inputs.
  • The utility providers 152 also receive data from the energy cloud 150 which may help the utility providers 152 optimize their energy production by observing real-time energy demands from users. The utility providers 152 may utilize the data to model and predict future energy demands to avoid problems such as overloaded transformers and overworked generators. The utility providers 152 may also use the information from the cloud 150 to determine localized areas with a large concentration of appliance control units 102 at full capacity during periods of high power demand. With the information, the utility provider 152 may shift power from the area with the large concentration of appliance control units 102 which are able to utilize their energy storage units 116 for power to areas without appliance control units 102, thereby lessening the burden on the utility provider to instantly respond to energy demand peaks and avoiding overloaded transformers and overworked generators.
  • In a preferred embodiment, appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively, receive power and control signals from the appliance control unit 102. The appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively, are directly connected to the appliance control unit 102 in which the control system 106 monitors various parameters of the appliances including, but not limited to, the voltage, current, power, and duration of use. The appliance control unit 102 is capable of connecting with existing appliances by utilizing power connectors known in the art. This ensures that the appliance control unit 102 is capable of connecting with existing and future appliances. The voltage, current, power, and duration of use of the appliances 120, 130, 140 respectively, are communicated to the control system 106 allowing the appliance control unit 102 to coordinate power usage of other appliances or even other appliance management systems 100.
  • In operation, the appliance control unit 102 uses information supplied from the energy cloud 150 and the grid power 104 to determine the optimum time to charge and supplement grid power 104 with power from the energy storage unit 116 to the connected appliances 120, 130, 140. A user may input, via the user interface 110, the desired usage time and duration. The control system 106 then uses the user's input, as well as any information made available from the energy cloud 150 to determine when and in what mode to charge the energy storage unit 116 and in what power delivery mode for the appliances 120, 130, and 140 respectively.
  • The appliance control system 100 can charge the energy storage unit 116 by utilizing the various available charge modes controlled by the power control unit 114. The charging of the energy storage unit 116 essentially provides time-shifting function for the use of grid power 104. Some utilities charge more for power used during peak times and less during off-peak times. The appliance control system 100 of the present invention allows for the shifting of grid power 104 usage to off-peak times when the cost of power is cheaper. If the energy storage unit 116 needs to be charged during peak times, the appliance control system 100 may use a trickle charge to help reduce energy costs. During off-peak times, or when power is available from a local source, such as solar or wind, the appliance control system 100 may use a normal charge or a fast charge. The system contemplates the use of lead-acid batteries, Lithium Ion batteries, and Nickel Metal Hydride batteries for the energy storage unit 116. However, the appliance control system 100 can be used with other energy storage technologies, such as fuel cells.
  • In instances where grid power 104 is at a reduced price or a black out condition is imminent, appliance control unit 102 may charge the energy storage unit 116 as fast as possible to ensure maximum power is available to run the appliances 120, 130, and 140 respectively, at the time when the cost of electricity is high or the availability of grid power 104 may not be optimal. When grid power 104 is not available, as when the blackout condition occurs, the appliance control system 100 will power the appliances 120, 130, and 140 respectively, completely from the energy storage unit 116. In brownout conditions, the appliance control system 100 may switch from providing power completely from the energy storage unit 116 or with the energy storage unit 116 and grid power 104 in a parallel mode. If grid power 104 is operating normally, appliance control system 100 may trickle charge the energy storage unit 116 while providing only grid power 104 to the appliances 120, 130, and 140 respectively.
  • The appliance control system 100 of the present invention ensures the users do not experience the negative aspects of fluctuating power delivery from utilities unable to compensate for the dynamic demands of power from their end-users. The appliance control system 100 is a low-cost system that shifts residential energy demand from peak times to off peak times by utilizing the appliance control system 100 energy storage unit 116, without negatively impacting the user's time of use or comfort. The appliance control system 100 simplifies energy management for users while helping to achieve the utilities goals for a stabilized smart grid.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a block diagram of an alternative embodiment of the present invention is shown and generally referred to as 200. Similar to the appliance management system 100 shown in FIG. 1, this alternative embodiment consists of an appliance control unit 202, grid power 204, and appliances 220, 230, 240 respectively, in addition to energy cloud 150, utility provider 152, and third parties 156. Grid power 204 is shown as a bi-directional function since power can be supplied back to the grid, as will be discussed below.
  • The appliance control unit 202 includes a control system 206, timer/clock 208, user interface 210, communication interface 212, memory 218, power control unit 214, and one or more modular battery units 216, The control system 206, timer/clock 208, user interface 210, communication interface 212, memory 218, power control unit 214, and one or more modular battery units 216 of the appliance control unit 202 is substantially similar to the control system 106, timer/clock 108, user interface 110, communication interface 112, memory 118, power control unit 114, and energy storage unit 116 of appliance control unit 102 and the details and descriptions in which are fully incorporated herein.
  • In this embodiment, the appliance control unit 202 also includes an inverter 215 which is bi-directional and capable of converting grid power 204 into a form capable of charging the modular battery unit 216 and also converts the power from the modular battery units 216 to a form that can be fed back to grid power 204. The bi-directional nature of the inverter 215 allows the appliance control unit 202 to receive as well as return grid power 204 to the grid. In certain instances, the returned power reduces the utility costs of the site operating the appliance control unit 202. Further, by making available unused, stored power, the power can be redistributed in the power grid for use by other consumers reducing the power load requirements on the utility provider 152.
  • In this alternative embodiment, the number of modular battery units 216 is scalable. The number of modular battery units 216 may depend on the number of appliances 220, 230, 240 respectively, connected to the appliance control unit 202. In other words, the more appliances attached to the appliance control unit 202 the more modular battery units 216 will be connected to ensure adequate power to run the appliances. Further, if grid power 204 is not generally reliable or extended brown out or black out conditions are expected, additional modular battery units 216 may be added to store power harvested from the grid power 204 when power is available.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, a block diagram of another alternative embodiment of an appliance management system is shown and generally referred to as 300. Similar to the appliance control unit 202 shown in FIG. 2 and appliance control unit 102 shown in FIG. 1, this alternative embodiment consists of an appliance control unit 302, grid power 304, appliance 320, energy cloud 150, a utility provider 152, a remote client server 154, and a third party 156. In the alternative embodiment, appliance control unit 302 consists of control chassis 301 and a power chassis 303. The control chassis 301 includes a control system 306, timer/clock 308, user interface 310, communication interface 312, and memory 318. The power chassis 303 includes a power control unit 314, an inverter 315, and modular battery units 316. The components of the appliance management system 300 are similar to the operation of like components in the earlier embodiments, appliance management system 100 and appliance management system 200, as discussed above and wherein the details and descriptions are fully incorporated herein. In this embodiment, control chassis 301 and power chassis 303 are separate from each other yet are housed within the same appliance control unit 302. The separation of control chassis 301 and power chassis 303 allows for optimum placement of radios or antennas for communication.
  • It is also contemplated that the control chassis 301 and power chassis 303 are not housed within the same appliance control unit 302. Rather, the control chassis 301 and power chassis 303 are physically separate, allowing the placement of each chassis in separate locations. The separation of the chassis may allow the placement of the power chassis 303 in a location closer to the appliance whereas the control chassis 301 may be placed in a location for easy access by a user. Further, by separating the appliance control unit 302, the area of realty taken by the appliance control unit 300 may be minimized.
  • The operation of the appliance management system 300 is similar to the appliance management system 200 shown in FIG. 2. The appliance control unit 302 receives power from grid power 304. Appliance control unit 302 also communicates with energy cloud 150 to transmit and receive information associated with utility provider 152 and the grid power 304. If the utility provider 152 transmits a request for power from the appliance control unit 302, and the appliance control unit 302 is configured to allow power return the grid power 304, then control system 306 will signal the power control unit 314 to convert power from modular battery unit 316, via inverter 315, to a form that can be fed back to grid power 304. If a user programs appliance control unit 302 to not return power to grid power 304, appliance control unit 302 may send a signal, via energy cloud 150, to inform the utility provider 152, remote server client 154, and any third party 156 that appliance control unit 302 will not return power to power grid 304.
  • Appliance control unit 304 may be programmed to automatically respond to a request for power by signaling an acknowledgement to energy cloud 150 then return power to grid power 304. Through programming of the appliance control unit 302, a user may set limits on the amount of power to be returned as well as specific times for power to be returned. This helps to ensure that appliance control unit 302 maintains sufficient stored energy to operate an appliance 320 at the user's desired time. When appliance control unit 302 is programmed to limit power return to grid power 304, appliance control unit 302 may signal energy cloud 150 of the programmed limits thereby allowing utility provider 152, remote server client 154, and third parties 156 to better predict and control the amount of power available on grid power 304.
  • Now referring to FIG. 4, a block diagram of another alternative embodiment of the appliance management system is shown and generally referred to as 400. This embodiment consists of the same individual components as other embodiments discussed above, but the power chassis 303 (from FIG. 3) is integrated into an appliance 420 and 430 instead of appliance control unit 402. Each appliance 420 and 430 receives power from grid power 404 individually. The appliances 420 and 430 each communicate with the appliance control unit 402. As in previous embodiments, appliance control unit 402 is in communication with energy cloud 150.
  • In this embodiment, appliance control unit 402 consists of control system 406, timer/clock 408, user interface 410, communication interface 412, and memory 418. Appliance 420 includes power control unit 422, inverter 423, and modular battery units 424. Appliance 430 includes power control unit 432, inverter 433, and modular battery units 434. The number of modular battery units 424 and 434 for each appliance 420 and 430 respectively, is scalable to meet the needs of the attached appliance. The appliance control unit 402 is in communication with appliance 420 and appliance 430.
  • In an alternative embodiment, appliance 420 and appliance 430 are interconnected to allow the sharing of power without a separate connection to grid power 404. The appliance control unit 402 controls the sharing of power between appliance 420 and appliance 430. This provides the advantage of allowing a user to choose how many modular battery units 424 and modular battery units 434 to install in appliance 420 and appliance 430 respectively, yet ensuring that enough power is available to run any one particular appliance 424 and appliance 434.
  • While there have been shown what are presently considered to be preferred embodiments of the present invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made herein without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (20)

I claim:
1. An appliance management system comprising:
an appliance control unit, wherein said appliance control is configured to monitor and regulate power;
an energy cloud, said energy cloud in communication with said appliance control unit to communicate data to said appliance control unit; and
wherein said appliance control unit regulates power n response to said data from said energy cloud.
2. The appliance management system of claim 1, wherein said appliance control unit comprises:
a control system;
a user interface input in communication with said control system;
a communication interface in communication with said control system;
memory in communication with said control system; and
a timer and clock in communication with said control system, said user interface system, said communication interface, and said memory.
3. The appliance management system of claim 2, wherein said appliance control unit further comprises:
a power control unit in communication with said control system and said timer and clock; and
an energy storage unit in communication with said power control unit, said control system, and said timer and clock.
4. The appliance management system of claim 3, wherein said appliance control unit further comprises grid power.
5. The appliance management system of claim 4 further comprises:
a remote server client in communication with said energy cloud;
at least one utility provider in communication with said remote server client and said energy cloud;
at least one third party system in communication with said energy cloud.
6. The appliance management system of claim 5 further comprising an inverter, said inverter is connected to said grid power, and wherein said inverter receives grid power.
7. The appliance management system of claim 6, wherein said inverter is bi-directional, and wherein said inverter receives and returns grid power.
8. The appliance management system of claim 7, further comprises:
a control chassis housing said control system, said timer and clock, said user interface input, said communication interface, and said memory; and
a power chassis housing said power control unit, said inverter, and said energy storage unit.
9. The appliance management system of claim 8, wherein said control chassis and said power chassis are housed within an appliance control unit chassis.
10. An appliance management system comprising:
an appliance control unit, wherein said appliance control is configured to monitor and regulate electrical power;
an energy cloud, said energy cloud in communication with said appliance control unit to communicate data to said appliance control unit;
at least one appliance with an integrated power chassis, said appliance in communication with said appliance control unit; and
wherein said appliance control unit regulates electrical power to said appliance in response to said data from said energy cloud.
11. The appliance management system of claim 10, wherein said appliance control unit comprises:
a control system;
a user interface input in communication with said control system;
a communication interface in communication with said control system;
a memory in communication with said control system; and
a timer and clock in communication with said control system, said user interface system, said communication interface, and said memory.
12. The appliance management system of claim 11, wherein said appliance control unit further comprises a control chassis housing said control system, said user interface input, said communication interface, said memory and said timer and clock.
13. The appliance management system of claim 12, wherein said power chassis of said appliance comprises:
a power control unit in communication with said control system and said timer and clock;
at least one energy storage unit in communication with said power control unit, said control system, and said timer and clock; and
an inverter in communication with said power control unit and said energy storage unit, said inverter is connected to a grid power.
14. The appliance management system of claim 13 further comprises:
a remote server client in communication with said energy cloud;
at least one utility provider in communication with said remote server client and said energy cloud;
at least one third party system in communication with said energy cloud.
15. The appliance management system of claim 14 wherein said inverter is bi-directional, wherein said inverter receives and returns grid power to the power grid.
16. A method of providing uninterruptable power comprising the steps of:
providing an appliance control unit, said appliance control unit configured for power delivery;
providing an energy cloud in communication with said applicant control unit;
providing a grid power to said appliance control unit;
sending data from said energy cloud to said appliance control unit;
alternating power delivery of said appliance control unit in response to said data from said energy cloud.
17. The method of providing uninterruptable power of claim 16, wherein said appliance control unit comprises:
a control system;
a user interface input in communication with said control system;
a communication interface in communication with said control system;
a memory in communication with said control system;
a timer and clock in communication with said control system, said user interface system, said communication interface, and said memory;
a power control unit in communication with said control system and said timer and clock; and
an energy storage unit in communication with said power control unit, said control system, and said timer and clock.
18. The method of providing uninterruptable power of claim 17, further comprising the steps of:
providing a remote server client in communication with said energy cloud;
providing at least one utility provider in communication with said remote server client and said energy cloud;
providing at least one third party system in communication with said energy cloud.
19. The method of providing uninterruptable power of claim 18, wherein said appliance control unit further comprises an inverter.
20. The method of providing uninterruptable power of claim 19, wherein said inverter is bi-directional.
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