US20150051054A1 - Exercise device for action sports training - Google Patents

Exercise device for action sports training Download PDF

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US20150051054A1
US20150051054A1 US14459279 US201414459279A US2015051054A1 US 20150051054 A1 US20150051054 A1 US 20150051054A1 US 14459279 US14459279 US 14459279 US 201414459279 A US201414459279 A US 201414459279A US 2015051054 A1 US2015051054 A1 US 2015051054A1
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assembly
exercise device
handlebar
configured
device
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US14459279
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Todd Barnhill
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Todd Barnhill
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/008Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices using hydraulic or pneumatic force-resisters
    • A63B21/0083Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices using hydraulic or pneumatic force-resisters of the piston-cylinder type
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/15Arrangements for force transmissions
    • A63B21/159Using levers for transmitting forces
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B21/00Exercising apparatus for developing or strengthening the muscles or joints of the body by working against a counterforce, with or without measuring devices
    • A63B21/40Interfaces with the user related to strength training; Details thereof
    • A63B21/4041Interfaces with the user related to strength training; Details thereof characterised by the movements of the interface
    • A63B21/4047Pivoting movement
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/03516For both arms together or both legs together; Aspects related to the co-ordination between right and left side limbs of a user
    • A63B23/03525Supports for both feet or both hands performing simultaneously the same movement, e.g. single pedal or single handle
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/03575Apparatus used for exercising upper and lower limbs simultaneously
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/03575Apparatus used for exercising upper and lower limbs simultaneously
    • A63B23/03583Upper and lower limbs acting simultaneously on the same operating rigid member
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/02Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00 for large-room or outdoor sporting games
    • A63B71/023Supports, e.g. poles
    • A63B2071/025Supports, e.g. poles on rollers or wheels
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/64Heated
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/04Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for lower limbs
    • A63B23/0405Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for lower limbs involving a bending of the knee and hip joints simultaneously
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B23/00Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body
    • A63B23/035Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously
    • A63B23/12Exercising apparatus specially adapted for particular parts of the body for limbs, i.e. upper or lower limbs, e.g. simultaneously for upper limbs or related muscles, e.g. chest, upper back or shoulder muscles
    • A63B23/1209Involving a bending of elbow and shoulder joints simultaneously
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/0066Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for wind-surfing
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/16Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for cycling, i.e. arrangements on or for real bicycles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/18Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for skiing
    • A63B69/187Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for skiing for water-skiing

Abstract

An exercise device for action sports training is introduced herein. The device is configured for training and conditioning of the muscles associated with moto-induced CECS or “arm pump”. In various embodiments the exercise device can be configured for self-standing; mounting to a stationary object; or a combination thereof.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims benefit of priority with U.S. Provisional Ser. No. 61/865,404, filed Aug. 13, 2013; the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to exercise equipment for action sports training; and more particularly, to such exercise equipment for training and conditioning of muscles used in motocross and related sports.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • “Motocross” is a form of motorcycle racing; and is known to be a physically demanding sport.
  • Racers who participate in motocross and other related motorcycle racing sports often experience muscle cramps and fatigue of the wrists, arms, and the related musculature.
  • In particular, “arm pump”, or chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), is a compartment syndrome overuse type injury. Arm pump exists due to the complex coordination necessary at the hands and wrists required to control a high powered motorcycle. When you grip something in your hand there is co-contraction between the muscle groups on the back (dorsal) and front (volar) of the forearm. To necessitate a stronger grip the wrist is pulled into extension. This co-contraction results in an increase in compartment pressure, i.e. It is harder for the blood to flow through this region.
  • Thus, to simply grip a handlebar increases pressure. To grip the handlebar of a rapidly accelerating or decelerating motorcycle necessitates stronger grip levels. If you then add the throttle action, which uses the dorsal wrist extensors more than the volar wrist flexors, then the clutch and brake levers, which use the volar finger flexors, then the complex nature of this injury starts to appear.
  • If you then factor in a “technical” circuit or track requiring repeated braking from high speeds followed by lots braking zones, lots of direction changes, short periods of acceleration, it becomes clear that the forearms do not get a lot of rest per lap.
  • Ergonomics are extremely important with this type of injury, hence handlebar and lever position are crucial. As are lever pressures, short travel throttles and so on.
  • Although various ergonomic accessories such as grips have recently become commercially available, there has yet to be provided an exercise device for training and conditioning these specific muscles for minimizing the likelihood of a CECS onset.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In view of the above limitations in the art, an exercise device for action sports training is introduced herein. The device is configured for training and conditioning of the muscles associated with moto-induced CECS or “arm pump”.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Features of the claimed exercise device for action sports training are illustrated in the appended drawings, wherein:
  • FIG. 1A shows a perspective view of an exercise device for action sports training according to a first embodiment.
  • FIG. 1B shows a perspective view of a rigid tubular frame of the exercise device in accordance with the first embodiment.
  • FIG. 1C shows a perspective view of a handlebar assembly of the exercise device in accordance with the first embodiment.
  • FIG. 1D shows a perspective view of a seat assembly of the exercise device in accordance with the first embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 shows a side view of the exercise device and various moving componentry thereof.
  • FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of an exercise device for action sports training according to a second embodiment.
  • FIG. 4A shows a front perspective view of an exercise device for action sports training according to a third embodiment.
  • FIG. 4B shows a rear perspective view of the exercise device in accordance with the third embodiment.
  • FIG. 5A shows a perspective view of an alternative exercise device in accordance with the third embodiment.
  • FIG. 5B shows a side view of the exercise device of FIG. 5A.
  • FIG. 5C shows a rear view of the exercise device of FIGS. 5(A-B).
  • FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of an alternative exercise device in accordance with the second embodiment.
  • FIG. 7A shows a perspective view of yet another alternative exercise device in accordance with the third embodiment.
  • FIG. 7B shows a detailed view of the hitch tube and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 7C shows a detailed view of the front base plate and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 7D shows a detailed view of the handlebar coupler and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 7E shows a detailed view of the static foot peg assembly mount and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 7F shows a detailed view of the rear base plate and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A.
  • FIG. 8A shows a rear perspective view of an optional rotating handlebar assembly for incorporating with any of the embodiments herein.
  • FIG. 8B shows a side view of the optional rotating handlebar assembly of FIG. 8 A.
  • FIG. 8C shows a front perspective view of an optional rotating handlebar assembly of FIGS. 8(A-B).
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS
  • With reference to the appended drawings, certain examples are provided for the purpose of illustrating novel features and benefits of an exercise device for action sports training. Although particular examples are referenced herein, these examples are being described for illustrative purposes only and shall not be construed as limiting the spirit and scope of the claimed invention. Rather, those having skill in the art will understand that certain modifications, substitutions and variations may be implemented to yield substantially similar results. Moreover, since various components can be individually redesigned or substituted to yield a similar device, a plurality of embodiments are being disclosed in an effort to illustrate in part a number of possible variations of the claimed invention.
  • In the drawings, three product embodiments are disclosed herein.
  • A first embodiment, as illustrated in FIGS. 1(A-D) and FIG. 2, provides an exercise device for action sports training wherein the device is configured for self-standing in an upright position on a substantially flat surface.
  • In a second embodiment, as illustrated in FIG. 3, and in an alternative variation illustrated in FIG. 6, an exercise device for action sports training is configured to attach to a conventional receiver hitch, the receiver hitch (not shown) generally forms part of an automobile or trailer, but may form a portion of any structure, stand, or vehicle sufficient to mount the exercise device in a secure fashion.
  • Finally, in a third embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 4(A-B), and also in the alternative versions of the device as illustrated in FIGS. 5(A-C) and FIGS. 7(A-F), respectively, an exercise device for action sports training is configured for each of: self-standing on a substantially flat surface, and attachment with a receiver hitch, combining various features of the first and second embodiments as described above.
  • Each of these embodiments and respective features, though similar, will be described in turn.
  • Although the illustrated embodiments physically resemble a motorcycle or racing bike, the claimed invention may be used across a wide spectrum of action sports for the purpose of training arm and hand muscle groups for reducing arm pump attributed to participation in such action sports, including motocross, kite boarding, wake boarding, jet skiing, and many others.
  • In a general embodiment, an exercise device comprises a handlebar assembly configured to provide a user with resistance training as the handlebar assembly is translated both forward and backward. The handlebar assembly is coupled to a frame at a pivot, and further coupled to a resistance mechanism adapted to provide resistance in two opposing directions, such as for example a conventional shock absorber. The frame is secured to a stable structure or ground and provides a reference from which the user translates the handlebar assembly. Optionally, but preferably, a seat is provided for user comfort and stability during a training session. Other optional features may include one or more of: a resistive clutch handle; a resistive brake handle; a resistive throttle lever or grip; heated seat for warming the users body in anticipation of an upcoming heat or event; heated grips for warming the users hands; an adjustable seat configured to adjust height or length about the device; one or more adjustable standing braces configured for setting about multiple angles within a horizontal bottom plane; an adjustable hitch mount configured for selectable positioning about a vertical height of the frame at a front end thereof; an adjustable resistance mechanism such as an adjustable shock absorber configured to selectably adjust resistance provided in one or more directions along a shock axis; one or more static foot pegs configured for static positioning about the device frame or other stable structure thereof; and a dynamic foot peg assembly configured to extend outwardly from a bottom portion of the handlebar assembly for enhancing foot work in conjunction with the hand and arm training provided by the handlebar assembly.
  • First Embodiment
  • Now turning to the first embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 1(A-D) and FIG. 2, an exercise device for action sports training is configured for self-standing in an upright position on a substantially flat surface. The substantially flat surface may include any dirt, turf, pavement, concrete, or other flat surface. As illustrated in FIG. 1A, the exercise device 100 a comprises a rigid tubular frame assembly 110, a handlebar assembly 130 coupled to the rigid tubular frame at a pivot, a seat assembly 160 coupled to a rear side of the rigid tubular frame, a shock absorber 150 having a first end thereof attached to the rigid tubular frame near a front end and a second end coupled to the handlebar assembly at a brace. In this embodiment, an optional dynamic foot peg assembly is provided, the dynamic foot peg assembly extends rearward from a bottom end of the handlebar assembly. The dynamic foot peg assembly provides the function of assisting pull-back of the handlebar with force exerted on the dynamic foot pegs is increased. An optional static foot peg assembly is mounted near a rear side of the device for providing a fixed platform for resting a user's feet during arm, hand and wrist training.
  • FIG. 1B further illustrates the features and components of the rigid tubular frame 110 in accordance with the first embodiment. The rigid tubular frame is generally a tubular aluminum or steel structure bent and/or cut and welded into a frame. Although aluminum and steel are preferred, various composite plastics, wood, or other metals may be used so long as the material selected provides a rigid structure. The frame 110 comprises a first vertical portion 111 attached to a second horizontal portion 112 at a corner portion 118. A diagonal portion 113 extends from a distal end of the vertical portion to a distal end of the horizontal portion, forming a triangular frame. A handlebar assembly mount 114 having an aperture 132 therethrough is coupled to the diagonal portion 113 and configured for attachment with the handlebar assembly, forming a pivot therebetween. The rigid tubular frame is being shown having an optional first vertical aperture group 115 comprising a series of apertures disposed along a length of the first vertical portion 111. The first vertical aperture group is provided for use with an optional hitch mount assembly (not shown). A first shock absorber mount 151 is coupled to the first vertical portion 111 near a front side of the frame. A front base plate 116 is shown attached at the distal end of the first vertical portion 111, and standing braces 120 a; 120 b are further attached therewith. Standing braces 120 a; 120 b, respectively, may further comprise one or more gripping knobs 117 attached along a bottom surface thereof for providing gripping traction with the ground surface. The gripping knobs may be adjustable for enabling use with an uneven ground.
  • FIG. 1C further illustrates the features and components of the handlebar assembly 130 in accordance with the first embodiment. The handlebar assembly is shown with two elongated forks 131 a; 131 b extending from a bottom end to a top end. It should be noted that a single elongated bar can be implemented, however, in this preferred embodiment two elongated forks are provided for additional rigidity. A top plate 137 is attached to each of the elongated forks 131 a; 131 b, respectively, at the top end. One or more handlebar couplers are attached to the top plate (here two handlebar couplers 129 a; 129 b are shown). A handlebar 135 is engaged with each of the one or more handlebar couplers to form the handlebar assembly. A truss 136 is provided for stability of the handlebar assembly and extends between the first and second elongated forks 131 a; 131 b, respectively. A brace 138, may include a shock bolt 134, and is also configured to extend between the first and second elongated forks 131 a; 131 b. The brace is configured to engage with the shock absorber for communicating a resistive force of the shock absorber to the handlebar assembly. A key component of the handlebar assembly includes a pivot 139, which may be formed of a pivot bolt 133 or a rod, and extends between the first and second elongated forks 131 a; 131 b, respectively. The handlebar assembly is configured to couple with the rigid tubular frame at the pivot.
  • Moreover, the handlebar assembly is shown having an optional dynamic foot peg assembly 140 extending behind the handlebar assembly. The dynamic foot peg assembly comprises a first elongated structural element 142 a and a second elongated structural element 142 b, each extending from respective elongated forks at an angle between about forty five degrees and about one hundred and thirty five degrees in a rearward direction with respect to the vertical forks. The dynamic foot peg assembly further comprises a first foot peg 141 a and a second foot peg 141 b, each disposed at a distal end of the elongated structural elements.
  • FIG. 1D further illustrates the features and components of the seat assembly 160 in accordance with the first embodiment. The seat assembly is adapted to engage with the rigid tubular frame at a rear side thereof and configured to provide a seat for comfort and support of a user during a training session using the device. The seat assembly comprises a vertical support element 162 extending from a bottom end thereof to a top end. A seat 161 is coupled to the vertical support element at the top end. The seat can optionally be adjustable about a height for customizing height for user requirements. A pin 121 is shown for selecting a height of the seat with respect to the vertical support element 162. An orthogonal tube 163 extends outwardly from the vertical support element 162 toward a front side. The orthogonal tube 163 is configured to insert within a rear side of the horizontal portion 112 of the rigid tubular frame 110. The orthogonal tube may comprise one or more apertures and a pin 121 extending along a length thereof for selectably configuring a length of the seat assembly about the frame.
  • The vertical support element 162 of the seat assembly 160 may optionally comprise a plurality of apertures disposed along a length thereof for selectable engagement of a static foot peg assembly 166 having static foot pegs 165 a; 165 b, respectively. The static foot peg assembly is adjustable up or down along the plurality of apertures of the vertical support element 162, and may be selectable engaged with a removable pin.
  • A rear base plate 167 is coupled to the vertical support element 162 at the bottom end, and one or more standing braces may be optionally attached (two standing braces 120 c; 120 d are shown). The standing braces may optionally comprise one or more gripping knobs 117 c; 117 d as described above.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates the dynamic function of the exercise device for action sports training according to the first embodiment. The seat assembly 160 is coupled to the rigid tubular frame 110 as described above. The handlebar assembly 130 comprises a dynamic foot peg assembly 140 extending therefrom, and the handlebar assembly with dynamic foot peg assembly is coupled to the rigid tubular frame 110 at a pivot P. Pivot P forms the translational juncture from which the handlebar assembly is configured to translate with respect to the frame in a forward direction “H1” and a rearward direction “H2”. Note that the shock absorber 150 provides shock absorber resistance in the “S1” and “S2” directions, respectively, and the bidirectional shock absorber resistance is communicated to the handlebar assembly for providing resistance in the opposing H1 and H2 directions. Meanwhile, the shock absorber is further configured to communicate the bidirectional resistance of the S1 and S2 directions to the foot pegs, which in turn provide resistance training in the “F1” and “F2” directions.
  • It is important to note that when loaded with a mass of a user at the dynamic foot pegs, the user's weight is compounded with exerted force in the F2 direction while the user's weight is counteracted against the exerted force in the F1 direction, thus the force of F2 is less than the force of F1 when loaded with the mass of a given user. Thus, mimicking the effect of motorcycle suspension, the user's weight is properly distributed with use of the dynamic foot pegs for a more realistic training. Alternatively, the user may place her feet about the static foot peg assembly for experiencing an even training in both directions. No other device has been provided which accomplishes each of these functions.
  • The standing braces 120 extend laterally within a horizontal plane for maintaining the exercise device in an upright standing position during use.
  • Second Embodiment
  • FIG. 3 exemplifies the exercise device for action sports training being configured to attach to a conventional receiver hitch; the receiver hitch (not shown) may form a portion of any structure or vehicle. The exercise device 100 b comprises a rigid tubular frame 110, a seat assembly attached to the frame at a rear side thereof, a handlebar assembly coupled to the frame forming a pivot, a shock absorber 150 extending between the frame at a front side thereof and the handlebar assembly, and a hitch assembly coupled to the frame at the front side thereof.
  • The seat assembly comprises a seat 161, a vertical support element 162 extending beneath the seat 161, and an orthogonal tube 163 configured to slideably engage and nest within a tube portion of the frame 110 at the rear side thereof. A pin 121 is used to selectably engage the orthogonal tube 163 within the frame at a desired length. Similarly, a pin can be used to select a height of the seat about the vertical support element 162.
  • The handlebar assembly comprises a handlebar 135 coupled to forks 131 at handlebar couplers 129 in a manner similar to the first embodiment as described above. A number plate 170 can be optionally affixed to the handlebar assembly, for example to indicate ownership or otherwise indicating the rider for which the device is adjusted or configured for use. The handlebar assembly is coupled to the frame at handlebar-assembly mount 114 with a pivot bolt 133 extending through the forks and the handlebar-assembly mount. A dynamic foot peg assembly extends behind the handlebar assembly and comprises elongated structural elements 142 and dynamic foot pegs 141 also similar to the first embodiment.
  • Shock absorber 150 is coupled to the handlebar assembly at a brace thereof, and further coupled to the frame near a front side thereof.
  • A hitch assembly comprises a hitch mount 125 and a hitch tube 126 secured to the hitch mount at hitch bolts 127. The hitch assembly is engaged with the frame using pins 121 inserted through vertical apertures of the frame. No standing braces are present in this embodiment since the device is configured to mount to a hitch receiver, such as for example a hitch receiver of a truck, vehicle, or stationary structure. Other than the method for maintaining the device in an upright position, the device substantially functions as described in the first embodiment, FIG. 2.
  • In an alternative version of the device, and also relating to the second embodiment wherein the exercise device for action sports training is configured to attach to a conventional receiver hitch, as illustrated in FIG. 6, the exercise device comprises static foot pegs attached at the pivot of the handlebar assembly. In this regard, both the weight and cost of the device is reduced by eliminating the dynamic foot pegs and associated componentry. In addition, portions of rolled or bent tubing can be used to form the rigid frame as opposed to the sectioned and welded tubing. Optional handlebar grips are also shown.
  • As shown in FIG. 6, the exercise device comprises a rigid frame 110 and a handlebar assembly coupled to the frame at a pivot 139. The handlebar assembly comprises forks 131 extending upwardly from the pivot 139. Static foot pegs 165 are shown attached to the forks at the pivot and are not configured for movement, thus referred to as static foot pegs. A number plate 170 is connected to the forks at an upper end thereof. Handle bars 135 are attached to the handlebar assembly at handlebar couplers 129. Handlebar grips 175 are attached for ergonomics. A shock absorber 150 further couples the handlebar assembly to the frame and extends from a truss between the forks to an adjustable shock absorber mounting plate 190. The shock absorber can be adjusted by releasing the knob 191 to slide the shock absorber mounting plate 190 about a shock absorber mounting track 192 to an intended position. A seat 161 is coupled to a vertical support 162 being adjustable for rider height using the pin 121. The distance of the rider seat from the frame is adjusted by extending orthogonal tube 163 using a pin and aperture or other adjustment means.
  • In the exploded view of FIG. 6, the hitch assembly is shown in more detail. The hitch assembly is shown attached to the vertical portion 111 of the frame, and includes a hitch tube 126 attached to a hitch mount 125 via bolts 127 extending therebetween. Pins 121 secure the hitch mount to the frame.
  • Third Embodiment
  • In a third embodiment as illustrated in FIGS. 4(A-B), an exercise device for action sports training is configured for each of: self-standing on a substantially flat surface, and attachment with a receiver hitch, thereby combining various features of the first and second embodiments as described above.
  • FIGS. 4(A-B) illustrates the exercise device 100 c, comprising: a rigid tubular frame 110; a seat assembly coupled with the frame at a rear end thereof; a handlebar assembly coupled to the frame at a pivot, and further coupled to the frame with a shock absorber extending therebetween. The exercise device comprises standing braces for standing the device on a substantially flat surface, and further comprises a hitch assembly for attaching the device to a hitch receiver of a vehicle or other structure.
  • The seat assembly comprises a seat 161 coupled to a vertical support element 162. The vertical support element extends to a bottom end to attach with rear base plate 167. Two opposing standing braces 120 extend outwardly in opposite directions from the rear base plate 167. The angle from which the standing braces extend with respect to the rear base plate is configurable using a pin 121 and aperture in the base plate (not shown). A slot extending axially creates the ability for moving the standing brace about the rear base plate. The vertical support element 162 further comprises a plurality of apertures extending along a length thereof to form a second vertical aperture group 164. An optional static foot peg assembly having a static foot peg assembly mount 166 is secured to the vertical support element 162 using a pin extending through one or more apertures of the vertical aperture group 164.
  • The handlebar assembly comprises a handlebar 135 coupled to forks 131 at handlebar couplers 129. An optional number plate 170 is affixed to the handlebar assembly for identification purposes. An optional dynamic foot peg assembly 140 extends behind the handlebar assembly at a bottom end thereof. The handlebar assembly is coupled to the frame 110 at pivot 139, and further coupled to the frame 110 via a shock absorber 150 extending therebetween.
  • The frame is further outfitted with adjustable standing braces 120 that are coupled to a front base plate 116 via pins 121, slots 122 and base plate apertures as described above.
  • A hitch mount assembly is coupled to the frame at a front side thereof using pins 121 extending through hitch mount 125 and vertical apertures 115 of the first vertical aperture group. The hitch mount assembly further comprises a hitch tube 126 extending forward from the hitch mount and configured for insertion and nesting within a conventional hitch receiver.
  • Thus, in the third embodiment, the exercise device is configured for any of (i) standing upright about a substantially flat surface; or (ii) engagement with a conventional hitch receiver of a vehicle or other support structure.
  • Alternative versions of the device are shown in FIGS. 5(A-C); and FIGS. 7(A-F), respectively.
  • In a first alternative version of the device, FIGS. 5(A-C) illustrate an exercise device configured for both self-standing and mounting to a stationary object.
  • FIG. 5A shows a perspective view of an alternative exercise device in accordance with the third embodiment. The exercise device in FIG. 5 comprises a frame 110 and a handlebar assembly coupled to the frame at a pivot 139 (shown with more detail in the exploded view). The pivot can comprise a rigid structure configured to attach to the diagonal portion of the frame via a bolt extending therebetween, the rigid structure of the pivot being coupled to the forks 131 of the handlebar assembly via an axle therethrough, such that the handlebar assembly can rotate about the rigid structure of the pivot. Static foot pegs 165 are shown attached at the pivot 139. The handlebar assembly is further coupled to the frame by a shock absorber 150 extending therebetween. The device further comprises a vertical support member and a seat 161 attached therewith, the vertical support member is adjustably engaged with a horizontal portion 112 of the rigid frame 110. Additional static foot pegs 165 are shown attached to the vertical support member. Four standing braces 120 are shown, with two of said braces being coupled to the front end of the frame and the remaining two braces being coupled to the vertical support member. Handlebars 135 and grips 175 are shown attached to the handlebar assembly. A mounting tube 126 is mounted to the vertical portion of the frame at the front side of the device. A dolly or wheel assembly is attached for transporting the device. The wheel assembly includes a wheel 180 and a wheel mounting bracket 181.
  • FIG. 5B shows a side view of the exercise device of FIG. 5A. The device is shown with a number plate 170 (optional). A handlebar pivot lockout is shown attached to the horizontal portion of the frame. A corresponding pin extends through the forks and is used to engage the handlebar pivot lockout if desired by a user of the device.
  • FIG. 5C shows a rear view of the exercise device of FIGS. 5(A-B).
  • In a second alternative version of the device, FIGS. 7(A-F) illustrate an exercise device configured for both self-standing and mounting to a stationary object.
  • FIG. 7A shows a perspective view of yet another alternative exercise device in accordance with the third embodiment. In this embodiment, a resistive pedal assembly 200 is added for providing a means for the rider to warm up immediately prior to an event. The pedal assembly can be removable, as shown, using pins to attach the pedal assembly to the frame. The pedal assembly is similar to that of a conventional exercise bike. The pedal assembly as shown comprises pedals 201 extending from a sprocket of the pedal assembly 200. Furthermore, a pedal assembly guard is shown positioned between a pedal and the sprocket. The pedal assembly guard can be removed using pins 121. Otherwise the remaining illustrated features are identical to those illustrated in FIG. 5A.
  • FIG. 7B shows a detailed view of the hitch tube and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A. In addition, the adjustable shock mount is being illustrated, the adjustable shock mount comprising a shock absorber mounting plate 190, a knob 191 for releasing the shock from the plate, and a shock absorber mounting track 192 having apertures for receiving pins or bolts for engaging the plate to the track. The components of the hitch tube are substantially as described in FIG. 6 and the associated descriptions.
  • FIG. 7C shows a detailed view of the front base plate and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A. The device is equipped with adjustable standing braces 120. The braces are attached to a base plate 116 via bolts 123 and washers extending therebetween to form a joint. Standing brace adjusters 124 are used to fixedly position the braces about apertures positioned on the base. Thus, the bolts act as a hinge while the adjusters serve to lock the braces in position relative to the base plate 116.
  • FIG. 7D shows a detailed view of the handlebar coupler and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A. The handlebar coupler 129 is shown engaged with the top plate 137 by bolts 123. As the coupler is tightened, the handlebars 135 are captured and frictionally retained in position relative to the couplers and top plate.
  • FIG. 7E shows a detailed view of the static foot peg assembly mount and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A. The static foot peg assembly can be attached to the rear vertical support 162, the assembly comprises a static foot peg mount 166 and one or more static foot pegs 165 coupled to the mount.
  • FIG. 7F shows a detailed view of the rear base plate and associated componentry assembled therewith in accordance with the device of FIG. 7A. The rear base plate is substantially similar to the front base plate as described in FIG. 7C and the related descriptions; but further comprises a wheel assembly including a wheel 180 and a wheel bracket 181.
  • An optional feature for inclusion with any embodiment of the exercise device, a rotating handlebar assembly is described.
  • FIG. 8A shows a rear perspective view of an optional rotating handlebar assembly for incorporating with any of the embodiments herein. The rotating handlebar assembly promotes pivoting of the handlebars about a yaw axis and a roll axis. The rotating handlebar assembly comprises forks 131 and a truss 136 extending between the forks for support. A steering plate 210 is shown attached to the forks via bolts. A linkage and steering base 213 is coupled to the steering plate 210 via a steering knob 212 and bolt associated therewith, and is further adjustable using the steering pin 211 to engage a steering track of the linkage. Handlebar couplers 129 are attached to a top plate, and the top plate is further attached to the linkage and steering base 213 via a fulcrum bolt 214.
  • FIG. 8B shows a side view of the optional rotating handlebar assembly of FIG. 8A. An optional number plate 170 can be attached to the forks 131 for aesthetics. Handlebars 135 are shown engaged with the couplers 129.
  • FIG. 8C shows a front perspective view of an optional rotating handlebar assembly of FIGS. 8(A-B).
  • With the particular embodiments as illustrated above, the exercise device can be utilized outdoors such as at an action sports event, or indoors such as within a gym or workout facility.
  • With reference to the illustrated embodiments, it should be understood that variations in the described features, or those known in the art, may provide alternative embodiments that are deemed to be within the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed.
  • FEATURE DESCRIPTION
    exercise device (100a; 100b; 100c)
    rigid tubular frame (110)
    vertical portion (111)
    horizontal portion (112)
    diagonal portion (113)
    handlebar-assembly mount (114)
    first vertical aperture group (115)
    front base plate (116)
    gripping knobs (117)
    corner portion (118)
    standing brace (120a; 120b; 120c; 120d)
    pin (121)
    brace slot (122)
    bolt (123)
    adjuster (124)
    hitch mount (125)
    hitch tube (126)
    hitch bolt (127)
    hitch slot (128)
    handlebar coupler (129)
    handlebar assembly (130)
    fork (131)
    pivot aperture (132)
    pivot bolt (133)
    brace bolt (134)
    handlebar (135)
    truss (136)
    top plate (137)
    brace (138)
    pivot (139)
    dynamic foot peg assembly (140)
    dynamic foot pegs (141a; 141b)
    elongated structural elements (142a; 142b)
    shock absorber (150)
    first shock mount (151)
    seat assembly (160)
    seat (161)
    vertical support element (162)
    orthogonal tube (163)
    second vertical aperture group (164)
    static foot peg assembly (165a; 165b)
    static foot peg assembly mount (166)
    rear base plate (167)
    number plate (170)
    handle grip (175)
    wheel (180)
    wheel bracket (181)
    shock absorber mounting plate (190)
    knob (191)
    shock absorber mounting track (192)
    pedal assembly (200)
    pedal (201)
    pedal assembly guard (202)
    steering plate (210)
    steering pin (211)
    steering knob (212)
    steering base (213)
    fulcrum bolt (214)

Claims (14)

  1. 1. An exercise device for action sports training, comprising:
    a rigid tubular frame having a front side and a rear side;
    a seat assembly;
    a handlebar assembly; and
    a shock absorber;
    the seat assembly being coupled to the rigid tubular frame at the rear side thereof;
    the handlebar assembly being coupled to the rigid tubular frame at a pivot, the pivot being disposed between the front side and the rear side of the rigid tubular frame and configured to promote pivoting movement of the handlebar assembly about the rigid tubular frame;
    the shock absorber having a first mount and a second mount, the second mount being disposed opposite of the first mount, the first mount being coupled to the rigid tubular frame near the front side thereof, and the second mount being coupled to the handlebar assembly;
    wherein the exercise device is configured to provide resistive training during translation of the handlebar assembly in each of a forward and backward direction.
  2. 2. The exercise device of claim 1, further comprising an adjustable hitch adapter for engaging the device with a hitch receiver of a motorized vehicle.
  3. 3. The exercise device of claim 1, comprising one or more standing braces for maintaining the device in an upright position on a flat surface.
  4. 4. The exercise device of claim 3, wherein one or more of the standing braces are adjustable about a plurality of angles within a horizontal base plane.
  5. 5. The exercise device of claim 1, further comprising a dynamic foot peg assembly extending outwardly from the bottom portion of the handlebar assembly, the dynamic foot peg assembly comprising one or more elongated structural elements, and a pair of opposing foot pegs, wherein the foot peg assembly is configured to extend from the handlebar assembly at a fixed angle therebetween, and wherein the foot peg assembly is configured to communicate resistance of the shock absorber.
  6. 6. The exercise device of claim 1, further comprising a static foot peg assembly, the static foot peg assembly being configured to adjustably engage with a vertical structural element extending between the seat assembly and one or more rear standing braces.
  7. 7. The exercise device of claim 1, wherein the first mounting point of the shock absorber comprises an adjustable shock mount configured for positioning vertically about a vertical portion of the rigid frame.
  8. 8. The exercise device of claim 1, further comprising a wheel assembly for portability; said wheel assembly comprising a wheel coupled to the device at a wheel bracket.
  9. 9. The exercise device of claim 1, the handlebar assembly comprising pivoting handlebars configured to pivot the handlebars about a yaw axis and a roll axis.
  10. 10. The exercise device of claim 1, comprising a handlebar pivot lockout configured to engage a pin extending through the forks for locking the handlebar assembly in a fixed position relative to the pivot.
  11. 11. The exercise device of claim 1, comprising a handlebar pivot lockout configured to engage a pin extending through the forks for locking the handlebar assembly in a fixed position relative to the pivot.
  12. 12. The exercise device of claim 1, further comprising a resistive pedal assembly.
  13. 13. The exercise device of claim 12, wherein said resistive pedal assembly is removeably attached to the frame of the device.
  14. 14. The exercise device of claim 1, wherein said shock absorber is an adjustable shock absorber for providing adjustable resistance about the pivoting handlebar assembly.
US14459279 2013-08-13 2014-08-13 Exercise device for action sports training Abandoned US20150051054A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

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US14459279 US20150051054A1 (en) 2013-08-13 2014-08-13 Exercise device for action sports training

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US14459279 US20150051054A1 (en) 2013-08-13 2014-08-13 Exercise device for action sports training

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP3263192A1 (en) * 2016-07-01 2018-01-03 Technogym S.p.A. Support frame for a gymnastic apparatus, particularly for a cycling simulation device

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