US20150047138A1 - Disposable premoistened multilayered cleaning wipe - Google Patents

Disposable premoistened multilayered cleaning wipe Download PDF

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US20150047138A1
US20150047138A1 US13/967,752 US201313967752A US2015047138A1 US 20150047138 A1 US20150047138 A1 US 20150047138A1 US 201313967752 A US201313967752 A US 201313967752A US 2015047138 A1 US2015047138 A1 US 2015047138A1
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Prior art keywords
wipe
layer
edges
core
pair
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Abandoned
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US13/967,752
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Jeanne Marie Hughes
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Procter and Gamble Co
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Procter and Gamble Co
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Priority to US13/967,752 priority Critical patent/US20150047138A1/en
Assigned to PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE reassignment PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ROSELLE, BRIAN JOSEPH, GUMMOW, JONATHAN DAVID, SEISER, JENNIFER KAY
Publication of US20150047138A1 publication Critical patent/US20150047138A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47LDOMESTIC WASHING OR CLEANING; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47L13/00Implements for cleaning floors, carpets, furniture, walls, or wall coverings
    • A47L13/10Scrubbing; Scouring; Cleaning; Polishing
    • A47L13/16Cloths; Pads; Sponges
    • A47L13/17Cloths; Pads; Sponges containing cleaning agents
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C11ANIMAL OR VEGETABLE OILS, FATS, FATTY SUBSTANCES OR WAXES; FATTY ACIDS THEREFROM; DETERGENTS; CANDLES
    • C11DDETERGENT COMPOSITIONS; USE OF SINGLE SUBSTANCES AS DETERGENTS; SOAP OR SOAP-MAKING; RESIN SOAPS; RECOVERY OF GLYCEROL
    • C11D17/00Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties
    • C11D17/04Detergent materials characterised by their shape or physical properties combined with or containing other objects
    • C11D17/049Cleaning or scouring pads; Wipes

Abstract

A premoistened cleaning wipe having a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis intersecting and orthogonal to the longitudinal axis and in plane with the wipe the longitudinal axis being longer than the transverse axis, the wipe having: a liquid permeable first layer joined in facing relationship to a liquid permeable second layer; a free liquid cleaning composition having between about 0.001% to about 10% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant, the cleaning composition releasably absorbed in the wipe; and a plurality of edges, the wipe extending to pairs the edges; wherein a least one intersection between a pair of the edges has an arced portion and at least one intersection between a pair of the edges has an angled portion.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • Disposable premoistened multilayered cleaning wipes.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • People come into contact with many surfaces in their normal everyday lives. The propensity for surfaces to harbor viruses, bacteria, dust, dander, soil, grease, hair, and like materials is well known. As people come into contact with surfaces as they move about, they are exposed to these nefarious materials. Exposure to viruses and bacteria can result in illness. Exposure to dust, dander, and pet hair can cause respiratory distress. Exposure to soil and grease can result in stained clothing. As such, devices for cleaning surfaces are desirable.
  • One common device provided to consumers for cleaning surfaces is a premoistened rectangular cleaning wipe. Such wipes are commonly single layers of a nonwoven fibrous material, the fibrous material being pulp or polyolefin material. One limitation to such simple common wipes is that the wipe has only one kind of texture and that texture is presumed by marketers to be efficacious on all kinds of surfaces for all kinds of materials deposited on such surfaces.
  • In reality, the texture of surfaces and the types of materials deposited on such surfaces vary widely. For instance, the texture of the surface of a sofa is vastly different from a countertop surface. The type of cleaning needed to clean the crumbs and hair from a textile at the crease between decorative cording on a sofa and the body of a cushion is wildly different from the type of cleaning needed to clean a hard countertop surface or the body of a textile cushion. Similarly, hair and dust have properties that are largely different from soil.
  • Many surfaces throughout the consumer's home have complex shapes. For example, many sofa designs include decorative cording around the boundary of cushions. The cording can have a generally circular cross section and be attached to the relatively flat surface of a sofa cushion or at the intersection between two panels of fabric that form a sofa cushion. When tube-like cording is attached to a flat surface, there is a crease between the flat surface and the cording. Crumbs, dust, dander, paste, hairs, and the like can accumulate in this crease and be unsightly.
  • In view of the wide variety of surfaces that need cleaning and the complex shapes that need to be cleaned, it is desirable to provide a wipe having particular features that are adapted to clean a wide variety of surfaces and detritus. With these needs in mind, there is a continuing unaddressed need for a disposable premoistened multilayered cleaning wipe having features adapted to clean a wide variety of surfaces and shapes of surfaces.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A premoistened cleaning wipe having a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis intersecting and orthogonal to the longitudinal axis and in plane with the wipe, the longitudinal axis being longer than the transverse axis, the wipe comprising: a liquid permeable first layer joined in facing relationship to a liquid permeable second layer; a free liquid cleaning composition comprising between about 0.001% to about 10% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant, the cleaning composition releasably absorbed in the wipe; and a plurality of edges, the wipe extending to pairs of the edges; wherein a least one intersection between a pair of the edges comprises an arced portion and at least one intersection between a pair of the edges comprises an angled portion.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a wipe viewed in the direction of the longitudinal axis, an intersection between a pair of edges comprising an arced portion and an intersection between a pair of edges comprising an angled portion.
  • FIG. 2 is a plan view of a wipe.
  • FIG. 3 is a plan view of a wipe in which all but one of the intersections between a pair of edges comprises an angled portion.
  • FIG. 4 is a plan view of a wipe in which all but one of the intersections between a pair of edges comprises an arced portion.
  • FIG. 5 is a plan view of a wipe that is symmetric about the longitudinal axis.
  • FIG. 6 is a plan view of a wipe that is symmetric about the transverse axis.
  • FIG. 7 is a plan view of a wipe having an even number of edges, symmetric about both the longitudinal axis and the transverse axis.
  • FIG. 8 is a side view of a wipe comprising a core, viewed in the direction of the longitudinal axis, an intersection between a pair of edges comprising an arced portion and an intersection between a pair of edges comprising an angled portion.
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view of a first layer.
  • FIG. 10A is profile view of a portion of an abrasive layer.
  • FIG. 10B is perspective view of a portion of an abrasive layer.
  • FIG. 11 is a plan view of a wipe.
  • FIG. 12 is cross sectional view of a wipe cut along the longitudinal axis.
  • FIG. 13 is a cross sectional view of a wipe taken across the longitudinal axis.
  • FIG. 14 is a side view of a wipe taken in line with the longitudinal axis.
  • FIG. 15 is a plan view of a wipe having channels.
  • FIG. 16 is a cross sectional view of the wipe shown in FIG. 15 marked 16-16′.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • As used herein, the term “joined” refers to the condition where a first member is attached, or connected, to a second member either directly; or indirectly, where the first member is attached, or connected, to an intermediate member which in turn is attached, or connected, to the second member either directly; or indirectly.
  • Cleaning wipes can be practical for consumers to use for cleaning a variety of surfaces found throughout the household. For example, it can be desirable for a consumer to use a wipe to clean counter-top surfaces, upholstery, curtains, furniture surfaces, and the like. In use, the consumer can grasp the wipe and wipe the surface. If the wipe contains a cleaning composition, the process of wiping the surface can expel at least some of the cleaning composition onto the surface. The cleaning composition can contain substances, including surfactants, to help remove soil from the surface being cleaned. As the consumer rubs the wipe against the surface to be cleaned, the wipe can lift soil from the surface being cleaned and contain the soil in the core of the wipe or on the surface of the wipe.
  • A wipe 10 is shown in FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 1, the wipe 10 can comprise a liquid permeable first layer 20 joined to a liquid permeable second layer 30. The first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be in a facing relationship with one another. The first layer 20 and second layer 30 can individually be generally planar webs of material or materials, each having a first surface 21 and second surface 22 opposing the first surface. The wipe 10 can have a first side 330 and an opposing second side 340. A cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed into one or more of the first layer 20, second layer 30, and a core, if present. A cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed into the interstitial spaces between fibers of one or more of the first layer 20, second layer 30, and a core, if present. A cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed into the interstitial spaces between fibers of a material selected from the group consisting of the first layer 20, second layer 30, and the core, and combinations thereof.
  • FIG. 2 is a top view of a wipe 10. As shown in FIG. 2, the wipe 10 can have a longitudinal axis L and a transverse axis T intersecting and orthogonal to the longitudinal axis L and in plane with the wipe 10. The longitudinal axis L can be longer than the transverse axis T. In other words, the length of the wipe 10 measured along the longitudinal axis L can be longer than the width of the wipe 10 measured along the transverse axis T. The wipe 10 can extend between transverse edges 320 that are disposed across the transverse axis T.
  • The wipe 10 can comprise a plurality of edges 15 to which the wipe 10 extends. Said otherwise, the extent of the wipe 10 in the plane defined by the longitudinal axis L and the transverse axis T can be defined by the edges 15. That is, the wipe 10 can extend to pairs of the edges 15. Pairs of edges 15 intersect at unique intersections 17 spread out on the wipe 10.
  • In use, the wipe 10 can be held generally flat in the consumer's hand and wiped against a relatively flat surface in any direction. To provide for the ability to clean creases between a variety of fabrics and surfaces, different types of intersections 17 can be provided on the wipe. For fragile fabrics such as fabric formed from knitted yarn, it may be desirable to use a soft rounded intersection 17 to gently clean creases so as to minimize damage to the fibrous structure of the fabric. For more sturdy surfaces, such a shoes and backpacks, it may be desirable to have a more sharp edged cleaning implement that can deeply and aggressively penetrate a crease to dislodge all the detritus contained therein. It is desired that a single wipe be capable of cleaning many different kinds of surfaces and fabric.
  • The intersections 17 of the edges 15 are thought to be particularly suitable for cleaning creases. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that the intersections 17 of the edges 15 might be stiffer than edges 15 themselves since along an edge 15 there is only one structural element resisting bending whereas at the intersection 17 there are two structural elements that resist bending. Further, when force is applied by the consumer to the intersection 17 as she penetrates a crease, the applied stress is greater than if she would penetrate the crease with an entire edge 15 of the wipe 10, assuming that she can even fit an entire edge 15 in the crease. As such, the corners at the intersections, whether sharp or rounded, are thought to provide for enhanced utility in cleaning creases as compared to straight edges, with each particular shape particularly suited for cleaning different contours of surfaces. Further, having different resistances to bending between these two parts of the wipe 10 can be beneficial in that the stiffer part can be more suitable for cleaning one type of feature, such as the crease between cording and fabric on a sofa, and the more flexible part can be used to clean the intersection between two materials or to lightly brush a delicate surface, such as the matting of a painting.
  • To provide for the ability to clean a variety of creases in and on different surfaces, it is desirable to provide in the wipe 10 corners having different contours. At least one intersection 17 between a pair of edges 15 can comprise an arced portion 18 and at least one intersection 17 between a pair of edges 15 can comprise an angled portion 19. An angled portion 19 is defined by the shape of two rays that intersect at a vertex or any transition between two rays that occurs over a path length between the rays of less than 4 mm. An arced portion 18 is a curved shape connecting two rays that occurs over a path length between the rays of greater than or equal to 4 mm. An intersection 17 may comprise a plurality of arced portions 18, for example as if the intersection 17 has one part that is a hyperbolic curve and another part is a circular curve.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the wipe 10 can have a first quadrant 25. The wipe 10 can have a second quadrant 22 on the opposite side of the longitudinal axis L as compared to the first quadrant 25 and on the same side of the transverse axis T as the first quadrant. The wipe can have a third quadrant 23 on the same side of the longitudinal axis L as the first quadrant but on the opposite side of the transverse axis T as compared to the first quadrant 25. The wipe can have a fourth quadrant 24 on the same said of the longitudinal axis L as the second quadrant 22 but on the opposite side of the transverse axis T as compared to the third quadrant 23.
  • The intersection 17 can comprise a circular arced portion 18 as shown in the first quadrant 25 of the wipe 10 illustrated in FIG. 2. The intersection 17 can comprise an arced portion 18 having varying curvature as shown in the fourth quadrant 24 of the wipe 10 illustrated in FIG. 2. A variety of curved shapes are contemplated with respect to shape or shapes of the intersections 17 that comprise an arced portion 18.
  • Pairs of edges 15 can intersect such that two intersections 17 between pairs of edges 15 each comprise an arced portion 18 and are on opposing sides of the longitudinal axis L and opposing sides of the transverse axis T, as shown in FIG. 2.
  • Pairs of edges 15 can intersect such that two intersections 17 between pairs of edges 15 each comprise an arced portion 18. Pairs of edges 15 can intersect such intersections 17 on opposing sides of the longitudinal axis L and opposing sides of the transverse axis T, each comprising an arced portion 18, and pairs of edges 15 can intersect such intersections 17 on opposing sides of the longitudinal axis L and opposing sides of the transverse axis T, each comprising an angled portion 19, as shown in FIG. 2. Various arrangements of intersections 17 having an arced portion 18 and an angled portion 19 are thought provide the use with the ability to employ both kinds of such intersections 17 for cleaning without having to reposition the wipe 10 in her hand.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the wipe 10 can extend to a pair of transverse edges 320 spaced apart from the longitudinal axis L and a pair of longitudinal edges 32 spaced apart from the transverse axis T. Intersections 17 between two pairs of the edges 15 can comprise an arced portion 18.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, the transverse edges 320 can be non-linear transverse edges 320. The transverse edges 320 can be curved, straight, or a combination of straight and curved. Similarly, the longitudinal edges 32 can be curved edges, straight edges, or a combination of straight edges and curved edges. Without being bound by theory non-linear transverse edges 320 may provide for improved comfort to the user's hand when she uses the wipe 10 and may also provide for the ability to clean a variety of complex shapes that might occur at the intersection between two materials.
  • Depending on the desired functionality that is to be imparted to the wipe 10, the number of intersections 17 that comprise an arced portion 18 and the number of intersections 17 that comprise an angled portion 19 can be varied. An embodiment in which all but one of the intersections 17 comprise an angled portion 19 is shown in FIG. 3. Such an embodiment might be practical if the user of the wipe 10 desires to mostly use the wipe to clean creases in household articles yet still have an intersection 17 comprising an arced portion 18 to clean intersections between two materials.
  • An embodiment in which all but one of the intersections 17 comprise an arced portion 18 is shown in FIG. 4. Such an embodiment might be practical if the user of the wipe 10 desires to mostly use the wipe to clean intersections of materials in household articles yet still have an intersection 17 comprising an angled portion 19 to clean creases. The pairs of the edges 15 can meet at intersections 17 and there can be more intersections 17 comprising an arced portion 18 than intersections 17 that comprise an angled portion 19.
  • A variety of shapes are contemplated for the wipe 10. The wipe 10 can have 3 or more edges. The wipe 10 can have four edges so as to provide for a generally rectangular or square shape. The wipe 10 can be symmetric about the longitudinal axis L. Without being bound by theory, a symmetric wipe 10 might be practical to simplify manufacturing of the wipe 10 and to provide for a more intuitive use by the consumer. The wipe 10 can comprise an even number of edges 15.
  • The wipe 10 can be symmetric about the longitudinal axis L, as shown in FIG. 5. Symmetry about the longitudinal axis L is thought to provide ease of manufacturing and for helping the user understand and immediately identify that different edges of the wipe 10 are designed to have different cleaning utility. Similarly, the wipe 10 can be symmetric about the transverse axis T for the same reasons, as shown in FIG. 6.
  • The wipe 10 can be symmetric about the longitudinal axis L and transverse axis T, as shown in FIG. 7. Such a wipe 10 can provide for multiple edges 15 for the consumer to use as she cleans. Further, symmetry in both directions can signal the user that the overall orientation of the wipe 10 is not important in so far as the portion the wipe 10 interior to the edges 15 that is used to clean.
  • A core 40 can be between the first layer 20 and the second layer 30, as shown in FIG. 8. FIG. 8 is a view of the wipe 10 looking along the longitudinal axis L. The core can be between the liquid permeable first layer 20 and the liquid permeable second layer at an intersection 17 between a pair of the edges 15 that comprises an angled portion 19. Within the core 40, a cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed.
  • First Layer
  • The first layer 20 can be liquid permeable. That is, the first layer 20 can provide for thru-transport of cleaning composition from a core 40 to the first surface 21 of the first layer 20. Once the cleaning composition is on the first surface 21 of the first layer 20 or in the first layer 20, the cleaning composition can be delivered to the surface being cleaned.
  • The first layer 20 can be superimposed over the core 40. In one embodiment, the first layer 20 is associated with the core 40 by spray-gluing the first layer 20 to the surface of the core 40. In another embodiment, the core 40 can be loosely enrobed by the first layer 20 and second layer 30 without any points of attachment to one or both of the first layer 20 and second layer 30. The first layer 20 can be joined to the core 40 using any technique known in the art for joining webs of material, including, but not limited to, ultrasonic bonding and thermal bonding. It can be practical to provide a thermally embossed pattern on the first layer 20 of the wipe 10 to provide for bonding between the first layer 20 and the core 40.
  • The first layer 20 can be a material that is compliant and soft feeling. A suitable first layer 20 can be manufactured from a wide range of materials such as polymeric materials, formed thermoplastic films, apertured plastic films, porous films, aperture formed films, reticulated foams, natural fibers (e.g., wood or cotton fibers), woven and non-woven synthetic fibers (e.g., polyester or polypropylene fibers) or from a combination of natural and synthetic fibers. The first layer 20 can be a nonwoven comprising polyolefin fibers. A soft compliant first layer 20 can provide for a pleasant interface between the wipe 10 and the user's hand during use of the wipe 10.
  • Apertured formed films can be used for the first layer 20 since they are pervious to the cleaning composition and can be non-absorbent and hydrophobic. A surface of a formed film which is in contact with the surface being cleaned can remain relatively dry if the formed film is or is rendered to be hydrophobic. Moreover, apertured formed films are thought to capture and retain lint, fibrous matter such as pet hair, and the like, from the surface being treated, thereby further enhancing the cleaning benefits afforded by the wipe 10. Suitable apertured formed films are described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,929,135, entitled “Absorptive Structure Having Tapered Capillaries”, issued to Thompson on Dec. 30, 1975; U.S. Pat. No. 4,324,246, entitled “Disposable Absorbent Article Having A Stain Resistant Coversheet”, issued to Mullane and Smith on Apr. 13, 1982; U.S. Pat. No. 4,342,314, entitled “Resilient Plastic Web Exhibiting Fiber-Like Properties”, issued to Radel and Thompson on Aug. 3, 1982; and U.S. Pat. No. 4,463,045, entitled “Macroscopically Expanded Three-Dimensional Plastic Web Exhibiting Non-Glossy Visible Surface and Cloth-Like Tactile Impression”, issued to Ahr, Louis, Mullane and Ouellete on Jul. 31, 1984; U.S. Pat. No. 4,637,819 issued to Ouellette, Alcombright & Curro on Jan. 20, 1987; U.S. Pat. No. 4,609,518 issued to Curro, Baird, Gerth, Vernon & Linman on Sep. 2, 1986; U.S. Pat. No. 4,629,642 issued to Kernstock on Dec. 16, 1986; and EPO Pat. No. 0,16,807 of Osborn published Aug. 30, 1989. A suitable apertured formed film can be a 25 gram per square meter polyethylene vacuum formed film sold as product ID PT02 by Clopay.
  • The apertures in such a first layer 20 may be of uniform size or can vary in size, as disclosed in the foregoing published documents, which can be referred to for technical details, manufacturing methods, and the like. Such apertures may also vary in diameter in the manner of so-called “tapered capillaries”. Such formed-film cover-sheets with tapered capillary apertures can be situated over the core 40 such that the smaller end of the capillaries face the core 40 and the larger end of the capillary faces outward. The capillary apertures can provide for transport of the spent cleaning composition from the surface being cleaned to the core 40. Apertures in the formed film first layer 20 can have diameters in the range of from 0.1 mm to 1 mm, or as disclosed in the aforesaid patent references.
  • The first layer 20 may comprise a plurality of first apertures passing through the first layer 20 and a plurality of second apertures passing through first layer 20. The first apertures can be larger than the second apertures. Each of the first apertures can have an open area between about 0.007 mm2 to about 0.8 mm2. Each of the second apertures can have an open area between about 0.8 mm2 and about 12 mm2. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that by providing second apertures of such size that soil that is lifted from the surface being wiped can be transported through the second apertures to the core 40 and be visible on the core 40 when the user inspects the wipe 10 after use. The smaller first apertures can provide for fluid transport through the first layer 20 both when the cleaning composition is expelled from the wipe 10 and retrieved by the wipe 10 from the surface being cleaned during use. Further, a combination of smaller and larger apertures can be practical for providing for adequate fluid transport through the first layer yet still feel dry to the touch when the user uses her hand to hold the wipe 10 to rub the surface being cleaned.
  • The first layer 20 can be hydrophobic. However, if desired in one embodiment, the outer and/or inner surfaces of the first layer 20 can be made hydrophilic by treatment with a surfactant which is substantially evenly and completely distributed throughout the surface of the first layer 20. This can be accomplished by any of the common techniques well known to those skilled in the art. For example, the surfactant can be applied to the first layer 20 by spraying, by padding, or by the use of transfer rolls. Further, the surfactant can be incorporated into the polymeric materials of a formed film first layer 20. Such methods are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,009,653.
  • The first layer 20 can be a laminate of an apertured formed film as described previously and a nonwoven. The nonwoven can be made of one or more types of fibers such as those selected from the group consisting of polyester, polyethylene, polypropylene, bi-component fibers, wood, cotton, rayon, and combinations thereof. The nonwoven can be formed by known nonwoven extrusion processes such as those selected from the group consisting of melt blowing, spunbonding, carding, and combinations thereof. The nonwoven can be extensible, elastic, or inelastic. The nonwoven web can comprise polyolefin fibers. The polyolefin fibers can be selected from the group consisting of polypropylene, polyethylene, ethylene copolymers, propylene copolymers, and butane copolymers. The nonwoven can be a 28 gram per square meter 50/50 polyethylene sheath/polypropylene core bi-component fiber. The nonwoven can be a laminate of a plurality of nonwoven webs. For instance, the nonwoven can comprise a first layer of spunbonded polypropylene having a basis weight from about 6.7 grams per square meter to about 271 grams per square meter, a layer of melt blown polypropylene having a basis weight from about 6.7 to about 271 grams per square meter, a layer of melt blown polypropylene having a basis weight from about 6.7 grams per square meter to about 136 grams per square meter, and a second layer of spunbonded polypropylene having a basis weight from about 6.7 grams per square meter to about 271 grams per square meter. The nonwoven can be a spunbonded nonwoven or a melt blown nonwoven having a basis weight from about 6.7 grams per square meter to about 339 grams per square meter. The nonwoven can be a 28 gram per square meter 50/50 polyethylene sheath/polypropylene core bi-component fiber. The nonwoven fibers can be joined by bonding to form a coherent web structure. The bonding can be selected from the group consisting of chemical bonding, thermal bonding, point calendaring, hydroentangling, and needle punching.
  • The nonwoven can be joined to an apertured formed film using techniques known in the art including melt bonding, chemical bonding, adhesive bonding, ultrasonic bonding, and the like.
  • A laminate of a nonwoven and apertured formed film can be formed as described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,628,097, issued to Benson and Curro, on May 13, 1997, to form the first layer 20. For such a laminate structure, the first layer 20 may comprise a plurality of first apertures 200 passing through the first layer 20 (i.e. both the apertured formed film 41 and nonwoven 42) and a plurality of second apertures 210 passing through the apertured formed film 41 but not the nonwoven 42, as shown in FIG. 9, which is an embodiment of a first layer 20 of the wipe 10. That is, the nonwoven 42 can be free from the second apertures 210. The first apertures 200 can be larger than the second apertures. Each of the second apertures 210 can have an open area between about 0.007 mm2 to about 0.8 mm2. Each of the first apertures 200 can have an open area between about 0.8 mm2 and about 12 mm2. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that by providing first apertures 200 of such size that soil that is lifted from the surface being wiped can be transported through the first apertures 200 to the core 40 and be visible on the core 40 when the user inspects the wipe after use. The second apertures 210, which can be smaller than the first apertures 200, can provide for fluid transport through the first layer 20 both when the cleaning composition is expelled from the wipe 10 and retrieved by the wipe 10 during use. Further, a combination of smaller and larger apertures can be practical for providing for adequate fluid transport through the first layer yet still feel dry to the touch when the user uses her hand to rub the surface being cleaned with the wipe 10. The first apertures 200 can be sized and dimensioned such that a user is able to view the core 40 through such apertures.
  • The first layer 20 can comprise an apertured film. For instance, the first layer 20 can be a 25 gram per square meter polyethylene vacuum formed film sold as product ID PT02 by Clopay. The first layer 20 can comprise a laminate of a film and a nonwoven having apertures through the laminate. The first layer 20 can comprise a laminate of an apertured film and a nonwoven. The first layer 20 can comprise a laminate of an apertured film having first apertures 200 and a nonwoven, the apertured film and nonwoven both having first apertures 200 there through. The first layer 20 can comprise a fibrous material, such as a fibrous nonwoven comprising polyolefin fibers. The first layer 20 can be an apertured fibrous material, such as an apertured fibrous nonwoven comprising polyolefin fibers.
  • The first layer 20 can be a spunbond nonwoven. The spunbond nonwoven can be apertured. The apertures can have an open area greater than about 0.1 mm2. The fibers of the spunbond nonwoven can be bicomponent continuous fibers. The fibers of the spunbond can be blended continuous fibers. The fibers can be extruded and bonded in a single step. For bicomponent spunbond fibers, the components of the fiber can have two different melting points. For blended fibers, the component fibers of the blend can have two different melting points. The spunbond nonwoven can have a basis weight of between about 15 grams per square meter to about 80 grams per square meter.
  • The first layer 20 can be a coherent extensible nonwoven that is a thermally bonded spun bond nonwoven web of randomly arranged substantially continuous fibers. The spunbond nonwoven can be manufactured using a conventional spunbond process. Molten polymer is extruded in continuous filaments that are subsequently quenched, attenuated by a high velocity fluid, and collected in a random arrangement on a collecting surface. After collection of the fibers, thermal, chemical, or mechanical bonding can be performed on the fiber to form the spun bond nonwoven. The first layer can be a spunbond nonwoven referred to as SOFSPAN 200 available from Fiberweb.
  • Core
  • The core 40 can be a material that can releasably absorb a cleaning composition. In practice, the voids within the core 40 can act as a reservoir for the cleaning composition, the cleaning composition being stored within the capillaries within the core 40. The core 40 can be a fibrous material in which the capillaries are provided by the interstitial spaces between the fibers of the core 40. The core 40 can be an open celled foam in which the capillaries are provided by the interconnected pores within the foam. The core 40 can comprise a nonwoven. An economical core 40 can be provided by a nonwoven comprising polyolefin fibers.
  • The core 40 can comprise a layer of cellulosic material. The core can comprise an 80 gram per square meter nonwoven of bicomponent fibers, the bicomponent fibers comprising a polyethylene sheath and a polyethylene terephthalate core having a loft of about 2.5 mm. The bicomponent fibers can provide for structural integrity of the core 40 when bonded. Having an appreciable weight fraction of the core 40 made of cellulose can be economical and technically sound since cellulose is known to highly absorbent.
  • The core 40 can comprise a multi bonded air-laid core. The core 40 can comprise a multi bonded air-laid core comprising about 15% by weight bicomponent fibers having a polyethylene sheath and polyethylene terephthalate core, about 2.5% by weight latex, about 82% by weight pulp, and a basis weight of about 135 grams per square meter. The bicomponent fibers can provide for structural stability and rigidity of the core 40 and the latex can aid in bonding the different components of the core 40 together.
  • The core 40 can comprise a thermally bonded air-laid core. The core 40 can comprise a thermally bonded air-laid core comprising about 18% by weight bicomponent fibers having a polyethylene sheath and polypropylene core and about 82% pulp.
  • The core 40 can comprise a laminate of an 80 gram per square meter nonwoven of bicomponent fibers, the bicomponent fibers comprising a polyethylene sheath and a polyethylene terephthalate core having a loft of about 2.5 mm and two layers of a multi bonded air-laid core comprising about 15% by weight bicomponent fibers having a polyethylene sheath and polyethylene terephthalate core, about 2.5% by weight latex, about 82% by weight pulp, and a basis weight of about 135 grams per square meter. The core 40 can be a single layer thermally bonded pulp core that is 90% by weight pulp and 10% by weight bicomponent polyethylene/polypropylene fibers.
  • The core 40 can comprise open celled foam. For instance, the core 40 can comprise open celled foam formed from a high internal phase emulsion, such as the open celled foam described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,387,207, issued to Dyer, DesMarais, LaVon, Stone, Taylor, and Young, on Feb. 7, 1995. Open celled foams can be desirable since they can provide for a large storage volume of cleaning composition relative to the mass of the core 40.
  • The core 40 can comprise a material selected from the group consisting of polyolefin fibers, cellulose fibers, rayon, open celled foam, and combinations thereof.
  • The functions of the core 40, if present, are to store a cleaning composition prior to use, dispense cleaning composition when the wipe 10 is used to clean a surface, reabsorb spent cleaning composition after cleaning, and retain soil that has been removed by the cleaning effort. The core can have a storage volume of about 19 ml. The core can have a storage volume of between about 5 mL and about 30 mL in an uncompressed state. The core can have a storage volume of between about 12 mL and about 25 mL in an uncompressed state. The core can have a storage volume of between about 16 mL and about 25 mL in an uncompressed state.
  • Second Layer
  • The second layer 30 can be liquid permeable. That is, the second layer 30 can provide for thru-transport of liquid cleaning composition from a core 40 to the second surface 22 of the second layer 30. The second layer 30 can be superimposed under the core 40 so that the core 40 is between the first layer 20 and second layer 30. In one embodiment, the second layer 30 can be associated with the core 40 by spray-gluing the second layer 30 to the surface of the core 40. In another embodiment, the core 40 is loosely enrobed by the first layer 20 and second layer 30 without any points of attachment. The second layer 30 can be joined to the core 40 using any technique known in the art for joining webs of material, including, but not limited to, ultrasonic bonding and thermal bonding.
  • The second layer 30 can be a material that is compliant and soft feeling. The second layer 30 can be any of the materials as described previously as being suitable for the first layer 30. It can also be practical for the second layer 30 to be an abrasive layer.
  • Abrasive Layer
  • The wipe 10 can have an abrasive layer. The abrasive layer of the wipe 10 can be the second layer 30 of the wipe 10. Arranged as such, the first layer 20 can provide for a soft compliant wiping surface and the abrasive layer can be on the side of the core 40 opposite the first layer 20. In a simple construction, the wipe 10 can have 3 layers, a first layer 20, an abrasive layer being the second layer 30, and a core 40 disposed between the abrasive layer and first layer 20.
  • It is contemplated that the second layer 30 can be positioned such that the second layer 30 is between the abrasive layer and the core 40. For instance, as shown in FIG. 1, the second layer 30 can be the abrasive layer of the wipe 10. If the abrasive layer is the second layer 30, other layers of material may be between the abrasive layer and core 40, but are not necessarily needed.
  • If other layers are provided between the abrasive layer and the core 40, such other layers can have other functional attributes and one or more of those layers can be considered to be the second layer 30 as described herein.
  • The abrasive layer can be liquid permeable. That is, the abrasive layer can provide for thru-transport of liquid from a core 40 from the first surface 21 to the second surface 22 of the abrasive layer. The abrasive layer can be superimposed over the core 40. In one embodiment, the abrasive layer is associated with the core 40 by spray-gluing the abrasive layer to the surface of the core 40. In another embodiment, the core 40 is loosely enrobed by the first layer 20 and abrasive layer without any points of attachment. The abrasive layer can be bonded to the core 40 using any technique known in the art for joining webs of material, including, but not limited to, ultrasonic bonding and thermal bonding.
  • A suitable abrasive layer can be manufactured from a wide range of materials such as polymeric materials, formed thermoplastic films, apertured plastic films, porous films, aperture formed films, reticulated foams, natural fibers (e.g., wood or cotton fibers), woven and non-woven synthetic fibers (e.g., polyester or polypropylene fibers) or from a combination of natural and synthetic fibers.
  • The abrasive layer can be a material that provides an abrasive surface of the wipe 10. In use, an abrasive layer that is rough can help to dislodge soil from the surface being cleaned and can help pick up loose fibers such as dust, lint, dander, pet hair, and the like from the surface being cleaned. Further, an abrasive layer may help fluff up the fibers in textiles that are being cleaned thereby allowing for better application of the cleaning composition to the textile surface being cleaned.
  • The abrasive layer can comprise a net material. The net material can be a net comprised of at least two sets of strands wherein each set of strands crosses and interconnects another set of strands at a substantially fixed angle wherein strands in each set extend along a respective direction and are in substantially co-planar, spaced-apart relationship. The net material can be polypropylene or other suitably durable polyolefin material. The abrasive layer can be a material such as that sold under the trade name DELNET, by Delstar Technologies, Inc., Middletown, Del.
  • The abrasive layer can comprise a composite material 99 such as any of the materials described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,917,985 issued to Dorsey et al. on Apr. 5, 2011. For instance, as shown in FIGS. 10A and 10B, the abrasive layer 50 can comprise a net material 100 comprising at least two sets of strands 110 wherein each set of strands 110 crosses and interconnects another set of strands 110 at a substantially fixed angle wherein strands 110 in each set of strands 110 extend along a respective direction and are in substantially co-planar, spaced-apart relationship that is bonded to a substrate 120 wherein a plurality of the strands 110 are broken forming raised whiskers 130 that extend away from the substrate 120, as shown in FIGS. 10A and 10B. The abrasive layer 50 can be positioned to form the wipe 10 such that the whiskers 130 extend away from the core 40. That is, the second side of the wipe 10 can have whiskers 130. As the wipe 10 can be constructed, the substrate 120 can be between the net material 100 and the core 40. Together, the net material 100 and substrate 120 can form an outer layer of the wipe 10 that is the second side of the wipe 10.
  • The net material 100 can be a 51 grams per square meter polypropylene net (style number RO412-10PR) made by Delstar Technologies, Inc., Middletown, Del., and sold under the trade name DELNET. The net material 100 can be polypropylene net (style number RC0707-24P) made by Delstar Technologies, Inc., Middletown, Del., and sold under the trade name DELNET.
  • The net material can have 40 strands per inch in the machine direction and 13 strands per inch in the cross direction that are bonded to one another, together forming the two sets of strands 110. The net material can be polypropylene fine square structure net referred to as PF40 and sold by Smith and Nephew Extruded Films, East Yorkshire, England. The net material 100 can be thermally bonded to one or more layers of a substrate 120 to form composite 99.
  • The substrate 120 can be a nonwoven or woven material. The substrate can be one or more layers of 60 grams per square meter 50% polypropylene 50% rayon spun laced nonwoven fabric. The substrate 120 can be a 60 gram per square meter polypropylene polyethylene copolymer. The substrate 120 can be SOFSPAN 120, available from Fiberweb. The composite 99 can be stressed to break a plurality of the strands 110 to form the whiskers 130. The stress can be provided, for instance, by a ring rolling process as described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,917,985 issued to Dorsey et al. on Apr. 5, 2011.
  • In one embodiment of the wipe 10, it can be practical for the abrasive layer 50 to be translucent. Such translucency can provide the user the ability to examine the second side of the wipe and observe that a colored second layer 30 is between the abrasive layer 50 and the core 40. A translucent abrasive layer 50 can be provided by an uncolored or lightly colored abrasive layer.
  • Free Liquid Cleaning Composition
  • To aid in cleaning, the wipe 10 can be provided with a free liquid cleaning composition. The free liquid cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed in the core 40. That is, the volume of the free liquid cleaning composition is held within the voids of the core 40 by capillary forces. For example, the free liquid cleaning composition can be held by surface tension within the interstitial spaces between fibers or within the cells of an open celled foam forming the core 40. The free liquid cleaning composition can be expelled from the core 40 by compressing the core 40. The core 40 can reabsorb spent cleaning composition into voids within the core 40 by capillary forces. The capillary forces can act to draw spent cleaning composition through the first layer 20 to the core 40.
  • The free liquid cleaning composition is an unencapsulated liquid cleaning composition. The free liquid cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed in a material selected from the group consisting of first layer 20, second layer 30, core 40, and combinations thereof. The free liquid cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed in constituent fibers of a material selected from the group consisting of first layer 20, second layer 30, core 40, and combinations thereof.
  • One practical formulation of the cleaning composition is set forth in Table 1.
  • TABLE 1
    Cleaning composition formulation.
    Ingredient % Active by Weight Function
    Distilled water Quantity sufficient to Solvent
    balance to 100%
    Sodium lauryl sulfate 0.90 Anionic surfactant
    C12/14 amine oxide 0.30 Cationic surfactant
    Glycol Ether PPh 1.50 Solvent
    Citric Acid 50% Trace as needed to target pH adjustment,
    pH of 7 builder
    Korolone B-119 0.01 Preservative
    Perfume 0.02 Perfume
    Dow Corning DC 2310 0.02 Antifoam
  • The cleaning composition can comprise between about 0.001% to about 10% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant. The cleaning composition can comprise between about 0.1% to about 5% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant. The cleaning composition can comprise between about 0.1% to about 4% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant. The cleaning composition can comprise between about 0.1% to about 3% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant. The cleaning composition can comprise between about 0.1% to about 2% by weight of the liquid cleaning composition of surfactant. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that lower mass fractions of surfactant might result in less observable residual cleaning composition left on a surface after cleaning. Higher mass fractions of surfactant might result in ringing and spotting from a locally heavy application of the cleaning composition to the surface being cleaned.
  • The cleaning composition can comprise 0.001% to 0.1% by weight of an antifoam compound. A non-limiting example of an antifoam compound is Dow Corning DC 2310.
  • The cleaning wipe 10 can comprise between about 5 g to about 40 g of cleaning composition. The cleaning wipe 10 can comprise between about 15 g to about 30 g of cleaning composition.
  • Wipe
  • The wipe 10 as contemplated herein can have two sides, each having a different function. For instance, one side of the wipe can have a soft compliant surface for wiping a surface or fabric to remove light soiling, dust, and lint and the other side can have an abrasive surface that can dislodge agglomerations of soil or alter the surface of a textile so that a cleaning composition can be effectively delivered to and retrieved from the textile.
  • A premoistened wipe 10 having a longitudinal axis L is shown in FIG. 11. The wipe 10 can have a liquid permeable first layer 20 joined to a liquid permeable second layer 30. The first layer 20 and the second layer 30 can be in a facing relationship with one another. By facing relationship, it is meant that the two components rest generally flat relative to one another so that one planar surface of one component faces a planar surface of the other component, like a floor mat rests on the floor. Two components can be in a facing relationship yet still have other components positioned between the two components that are in a facing relationship, for instance like a sandwich that has a slice cheese positioned between two slices of bread that are in a facing relationship.
  • For instance, the wipe 10 can be designed so that the core 40 is absent between the first layer 20 and second layer 30 proximal the transverse edges 320. The first layer 20 and the second layer 30 can be joined directly to one another so that the first layer 20 and second layer 30 are in direct contact with one another.
  • As shown in FIG. 11, the first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be joined to one another along each transverse edge 320. The first layer 20 can be an apertured film, and apertured formed film, a nonwoven, woven material, or a composite material of such constituents.
  • The wipe 10 can have a variety of constructs including any of those discussed previously. In the construction shown in FIG. 1, the first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be joined to one another, for instance by melt bonding, chemical bonding, adhesive bonding, ultrasonic bonding, and the like. The first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be joined to one another along the transverse edges 320. The transverse edges 320 are spaced apart away from the longitudinal axis L. The transverse edges 320 can be straight lines or nonlinear, for instance a decorative scalloped pattern. The first layer 20, second layer 30, and core 40 can be coextensive with one another along the longitudinal axis L, as shown in FIG. 1. The first layer 20, core 40, and second layer 30 can be joined together at the longitudinal ends of the wipe 10, as shown in FIG. 6. In an alternative arrangement, the first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be joined to one another along the transverse edges 320 and along the longitudinal ends to form a pocket in which the core 40 is positioned. In such an arrangement, the first layer 20 and second layer 30 can be longitudinally more extensive than the core 40 so that at the longitudinal ends of the wipe 10, the core 40 is not between the first layer 20 and second layer 30. That is, the longitudinal ends/longitudinal edge bonds of the wipe 10 can be free of material from the core 40. The first layer 20 and second layer 30 can extend longitudinally beyond the core 40 and extend further away from the longitudinal axis L than the core 40, thereby forming a pouch within which the core 40 is positioned. Arranged as such, the transverse edges 320 can be free of material from the core 40.
  • As shown in FIG. 12, the wipe 10 can comprise a pair of longitudinal edge bonds 400 disposed at opposing longitudinal edges of the wipe 10 across the longitudinal axis L. Each longitudinal edge bond 400 can comprise material from the first layer 20, the core 40, and the second layer 30. By having longitudinal edge bonds 400 that include the core 40, the longitudinal edge bonds 400 can have a greater resistance to bending as compared to other portions of the wipe 10, for instance as compared to the transverse edge bonds 410. The longitudinal edge bonds 400 can have a greater resistance to bending than the transverse edge bonds 410 of the wipe 10. Having a different resistances to bending between these two parts of the wipe 10 can be beneficial in that the stiffer part can be more suitable for cleaning one type of feature, such as the crease between cording and fabric on a sofa, and the more flexible part can be used to lightly brush a delicate surface, such as the leaf of decorative plant.
  • Resistance to bending can be measured by separating the relevant bond from the wipe and using a two point bending test with the resistance to bending quantified as the force required to deflect the free end of the beam of bond material 10% of the length of the beam of bond material.
  • Similarly, the longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be thicker than the transverse edge bonds 410, the thickness being measured orthogonal to the longitudinal axis L and out of plane with respect to the first layer 20 and the second layer 30. This difference in thickness can provide for the availability of the wipe 10 to fit into different size cracks, crevices, and creases.
  • Stiff longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be useful for cleaning narrow creases and folds in surfaces. If the longitudinal edge bonds 400 are floppy, as might be the case if only the first layer 20 and second layer 30 are bonded to one another to enclose the core 40, it might be difficult for the user to slip the wipe 10 edgewise into a narrow crease, crevice, or fold. It is thought that the stiff longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be useful for cleaning the crease between the sole of a dress shoe and the body of the shoe. The stiff longitudinal edge bonds 400 might also be useful for cleaning the crease between the textile on a sofa and decorative cording that is commonly found around the edges of components of the sofa such as the cushions, arm rests, and decorative contours, where dirt, food crumbs, dander, and pet hair often accumulate. The stiff longitudinal edge bonds 400 might also be useful for cleaning between the keys of a computer keyboard or piano, within the contours of the facings and buttons of electronic devices such as televisions and stereos, around the edges of picture frames, and other hard to reach narrow creases, cracks, and crevices.
  • If desired, the longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be continuous or intermittent. Continuous longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be stiffer than intermittent longitudinal edge bonds.
  • Longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be provided for by thermally bonding the first layer 20, second layer 30, and core 40 to one another. As shown in FIG. 12, the longitudinal edge bonds 400 can have a longitudinal edge bond minimum thickness TB and the wipe 10 can have a maximum thickness TL along the longitudinal axis L. The longitudinal edge bond minimum thickness TB and the maximum thickness TL are both measured orthogonal to the longitudinal axis L and out of plane with respect to the first layer 20 and the second layer 30. The longitudinal edge bond minimum thickness TB can be less than about 80% of the maximum thickness TL. The longitudinal edge bond minimum thickness TB can be less than about 30% of the maximum thickness TL. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that relatively thin longitudinal edge bonds 400 can be beneficial in that they can readily enter narrow creases, cracks, and crevices and be used to clean such features. Further, by having a fatter part of the wipe 10 somewhat away from the thin longitudinal edge bond 400 the wipe can be stuffed to fit into narrow cracks, creases, and crevices, thereby providing for better cleaning, particularly around the exit from such features which may be the most visually apparent portion of the feature.
  • The maximum thickness TL of the wipe 10 can be between about 3 mm to about 10 mm, or about 3 mm to about 8 mm, or 3 mm to about 6 mm. Longitudinal edge bonds 400 that comprise the first layer 20, second layer 30, and core 40 can have a longitudinal edge bond minimum thickness TB between about 0.1 mm and 2.4 mm. The thickness of the longitudinal edge bonds 400 and the transverse edge bonds 410 can be controlled by, for example, altering the pressure and/or heat applied that portion of the wipe 10 to form the respective bond. Higher pressure and greater amounts of heat can be associated with stiffer and or thinner bonds.
  • The second layer 30 can be a layer that is an interior component of the wipe 10, as shown in FIG. 13. As shown in FIG. 13, the core 40 can be positioned between the first layer 20 and the second layer 30. The second layer 30 can be colored, as described previously, for instance by a dye, pigment, ink, or other technique. The second layer 30 can be between the core 40 and the abrasive layer 50. The abrasive layer 50 can form an exterior surface of the wipe 10 that can be used to dislodge soil from the surface being cleaned. The first layer 20, second layer 30, and abrasive layer 50 can be joined to one another along the transverse edges 320, for instance by thermally bonding the three materials together. The second layer 30, if colored, can be visible through the first layer 20 at positions where the first layer 20 and second layer 30 are joined to one another and the core 40 is not between the first layer 20 and second layer 30.
  • As shown in FIG. 14, the abrasive layer 50 can be the second layer 30. That is, the wipe 10 can comprise first layer 20 and a second layer 30 and a core 40 positioned between the first layer 20 and second layer 30, wherein the second layer 30 is an abrasive layer 50. The abrasive layer 50 can be colored. The abrasive layer 50 can be colored with a material selected from the group consisting of dye, pigment, ink, and combinations thereof.
  • The first layer 20 can form a first side 330 of the wipe 10. As shown in FIGS. 15 and 16, the first side 330 of the wipe 10 can comprise one or more channels 250 embossed into the core 40. Embossed channels 250 can increase the stiffness of the wipe 10 and increase the durability of the wipe 10.
  • The embossed channels 250 can provide for pillowed regions on the wipe 10 which impart a three-dimensional surface profile from the generally planar surface of the first layer 20. Channels 250 can be embossed into the wipe 10 in any manner known in the art including embossing, fusion bonding, thermal bonding, and the like for impressing a pattern upon a substrate. Without being bound by theory, it is thought that channels 250 provide for regions of a fibrous substrate that have a higher capillary potential than regions of the fibrous substrate that are devoid of channels 250. The increased capillarity is provided for by the close proximity of the fibers constituting the fibrous substrate. Channels 250 can provide for pathways of enhanced capillarity throughout the wipe 10, thereby promoting widespread distribution of the liquid cleaning composition in the wipe 10.
  • The channels 250 can be continuous channels 250. The channels can be discontinuous channels 250. Discontinuous channels can provide for the pathways of enhanced capillarity in the same manner as continuous channels 250 provided that the spacing between channel segments 26 of the channel 250 are sufficiently small so that fluid can still be conducted from one channel segment to another. For discontinuous channels, the spacing between segments of the channel 250 can be less than the length of the channel segments 26.
  • A channel 250 can extend away from a longitudinal edge 32. The longitudinal edge 32 can extend across the longitudinal axis L. By having the channel 250 extend all the way to the longitudinal edge 32, the liquid cleaning composition might be distributed all the way to the opposing longitudinal edge 32 of the wipe 10, thereby providing enhanced efficacy of the wipe 10. The wipe 10 can comprise a plurality of channels 250 each of which extend away from or proximal to the longitudinal edge 32, with an increased number of channels 250 thought to provide for enhanced distribution of the cleaning composition. One or more channels 250 can extend from one longitudinal edge 32 to an opposing longitudinal edge 32. That is, one or more channels 250 can extend between the longitudinal edges 32. Such an arrangement can be practical for distributing cleaning composition along the entire extent of the wipe 10 in longitudinal direction. Further, channels 250 that are generally oriented in the longitudinal direction can provide for enhanced stiffness of the wipe 10 with respect to bending about the transverse axis T.
  • A channel 250 can be formed in one or more layers of the wipe 10, as shown in FIG. 12. A channel 250 can comprise material from one or more of the first layer 20, the core 40, and the second layer 30. A channel 250 can comprise a material selected from the group consisting of the first layer 20, the core 40, the second layer 30, and combinations thereof. Channels 250 in one or more of the layers comprised of a nonwoven material can be practical. The wipe 10 can comprise intersecting channels 25. Optionally, the channels 250 can be spaced apart from one another.
  • A channel 250 need not extend all the way to the longitudinal edge 32. The wipe 10 can have one or more longitudinal edge bonds 400. A channel 250 can extend away from the edge bond 400. It is contemplated herein that the wipe 10 can comprise a plurality of such channels 250. The channels 250 can extend away from the longitudinal edge bond 400 to an opposing longitudinal edge bond 400. As described and shown herein, the longitudinal edge bond 400 can comprise material selected from the group consisting of the first layer 20, the second layer 30, the core 40, and combinations thereof. The longitudinal edge bond 400 can provide for a dense fibrous structure having high capillarity.
  • Channels 250 can also be beneficial for helping the wipe 10 maintain distribution of the cleaning composition in the wipe 10 when the wipe 10 is packaged such that the package is designed so that one of the longitudinal edges 32 is oriented towards the bottom of the package. In such an arrangement, if the pore sizes of the materials constituting the wipe 10 are so large such that the capillary potential of any part of the wipe 10 is less than the length of the wipe 10 along the longitudinal axis L, the wipe 10 may not be wetted across the entire length along the longitudinal axis L. The channels 250 can help draw up any cleaning composition that is contained in the bottom of the package higher up into the wipe in the longitudinal direction. The depth of the channels 250 can be greater than about 0.25 mm.
  • One or more channels 250, continuous or segmented, can extend between the transverse edge bonds 320. Plurality of channels 25, continuous or segmented, can extend between the transverse edge bonds 320. Such channels 250 can promote distribution of the cleaning composition laterally in the transverse direction and provide for enhanced bending stiffness about the longitudinal axis L. One or more channels 250, continuous or segmented, can extend between the transverse edges 320.
  • The wipe 10 can comprise a first layer 20, second layer 30 in facing relationship with the first layer 20, a plurality of channels 25, and a free liquid cleaning composition releasably absorbed in wipe 10. The cleaning composition can be releasably absorbed in a layer selected from the group consisting of the first layer 20, the second layer 30, core 40, and combinations thereof. A core 40 can be disposed between the first layer 20 and the second layer 30. The channels 250 can extend from the longitudinal edge 32. The channels 250 can extend proximal to the longitudinal edge 32. The channels 250 can extend between the longitudinal edges 32. The channels 250 can extend from the transverse edge 320. The channels 250 can extend proximal to the transverse edge 320. The channels 250 can extend between the transverse edges 320. The channels 250 can extend to within less than about 10 mm of the longitudinal edge 32 and or transverse edge 320.
  • Since the wipe 10 can be designed to use as a hand implement, the wipe 10 can be sized and dimensioned to conform to an adult human hand. For instance, the wipe 10 can have a length, as measured along the longitudinal axis L of between about 8 cm and about 14 cm. The wipe 10 can have a maximum width, as measured orthogonal to the longitudinal axis L and in plane with the first layer 20 of between about 5 cm and about 12 cm.
  • Fluid Expression
  • To provide for different sides of the wipe 10 having different functions, it can be practical to make the first side 330 express liquid cleaning composition from the core 40 at a different amount or rate as compared to the second side 340. For instance, if the first side 330 of the wipe 10 is being used by the consumer for wiping a sofa, the user's objective may be removal of light dust and pet hair. The cleaning capability of the wipe 10 for cleaning light dust and pet hair may not require as much cleaning composition to be effective as compared to a cleaning effort on more heavily soiled surfaces employing the second side 340 of the wipe 10. As such, it may be beneficial to have first side 330 express liquid more slowly or in a lower quantity than the second side 340. The quantity of liquid cleaning composition expressed from a particular side of the wipe 10 can be quantified by the cumulative wipe fluid loss value. To provide for a marked difference in cleaning composition expression, the first side 330 and second side 340 can each have an individual cumulative wipe fluid loss value and the cumulative wipe fluid loss value of the first side 330 and the cumulative wipe fluid loss value of the second side 340 can differ by more than about 10%. Such a difference can provide for a user noticeable difference in cleaning composition expression from the first side 330 as compared to the second side 340. If desired, the cumulative wipe fluid loss value of the second side 340 can be more than about 10% greater than the cumulative wipe fluid loss value of the first side 330. Such an arrangement can be practical if the first side 330 is designed for light cleaning and the second side 340 is designed for more heavy cleaning.
  • The cumulative wipe fluid loss value is measured as follows. A stack of layers of Ahlstrom filter paper grade 989 supplied by Empirical Manufacturing Company (or equivalent) is provided. The number of layers needs to be sufficient so that at least the bottom 3 layers are substantially dry after completion of the test so that the stack of filter paper is not wetting through. A layer is considered substantially dry if the percent change in the mass of the layer in percent post-test as compared to the pre-test dry mass is less than 1%. The dimensions of each layer of filter paper need to extend laterally beyond the wipe being tested by 13 mm. The filter paper is conditioned in advance of the test for at least 12 hrs at a temperature of 21.1° C.+/−1° C. and a relative humidity of 65% and the measurement of the cumulative wipe fluid loss value is measured under the same conditions. The wipe is temperature conditioned for 12 hours at 21.1° C.+/−1° C. The wipe is tested in its as wetted state.
  • The wipe being tested, which has cleaning composition absorbed therein, is weighed using a Sartorius E2000D laboratory balance. Then the wipe is placed flat and centered onto the stack of filter paper. A rigid non-porous weight having an area greater than the area of the wipe is applied to the wipe so that the pressure applied to the wipe is 5.59 kPa+/−0.34 kPa. The area used to compute the pressure is the plane area of the wipe minus the area of any bond(s) about the periphery of the wipe.
  • The pressure is applied to the wipe within 1 second in a manner such that the pressure applied does not exceed 5.59 kPa+/−0.34 kPa at any time during the pressure application and then left on the wipe so that the total pressure is supported by the wipe for 30 seconds. After 30 seconds, the applied pressure is removed and the wipe is immediately weighed using the laboratory balance. The difference in weight of the wipe before the pressure is applied and after the pressure is applied and removed is the cumulative wipe fluid loss value for the side of the wipe facing the filter paper layers. A fresh wipe and fresh filter paper is used for each measurement of cumulative wipe fluid loss value that is made.
  • The dimensions and values disclosed herein are not to be understood as being strictly limited to the exact numerical values recited. Instead, unless otherwise specified, each such dimension is intended to mean both the recited value and a functionally equivalent range surrounding that value. For example, a dimension disclosed as “40 mm” is intended to mean “about 40 mm.”
  • Every document cited herein, including any cross referenced or related patent or application, is hereby incorporated herein by reference in its entirety unless expressly excluded or otherwise limited. The citation of any document is not an admission that it is prior art with respect to any invention disclosed or claimed herein or that it alone, or in any combination with any other reference or references, teaches, suggests or discloses any such invention. Further, to the extent that any meaning or definition of a term in this document conflicts with any meaning or definition of the same term in a document incorporated by reference, the meaning or definition assigned to that term in this document shall govern.
  • While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of this invention.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A premoistened cleaning wipe having a longitudinal axis and a transverse axis intersecting and orthogonal to said longitudinal axis and in plane with said wipe, said longitudinal axis being longer than said transverse axis, said wipe comprising:
a liquid permeable first layer joined in facing relationship to a liquid permeable second layer;
a free liquid cleaning composition comprising between about 0.001% to about 10% by weight of said liquid cleaning composition of surfactant, said cleaning composition releasably absorbed in said wipe; and
a plurality of edges, said wipe extending to pairs of said edges;
wherein a least one intersection between a pair of said edges comprises an arced portion and at least one intersection between a pair of said edges comprises an angled portion.
2. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said arced portion is a circular arced portion.
3. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said arced portion has a varying curvature.
4. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein all but one of said intersections between a pair of said edges comprise an arced portion.
5. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein all but one of said intersections between a pair of said edges comprises an angled portion.
6. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe extends to a pair of transverse edges spaced apart from said longitudinal axis and a pair of longitudinal edges spaced apart from said transverse axis.
7. The wipe according to claim 6, wherein said transverse edges are non-linear transverse edges.
8. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe has an even number of edges.
9. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe is symmetric about said longitudinal axis.
10. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe is symmetric about said transverse axis.
11. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe is symmetric about said longitudinal axis and said transverse axis.
12. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe comprises a core between said liquid permeable first layer and said liquid permeable second layer.
13. The wipe according to claim 12, wherein said core is between said liquid permeable first layer and said liquid permeable second layer at an intersection between a pair of said edges that comprises an angled portion.
14. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein pairs of said edges meet at intersections and there are more intersections comprising an arced portion than intersections that comprise an angled portion.
15. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe extends to a pair of transverse edges spaced apart from said longitudinal axis and a pair of longitudinal edges spaced apart from said transverse axis, wherein two intersections between pairs of said edges each comprise an arced portion and are on opposing sides of said longitudinal axis and opposing sides of said transverse axis.
16. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe extends to a pair of transverse edges spaced apart from said longitudinal axis and a pair of longitudinal edges spaced apart from said transverse axis, wherein two intersections between pairs of said edges each comprise an arced portion.
17. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said wipe is sized and dimensioned to conform to an adult human hand.
18. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said core is a material selected from the group consisting of polyolefin fibers, cellulose fibers, rayon, open celled foam, and combinations thereof.
19. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said first layer comprises a laminate of an apertured formed film and a nonwoven.
20. The wipe according to claim 1, wherein said first layer is an apertured spunbond nonwoven comprising polyolefin fibers.
US13/967,752 2013-08-15 2013-08-15 Disposable premoistened multilayered cleaning wipe Abandoned US20150047138A1 (en)

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