US20150032438A1 - Sensor emulation using mote networks - Google Patents

Sensor emulation using mote networks Download PDF

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US20150032438A1
US20150032438A1 US14295178 US201414295178A US2015032438A1 US 20150032438 A1 US20150032438 A1 US 20150032438A1 US 14295178 US14295178 US 14295178 US 201414295178 A US201414295178 A US 201414295178A US 2015032438 A1 US2015032438 A1 US 2015032438A1
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mote
sensors
readings
circuitry
sensor
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Abandoned
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US14295178
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Alexander J. Cohen
Edward K.Y. Jung
Royce A. Levien
Robert W. Lord
Mark A. Malamud
John D. Rinaldo, Jr.
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Searete LLC
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Searete LLC
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F9/00Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units
    • G06F9/06Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units using stored programs, i.e. using an internal store of processing equipment to receive or retain programs
    • G06F9/44Arrangements for executing specific programs
    • G06F9/455Emulation; Interpretation; Software simulation, e.g. virtualisation or emulation of application or operating system execution engines
    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05BCONTROL OR REGULATING SYSTEMS IN GENERAL; FUNCTIONAL ELEMENTS OF SUCH SYSTEMS; MONITORING OR TESTING ARRANGEMENTS FOR SUCH SYSTEMS OR ELEMENTS
    • G05B17/00Systems involving the use of models or simulators of said systems
    • G05B17/02Systems involving the use of models or simulators of said systems electric

Abstract

A method may include and/or involve collecting readings from a number of mote sensors of a mote network, the mote sensors at a number of mote sensor locations, and emulating, as a source or sources of the readings, a number of sensors at a number of sensor locations.

Description

    TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present disclosure relates to mote networks, and more particularly to emulation of non-mote sensors using mote networks.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Mote sensors may be distributed throughout an area and/or volume of interest. The mote sensors may interact to form a mote network. Mote networks may be advantageously employed in environments and/or applications involving non-mote sensors.
  • SUMMARY
  • The following summary is intended to highlight and introduce some aspects of the disclosed embodiments, but not to limit the scope of the claims. Thereafter, a detailed description of illustrated embodiments is presented, which will permit one skilled in the relevant art to make and use various embodiments.
  • A method may include and/or involve collecting one or more readings from a number of mote sensors of a mote network, the number of mote sensors at a number of mote sensor locations, and emulating, as a source or sources of the one or more readings, a number of sensors at a number of sensor locations. Emulating, as a source or sources of the one or more readings, a number of sensors at a number of sensor locations may include and/or involve emulating, as a source or sources of the readings, a number of sensors at a number of sensor locations different than the number of mote sensors, and/or collecting the one or more readings from a number of mote sensors less than the number of the one or more sensors, and/or collecting the one or more readings from at least one mote sensor location different than any of the number of sensor locations, and/or emulating one sensor, and/or improving upon an accuracy of the one or more readings over an accuracy of one or more readings from the number of sensors, and/or collecting the one or more readings from a number of mote sensors greater than the number of sensors. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve adapting one or more of the number of mote sensors, the number of mote sensor locations, or the one or more mote sensor locations to account for one or more failed mote sensors and/or involve adapting one or more of the number of mote sensors, the number of mote sensor locations, or the one or more mote sensor locations to account for one or more failed mote sensors may include and/or involve the mote network adapting one or more of the number of mote sensors, the number of mote sensor locations, or the mote sensor locations to account for one or more failed mote sensors. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve changing at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the number of sensors. Changing at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the number of the sensors may include and/or involve the mote network selecting at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the number of the sensors. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve adapting the emulating to account for one or more changes to one or more of the mote sensor locations, accuracy of the emulating of the number of sensors, performance of the emulating of the number of sensors, or to one or more changes in the environment of the mote network. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the number of sensors, and refining a selection of at least one of the mote sensors, the number of mote sensors, the mote sensor locations, or the number of mote sensor locations in order to improve emulation of at least one of the behavior or the characteristic of the number of sensors. Observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the number of sensors and refining a selection of at least one of the mote sensors, the number of mote sensors, the mote sensor locations, or the number of mote sensor locations in order to improve emulation of at least one of the behavior or the characteristic of the number of sensors may include and/or involve the mote network observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the number of sensors and refining a selection of at least one of the mote sensors, the number of mote sensors, the one or more mote sensor locations, or the number of mote sensor locations in order to improve emulation of at least one of the behavior or the characteristic of the number of sensors. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application and are a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings. Selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings may include and/or involve the mote network selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve the mote network selecting at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve an accuracy of the one or more derived readings. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The method may include and/or involve adapting the emulating to account for one or more changes to the one or more mote sensor locations. In addition to the foregoing, other method aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • An apparatus may include and/or involve logic to receive one or more readings from two or more mote sensors, logic to convert the one or more readings into at least one non-mote sensor reading, and logic to communicate the at least one non-mote sensor reading via a non-mote sensor interface. The logic to communicate the at least one non-mote sensor reading via a non-mote sensor interface may include and/or involve logic to emulate a manner of communication of the at least one non-mote sensor. In addition to the foregoing, other apparatus aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The apparatus may include and/or involve logic to apply location information for the two or more mote sensors to derive at least one emulated non-mote sensor location. In addition to the foregoing, other apparatus aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The apparatus may include and/or involve logic to select at least one mote sensor to provide the one or more readings. The logic to select at least one mote sensor to provide the one or more readings may include and/or involve logic to select one or more mote sensors to compensate for at least one failed mote sensor, and/or logic to select at least one mote sensor to increase an accuracy of emulation of the at least one non-mote sensor. In addition to the foregoing, other apparatus aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The apparatus may include and/or involve logic to emulate at least one source of non-mote sensor readings. In addition to the foregoing, other apparatus aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • The apparatus may include and/or involve logic to cause a change in at least one location from which the one or more readings are provided. The logic to cause a change in at least one location from which the one or more readings are provided may include and/or involve logic to deselect at least one mote as a source of the one or more readings and to select at least one other mote as the source of the one or more readings, and/or logic to cause at least one mote that is a source of the one or more readings to change position. In addition to the foregoing, other apparatus aspects are described in the claims, drawings and text forming a part of the present application.
  • Other system/method/apparatus aspects are described in the text (e.g., detailed description and claims) and drawings forming the present application.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • In the drawings, the same reference numbers and acronyms identify elements or acts with the same or similar functionality for ease of understanding and convenience. To easily identify the discussion of any particular element or act, the most significant digit or digits in a reference number refer to the figure number in which that element is first introduced.
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a system providing mote network emulation of one or more legacy sensor devices.
  • FIG. 2 is an action flow diagram of an embodiment of a process of mote network sensor emulation.
  • FIG. 3 is a flow chart of an embodiment of mote network sensor emulation.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • References to “one embodiment” or “an embodiment” do not necessarily refer to the same embodiment, although they may.
  • Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, throughout the description and the claims, the words “comprise,” “comprising,” and the like are to be construed in an inclusive sense as opposed to an exclusive or exhaustive sense; that is to say, in the sense of “including, but not limited to.” Words using the singular or plural number also include the plural or singular number respectively. Additionally, the words “herein,” “above,” “below” and words of similar import, when used in this application, refer to this application as a whole and not to any particular portions of this application. When the claims use the word “or” in reference to a list of two or more items, that word covers all of the following interpretations of the word: any of the items in the list, all of the items in the list and any combination of the items in the list.
  • “Logic” refers to signals and/or information that may be applied to influence the operation of a device. Software, hardware, and firmware are examples of logic. Hardware logic may be embodied in circuits. In general, logic may comprise combinations of software, hardware, and/or firmware.
  • System Providing Mote Network Emulation of One or More Legacy Sensor Devices
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an embodiment of a system providing mote network emulation of one or more legacy sensor devices.
  • A mote network within a volume/area 117 includes multiple mote sensor/processors. For purposes of illustration, three motes 102, 103, and 104 are shown, although in practice the network could have more or fewer (typically more) motes. Mote 103 is shown in more detail, having a communication interface 106, an environmental sensor 107, and other logic 109 to carry out/participate in various acts as described herein.
  • The system further includes at least one external device 111 having its own logic 113 to carry out/participate in acts described herein, and at least one legacy device 119 adapted to interact with non-mote (a.k.a. legacy) sensors. The device 111 may include an interface 121 to interact with the device 119 by emulating one or more non-mote sensors.
  • Readings may be collected from a number of mote sensors (e.g., one, two, three, etc., mote sensors) of a mote network (henceforth, “data collection”), the mote sensors located at a number of mote sensor locations. A number of “legacy” (a.k.a. non-mote) sensors may be emulated as a source or sources of the readings (henceforth, “sensor emulation”). In systems where the location of the legacy sensors is a factor, legacy sensors may be emulated to be at particular locations.
  • Sensor emulation may include and/or involve emulating, as a source or sources of the readings, a number of sensors at a number of sensor locations different than the number of mote sensors. For example, a large room may be created by merging two rooms (e.g. removing a wall), each room having a thermocouple connecting to the heating system. The thermocouples may be removed as part of the renovation, with the wires to the thermocouples remaining To replace the removed thermocouples, a large number of motes (say, 80 motes, including motes 102-104) having temperature sensors may be placed in locations throughout the room. The interface device 111 may be attached to the thermocouple wires to the heating system. Furthermore, sensor emulation may include emulation of another mote network; for example, a new mote sensor network might emulate an old (e.g., failing) one.
  • Emulation information may be provided to the device 111 in order to enable the device 111 to emulate the removed thermocouples using readings from one or more motes of the mote network. One or more of the motes may communicate temperature readings to the device 111, which may apply logic 113 to emulate the thermocouple readings using the mote readings. The device 111 may convert the mote readings to analog signals compatible with the legacy thermocouple wires and may communicate these signals using the wires to the heating system.
  • Thus, data collection may involve collecting readings from a number of mote sensors more or less than the number of sensors being emulated. There may be various manners of implementing data collection, including but not limited to collecting readings from at least one mote sensor at a location different than any of the sensor locations. A single sensor may be emulated, possibly at a single location such as location 131, or more than one sensor of the same or different types may be emulated. (See the previous example for a collection of a large number of motes that emulate in this case, two thermocouples).
  • Sensor emulation may involve improving upon an accuracy of readings that would be provided by the sensors. Greater accuracy may be accomplished by collecting readings from a number of mote sensors greater than the number of sensors. Thus, in the previous example, emulation of two thermocouples by a large number of mote sensors may, in some situations, increase the accuracy of the temperature readings, through statistical averaging and other techniques, by an order of magnitude or more over what the sensors themselves could provide.
  • As a second manner of accomplishing greater accuracy, the mote sensors may use a different physical technique to obtain their readings than that of the emulated sensors. In the previous example, the thermocouple sensors which were replaced typically may not have measurement accuracy appreciably greater than 1 degree centigrade. The mote sensors may be thermistors, which use resistors to develop temperature readings, and may be an order of magnitude or more accurate than thermocouples.
  • Readings may be collected from two or more mote sensors of a mote network in different locations. One or more readings may be derived from these collected readings, where the derived readings emulate readings from at least one non-mote sensor in at least one non-mote sensor location.
  • Besides replacing previously used sensors with a network of mote sensors, mote sensors emulating some other type of sensor can obviously be used in new installations which would ordinarily use the other sensor.
  • Network Adaptation
  • Various aspects of the data collection and/or emulation may be adapted to improve accuracy and/or account for environmental factors such as mote failures (henceforth, “network adaptation”). For example, the number of mote sensors, the number of mote sensor locations, and/or the mote sensor locations may be adapted to account for one or more mote sensors that were providing readings but which have failed. Network adaptation may be caused by external logic (e.g. logic 113) or by the mote network itself (a.k.a. the mote network is “self-adapting”).
  • Network adaptation may include and/or involve changing at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulation of the sensors (henceforth, “location adaptation”). Location adaptation may be caused by external logic (e.g. logic 113) or by the mote network itself (a.k.a. the mote network is “self-adapting”).
  • Network adaptation may be performed to account for changes to one or more of the mote sensor locations, accuracy of the emulating of the number of sensors, performance of the emulating of the number of sensors, or to changes in the environment of the mote network. As an example where a changed mote position may result in network adaptation, a mote which is providing readings used in sensor emulation may be dislodged from its position, say the underside of a table, and fall to the floor. Its readings may then be lower, as the cold generated by air conditioning in the location is most intense on the floor. The system may recognize directly that the location of the mote has changed, using location logic, or it may recognize that the readings being given by the mote are uncharacteristic of its prior position. The system may then adapt by selecting one or more motes to replace the mote in providing readings used in the emulation.
  • As an example of when reading accuracy may trigger adaptation, the system may examine the accuracy of readings, either automatically or triggered by the intervention of some person or device(s). For example, a person may bring a highly accurate thermometer into the room and take readings at the two emulated locations. If the accuracy of the mote readings is not comparable, the system may adapt which and/or how many motes to use to provide readings.
  • As another example of adaptation, motes may be added to the system, or one or more motes in the system may have their locations moved. The system may then adapt the selection of motes to use for emulation, resulting in increased emulation accuracy going forward.
  • As another example of adaptation, a part of the mote environment becomes contaminated. For example, workers might respond to a small fire by spraying part of a wall or other surface with fire retardant, which may then coat the motes attached thereon. The system may recognize these motes are no longer giving characteristic readings and may then select one or more replacement motes.
  • Network adaptation may involve observing behavior and/or characteristics of the sensors to emulate, and refining a selection of the mote sensors, the number of mote sensors, the mote sensor locations, and/or the number of mote sensor locations in order to improve emulation of behavior and/or characteristics of the sensors. For example, motes 102-104 may provide pressure readings in a pipe 117 carrying a moving fluid. A conventional non-mote pressure sensor may also be present in the pipe. The system may observe behavior and/or characteristics of the pressure sensor to emulate, and refine a selection of the mote sensors, the number of mote sensors, the mote sensor locations, and/or the number of mote sensor locations in order to improve emulation of behavior and/or characteristics of the non-mote pressure sensor.
  • Network adaptation may involve selecting one or more replacement mote sensors (a.k.a. “mote replacement”) to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the collected readings. Mote replacement may in some cases involve the mote network selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the collected readings. In other cases, external logic such as logic 113 may select mote replacements.
  • Emulation Interface
  • An interface device such as device 111 may be provided to receive and/or collect readings from the mote sensors, and to convert the readings into at least one non-mote sensor reading. The device 111 may include logic to communicate the at least one non-mote sensor reading via a non-mote sensor interface. Thus, the device 111 may serve to emulate at least one non-mote (e.g. legacy) sensor via a mote network (henceforth, “sensor interface emulation”). Sensor interface emulation may include and/or involve logic to emulate a manner of communication of the at least one non-mote sensor. In other words, the device 111 may appear as the non-mote sensor(s) to controllers or other devices adapted to interact with the non-mote sensor(s).
  • Some applications may not employ an external device 111. Instead, the mote network itself may provide the functions of the external device 111.
  • In some applications the location(s) of the emulated non-mote sensor(s) may be relevant to controllers or other devices that interact with the non-mote sensors. The device 111 may include and/or involve logic to apply location information for the mote sensors that provide the readings in order to derive at least one emulated non-mote sensor location. For example, in the example of motes emulating thermocouples, the device 111 may determine two locations with which to associate the emulated thermocouple readings, based upon the locations of the motes chosen to provide readings for the emulation. In some situations the mote network itself may provide these features.
  • The device 111 may include and/or involve logic to select at least one mote sensor to provide the readings (henceforth, “mote sensor selection”). Mote sensor selection may involve logic to select one or more mote sensors to compensate for at least one failed mote sensor, and or logic to select at least one mote sensor to increase an accuracy of emulation of the at least one non-mote sensor. In some implementations, the mote network itself may provide these features.
  • The device 111 may include and/or involve logic to cause a change in at least one location from which the readings are provided. The logic to cause a change in at least one location from which the readings are provided (henceforth, ‘mote location selection’) may include and/or involve logic to deselect at least one mote as a source of the readings and to select at least one other mote as the source of the readings. This may include and/or involve logic to cause at least one mote that is a source of the readings to change position.
  • Process of Mote Network Sensor Emulation
  • FIG. 2 is an action flow diagram of an embodiment of a process of mote network sensor emulation. The motes in the network communicate with their nearest neighbors. The mote closest to the interface device passes all such communication it receives to the mote interface.
  • At 202 mote 1 communicates its sensor reading to mote 2. At 204 mote 2 communicates its sensor reading to mote 3. At 206 mote 2 communicates mote 1's sensor data to mote 3. At 208, 210, and 212 mote 3 communicates the data for itself, mote 1, and mote 2 respectively to the mote interface.
  • The mote interface then calculates the derived data value for the sensor or sensors which are being emulated. At 214, this derived data is communicated to the controller.
  • The mote interface has recognized that the emulation(s) may better be performed by making some change affecting mote 2, and at 216, the mote interface sends the information to perform the mote 2 adaptation to mote 3. At 218, mote 3 communicates this information about the mote 2 adaptation to mote 2.
  • Mote Network Sensor Emulation
  • FIG. 3 is a flow chart of an embodiment of mote network sensor emulation. At 302, readings from the motes participating in the sensor emulation are obtained. At 306, the emulation is performed. At 308, the results of the emulation are examined. At 310, if the results are satisfactory, at 314 the emulation is complete.
  • If unsatisfactory, at 312 the calculations and/or motes used may be adjusted. Additional mote readings may be obtained at 302, and the process repeats.
  • Those having skill in the art will appreciate that there are various vehicles by which processes and/or systems described herein can be effected (e.g., hardware, software, and/or firmware), and that the preferred vehicle will vary with the context in which the processes are deployed. For example, if an implementer determines that speed and accuracy are paramount, the implementer may opt for a hardware and/or firmware vehicle; alternatively, if flexibility is paramount, the implementer may opt for a solely software implementation; or, yet again alternatively, the implementer may opt for some combination of hardware, software, and/or firmware. Hence, there are several possible vehicles by which the processes described herein may be effected, none of which is inherently superior to the other in that any vehicle to be utilized is a choice dependent upon the context in which the vehicle will be deployed and the specific concerns (e.g., speed, flexibility, or predictability) of the implementer, any of which may vary. Those skilled in the art will recognize that optical aspects of implementations may involve optically-oriented hardware, software, and or firmware.
  • The foregoing detailed description has set forth various embodiments of the devices and/or processes via the use of block diagrams, flowcharts, and/or examples. Insofar as such block diagrams, flowcharts, and/or examples contain one or more functions and/or operations, it will be understood as notorious by those within the art that each function and/or operation within such block diagrams, flowcharts, or examples can be implemented, individually and/or collectively, by a wide range of hardware, software, firmware, or virtually any combination thereof. Several portions of the subject matter subject matter described herein may be implemented via Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), digital signal processors (DSPs), or other integrated formats. However, those skilled in the art will recognize that some aspects of the embodiments disclosed herein, in whole or in part, can be equivalently implemented in standard integrated circuits, as one or more computer programs running on one or more computers (e.g., as one or more programs running on one or more computer systems), as one or more programs running on one or more processors (e.g., as one or more programs running on one or more microprocessors), as firmware, or as virtually any combination thereof, and that designing the circuitry and/or writing the code for the software and/or firmware would be well within the skill of one of skill in the art in light of this disclosure. In addition, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the mechanisms of the subject matter described herein are capable of being distributed as a program product in a variety of forms, and that an illustrative embodiment of the subject matter described herein applies equally regardless of the particular type of signal bearing media used to actually carry out the distribution. Examples of a signal bearing media include, but are not limited to, the following: recordable type media such as floppy disks, hard disk drives, CD ROMs, digital tape, and computer memory; and transmission type media such as digital and analog communication links using TDM or IP based communication links (e.g., packet links).
  • In a general sense, those skilled in the art will recognize that the various aspects described herein which can be implemented, individually and/or collectively, by a wide range of hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof can be viewed as being composed of various types of “electrical circuitry.” Consequently, as used herein “electrical circuitry” includes, but is not limited to, electrical circuitry having at least one discrete electrical circuit, electrical circuitry having at least one integrated circuit, electrical circuitry having at least one application specific integrated circuit, electrical circuitry forming a general purpose computing device configured by a computer program (e.g., a general purpose computer configured by a computer program which at least partially carries out processes and/or devices described herein, or a microprocessor configured by a computer program which at least partially carries out processes and/or devices described herein), electrical circuitry forming a memory device (e.g., forms of random access memory), and/or electrical circuitry forming a communications device (e.g., a modem, communications switch, or optical-electrical equipment).
  • Those skilled in the art will recognize that it is common within the art to describe devices and/or processes in the fashion set forth herein, and thereafter use standard engineering practices to integrate such described devices and/or processes into larger systems. That is, at least a portion of the devices and/or processes described herein can be integrated into a network processing system via a reasonable amount of experimentation.
  • The foregoing described aspects depict different components contained within, or connected with, different other components. It is to be understood that such depicted architectures are merely exemplary, and that in fact many other architectures can be implemented which achieve the same functionality. In a conceptual sense, any arrangement of components to achieve the same functionality is effectively “associated” such that the desired functionality is achieved. Hence, any two components herein combined to achieve a particular functionality can be seen as “associated with” each other such that the desired functionality is achieved, irrespective of architectures or intermedial components. Likewise, any two components so associated can also be viewed as being “operably connected”, or “operably coupled”, to each other to achieve the desired functionality.

Claims (31)

  1. 1-30. (canceled)
  2. 31. A system comprising:
    circuitry for collecting one or more readings from one or more mote sensors of a mote network, the one or more mote sensors at one or more mote sensor locations;
    circuitry for emulating in an emulation environment at least some of the one or more mote sensors responsive to at least some of the one or more readings collected by the circuitry for collecting; and
    circuitry for refining a selection of at least one of a number of mote sensors or a number of mote sensor locations in order to improve an emulation of at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of at least some of the one or more mote sensors.
  3. 32. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for emulating in an emulation environment at least some of the number of sensors responsive to at least some of the one or more readings collected by the circuitry for collecting further comprises:
    circuitry for emulating in an emulation environment, as one or more sources of at least some of the one or more readings, a number of emulated sensors at a number of emulated sensor locations different than the number of mote sensors.
  4. 33. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for collecting one or more readings from one or more mote sensors of a mote network, the one or more mote sensors at one or more mote sensor locations further comprises:
    circuitry for collecting the one or more readings from a number of mote sensors less than the number of the one or more sensors.
  5. 34. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for collecting one or more readings from one or more mote sensors of a mote network, the one or more mote sensors at one or more mote sensor locations further comprises:
    circuitry for collecting the one or more readings from at least one mote sensor location different than any of the number of sensor locations.
  6. 35. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for emulating in an emulation environment at least some of the one or more mote sensors responsive to at least some of the one or more readings collected by the circuitry for collecting further comprises:
    circuitry for emulating one sensor in an emulation environment.
  7. 36. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for emulating in an emulation environment at least some of the one or more mote sensors responsive to at least some of the one or more readings collected by the circuitry for collecting further comprises:
    circuitry for improving upon an accuracy of the one or more readings over an accuracy of one or more readings from the one or more mote sensors.
  8. 37. The system of claim 31, wherein circuitry for collecting one or more readings from one or more mote sensors of a mote network, the one or more mote sensors at one or more mote sensor locations further comprises:
    circuitry for collecting the one or more readings from a number of mote sensors greater than a number of sensor locations.
  9. 38. The system of claim 31, further comprising:
    circuitry for adapting at least one of a number of mote sensors, a number of mote sensor locations, or one or more locations of the one or more mote sensors to account for one or more failed mote sensors.
  10. 39. The system of claim 38, wherein circuitry for adapting at least one of a number of mote sensors, a number of mote sensor locations, or one or more locations of the one or more mote sensors to account for one or more failed mote sensors further comprises:
    the mote network adapting one or more of a number of mote sensors, a number of mote sensor locations, or one or more mote sensor locations to account for one or more failed mote sensors.
  11. 40. The system of claim 31, further comprising:
    circuitry for changing at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors.
  12. 41. The system of claim 40, wherein circuitry for changing at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors further comprises:
    the mote network selecting at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve the accuracy of the emulating of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors.
  13. 42. The system of claim 31, further comprising:
    circuitry for adapting the emulating to account for one or more changes to one or more of one or more mote sensor locations, accuracy of the emulating of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors, performance of the emulating of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors, or to one or more changes in the environment of the mote network.
  14. 43. The system of claim 31, further comprising:
    circuitry for observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors.
  15. 44. The system of claim 43, wherein circuitry for observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors further comprises:
    the mote network observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the at least some of the one or more mote sensors.
  16. 45. A system comprising:
    circuitry for collecting one or more readings from two or more mote sensors of a mote network, the two or more mote sensors in two or more mote sensor locations;
    circuitry for deriving one or more derived readings from the collected one or more readings, the one or more derived readings emulating one or more readings from at least one non-mote sensor in at least one non-mote sensor location; and
    circuitry for refining at least one of a selection of the two or more mote sensors from which to collect the one or more readings to improve a derivation of the at least one non-mote sensor.
  17. 46. The system of claim 45, further comprising:
    circuitry for selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings.
  18. 47. The system of claim 46, wherein circuitry for selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings further comprises:
    circuitry for the mote network selecting one or more replacement mote sensors to replace one or more failed mote sensors as a source of the one or more collected readings.
  19. 48. The system of claim 45, further comprising:
    the mote network selecting at least one of the mote sensor locations to improve an accuracy of the one or more derived readings.
  20. 49. The system of claim 45, further comprising:
    circuitry for adapting the deriving to account for one or more changes to the one or more mote sensor locations.
  21. 50. The system of claim 45, further comprising:
    circuitry for observing at least one of a behavior or a characteristic of the at least some of the two or more mote sensors.
  22. 51. A machine, comprising:
    a processing component; and
    one or more non-transitory media readable by the processing component and bearing at least:
    one or more instructions configured to receive one or more readings from two or more mote sensors;
    one or more instructions configured to convert the one or more readings into at least one non-mote sensor reading; and
    one or more instructions configured to communicate the at least one non-mote sensor reading via a non-mote sensor interface.
  23. 52. The machine of claim 51, wherein the one or more instructions configured to communicate the at least one non-mote sensor reading via a non-mote sensor interface further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to emulate a manner of communication of the at least one non-mote sensor.
  24. 53. The machine of claim 51, wherein the one or more non-transitory media further comprise:
    one or more instructions configured to apply location information for the two or more mote sensors to derive at least one emulated non-mote sensor location.
  25. 54. The machine of claim 51, wherein the one or more non-transitory media further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to select at least one mote sensor to provide the one or more readings.
  26. 55. The machine of claim 54, wherein the one or more instructions configured to select at least one mote sensor to provide the one or more readings further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to select one or more mote sensors to compensate for at least one failed mote sensor.
  27. 56. The machine of claim 54, wherein the one or more instructions configured to select at least one mote sensor to provide the one or more readings further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to select at least one mote sensor to increase an accuracy of emulation of the at least one non-mote sensor.
  28. 57. The machine of claim 51, wherein the one or more non-transitory media further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to emulate at least one source of non-mote sensor readings.
  29. 58. The machine of claim 51, wherein the one or more non-transitory media further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to cause a change in at least one location from which the one or more readings are provided.
  30. 59. The machine of claim 58, wherein the one or more instructions configured to cause a change in at least one location from which the one or more readings are provided further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to deselect at least one mote as a source of the one or more readings and to select at least one other mote as the source of the one or more readings.
  31. 60. The machine of claim 58, wherein the one or more instructions configured to cause a change in at least one location from which the one or more readings are provided further comprises:
    one or more instructions configured to cause at least one mote that is a source of the one or more readings to change position.
US14295178 2005-08-12 2014-06-03 Sensor emulation using mote networks Abandoned US20150032438A1 (en)

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US20070035410A1 (en) 2007-02-15 application
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US8743698B2 (en) 2014-06-03 grant

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