US2014992A - Golf game - Google Patents

Golf game Download PDF

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Publication number
US2014992A
US2014992A US46575930A US2014992A US 2014992 A US2014992 A US 2014992A US 46575930 A US46575930 A US 46575930A US 2014992 A US2014992 A US 2014992A
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game
golf
course
base
provided
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Expired - Lifetime
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William H Stayton
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William H Stayton
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F7/00Indoor games using small moving playing bodies, e.g. balls, discs or blocks
    • A63F7/22Indoor games using small moving playing bodies, e.g. balls, discs or blocks in which the playing bodies are projected through the air
    • A63F7/24Devices controlled by the player to project or roll-off the playing bodies
    • A63F7/2409Apparatus for projecting the balls
    • A63F7/2472Projecting devices with actuating mechanisms, e.g. triggers, not being connected to the playfield

Description

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w. H. STAYTQN GOLF GAME Original Filed Jul 5, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l fiepth 1?, W35. w. H. STAYTON fl p GOLF GAME Original Filed July 3, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 11?, 1935. w. H. STAYTON GOLF GAME Original Filed July 3, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Sept. 17, 1935 UNlTED STATES amass earsn'r oF'FIcE Application July 3, 1930, Serial No. 465,759 Renewed December 26, 1934 2 Claims.

This invention relates to games and more particularly to a game providing a miniature variation and close simulation of the well-known outdoor game of golf.

It has been heretofore proposed to provide games in imitation of golf which might be played on a sufficiently small scale to provide indoor amusement, but all of these games, to applicants knowledge, have, by their reduction in scale,

resultedin the elimination of most of the elements which combine to make outdoor golf such a popular, competitive sport. Personal judgment, physical skill, knowledge of the rules of the game and other psychological factors, all of which contribute greatly to the enjoyment of the outdoor game, have largely vanished in the miniature reproductions previously provided.

It is therefore one of the objects of the present invention to provide a game which is highly instructive as well as entertaining, and which requires and encourages the use of individual skill.

Another object is to provide a novel game of miniature golf in which the usual conditions and problems of actual outdoor play are closely simu- 1 lated, and which requires a degree of skill comparable to that exercised in the regular game.

A further object is to provide a gameof golf which, although greatly reduced in scale, affords the sameopportunities for enjoyment and instruction, and accurately presents the same problems as the outdoor game, thereby constituting a most desirable means of practice and steady with respect to the physical movements, exercise of judgment and rules of play of the game in gen- -eral.

Still another object is to provide a miniature golf course accurate in its reproduction of actual physical conditions and of such construction that it may be conveniently transported and set up I for play in a limited space.

A still further object is to provide a novel playing board for a game of golf which has a surface accurately simulating in miniature the tees, fairways, greens and hazards of an actual golf 45. course, said playing board comprising a plurality of sections adapted to be easily joined each to the other to produce a course of any desired length, and layout.

Another object is to provide a novel playing 50 board for a game of golf having both of its surfaces prepared in simulation of an actual golf course, each surface constituting a different layout of holes, thereby affording the maximum opportunity for play under varied conditions.

55 A still furtherobject is to provide a novel game of miniature golf in which the movements of a manikin golfer may be completely controlled by the player of the game, and the shots played upon a game board which reproduces actual playing conditions with utmost fidelity. 5

These and other objects will appear more fully from a consideration of the detailed description of the invention which follows. Although two embodiments each of the game board and manikin are described and illustrated in the accom- 10 panying drawings, it will be expressly understood that the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only, and are not to be construed as a limitation of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended 15 claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of one embodiment of the playing surface according to the present invention wherein a plurality of portable sections are 20 joined together to constitute a miniature golf course;

Fig. 2 is a sectional View taken on line 22 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of 25 Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of another embodiment of the playing surface;

Fig. 5 is a sectional View taken on line 55 of Fig. 4; 30 Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are perspective views, taken at different angles showing one embodiment of a manikin with which the game may be played;

and

Fig. 9 is a detail view partially in section of 35 another embodiment of the manikin.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views, there is disclosed therein a miniature golf game comprising three novel, 40 cooperating game piecesa playing board or, surface, a ball, and a manikin player.

The playing board or surface (Figs. 1-5) comprises, in general, a base or mat upon which are accurately reproduced in miniature the physical characteristics of a golf course. The board may be made in sections, each section being a complete unit in itself of any desired number of holes, with suitable means being provided for joining a plurality of sections in order to construct a course of any desired length and layout, or, if desired and if sufiicient space is available,. an entire course may be laid out and constructed'as' a unit. The base or mat may be either permanently attached to a table or other 55,

suitable support, or adapted for temporary attachment and ready portability. The preferred construction, however, embodies portable sections of a rigid base of slightly smaller size than the ordinary card table, both sides of the base being finished to represent a portion of a golf course, and means for supporting and joining a plurality of such sections. An alternative construction comprises similar portable sections of a flexible mat of substantially the same size as an ordinary card table, each of which sections can be rolled up into a small package of con-- venient size for easy transportation, and then spread out and temporarily secured by suitable means to any available table.

Referring now in detail to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the playing board as shown therein comprises a plurality of portable sections In supported in any suitable manner as on card tables H, and novel means for joining the various sections to pmstitute the desired layout. Each section I0 has a'base I2, of any suitable material such as wood, in each corner of which is secured a supporting pillar I3 projecting on each side thereof. These sections I! may be of any desirable size, but as shown are slightly smaller than the top of an average card table II.

Both sides of base I2 are prepared in simulation of a golf course by reproducing in miniature thereon, by any suitable means, the physical characteristics of the tees, fairways, rough, hazards and greens of any known or imaginary course. The contour of the surface may first be prepared by applying to base I2 a suitable amount of padding I4, such as felt, and then a fabric covering I5 placed thereover and secured to base I2 at the edges thereof. Fabric covering I5 may be of any desired material but preferably is provided with a pile in simulation of 1 grass, the height of which can be varied by cutting so as to be short in the fairways and long in the rough. Miniature trees, fences and other similar hazards may be placed onthe surface of fabric covering I5, and, if desired, secured thereto as by sewing.

If desired, the greens and large hazards, such as ponds or sand traps and bunkers, may be constructed as units removable from base I2 and interchangeable one with the other, thus again increasing the number of possible variations in the layout of the course. As shown, each green and large hazard comprises a base member I6, preferably of the same material as base I2, which is appropriately surfaced similarly to base I2, but on one side only. The'greens are surfaced with a thin layer of padding I4 and a substantially smooth fabric covering I5, and are each provided with a cup I1 representing the hole, in which is removably supported the staff I8 of a flag I9. Those units representing ponds and sand traps may be provided with suitable depressions 20 in base members water and sand may be placed.

All units are of the same size and shape so as to be interchangeable, and are adapted to be seated in suitable recesses 2I formed in base I2. For convenience, the units have been shown as circular with a shouldered flange 22 engaging an inwardly projecting collar 23 formed integrally with base I2, but it is tobe understood that other forms of construction may be utilized.

Novel means are also provided for joining together the various sections of the playing surface. which not only make possible a complete,

I 6 in which continuous layout, but also prevent the transmission of vibrations or shocks from one section to another which might disturb the play. Two forms of such connecting means are shown in the drawings, that in Fig. 2 illustrating a flexible or resilient trough which might be utilized to represent a stream, and that in Fig. 3 showing a strip of surface similar to that of the adjoining sections Ill.

The flexible trough of Fig. 2 comprises a pair of rods or strips 24, equal in length to base I2, and a trough 25 of resilient material such as rubber, equal in length to the distance between pillars I3 and secured to rods 24 by any suitable means such as sewing.

The connecting strip shown in Fig. 3 has a thin base plate 26 of suitable material on which is formed a surface of padding I4 and fabric covering I5 similar to that formed on base I 2.

Base plate 25 is equal in length to trough 25 and slightly narrower than the space which it is to cover so as to allow a small movement of one section IE! without disturbing the adjacent section.

A second embodiment of the playing board is disclosed in Figs. 4 and 5, differing from that just described in that the base comprises a flexible mat which may be rolled up for ready transportation, and is provided with a playing surface on only one side, the base being adapted to rest directly upon the supporting table and to be temporarily secured thereto by suitable means.

As shown, a base E2, of any suitable flexible material such as rubber, is made substantially equal in size to the top of card table I I and is provided with suitable straps 2i in each corner thereof which are adapted to slip under the corners of table Ii and thus temporarily secure the playing board thereto. The upper surface of base I2 is prepared in simulation of a golf course by means of padding I4 and a fabric covering 55 in a manncr similar to that previously described. The green and large hazards are also made as rernovable, interchangeable units similar to those shownin Figs. 1 and 2, suitable shouldered recesses 2 i being provided in base I2 to receive the flanged base members I6. It will be understood that these units are removed from recesses 2i when base i 2' is rolled up for transportation.

The miniature golf course thus provided may be laid out as a replica of any actual course, or may be a combination of famous holes of various courses. The fairways, greens, hazards and oth er physical characteristics of the course are accurately constructed to scale, the scale used also being an important factor to be considered in the construction of the ball and manikin player later to be described.

Since the present game is intended to be as close a simulation as possible of the actual game of golf, a ball 28 is used instead of a disc or any of the'other artificial means heretofore proposed. The ball may be made of any suitable material, cork, aluminum and steel each having been utilized by applicant, but it is preferable to construct it from hard rubber and to provide it with a cover painted and marked in a manner similar to ordinary golf balls. The size and weight of the ball are, of course, dependent upon the size of the playing board and that of the manikin.

In order to propel the ball around the miniature golf course above described, a novel, portable manikin golf player has been provided which is so constructed as to allow maximum control by the player of the game over all movements of the manikin, thus rendering the element of individual skill the most important factor in the successful playing of the game. To this end the body and members of the manikin are made flexible in simulation of the joints and muscles of the human body, and a golf club is provided which is fully adjustable as to length of the shaft and angle of face of the club head. Novel means for actuating the club have also been devised which permit full personal control of the force and length of the stroke of the club by the player of the game.

As shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8, the manikin player comprises a torso or trunk 29, substantially cylindrical in shape and made of any suitable material, either wood or metal, which is adjustably supported at its lower end in a hip plate 33 to which are secured flexible legs 3| terminating in weight-' ed feet 32, and which at its upper end carries a rotatable shoulder band or disc 33 to which is secured a flexible arm 34 holding a miniature golf club 35.

The adjustable connection between torso 29 and hip plate 30 is preferably of the ball-and-socket type so as to allow a maximum of adjustability,

and as shown, (see Fig. 9 for details), comprises of the joint thus formed may be easily adjusted by screw 39.

The legs 3i of the manikin are preferably made of flexible tubing sufficiently stiff to support the weight of the rest of the manikin and yet flexible enough to enable the player of the game to adjust the legs to any desired position. The low er ends of the legs are provided with weighted feet 32 which may be cast of lead and swiveled thereto in any suitable manner, while the upper ends are provided with ferrules M which are rigidly secured to hip plate 33.

The upper end of torso 23 is provided with suitable means for rotatably supporting shoulder disc 33 and for adjusting its plane of. rotation relative to the torso. As shown, shoulder disc 33 is rotaably mounted on a shaft 42 and rests against a collar 33 secured to said shaft intermediate its ends. The lower end of shaft 42 below collar 43 is provided with a bifurcated portion 44 which engages the upper end of a stud 45 threaded into the upper end of torso 29. A bolt 46 extends through suitable openings in bifurcated portion 44 and stud Q5 and. is provided with a butterfly nut 31, thereby affording an easily adjustable means for varying the plane of rotation of disc 33 relative to torso 29.

Arm 34 is made of tubing similar to that comprising legs 3| but is preferably slightly more flexible. The upper end of arm 34 is provided with a ferrule as which is threaded into the periphery of shoulder disc 33, and its lower end is provided with a chuck 49 in which is frictionally gripped the upper end of the shaft of golf club 35. The effective length of the shaft may thus be adjusted by sliding it through chuck 49, the upper extremity of the shaft extending within arm 34 which is hollow. Additional adjust-ability as to club 35 is afforded by providing a head or blade 59 which is connected to the lower end of the shaft by means of a screw 5| thus allowing the angle of the face of head 50 to be changed at the will of the player.

Novel means are also provided for actuating club 35 which require a maximum exercise of physical force by the player of the game and a minimum of mechanical assistance from the structure of the manikin. In the form shown, an actuating lever or arm 52 is threaded into the periphery of shoulder disc 33 opposite arm 33 and provided at its outer end with a suitable weighted ball or handle 33 which is adapted to be grasped by the player in making the stroke. In order to decrease the effect of weighted ball 53 in assist ing the stroke and to thus require that the actuating lever 52 be positively moved by the player throughout the stroke, a coil spring 5 is provided surrounding the upper end of shaft 32 and exerting a dampening force against shoulder disc 33. The other end of spring 33 is seated in a recess 55 formed in a detachable head 53 of the manikin which is threaded onto the upper end of shaft 32.

In Fig. 9 there is shown a variation which may be made in the construction of the torso and the connection therewith of the shoulder disc in the interest of greater flexibility and closer simula tion of the human body. As disclosed therein, the substantially cylindrical, rigid torso 29 of Figs. 6, '7 and 8 is replaced by a length of flexible tubing 57 which is secured at its lower end by a ferrule 58 to a hemispherical base 36', and at its upper end by another ferrule 59 to the collar 33 of shaft "52 on which shoulder disc 33 is rotatably mounted. The ball-and-socket connection of base 36' to hip plate 33, the mounting of shoulder disc 33 on shaft 42, and all other details of the manikin not specifically shown in Fig. 9 are similar to those shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8.

As mentioned above, a head 53, representing that of a man or woman, is adapted to be screwed onto the upper end of shafts 4| and M to complete the structure of the manikin. It is also contemplated that the manikin will be provided with clothing of any suitable character, such as indicated in the drawings, so dressed upon the figure as not to interfere with its mechanical functioning. The clothing, of course, may be changeable, as are the heads, so that the manikins used in a match may be appropriately dressed to represent the various players. In this connection, it may also be desirable to correlate the colors of the clothing of the various manikins with the markings of the balls so that each player will easily be able to identify his ball at any time during the game.

The above described golf manikin is disclosed and claimed in my application Serial No. 557,703, filed August 17, 1931, as a division of the present application.

In playing this game, the usual rules of golf obtain although it is permissible to formulate additional local rules as is common practice in the outdoor game. The game board or course is first prepared for play by setting it up in any suitable place where adequate space is available. In cases where the game is installed in clubs, hotels, amusement parks, etc., the layout will usually be permanently attached to its support and no preparation of the board will be necessary, but in the preferred embodiment, the individual, portable sections will be placed upon card tables, or other suitable supports, and connected together to form a course of any desired length and layout. If flexible mats of the form shown in Figs. 4 and 5 are used, they would first be unrolled and spread out on the tables, have their green and hazard units inserted in the proper recesses, and then be temporarily secured to the tables by the means provided.

The game is then played in the usual manner starting from Number 1 tee. The ball is teed up and the manikin placed in the proper position to make the drive, all operations being performed by the individual playing the game. The stance, or position of the feet, is first adjusted and then the position of the arm and body. The angle of the club head and the length of the shaft are also fixed in accordance with the judgment of the player and the ball is addressed. In making the stroke, the player grasps the actuating arm of the rotatable shoulder disk in one hand, using the other to steady the manikin, if necessary, and positively moves the club throughout a complete stroke.

Should the stroke be poorly executed due either to an error in judgment as to stance, etc., or to an improper use of physical force, a sliced, hooked, topped or dubbed shot will result just as in the regular game, due to the novel construction of the manikin.

After the drive has been made, the manikin will be moved by the player up to where the ball lies, the stance, club head, and length of shaft again adjusted and the second shot played, the amount of force used and the length of the swing again depending upon the judgment of the player. When the ball reaches the green, the club is adjusted for putting, and a slight tap used to put the ball in the hole.

The score is recorded in the same way as in the regular game, and any desired number of holes may be played in the above described manner to constitute the game. It Will be understood that a plurality of manikins and balls may be provided so that the game may be: played by twosomes, threesomes and foursomes as well as by single players, and matches arranged as in the regular game.

There is thus provided by the present invention a novel game of miniature golf which closely simulates in all its details the well-known outdoor game and which is instructive as Well as entertaining, requiring a degree of personal skill comparable to that exercised in the regular game and thus affording a desirable means of practice and study of the game in general. A novel form of game board is provided having a surface on which are accurately reproduced in miniature the physical characteristics of a golf course, and being of such construction as to be readily portable and easily attached to any suitable support for play. The game board may also be constructed with a playing surface on each side so as to afford a variation in the layout of the course.

It will be obvious that the invention is not limited to the exact forms described and illustrated in the drawings, but is capable of a variety of mechanical embodiments. For example, it is contemplated that the playing board may be permanently attached to its support and that an entire l8 hole course may be constructed as a unit. Such a layout would be well adapted for use in a club, hotel or amusement park, in which case it would probably be preferable to provide the manikin with a coin-operated locking device whereby it would be unlocked by the deposit of a coin and would automatically re-lock after the elapse of a predetermined period of time, or after a certain number of strokes have been played. Also, the layout of the playing surface may be designed to represent any desired actual or imaginary course in place of that shown in the drawings. Various other changes, which will now appear to those skilled in the art, may be made in the form, details of construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit of the invention, and reference is therefore to be had to the appended claims for a. definition of the limits of the invention.

What is claimed is 1. In a golf game, a playing board comprising a plurality of individual sections, the surface of eac h section comprising a miniature reproduction of a portion of a golf course, and means for connecting any edge of one of said sections to any edge of any other section to form a miniature golf course of any desired layout, said last named means comprising a trough of resilient material adapted for detachable engagement with any two sections to be connected.

2. In a golf game, a playing board comprising a plurality of individual sections, both surfaces of each section comprising a miniature reproduction of a portion of a golf course, means for supporting each section for play on either side thereof in such position that the under surface of said board is out of contact with the supporting surface, and means for connecting any edge of one of said sections to any edge of any other section to form a miniature golf course of any desired layout, said last named means comprising a trough of resilient material adapted for detachable engagement with any two sections to be connected.

WILLIAM H. STAYTON.

US2014992A 1930-07-03 1930-07-03 Golf game Expired - Lifetime US2014992A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750192A (en) * 1949-11-07 1956-06-12 Haslett Elmer Table ball game devices
US3735988A (en) * 1971-06-17 1973-05-29 D J Palmer Practice putting surface
US3809404A (en) * 1972-10-04 1974-05-07 A Fikse Miniature golf game and golfer
US4058313A (en) * 1976-05-24 1977-11-15 Fred Spradlin Golf game
US6179721B1 (en) * 1999-03-22 2001-01-30 Paul C. Bevan Golf putting apparatus with variable surface
US20070205553A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2007-09-06 Turley Jeffrey D Apparatus for table golf game

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750192A (en) * 1949-11-07 1956-06-12 Haslett Elmer Table ball game devices
US3735988A (en) * 1971-06-17 1973-05-29 D J Palmer Practice putting surface
US3809404A (en) * 1972-10-04 1974-05-07 A Fikse Miniature golf game and golfer
US4058313A (en) * 1976-05-24 1977-11-15 Fred Spradlin Golf game
US6179721B1 (en) * 1999-03-22 2001-01-30 Paul C. Bevan Golf putting apparatus with variable surface
US20070205553A1 (en) * 2004-05-26 2007-09-06 Turley Jeffrey D Apparatus for table golf game

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