US20140379435A1 - Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution - Google Patents

Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140379435A1
US20140379435A1 US14/272,435 US201414272435A US2014379435A1 US 20140379435 A1 US20140379435 A1 US 20140379435A1 US 201414272435 A US201414272435 A US 201414272435A US 2014379435 A1 US2014379435 A1 US 2014379435A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
plurality
strategic
initiative
organization
perspective
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US14/272,435
Inventor
Isam Yahia AL-FILALI
Original Assignee
Isam Yahia AL-FILALI
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201361820539P priority Critical
Application filed by Isam Yahia AL-FILALI filed Critical Isam Yahia AL-FILALI
Priority to US14/272,435 priority patent/US20140379435A1/en
Publication of US20140379435A1 publication Critical patent/US20140379435A1/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/063Operations research or analysis
    • G06Q10/0637Strategic management or analysis
    • G06Q10/06375Prediction of business process outcome or impact based on a proposed change
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/063Operations research or analysis
    • G06Q10/0637Strategic management or analysis

Abstract

Strategic planning and strategy execution is important in organizations of various sizes and types, such as business and industry, government, and nonprofit organizations. While strategic planning and strategy execution are important, present systems and methods present challenges in providing for a system that links all aspects of strategic planning and strategy execution and communicates strategic planning and strategy execution throughout an organization. The present disclosure provides a system and method with an ability to articulate and align objectives, measures, targets, resources, activities, and outputs with desired outcome(s) and desired impact.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/820,539, filed on May 7, 2013, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This disclosure relates to systems and methods of performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution.
  • BACKGROUND
  • In any environment where strategic planning and strategy execution are conducted, which includes performance management and communication of management goals, vision, objectives, measures, and desired outcomes, various techniques have been created to perform and align various aspects of the strategic planning and strategy execution. For example, a technique called a balanced scorecard and a technique called a logic model perform some aspects of strategic planning and strategy execution. The balanced scorecard is used mainly to measure, monitor, and report performance indicators of programs. Once overall strategies have been defined, the logic model is employed for development of details of individual programs, including performance indicators.
  • SUMMARY
  • This disclosure provides a system for developing a performance management framework, comprising a management system, an initiative interface system, a communication system, and a controller connected to the management system, the initiative interface system, and the communication system. The system further comprises providing a vision, at least one goal, and a strategy to the management system. The system also comprises developing at least one objective, at least one measure, and at least one target in the initiative interface system, for at least one of a plurality of perspectives, including an organization financial perspective, an organization customer perspective, an organization internal business processes perspective, and an organization learning and growth perspective, using the vision, the at least one goal, and the strategy. The system also comprises linking at least one of the organization financial perspective, the organization customer perspective, the organization internal business processes perspective, and the organization learning and growth perspective to at least one strategic initiative outcome and to at least one strategic initiative impact, and providing at least one of the organization financial perspective, the organization customer perspective, the organization internal business processes perspective, the organization learning and growth perspective, at least one strategic initiative outcome, at least one strategic initiative impact, and the link to at least one of a workforce, a management team, and a leadership through the communication system.
  • This disclosure also provides a method for developing a performance management framework, comprising providing a vision, at least one goal, and a strategy. The method also comprises developing at least one objective, at least one measure, and at least one target, for at least one of a plurality of perspectives, including an organization financial perspective, an organization customer perspective, an organization internal business processes perspective, and an organization learning and growth perspective, using the vision, the at least one goal, and the strategy. The method further comprises linking at least one of the organization financial perspective, the organization customer perspective, the organization internal business processes perspective, and the organization learning and growth perspective to at least one strategic initiative outcome and to at least one strategic initiative impact.
  • This disclosure also provides a method of providing a communication tool for an organization, the method comprising providing a strategic initiative including a plurality of inputs/resources, a plurality of activities, a plurality of outputs, a plurality of outcomes, an impact, and a plurality of key perspectives, including a financial perspective, a customer perspective, an internal business processes perspective, and a learning and growth perspective. The method further comprises providing a cause and effect relationship between the plurality of key perspectives and the plurality of inputs/resources, the plurality of activities, the plurality of outputs, the plurality of outcomes, the impact, and the plurality of key perspectives.
  • Advantages and features of the embodiments of this disclosure will become more apparent from the following detailed description of exemplary embodiments when viewed in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a representation of a conventional balanced scorecard.
  • FIG. 2 is a representation of a generic Reyada balanced scorecard for not-for-profit organizations.
  • FIG. 3 is a representation of a conventional logic model.
  • FIG. 4 is a process flow of an integrated model in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 5 is an alternative version of the process flow of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 is a process flow diagram for the integrated model of FIG. 4 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 7 is a process flow diagram of an integrated model as a strategic initiative management tool in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 8 is an integrated model template in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 9 is an embodiment of FIG. 8 more appropriate for application in knowledge based economies.
  • FIG. 10 is an adaptation of the embodiment of FIG. 9 in a University application.
  • FIG. 11 is the distribution of objectives among the dimensions of the model in FIG. 10.
  • FIG. 12 is a representation of an example of the relationship of resources and activities.
  • FIG. 13 is a strategic initiative system in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 14 is a strategic initiative module of the strategic initiative system of FIG. 13 in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 15 is an example of the application of the integrated model in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present disclosure.
  • FIG. 16 is a first project of the example of FIG. 15.
  • FIG. 17 is a second project of the example of FIG. 15.
  • FIG. 18 is a third project of the example of FIG. 15.
  • FIG. 19 is a fourth project of the example of FIG. 15.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Strategic planning and strategy execution is often important in organizations of various sizes and types, such as business and industry, government, and nonprofit organizations. While strategic planning and strategy execution are important, present systems and methods present challenges in providing for a system that links all aspects of strategic planning and strategy execution and communicates strategic planning and strategy execution throughout an organization. As described further hereinbelow, the present disclosure uses one or more Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) as a part of strategic planning and strategy execution, and the system and method of the present disclosure, which may be termed a Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution, provide an ability to articulate and align objectives, measures, targets, resources, activities, and outputs with desired outcome(s) and desired impact(s).
  • Applicant recognized that many organizations do an adequate job of strategic planning, only to see the effort go to waste as execution fails, which may be due to poor alignment of objectives, measures, targets, resources, activities, and outputs with desired outcomes, and a lack of understanding of how a strategic initiative, which requires the strategic planning and strategy execution, works, and the staff responsibilities required to make the strategic initiative work. In order to successfully execute a corporate strategy, a communication tool that facilitates communication of one or more corporate strategic objectives, measures, targets, initiatives, and desired outcomes to all levels of a workforce and one or more stakeholders is valuable. Such a tool is preferably implemented with a controller and system to provide the benefits of such equipment, including rapid communication of a changing environment and coordination between geographically separated portions of an organization. In addition, aligning the corporate strategy to an operational execution is critical to the success of implementing the corporate strategy. However, organizations routinely fail to transition a planning effort for a corporate strategy beyond a corporate planning activity into one or more operational layers of the organization. The Reyada system and method of the present disclosure provide a plurality of links from corporate strategic objectives to execution of objective-supporting corporate strategic initiatives.
  • The present disclosure provides an integrated model that seamlessly combines the capabilities of the balanced scorecard and the logic model approaches as well as providing additional capabilities to allocate and manage resources, to keep the strategic initiative on track, and to communicate quickly and effectively with the workforce and the stakeholder(s), especially when using one or more controllers and dispersed computing, such as a server and individual communications devices, which may include wired or wireless enabled laptops, tablets, smart phones, and other devices with the ability to connect to other similar devices, either directly or through a server. The integrated model features powerful tools to facilitate translating corporate strategy and management strategy objectives into actionable strategic initiatives. The integrated model also provides the capability to monitor performance of various strategic activities with non-financial and financial measures. The integrated model includes a framework that articulates and aligns objectives, measures, and targets with desired outcomes. The integrated model brings strategic initiative concepts and dreams to life and lets stakeholders try ideas and apply theories to a model or picture of how the strategic initiative would function, and provides stakeholders with a road map describing a sequence of related events connecting the need for the strategic initiative with the strategic initiative's desired outcomes or results. The integrated model helps stakeholders, some of whom may be members of the workforce, visualize and understand how human and financial investments can contribute to achieving intended or desired strategic initiative outcomes or goals and can lead to strategic initiative improvements. The integrated model can serve as a workforce communication tool that facilitates communication of corporate strategic objectives, measures, targets, and desired outcomes to all levels of the workforce and to stakeholders, especially when coupled with a controller or server connected to communication devices of the workforce and stakeholders, such as wired or wirelessly connected laptops, tables, PDA's, smart phones, and other devices performing similar functions.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a balanced scorecard is shown and indicated generally at 20. Balanced scorecard 20 was originated by Dr. Robert Kaplan of the Harvard Business School and Dr. David Norton in the mid-1990's as a performance measurement framework that added strategic non-financial performance measures to traditional financial metrics to give corporate managers and executives a “balanced” view of organizational performance. The balanced scorecard can be used by managers to keep track of the execution of corporate activities by the workforce or staff within their control and to monitor the consequences arising from these corporate activities. The balanced scorecard is one of the most widely adopted performance management tools or frameworks reported in a 2013 annual survey of management tools conducted by Management Tools & Trends published by Bain & Company.
  • Balanced scorecard 20 is a strategic planning and strategic management framework or system used extensively in business and industry, government, and nonprofit organizations worldwide to align corporate activities to the corporate vision and corporate strategy of the organization, to improve internal and external communications, and monitor organizational performance against management or strategic goals. Balanced scorecard 20 assists organizations in overcoming two fundamental problems: effectively measuring organizational performance, and successfully implementing corporate strategy. Balanced scorecard 20 also represents a balance between: financial and nonfinancial indicators; internal and external constituents of the organization; and leading and lagging indicators. The financial indicators may be represented as a financial perspective 22. Nonfinancial indicators may be represented as an internal business processes perspective 24, a customer perspective 26, and a learning and growth perspective 28. The balanced scorecard further translates a mission, one or more values, the vision, and the corporate strategy into the plurality of perspectives, including financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28.
  • Financial perspective 22 includes one or more financial objectives that represent the long term goal of the organization to provide superior returns based on an invested capital. Financial objectives typically relate to a measured profitability, an organization's liquidity, and a financial stability of the organization. Each profitability-related measure should be part of a link of cause-and-effect relationships that cumulate in improving financial performance. One or more financial performance measures indicate whether an organization's corporate strategy, an implementation of the corporate strategy, and an execution of the corporate strategy are contributing to a bottom line improvement in profitability. Financial perspective 22 objectives are preferably linked to a sequence of activities that must be accomplished with one or more financial processes, customers, one or more internal processes, with the workforce or employees, and with one or more corporate or organization systems to deliver long term economic performance.
  • Internal business processes perspective 24 enables organizations to identify the processes that are the most critical processes for achieving one or more customer and financial objectives. Each organization has a unique set of processes for creating value for customers and producing financial results. The process of deriving objectives and measures for internal business processes perspective 24 is based on at least one strategy to meet stakeholder, stockholder, and targeted customer expectations. Examples of critical internal business processes include innovation, operations, and post-sale support processes.
  • Learning and growth perspective 28 enables organizations to develop learning and growth objectives and measures to drive organizational learning and growth to achieve breakthrough organizational performance. Learning and growth perspective 28 objectives provide an infrastructure to enable and drive excellent outcomes of financial perspective 22 objectives, internal business processes perspective 24 objectives, and customer perspective 26 objectives. Attributes that may be used to identify specific objectives of learning and growth perspective 28 include workforce or employee capabilities, information system capabilities, workforce or employee and management motivation, workforce or employee empowerment, and organizational alignment. Organizational alignment occurs when all levels of management and the workforce are working toward the same organizational goals.
  • Customer perspective 26 enables organizations to align a plurality of core customer outcome measures, and to identify and measure at least one value proposition the customer outcome measures will deliver to targeted customers and to market segments. Core customer outcome measurements include customer or market share, retention, acquisition, satisfaction, and profitability. Attributes that may be used to identify specific value proposition objectives and measures for targeted customers and market segments include product and service attributes, customer relationships, organization or product image, and organization or product reputation.
  • Conventional balanced scorecard 20 may be viewed as basically an intuitive framework that guides development of appropriate tools for strategic management, which are compatible with the nature of organization and surrounding circumstances without the restrictive confines of the original model. Emerging tools could be totally different in appearance and content from the original skeletal structure. One could envision a generic balanced scorecard that can involve more than four dimensions, has drastically different performance measures, and is flexible enough to allow adaptation to entirely different organizations with diverse priorities, discrete characteristics, and distinct underlying situations. A new tool has to befit the evolution of economy and society and underscores the changing priorities of institutions. While a growing finance and associated shareholders' content were the prime mover of earlier planners and managers, knowledge is becoming at the forefront of any strategic management schema.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a newly formulated Reyada balanced scorecard is shown and indicated generally at 20 a. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a gives corporate managers and executives a “balanced” view of organizational performance. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a can be used by managers to keep track of the execution of corporate activities by the workforce or staff within their control and to monitor the consequences arising from these corporate activities, preferably when coupled with a communication system including a plurality of communication devices, such as wired or wireless personal computers, laptops, tablets, PDA's, smart phones, and other devices performing a similar function. Indeed, it can be expensive and cumbersome to implement Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a in the absence of such a system, given the typical geographic separation of the input sources and the need to communicate in relatively short time frames, such as hours or even minutes. Further, Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a may be ineffective in the absence of a communication system that permits effective inputs and outputs from a plurality of workforce personnel, staff, and/or stakeholders.
  • Novel multi-dimension knowledge-based balanced scorecard 20 a is devised as a component of the Reyada System. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a is compatible with the driving forces of a knowledge-based economy and harmonious with the vivacity of a knowledge-based society, building on the capabilities of a pervasive communication system connecting workforce, staff, and stakeholders that features near instantaneous communication via computers, such as PC's and laptops, netbooks, tablets, PDA's, smart phones, and other devices having equivalent capabilities. The associated indicators of Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a, such as innovation and knowledge exchange, may be taken into account when a balance between different perspectives needs to be stricken. The flexibility and versatility of the disclosed Reyada balanced scorecard allows individual organizations to customize situation-aware tools compatible with their aspirations and strategic management philosophy and compatible available communication tools for the efficient and effective coordination of inputs and outputs.
  • In any of the balanced scorecard forms, identification of perspectives and associated key performance indicators (KPI), whether leading indicators (evidencing and measuring performance in the organization) or lagging indicators (performance drivers), need to be consistent with the following rules: The perspectives are: unique and totally independent from each other with no overlaps between them; alignable with the strategy or strategic vision; compatible with the mission of the organization and accentuation of the knowledge capital. The indicators are commensurable and independent and inclusive of knowledge related variables. Both the perspectives and the indicators are accommodating for diversity among components of the organization and tailored to prevailing institutional, societal, and economic environments.
  • Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a is a strategic planning and strategic management framework or system that can be used extensively in business and industry, government, and most particularly nonprofit organizations worldwide to align corporate activities to the corporate vision and corporate strategy of the organization, to improve internal and external communications, and monitor organizational performance against management or strategic goals. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a, when combined with a communication system and one or more controllers to connect input sources to appropriate processing capabilities and providing outputs to one or more users, such as staff, workforce, and/or stakeholders, assists organizations in overcoming two fundamental problems: effectively measuring organizational performance; and successfully implementing corporate strategy. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a also represents a balance between: key performance indicators; internal and external constituents of the organization; and leading and lagging indicators. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a further translates a mission, one or more values, a vision, and a corporate strategy into a plurality of perspectives, including a knowledge institution perspective 22 a, an internal knowledge processes perspective 24 a, a knowledge societal perspective 26 a, and an indispensable knowledge growth perspective 28 a. The four perspectives are independently aligned with the institution's vision and strategic objectives. Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a is an aid to assure proper overall outcome, noting that even the best objectives can be achieved badly when the improvement of one aspect can be accomplished at the expense of another. The financial aspects of the institution are not clangorously inserted as an independent dimension; rather they are embedded in the KPIs of each dimension, whether directly or indirectly. Outreach to the community, and contribution to the wellness and building of the knowledge foundation of the society in general will attract financial contributions to advance the knowledge infrastructure of the institution. Grounding internal processes on knowledge will direct organization efforts to promote innovation and materialize inventions that can be an independent source of income through licensing and attract funds from the private sector.
  • Internal knowledge processes perspective 24 a focuses on enhancement of the robustness and resilience of institution internal processes, both competitive and collaborative, and enables organizations to identify the processes that are the most critical processes for achieving one or more societal and institutional objectives. Each organization has a unique set of processes for creating value for society and producing knowledge-based economic results. The process of deriving objectives and measures for internal knowledge processes perspective 24 a is based on at least one strategy to meet societal, and targeted stakeholder expectations. Examples of critical internal knowledge processes include innovation, operations, and operation support processes.
  • Knowledge growth perspective 28 a enables organizations to develop indispensable knowledge growth objectives and measures to drive organizational knowledge growth to achieve breakthrough organizational performance. Knowledge growth perspective 28 a objectives provide an improved human resources and knowledge infrastructure to enable and drive excellent outcomes of institution perspective 22 a objectives, internal knowledge processes perspective 24 a objectives, and knowledge societal perspective 26 a objectives. Attributes that may be used to identify specific objectives of knowledge growth perspective 28 a include workforce or employee capabilities, information system capabilities, workforce or employee and management motivation, workforce or employee empowerment, and organizational alignment. Organizational alignment occurs when all levels of management and the workforce are working toward the same organizational goals.
  • Societal perspective 26 a enables organizations to align a plurality of core societal outcome measures, and to identify and measure at least one value proposition the stakeholder outcome measures will deliver to targeted societal segments. Core societal outcome measurements include stakeholders' share, retention, acquisition, and satisfaction. Attributes that may be used to identify specific value proposition objectives and measures for targeted societal segments include product and service attributes, societal relationships, organization or product image, and organization or product reputation.
  • A comparison between the focus of conventional balanced scorecard 20 of FIG. 1 and Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a of FIG. 2 is given in Table 1. The questions to be answered by each perspective are compared in Table 2 for conventional balanced scorecard 20 of FIG. 1 and Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a of FIG. 2.
  • TABLE 1
    Focus of Conventional and Reyada Balanced Scorecards
    Conventional
    Balanced Reyada Balanced
    Dimension Scorecard Dimension Scorecard
    Financial 22 Improve Institutional Improve institutional
    organizational 22a knowledge value
    shareholder value
    Customer 26 Improve customer Societal 26a Improve satisfaction
    satisfaction and and relations with all
    relations society segments
    Internal Optimize Internal Enhance robustness
    Business particular Knowledge and resilience of
    Processes 24 internal business Processes 24a institutional internal
    processes processes, both
    competitive and
    collaborative
    Learning and Continuous Knowledge Improve human
    growth 28 organizational Growth 28a resources and
    learning and knowledge
    growth infrastructure
  • TABLE 2
    Questions to be answered by the Conventional and Reyada Balanced Scorecards
    Dimension Balanced Scorecard Dimension KBSC
    Financial 22 How should we Institutional 22a How will the institution as an
    appear to our integrated organization
    shareholders? become a guide light of
    knowledge, and a frontier for
    economic growth?
    Customer 26 How should we Societal 26a How will the institution
    appear to our successfully build a
    customers? knowledge society through
    scientific, cultural and
    pioneering research
    distinction?
    Internal What processes Internal What are the procedural
    Business must we excel at? Knowledge processes that we have to
    Processes 24 Processes 24a excel at to satisfy institution
    stakeholders?
    Learning How can we Knowledge How can we dedicate our
    and growth 28 sustain our ability Growth efforts to innovation and
    to change and Requirements 28a improvement to advance
    improve? institution knowledge
    infrastructure and human
    capital?
  • Referring to FIG. 3, a logic model is shown and generally indicated at 30. The term “logic model” surfaced in the mid-1990's when it began to be applied to a framework developed in the 1960's and the 1970's by Edward Suchman, reference Evaluative Research: Principles and Practice in Public Service and Social Action Programs, by E. A. Suchman, copyright 1967, and by Carol Weiss, reference Evaluation Research: Methods for Assessing Program Effectiveness, by C. Weiss and published by Prentice-Hall, copyright 1972. The logic model was enhanced by Joseph Wholey, reference Evaluation and Effective Public Management, by J. S. Wholey and published by Little-Brown, copyright 1983, and by Peter Rossi and Howard Freeman in the 1980's, reference Evaluation: A Systematic Approach, by P. H. Rossi and H. E. Freeman and published by Sage Publications, copyright 1987.
  • Logic model 30 is used to paint a picture of how an organization's proposed strategic initiative will work. Logic model 30 is a graphical depiction of the logical relationships between a plurality of elements, including resources 32, a plurality of activities 34, at least one output 36, and at least one outcome 38 of the strategic initiative, which may be considered elements of logic model 30. These elements are driven by a situation 76 and priorities 78. While there are many ways in which logic model 30 and logic models in general can be presented, the underlying purpose of constructing a logic model is to assess at least one if-then causal relationship between the elements of the strategic initiative. If resources 32 are available for the strategic initiative, then activities 34 can be implemented. If activities 34 are implemented successfully, then at least one output 36 and at least one outcome 38 can be expected. At least one impact may also result from activities 34, described in further detail hereinbelow.
  • Logic model 30 is a tool used most often by managers and evaluators of strategic initiatives to evaluate the effectiveness of a strategic initiative. Logic models are most often used in the evaluation stage of a strategic initiative. However, logic models can be used during planning and implementation. Logic models are a systematic and visual way to present and share the understanding of the relationship among the plurality of resources 32 available to operate the strategic initiative, the plurality of activities 34 planned to accomplish the strategic initiative, and at least one outcome 38 desired from the strategic initiative, which may be described as a change or a result.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, an integrated model is shown and generally indicated at 40. Integrated model 40 of the present disclosure is a visual performance management framework that enables holistic and pervasive operational performance management across an entire business. Integrated model 40 leverages the capabilities, benefits, and advantages of both the balanced scorecard and the logic model approaches. Integrated model 40 develops cause-and-effect or causal relationships between an organization's objectives, measures, and targets and the organization's strategic initiative's inputs or resources, activities, and outputs. Integrated model 40 also predicts, monitors and evaluates one or more outcomes and impacts within four balanced perspectives, financial, customer, internal business processes, and learning and growth. Thus, integrated model 40 transforms objectives, measures, targets, inputs, activities, and outputs into predicted outcomes and impacts.
  • Integrated model 40 as shown as a block diagram in FIG. 4 is a systematic way to present major components or elements of a strategic initiative. In the context of this disclosure, a strategic initiative is a tool of the strategy execution and often requires organizational cross-functional support to succeed. The strategic initiative consists of a collection of finite duration discretionary programs and projects that are designed to help the organization achieve its targeted performance. The strategic initiative responds to a strategic issue or situation that, when resolved, will have a significant impact on a desired organization performance. The strategic initiative includes planning, management, and evaluation. It should thus be understood that integrated model 40 may also be described as strategic initiative integrated model 40.
  • FIG. 4 describes key causal relationships between an organizations vision 42 and an organization's strategy 44 with a strategic initiative's objectives, 46, performance measures 48, and targets 50. In the context of this disclosure, vision 42 is an aspirational description of what an organization would like to achieve or accomplish in the mid-term or long-term future. Vision 42 is intended to serve as a clear guide for choosing current and future courses of action. Strategy 44 is a direction and a scope of an organization over the long term, which achieves advantages for the organization through its configuration of resources within an environment that is often challenging. Strategy 44 is intended to meet the needs of one or more markets and to fulfill stakeholder expectations of the organization. Strategy 44 is an expression of what the organization must do to get from one reference point to another reference point, and is usually developed at the top levels of the organization, but is often or even typically executed by lower levels within the organization. In general, strategies, such as strategy 44, are thoughtfully constructed plans, methods or actions of how to achieve a goal, objective 46, or a mission.
  • Objectives 46 are what an organization must do to achieve its goals or outcomes and to make its strategy 44 succeed. Each strategic objective 46 relates to a goal, and there may be more than one objective 46 to help achieve a goal. Any strategic objective, such as objective 46, is preferably Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and has a Timeline, which are sometimes called the SMART criteria. Performance measures 48 are a quantitative or qualitative tool to assess progress toward an outcome or a goal. Every performance measure 48 selected should be part of a link of cause-and-effect relationships that cumulate in improving business performance. Targets 50 are the expected levels of performance or improvement required in the future. Targets 50 are used to evaluate performance measurement data to access performance achieved compared to performance expected. Targets 50 put teeth into strategy 44 by imposing criteria that the organization must achieve.
  • A situation statement 52 describes the problem or challenge—a strategic situation—that will be resolved by the strategic initiative. Situation statement 52 communicates the relevance of the strategic initiative and establishes a baseline for comparison at a closure of the strategic initiative. Situation statement 52 includes information about the problem or challenge. For example, what are the causes of the problem or challenge, the symptoms of the problem or challenge, and the likely consequences if nothing is done to resolve the problem or challenge. Situation statement 52 may include the actual or projected costs of the problem or challenge, a description of who is affected by the problem or challenge, and the importance of the problem or challenge to stakeholders.
  • Integrated model 40 also identifies and provides cause-and-effect relationships between at least one input or resource 54, at least one planned activity 56, at least one output 58, and at least one outcome 60. The cause-and-effect relationships may also include at least one impact 62. Integrated model 40 further identifies at least one assumption 64 about the people involved in the strategic initiative, inputs or resources 54, the way leadership thinks integrated model 40 will work, and strategy 44. In addition, integrated model 40 identifies and provides cause-and-effect relationships between outcome(s) 60, impact(s) 62, and at least one external influence 66 that may affect desired results from the strategic initiative.
  • Inputs or resources 54 are the available resources to make planned activities 56, which are part of a strategic initiative scope of work, operational, and are essential for planned activities 56 to occur. Inputs or resources 54 include one or more human, financial, and organizational resources that a strategic initiative has available to direct toward performing planned activities 56. Examples of inputs or resources 54 include people, funds, facilities, knowledge, time, utilities, raw materials, finished materials, expendable supplies, transportation, etc.
  • Planned activities 56 are those tasks or scope of work that the strategic initiative accomplishes using inputs or resources 54. Activities 56 are one or more processes, operational or systemic tools, events, technology, and actions that are an intentional part of the implementation of the strategic initiative. Activities 56 are used to bring about outcome(s) 60 and potentially one or more impact(s) 62.
  • Output(s) 58 are the products, capital goods, and services that result from a strategic initiative, which may also be consider a development intervention because a strategic initiative attempts to intervene or change the way things are done at an organization. In some cases, such intervention may be to put into place new systems, methods, technologies, etc. that previously did not exist. In other cases, such intervention may be to modify existing systems, methods, technologies, etc. Output(s) 58 may also include changes resulting from the development intervention which are relevant to the achievement of outcome(s) 60. Output(s) 58 are typically the direct result of planned activities 56.
  • Output(s) 58 are an indication or measure of activities 56 to show that activities 56 have been completed and that activities 56 necessary to achieve objectives 46 have been identified. Output(s) 58 are usually described in terms of the size or scope of the services and products delivered or produced by the strategic initiative. Output(s) 58 indicate if a strategic initiative was delivered to the intended audience(s) in the intended dose, amount, or quantity. Strategic initiative output(s) 58 might be, for example, the number of classes taught, meetings held, materials produced, materials distributed, strategic initiative participation rates, strategic initiative demography, and/or the hours of each type of service produced.
  • Describing output(s) 58 allows us to establish linkages between situation statement 52 and impact(s) 62 of the strategic initiative. Examples of output(s) 58 that help link situation statement 52 and impact(s) 62 include: publications such as articles, bulletins, fact sheets, handbooks, and web pages; decision aids such as software, worksheets, models; teaching events such as workshops, field days, tours, and short courses; and discovery and application activities, such as research plots, demonstration plots, and product trials.
  • Outcome(s) 60 are the observable behavioral, institutional, and societal changes that take place over three to ten years, usually as a result of coordinated short term investments in individual and organizational capacity building for key development stakeholders. Outcome(s) 60 are the benefits, changes, or results anticipated to be derived from planned activities 56 and output(s) 58. Outcome(s) 60 provide an answer to what happened as a result of the strategic initiative, and outcome(s) 60 are useful to communicate the effects of the investment. Examples of outcome(s) 60 are specific changes in behavior or attitude of strategic initiative participants, knowledge, skills, status, and level of functioning. Strategic initiative outcome(s) 60 may be short term, intermediate term, or long term.
  • Short term outcomes should be attainable within one to three years. Examples of short term outcomes include changes in awareness, knowledge, skills, motivation, and attitude. Awareness includes customer recognition of the problem or challenge. Knowledge includes customer understanding of the cause(s) of the problem or challenge and potential solutions to the problem or challenge. Skills include customer possession of the skills needed to resolve the problem or challenge. Motivations include a customer desire to effect change. Attitude or behavior includes customer belief that their actions can make a difference in resolving the problem or challenge.
  • Intermediate term outcomes are often achievable within four to six years. Examples of intermediate term outcomes include changes that follow the short term outcomes, such as changes in practices, behaviors, policies, technologies, and management strategies. Practices are those procedures or steps used by participants in the organization, for example stakeholders, management, the work force, and in some cases, customers. Behaviors are exhibited by people, or collectively, organizations or groups within organizations. Policies are adopted by businesses, governments, and other types of organizations, and guide how the organization is operated. Technologies are those employed by the workforce and management, but also may include technologies employed by customers, suppliers, and stakeholders. Management strategies are typically implemented by individuals or groups on the management team or those with implied management authority, such as team leaders or teams empowered to implement management strategies.
  • Long term outcomes are often achievable within seven to ten years. Long term outcomes typically follow intermediate term outcomes when changed behaviors result in changed conditions, for example improved economic conditions, improved social conditions, improved environmental conditions, and improved political conditions. Improved economic conditions may include increased income or financial stability. Improved societal conditions may include reduced violence or improved cooperation between members of society. Improved environmental conditions may include improved air quality, decreased soil erosion, reduced runoff, and the like. Improved political conditions may include improved participation by members of a society or opportunity for members of a society.
  • Impact 62 is a fundamental intended or unintended change occurring in organizations, communities, or systems as a result of the strategic initiative's planned activities 56 within seven to ten years. Impact(s) 62 are the positive and/or negative, primary and secondary long term effects produced by the strategic initiative development intervention, either directly or indirectly, and either intended or unintended. Impact(s) 62 are the observable and measurable aspects of behavior, attitude, skills, knowledge, and other attributes that change as a result of involvement of the strategic initiative.
  • Assumption(s) 64 are the principles, beliefs, and ideas participants have about the strategic initiative, the people involved, and the way participants think it will work. Assumption(s) 64 are often qualitative assessments as opposed to quantitative assessments and are validated with research and experience. Examples of assumptions include the problem, challenge, or situation, resources and staff, methodologies, expectation of achievement, knowledge base, internal and external environment, and participants. The nature of assumptions can affect the progress of a strategic initiative by distorting, confusing, or misleading various elements of the strategic initiative.
  • External influence(s) 66 include the condition(s) that influence the success of the strategic initiative that are external to the strategic initiative and may be external to the organization. The strategic initiative has little or no control over external influence(s) 66. The environment in which the strategic initiative exists includes a variety of external factors that interact with and influence the action(s) of the strategic initiative. For example, institutional, community, and public policies may have either supporting of antagonistic effects on the strategic initiative. At the institutional level, schools may influence healthy eating habits in ways that are beyond the control of the organization, but these same influences may lead to wider social change. Documenting the social, physical, political, and institutional environments that can influence outcome(s) 60 helps to improve a planning process of the strategic initiative by identifying important partners and collaborators for the strategic initiative, the parts of the problem or challenge that the strategic initiative is able to realistically influence, the evaluation measures that will accurately reflect outcome(s) 60 of the strategic initiative, and any other needs that must be met in order to address the problem or challenge.
  • Referring to FIG. 5, an alternative version of the process flow of FIG. 4 is shown. FIG. 5 show an organization's strategic plan components, which are expressed in terms of an organization's mission 68, core values 70, vision 42, strategic goal(s) 72, and strategy 44. Strategic priorities will be used to generate a set of strategic initiative(s) 74, each of which is devoted to a specific situation, described in situation statement 52. Each strategic initiative 74 is aligned with specific objectives 46, performance measures 48, and targets 50. Each strategic initiative 74 requires specific inputs or resources 54 to perform planned activities 56. One or more initiative output(s) 58 are the direct result(s) of planned activities 56. Output(s) 58 provide one or more outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62, which are the benefits, changes or results from strategic initiative 74.
  • Mission 68 is often embodied as a mission statement, which is a brief description of an organization's fundamental purpose and may be a snapshot of the organization's current business. Core values 70 are a set of ideals that stakeholders value for the organization and that stakeholders use to make decisions and to keep the organization on track. Strategic goal(s) 72 are the milestone(s) an organization expects to achieve that evolve from the situation or strategic issue embodied in situation statement 52. Strategic goal(s) 72 transform strategic issues into specific performance targets 50 that can impact the entire organization. Strategic priorities are determined when strategic objective(s) 46 are ranked by their importance in achieving strategic goal(s) 72. All subsequent operational or tactical planning and resource allocation is based upon the strategic priorities.
  • Referring to FIG. 6, a Strategy Planning and Implementation (SPI) process flow is shown and generally indicated at 100. Strategy implementation is a process by which strategy 44 is turned into a set of actions, including strategic initiative(s) 74, programs, and projects. Organizations achieve their goals and create value through strategy implementation. The strategy implementation transforms an organization's conceptualized solutions into activities 56 and output(s) 58. Activities 56 ensure the realization of the organization's strategy 44. SPI process 100 is an exemplary embodiment process in accordance with the present disclosure that can be used in business and industry, government, and nonprofit organizations using KPI's. SPI process 100 articulates and aligns operations, objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50. Because of the source of inputs and the dispersal of outputs, SPI process 100 is preferably performed using a communication system including one or more controllers and a plurality of communication devices, such as wired or wirelessly connected computers, netbooks, notebook computers, tablets, PDA's, smart phones, and other devices that are capable of communication with other, similar devices. Such communication may be wired, such as through an Ethernet cable, or may be wireless, such as through Wi Fi or cellular communications. An exemplary embodiment of such a system capable of implementing SPI process 100 is described herein.
  • SPI process 100 begins with a start process 102, which initiates a strategic process to identify key aspects of an organization's strategy. Such identification may be provided through an exemplary management system and communicated through a server or controller. SPI process 100 moves from start process 102 to a consensus process 104. In consensus process 104, the organization's leadership or management begins building and gaining consensus on the organization's vision 42 and strategy 44 as a first step in using integrated model 40 as a framework for strategy implementation. Such consensus building may occur through a strategic initiative system that includes a management system, an initiative interface system, a communication system, and a server or controller. Control then passes from consensus process 104 to a translation process 106.
  • In translation process 106, leadership defines organizational objectives 46, which preferably occurs through a management system that is part of a strategic initiative system. Objectives 46 are what the organization must do to achieve strategic goals 72 and to make strategy 44 succeed. Objectives 46 identify what is critical to the future success of strategy 44. Each strategic objective 46 relates to a strategic goal 72, and there may be more than one strategic objective 46 related to each strategic goal 72. Objectives 46 are identified within four perspectives, financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28. Leadership or management ranks strategic objectives 46 by their importance in achieving strategic goal(s) 72 according to the strategic priorities, described hereinabove. After organizational objectives 46 have been defined, control moves from translation process 106 to a measures and targets identification process 108.
  • Leadership across the organization translates objectives into performance measure(s) 48 in measures and targets identification process 108, which preferably are communicated through the strategic initiative system. Every performance measure 48 selected is preferably part of at least one cause-and-effect relationship that cumulates in improving business performance. Leadership also defines at least one target 50 in measures and targets identification process 108 that are the expected levels of performance or improvement required in the future. Once performance measure(s) 48 and target(s) 50 have been established, control moves from measures and identification process 108 to a strategic initiatives process 110.
  • Strategic initiatives 74 will deliver objectives 46 are identified by leadership or management in strategic initiatives process 110. In addition, leadership or management may verify alignment of strategic initiative 74 with one or more of vision 42, strategy 44, mission 68, core values 70, and strategic goals 72. Because there are likely to be a plurality of strategic initiatives 74 at any one time, leadership or management typically prioritize strategic initiatives 74 based on relative costs of inputs or resources 54 and activities 56, and the potential value and risk of output(s) 58 and outcome(s) 60. In some situations, leadership or management may also consider impact(s) 62 when prioritizing strategic initiatives 74. Each strategic initiative 74 is tool of an organization's strategy execution and typically requires cross-functional team support to succeed. Strategic initiative 74 consists of a collection of finite duration discretionary projects and initiatives that are designed to help the organization achieve its target performance. Strategic initiative 74 responds to an issue, challenge, problem, or situation, collectively “problem,” that, when resolved, will have significant impact 62 on the organization's results, which may be financial results, market share, and/or other strategic indicators. For each strategic initiative 74, leadership or management defines situation statement 52 to communicate the relevance of strategic initiative 74, and establishes a baseline for comparison at a close of strategic initiative 74. Situation statement 52 includes a statement of the problem, including possible causes, symptoms, and possible or likely consequences if nothing is done to resolve the problem. Situation statement 52 may include actual or projected costs, a description of who is affected by the problem, and the importance of the problem to stakeholders. Each strategic initiative 74 is documented by recording a strategic initiative name or title and situation statement 52 into a template, such as a strategic initiative template 150 shown in FIG. 8. In addition, other aspects of each strategic initiative 74 may be documented in template 150, such as management allocated objectives 46, performance measures 48, and targets 50. Because of the complexity of obtaining information required to develop strategic initiatives 74, strategic initiatives process 110 is preferably conducted using the strategic initiative system, gathering information from an inventory system and communication through the management system. Once each strategic initiative 74 has been identified, aligned, and prioritized, control moves from strategic initiatives process 110 to an impact and external influences process 112.
  • While outcome(s) 60 are a direct result of activities 56 and output(s) 58, it is impact(s) 62 that is or are the desired result of each strategic initiative 74, because knowing the direction or heading of an organization is critical in picking the best route or path for an organization to use in accomplishing a corporate strategy. Impact(s) 62 are the ultimate end sought by each strategic initiative, frequently in alignment or synonymous with vision 42. Thus, one purpose of impact and external influences process 112 is to document the fundamental intended or unintended change or impact(s) 62 occurring within the organization, communities, or systems as a result of strategic initiative activities 56. Impact(s) 62 may also be recorded in template 150 of FIG. 8, which is preferably positioned as part of the strategic initiative system.
  • External influences 66, described hereinabove, may also be documented in this process and recorded in template 150. Leadership or management needs to take care in considering potential external influences because such influences can directly affect outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62, but can also be directly affected by outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62. Once desired impact(s) 62 and external influences 66 have been identified and document, control passes from impact and external influences process 112 to an outcomes process 114.
  • Results of strategic initiative 74 consist of outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62, both of which are described in outcomes process 114. Outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 each appear in sequence over time. Outcome(s) 60 are earlier indicators of progress toward results. Outcome(s) 60 are the benefits, changes, or results anticipated to be derived from planned activities 56 and output(s) 58. Outcome(s) 60 answer the question of what happened as a result of strategic initiative 74 and what is useful in communicating impact(s) 62 of the investment in strategic initiative 74. In many cases, outcomes may be identifiable only through the resources and capabilities of the strategic initiative system, using various sources of inputs and computing capability of communication devices positioned as part of the strategic initiative system. Additionally, one or more servers or controllers may be the repository for information obtain from outcomes process 114. Short term outcome(s) 60 of strategic initiative 74 should be attainable within one to three years, intermediate term outcome(s) 60 should be achievable within four to six years, and long term outcome(s) 60 should be reflected in impact(s) 62 within about seven to ten years, as described hereinabove. Outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 may be documented in template 150, described hereinabove. Once outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 have been described and documented, control passes from outcomes process 114 to a strategies and assumptions process 116.
  • In strategies and assumptions process 116, leadership identifies effective organizational strategies 44 likely to contribute to the results, i.e., outcome(s) 60 and/or impact(s) 62. Organizational strategies 44 with less relative value may be discarded in favor of those with higher relative value. Leadership or management also records and documents assumptions 64 that support specified organization strategies 44. Both strategies 44 and assumptions 64 may be documented in strategic initiative template 150, preferably positioned as part of the strategic initiative system. Once organization strategies 44 and assumptions 64 have been documented, control passes from strategies and assumptions process 116 to an activities process 118.
  • Planned activities 56 are identified by leadership or management in activities process 118, including processes, tools, events, technology, and actions that are an intentional part of strategic initiative 74 implementation. Activities 56 are used to bring about outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62. To properly document and communicate planned activities, activities process 118 is preferably conducted at least partially in the strategic initiative system, using the various resources of the strategic initiative system. Once planned activities 56 are identified, they may be recorded in strategic initiative template 150, and control passes from activities process 118 to an inputs/resources process 120.
  • Inputs/resources 54 required and essential to make a strategic initiative scope of work or activities 56 operational are identified by leadership or management in inputs/resources process 120. Inputs/resources 54 include one or more human, financial, and organizational resources that strategic initiative 74 has available to direct toward activities 56. Examples of inputs/resources 54 include people, further including, workforce, management, and stakeholders, funds, facilities, knowledge, time, utilities, raw materials, finished materials, expendable supplies, transportation, etc. All or portions of inputs/resources 54 are identified in the strategic initiative system to better track the availability and expenditure of such resources, and to assure proper allocation of resources. Once inputs/resources 54 have been identified and recorded, for example in strategic initiative template 150, control passes from inputs/resources process 120 to an outputs process 122.
  • Output(s) 58 include one or more products, capital goods, and services that directly result from a strategic initiative intervention or development, and more specifically, from activities 56, and are identified by leadership or management in outputs process 122. Output(s) 58 may also include changes resulting from strategic initiative activities 56 that are relevant to the achievement of outcome(s) 60. Output(s) 58 measure planned activities 56 to show that activities 56 identified as necessary to achieve objectives 46 have been completed. Output(s) 58 are often described in terms of a size or scope of products, capital goods, and services delivered and produced by strategic initiative 74. In many cases, output(s) 58 may be identifiable only as data in the strategic initiative system, which makes the communication devices and controller or server of the strategic initiative system important to the success of SPI process 100. Once output(s) 58 have been identified and recorded, for example in strategic initiative template 150, control passes from outputs process 122 to an end process 124, which terminates SPI process 100.
  • Referring now to FIG. 7, integrated model 40 is shown as a strategic initiative management tool or management process, generally indicated at 200. Management tool 200 is similar in many respects to integrated model 40, except certain portions of integrated model 40 are unnecessary for implementation of strategic initiative 74, and those portions are eliminated to transition from integrated model 40 to management tool 200. Generally, each of the elements of management tool 200 is identified by leadership or management, and may be considered process steps. Furthermore, because of the complexity of modern organizations, it is preferable that management tool be implemented in a communication system that includes one or more inter-connected (either by wire or wirelessly) computers, tablets, smart phones, etc., with inputs coming from one or more sources that may be geographically remote, data storage and analysis performed in one or more controllers, servers, etc., and communication provided by the system, conveying information contained in data storage or from the analysis. Management tool 200 begins with an objectives process 202, where leadership or management identifies essential objectives 46 that must be met to achieve an organization's strategy 44. Next, in a measures process 204 measures 48 are identified that define success in attainment of objectives 46. Following identification of measures 48, management or leadership identify improvement targets 50 in a targets process 206 that show how far and how fast strategic initiative 74 needs to go or extend in order to attain objectives 46. Next, management or leadership starts a new phase of a strategic initiative implementation 80 that involves specification of a budget and work plan 82. In this phase, management or leadership identifies inputs/resources 54 that include available resources to make the scope of work for strategic initiative 74 operational and essential for activities 56 to occur in an inputs/resources process 208. From definition of inputs/resources 54, management tool 200 moves to an activities process 210 where activities 56 are defined that includes, for example, the processes, tools, events, technology, and actions that are an intentional part of strategic initiative 74 implementation. After activities 56 are defined, output(s) 58 are defined in an outputs process 212. Output(s) 58 may include, for example, products, capital goods, and services those results from activities 56. Short term, intermediate term, and long term outcome(s) 60 are then defined in an outcomes process 214. Outcome(s) 60 includes observable behavioral, institutional, and societal changes. Lastly, impact(s) 62 are defined or described in an impact process 216. Impact(s) 62 can include the fundamental intended or unintended change(s) occurring in organizations, communities, or systems as a result of strategic initiative 74.
  • Referring now to FIG. 8, strategic initiative template 150, which is a template for integrated model 40, is shown. Template 150 includes cause-and-effect or causal relationships between allocated objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50 within the four key perspectives of conventional balanced scorecard 20: financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28; and inputs/resources 54, activities 56, outputs 58, outcomes 60, and at least one impact 62, similar to these elements of logic model 30. In addition, template 150 records strategies 44, assumptions 64, and external influences 66. Integrated model 40 is a versatile tool that can support many strategic management activities including, for example, planning, communications, consensus building, performance management, initiative management, learning and fundraising.
  • Integrated model 40 may be used as a strategic planning tool for business, government, and nonprofit organizations. Integrated model 40 provides a framework for articulating and aligning operations, goals 72, and measures 48. Integrated model 40 also defines the fundamental intended or unintended change occurring in organizations as a result of strategic initiative 74 activities 56. Integrated model 40 clarifies and translates an organization vision 42 and strategy 44, sets target(s) 50, aligns strategic initiative(s) 74, and helps leadership and/or management move from a reactive mode of operation to a proactive mode of operation.
  • Integrated model 40 is a valuable planning and development tool for strategic initiatives 74. Integrated model 40 provides a visual representation that describes and shares an understanding of relationships among strategic planning elements and the element necessary to operate strategic initiatives 74 and programs. Integrated model 40 describes a bounded strategic initiative 74, both what is planned, i.e., the doing, and the results expected present linkages between the four key perspectives, financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28. Integrated model 40 defines require inputs/resources 54 to make the scope of work of strategic initiative 74 operational, and defines required activities 56 to implement strategic initiative 74, e.g., actions, processes, events, services, products, technologies, or other elements. Integrated model 40 defines output(s) 58, e.g., anticipated products, services, or events, which will be delivered through the accomplishment of planned activities 56. In addition, integrated model 40 identifies outcome(s) 60, e.g., benefits, changes or results, which are derived from activities 56 and output(s) 58, providing a clear understanding of the structure and objectives of strategic initiatives 74 and a rationale underpinning the deployment of strategic initiatives 74. A comparison of the capabilities and benefits of balanced scorecard 20, logic model 30, and integrated model 40 as a planning tool is provided in Table 3 below.
  • TABLE 3
    Integrated Model as a Planning Tool
    Balanced Logic Integrated
    Capabilities, Usage & Benefit Scorecard Model Model
    Plans, sets targets 50, and aligns strategic X X
    initiatives 74.
    Serves as planning tools by providing a X
    framework for articulating and aligning goals
    72, objective(s) 46, activities 56, performance
    measure(s) 48, and impact(s) 62.
    Serves as a foundation for developing a strategic plan. X X X
    Brings strategic initiative 74 concepts and X X
    dreams to life and allows stakeholders to try an
    idea and apply theories to model or picture how
    strategic initiative 74 would function.
    Helps to gain a common understanding of how a X X
    strategic initiative 74 would work and the
    responsibilities (workforce, management, etc.) to make
    it work.
    Provides stakeholders with a road map X X
    describing the sequence of related events
    connecting the need for planned strategic
    initiative 74 with desired outcome(s) 60.
  • A well-built integrated model 40 is a powerful workforce communication tool. Integrated model 40 can show stakeholders at a glance what a strategic initiative 74 is doing, i.e., activities 56, and what it is achieving, i.e., outcome(s) 60, emphasizing the link between the two. Integrated model 40 provides a common understanding of how strategic initiative 74 works and staff responsibilities to make it work, and offers a systematic way of portraying the breadth of relationships involved in complex systems of causally related actions. Integrated model 40 helps stakeholders visualize and understand how human and financial investments can contribute to achieving intended strategic initiative 74 results and provides stakeholders with a road map describing the sequence of related events connecting the need for the planned strategic initiative 74 with the desired results of strategic initiative 74. Integrated model 40 builds common understanding and promotes buy-in among both internal and external stakeholders about what strategic initiative 74 is, how strategic initiative 74 works, and what strategic initiative 74 is trying to achieve. Integrated model 40 facilitates communications of corporate objectives 46 to all levels within the organization, and serves as a means of communicating with internal and external audiences. Integrated model 40 communicates strategic objectives 46 and performance measures 48, and improves communication between stakeholders. In addition, integrated model 40 communicates strategic initiative 74 to people outside strategic initiative 74 in a concise and compelling way, and illustrates the presumed effects of implementing strategies 44. A comparison of the capabilities and benefits of balanced scorecard 20, logic model 30, and integrated model 40 as a communication tool is provided in Table 4 below.
  • TABLE 4
    Integrated Model as a Communication Tool
    Balanced Logic Integrated
    Capabilities, Usage & Benefit Scorecard Model Model
    Communicates and links strategic objectives 46 X X
    and measures 48.
    Provides top down reflection of the X
    organization's mission 68, vision 42, strategy
    44, and a strategic initiative 74 outcome(s) 60 and
    impact(s) 62.
    Facilitates communication of corporate X X
    objective(s) 46 to all levels.
    Serves as a means of communicating with X X X
    internal and external audiences.
    Communicates strategic initiative 74 to people X X
    outside strategic initiative 74 in a concise and compelling
    way.
    Serves as a workforce communication tool. X X X
    Communicates strategic objective(s) 46, X
    performance measure(s) 48 to all levels as well
    as strategic initiative(s) 74 and impact(s) 62.
    Improves communication between stakeholders. X X X
  • Integrated model 40 serves as a visual performance management framework (PMF) that enables a holistic and pervasive operational performance management across an entire business. The framework gives managers and executives, i.e., leadership or management, a multi-view of organizational performance to enable an organization to clarify and plan its strategy implementation from different perspectives and create future value by concretizing or solidifying the metrics and actions necessary for this vision to come true. Integrated model 40 provides a fully deployed model that cascades from top levels of the organization down to the lowest ranks. Integrated model 40 aligns organization performance measures 48 with strategic initiatives 74 and provides an indication of future results through outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62. Integrated model 40 provides a diagnostic tool to monitor performance measures 48 including financial perspectives 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28. Integrated model 40 provides a foundation for an incentive compensation plan that ties employees' performance metrics in a direct way to an overall strategic initiative 74 implementation performance. Using integrated model 40, organizations can create a true culture of visibility, accountability, and performance enhancement. Integrated model 40 provides a fully deployed model that cascades from top levels of the organization down to the lowest ranks. A comparison of the capabilities and benefits of balanced scorecard 20, logic model 30, and integrated model 40 as a performance management framework is provided in Table 5 below.
  • TABLE 5
    Integrated Model as a Performance Management Framework
    Balanced Logic Integrated
    Capabilities, Usage & Benefit Scorecard Model Model
    Provides measures 48 derived from the strategy X X
    44 that represents a balance between external and internal
    measures.
    Provides a foundation for incentive X X
    compensation plans.
    Monitors performance with financial and non- X X
    financial measures.
    Provides an indication of future results. X X X
    Serves as a strategic framework for proactively X X
    managing performance.
    Clarifies and translates vision 42, goals 72, and X
    strategy 44 into activities 56.
    Develops objectives 46, measures 48, and targets X
    50 for an organization's financial perspective 22,
    and links financial perspective 22 to strategic
    initiative 74 outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62.
    Develops objectives 46, measures 48, and targets X
    50 for an organization's customer perspective
    26, and links customer perspective 26 to
    strategic initiative 74 outcome(s) 60 and
    impact(s) 62.
    Develops objectives 46, measures 48, and targets X
    50 for an organization's internal business
    processes perspective 24, and links internal
    business processes perspective 24 to strategic
    initiative 74 outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62.
    Develops objectives 46, measures 48, and targets X
    50 for an organization's learning and growth
    perspective 28, and links learning and growth
    perspective 28 to strategic initiative 74
    outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62.
  • Integrated model 40 further serves as a strategic initiative 74 management tool because it connects the dots between situation 52, objective(s) 46, measure(s) 48, target(s) 50, inputs/resources 54, activities 56, output(s) 58, outcome(s) 60, and impact(s) 62. Integrated model 40 can be a basis for developing a more detailed management plan, as depicted in FIG. 7. Using data collection and an evaluation plan, integrated model 40 helps leadership or management to track and monitor operations to better manage results. Integrated model 40 can serve as the foundation for creating budgets and work plans as depicted in FIG. 7. Leaders of strategic initiative(s) 74 need to have a working knowledge of financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28 with respect to value propositions because organizations often charter strategic initiatives 74 to close a gap or create an advantage with respect to value propositions. Value propositions broadly include benefits from activities 56, which may include output(s) 58, outcome(s) 60, and impact(s) 62. Integrated model 40 defines strategic objectives 46 of financial perspective 22, internal business processes perspective 24, customer perspective 26, and learning and growth perspective 28 with respect to value propositions as depicted in template 150 of FIG. 8.
  • Integrated model 40 may also be used as a learning tool. Integrated model 40 enhances a strategic feedback and learning process, providing a learning diagnostic tool to define, predict, and monitor workforce learning performance measures. Integrated model 40 serves as a workforce learning tool that enhances learning through an iterative exchange of information and experience by providing strong visual representation and graphics, for example FIGS. 4, 5, 7 and 8, that are proven as effective learning instruments. A comparison of the capabilities and benefits of balanced scorecard 20, logic model 30, and integrated model 40 as a learning tool is provided in Table 6 below.
  • TABLE 6
    Integrated Model as a Learning Tool
    Balanced Logic Integrated
    Capabilities, Usage & Benefit Scorecard Model Model
    Enhances learning through an iterative exchange X X
    of information and experience, providing
    valuable documentation or evidence.
    Enhances strategic feedback and learning. X X
    Helps stakeholders visualize and understand X X
    how human and financial investments contributed
    to achieving intended strategic initiative 74 goals
    and how such investments can lead to strategic initiative
    74 improvements.
    Provides a learning diagnostic tool to monitor X X
    learning performance measures.
    Serves as a workforce learning tool. X X X
    Enhances learning through an iterative exchange X X
    of information and experience, providing
    valuable documentation or evidence.
    Provides strong visual representation of cause- X
    and-effect (causal) relationships graphics, which
    are proven as effective learning instruments,
    between the four key perspectives, financial,
    customer, business processes, and learning and
    growth, and strategic initiative 74
    inputs/resources 54, activities 56, output(s) 58,
    outcome(s) 60, and desired impact(s) 62
    Enhances the learning process through X X
    evaluation.
    Serves as an evaluation tool for strategic X X
    initiative(s) 74 and policies as part of an
    evaluation framework.
    Illustrates the presumed effects of implementing X X
    strategies 44 described in the strategic plan, such
    as that shown in FIGS. 4 and 5.
    Helps to design new strategic initiative(s) 74 or X X
    to confirm that an existing strategic initiative 74
    design is still reasonable under current
    circumstances.
    Provides a common understanding of how X X
    strategic initiative 74 works and workforce,
    leadership, and/or management, collectively,
    staff, responsibilities to make it work.
    Provides a visual way to present and share the X
    understanding of the relationships among vision
    42 and inputs/resources 54 required to operate a
    strategic initiative 74, activities 56, and output(s)
    58, outcome(s) 60, and impact(s) 62,
    collectively, changes or results, desired to be
    achieved.
    Illustrates the presumed effects of implementing X X
    strategic initiative(s) 74.
    Offers a systematic way of portraying the X X
    breadth of relationships involved in complex
    systems and the effects of causally related
    actions.
    Helps stakeholders to visualize and understand X X
    how human and financial investments can
    contribute to achieving intended strategic
    initiative 74 goals.
    Provides stakeholders with a road map X X
    describing a sequence of related events
    connecting the need for planned strategic
    initiative 74 with the desired result(s) of
    strategic initiative 74.
  • A sound integrated model 40 demonstrates to funders that an organization has purposefully identified what a strategic initiative 74 will accomplish, what strategic initiative 74 is intended to achieve, and inputs/resources 54 needed to accomplish activities 56. Integrated model 40 can also help structure and streamline grant writing. Integrated model 40 provides a diagram that describes strategy 44 and the logically related parts of strategic initiative 74, showing links between audience needs, activities 56 and outcome(s) 60, and how outcome(s) 60 will be measured and evaluated.
  • While the strategic initiative template 150 of FIG. 8 is a template for the integrated model 40 using conventional balanced scorecard 20, strategic initiative template 150 a of FIG. 9 includes cause-and-effect or causal relationships between allocated objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50 within the four key perspectives of Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a of FIG. 2: knowledge institutional perspective 22 a, internal knowledge processes perspective 24 a, societal perspective 26 a, and growth perspective 28 a.
  • The use of the strategic initiative template 150 a in the case of not-for-profit institutions, such as public higher education bodies, is more appropriate than trying to bend the rules of application of conventional balanced scorecard 20; intended for tracking profitability, to fit situations wherein profits are believed to be trackless. Assigning explicit and succinct dimensions relevant to knowledge and public service to strategic management tools is more straightforward and apt to be more beneficent; especially in the case of knowledge-dispensing institutions, than indulgence into forceful attempts to interpret standard monetary dimensions, such as financial and shareholders perspectives. In other words, there is no need to stick to a situational balanced scorecard model but rather use it to set the framework for situation-aware models appropriate for the age of knowledge. Being a generic organism, Reyada balanced scorecard 20 a concept can be used to generate models for tracking the performance of higher education entities and research institutions whether or not their economic health and competitive edge are sensitive to performance. In fact, several balanced scorecards 20 a need to be generated for a single higher education entity, regardless of the type of resources, one for the whole organization and one of each of the comprising units due to the intrinsic differences between strategic management of an institution as a whole body and that of the comprising members or constituents.
  • For a specific situation, the case of a university, a strategic initiative template 150 b was derived in FIG. 10, taking into account the fact that university performance has no or negligible impact on finance since revenue is affected only by budgetary and policy variables, including those of the government, which may be local, regional, or national. Even stakeholders' satisfaction is of little consequence, since increased student population poses a burden rather financial benefit. Strategic initiative template 150 b is applicable to educational institutions characterized by fixed resources and growth rate dictated by national needs and budgetary constraints. This case is common for many government supported universities, municipality colleges and schools of high learning. Free education and government sponsored research equitable between national colleges on the same level dismisses performance as raisons d′être for financial health or economic viability.
  • In the case of the example, which will be for a fictional KA University, there are twenty strategic objectives 46. Those objectives are interrelated and are allocated in FIG. 11 to the four perspectives: a return to the University perspective 22 b, an internal processes perspective 24 b, a return to society perspective 26 b, and a knowledge requirements (human, technology and infrastructure) perspective 28 b.
  • Return to the University perspective 22 b involves four objectives: realizing quality standards according to international classification in a University electronic portal 4602; the University ranks first in scientific research on the level of the Arabic World per an approved international classifications 4605; Size of yearly internal resources is twice a current resources 4608 and an acquisition of the largest number of consulting contracts 4609.
  • Internal processes perspective 24 b, involves six objectives: development & offering 80% of the University curricula through an e-learning 4603; an approval of 50 Doctoral programs and all Departments offer Master Degrees 4606; a registration of the largest number of gifted students & innovators in the business incubators' program 4610; an actual implementation of courses content approved in the curricula 4613; a having implemented programs for each collaboration agreement 4615; a qualifying freshman students who meet the requirements and provision of alternative programs for those who do not meet those requirements 4617.
  • Return to the society perspective 26 b, involves six objectives: a number of distant learning students reaches sixty thousands (60,000) 4604; a building societal trust and content so that the University will be the first choice 4607; a top University in its geographic region in transfer, localization, and development of technology 4611; an international academic accreditation for 75% of the programs 4614; a getting local & international accreditation 4618; and a graduates include 5% education leaders, 1% Social leaders, 2% entrepreneurs 4619.
  • Knowledge requirements (human, technology and infrastructure) perspective 28 b involves four objectives: an integrated implementation of electronic communication within all University units 4601; a meeting requirements for academic accreditation of all programs 4612; an availability of success elements and effective performance of the infrastructure in all University units 4616; and a qualify two faculty members in each college to follow selection and development of future leaders 4620.
  • Measures 48 associated with each objective 46 are either explicitly indicated in the objective or separately specified. Each objective will have at least one measure. Table 7 lists measures 48 associated with objectives 46 for each strategy initiative 74.
  • TABLE 7
    Measures 48 associated with Objectives 46
    Strategic Initiative 74 Objectives 46 Measures 48
    Development of 4601 Completion of the readiness of the University
    electronic units to transfer to electronic communication
    communication 48011
    Reengineering of all communication systems
    of all University units 48012
    Availability of the required programs and
    technical preparations 48013
    Development of the 4602 the quality standards of the international
    University portal classification of the electronic portals of the
    universities 4802
    Distance learning and e- 4603 80% of the University Curricula 4803
    learning 4604 60,000 enrollees 4804
    Academic Accreditation 4612 accreditation requirements in all programs and
    of the Institution and academic units 4812
    Programs 4613 all University curricula meets international
    standards 4813
    4614 accreditation for 75% of the University
    programs and at least for 100 scientific
    programs 4814
    4615 Local and International Institutional
    accreditation of the University 4815
    Qualifying of students 4617 Orientation and qualification of freshman
    for university education student of the University and fulfillment of the
    requirements of the preparatory year in
    addition to provision of alternative programs
    for those students who cannot complete the
    required preparation 4817
    Raising the standards of 4606 Approve 50 doctorate programs 48061
    graduate studies All University departments provide Master
    degrees 48062
    Graduate students represent 20% of the total of
    full time students enrolled in the University
    48063
    Each department has at least one faculty
    member in with international record to
    supervise a graduate program 48064
    Development of 4605 Each member of the faculty has at least one
    Scientific Research scientific product (including scientific papers,
    translation, books) 48051
    All University departments provide Master
    degrees 48052
    Graduate students represent 20% of the total of
    full time students enrolled in the University
    48053
    Each department has at least one faculty
    member with international record to supervise
    a graduate program 48054
    Publication of 50% of the scientific members
    authored by members of the faculty in
    periodicals and scientific journals which meet
    the standards of the ISI that publishes a list of
    highly cited researchers 48055
    Each college organizes yearly one conference
    or symposium in its field 48056
    Development of 4608 volume of University-generated resources is
    University Resources twice then current volume 4808
    4609 volume of University-generated resources is
    twice then current volume 4809
    Nurturing the gifted and 4610 Registration of the largest number of gifted
    innovator students students and innovators in the business
    incubators 4810
    4619 5% University graduate qualify to become
    education leaders 48191
    1% University graduate qualify to become
    society leaders 48192
    2% University graduate qualify to become
    business entrepreneurs 48193
    4620 Qualifying two faculty members; at least, in
    each college to follow up with the selection
    and development of future leadership 4820
    Preparation of future 4610 Registration of the largest number of gifted
    leaders students and innovators in the business
    incubators 4810
    4619 5% University graduate qualify to become
    education leaders 48191
    1% University graduate qualify to become
    society leaders 48192
    2% University graduate qualify to become
    business entrepreneurs 48193
    4620 Qualifying two faculty members; at least, in
    each college to follow up with the selection
    and development of future leadership 4820
    Development of 4615 Each agreement for collaboration is in
    collaborative work harmony with the strategic plan of the
    University and the various areas of distinction
    4815
    Media outreach and 4607 KA University becomes the university of
    promotion of mental choice; according to the University media
    image outreach plan 4807
    Development of the 4611 The University ranks the first among the
    business and knowledge universities of its geographic region in the
    system development of programs for technology
    transfer, localization and advancements in the
    areas of the University distinction 4811
    4616 Completion of the laboratories, testing
    facilities and information networks and
    systems in all the University units 48161
    Availability of scientific and technical cadres
    required to operate and maintain such
    infrastructure 48162
    Continuous modernization and development of
    such infrastructure according to approved
    standards 48163
    ISO certification of the international quality of
    University laboratories and testing facilities
    specializing in evaluation and approval of the
    results obtained from such laboratories and
    testing facilities 48164
  • Targets 50 are associated with objectives 46 and accordingly there are twenty (20) targets to be aimed at. For each target 50 there are strategies 44 to achieve said target. Table 8 lists targets 50 and corresponding strategies 44.
  • TABLE 8
    Targets 50 and Strategies 44 associated with Objectives 46
    Objectives 46 Targets 50 Strategies 44
    4601 Completing the university e- Enhancing and developing
    readiness to go through the partnerships to establish
    electronic administration a suitable university
    50011 environment for electronic
    Systems reengineering in all administration development 4401
    university sectors 50012
    Availability of necessary programs
    and technical equipment 50013
    4602 Providing the electronic Providing the classification
    university gate with the quality requirements including the
    standards endorsed in the equipment, experiences and
    international classifications of efficiencies among the
    universities electronic sites electronic gate in a scientific
    5002 and attractive way, to assert the
    university credibility and
    enhance the trust of authorities
    responsible for classification
    4402
    4603 Using 80% of the university To provide an environment
    curricula in electronic suitable for distance learning
    education 5003 including Faculty members and
    technicians, and such
    environment will attract the
    concerned classes of community
    5003
    4604 To increase the number of 5003
    distance learning programs
    students to 50,000 students
    5004
    4605 At least one scientific
    publication for each one of the
    faculty members yearly (e.g.
    scientific papers - translation-
    book copyrighting &
    publication) 50051
    Publishing at least 50% of
    papers by the faculty members
    in the classified scientific
    journals(ISI) 50052
    Each faculty to organize a
    scientific forum or conference
    each year in its major specialty
    50053
    4606 All university departments Strategic partnerships with the
    grant the Master degree 50061 scientific and research
    The post-graduate studies institutions to contribute to the
    students represent 20% of the scientific climate and
    total enrollment 50062 infrastructure 4406
    At least there is one member of
    staff in each department
    having an international record
    related to post-graduate studies
    programs supervision 50063
    4607 Building the community trust Building an attractive media
    and persuasion in order that communication with all
    the university will be the first authorities inside and outside the
    option according to its media university to enhance trust in the
    communication plan 5007 university and its fundamental
    role 4407
    4608 The university annual self- Private sector discipline and
    resources volume should work 44081
    become twice double the Knowledge and discipline &
    current amount 5008 adherence to apply rules and
    regulations of private sector
    44082
    4609 The university should obtain 44081
    the biggest number of the 44082
    consultation contracts signed
    with all Saudi Universities, at
    least three fold of present
    quota 5009
    4610 Registering many talented and Developing the local and
    inventors under the programs international strategic
    of enterprises guarded by the partnerships which support the
    university all over the university environment,
    university 5010 encourages inventors and
    distinguished people 4410
    4611 First university in its Enhancing the university
    geographic region in credibility as a research
    developing, technology university in its strategic
    transfer and adaptation visions, programs, resources,
    programs 5511 capabilities and partnerships
    4411
    4612 Providing academic Providing scientific, technical,
    requirement accreditation in technological and organizational
    all academic programs and environment for academic and
    units 5012 institutional accreditation in all
    the academic programs and
    strategic units 4412
    4613 Actual application of the 4412
    curricula and courses included
    in the approved academic
    plans, developing them in a
    manner contributing to
    upgrading educational
    operation according to
    international criteria, and
    fulfill the community needs,
    and at least the academic
    accreditation criteria regarding
    all university curricula 5013
    4614 Obtaining the international 4412
    academic accreditation for
    75% of the university
    programs, at least for 100
    academic programs 5014
    4615 Each collaboration agreement Clear vision about the excellence
    will contain activated points of the partners
    programs consistent with the commensurate with the
    university strategic plan and its university strategic plan in
    excellence fields 5015 addition to providing an
    attractive environment to expand
    and invest these points
    4616 Availability of success 4411
    elements and efficient
    performance of infrastructure
    in all the university units
    through improving labs and
    information system and
    networking in all sectors
    50161
    Availability of necessary
    scientific and technical cadres
    to operate and maintain the
    above-mentioned elements
    50162
    Continuous upgrading and
    development for these
    elements according to the
    approved criteria 50163
    All central labs obtain relevant
    ISO certificates 50164
    4617 The qualification of the Adopting suitable scientific
    student of preparatory year to climate, attractive academic
    enable them to pass programs and cultural
    requirements in addition to environment good for academic
    providing substitute programs study 4417
    for students who do not meet
    the preparatory year
    requirements 5017
    Adopting suitable scientific 4412
    climate, attractive academic
    programs and cultural
    environment good for
    academic study 5018
    4619 Qualification of at least 5% of 4410
    the university graduates to
    become educational leaders
    50191
    Qualification of at least 1% of
    the university graduates to
    become community leaders
    50192
    Qualification of at least 2% of
    the university graduates to
    become entrepreneurs 50193
    4620 Qualify two faculty members Qualification of the faculty
    in each college to follow members (at least)
    selection and development of in each college to follow up
    future leaders 5020 choosing and developing the
    future leaders 4420
  • An example of inputs/resources 54, activities 56 and outputs 58 is shown in FIG. 12 for the case of KA University.
  • While the methods of the present disclosure may be performed manually, because the required inputs may be from multiple locations, because the workforce required to implement strategic initiative 74 may be in multiple locations (geographically separated), and because of the need to dynamically predict outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62, a strategic initiative system 250, shown in FIG. 13, provides a way to conduct strategic initiative 74 in a dynamic environment in a plurality of geographic locations.
  • Strategic initiative system 250 includes a management system 252, an inventory system 254, an initiative interface system 256, a communication system 258, and a controller 260. Many aspects of the disclosure are described in terms of sequences of actions to be performed by elements of a computer system or other hardware capable of executing programmed instructions, for example, a general purpose computer, special purpose computer, workstation, or other programmable data processing apparatus. It will be recognized that in each of the embodiments, the various actions could be performed by specialized circuits (e.g., discrete logic gates interconnected to perform a specialized function), by program instructions (software), such as logical blocks, program modules etc. being executed by one or more processors (e.g., one or more microprocessors, a central processing unit (CPU), and/or application specific integrated circuit), or by a combination of both. For example, embodiments can be implemented in hardware, software, firmware, middleware, microcode, or any combination thereof. The instructions can be program code or code segments that perform necessary tasks and can be stored in a non-transitory machine-readable medium such as a storage medium or other storage(s). A code segment may represent a procedure, a function, a subprogram, a program, a routine, a subroutine, a module, a software package, a class, or any combination of instructions, data structures, or program statements. A code segment may be coupled to another code segment or a hardware circuit by passing and/or receiving information, data, arguments, parameters, or memory contents.
  • The non-transitory machine-readable medium can additionally be considered to be embodied within any tangible form of computer readable carrier, such as solid-state memory, magnetic disk, and optical disk containing an appropriate set of computer instructions, such as program modules, and data structures that would cause a processor to carry out the techniques described herein. A computer-readable medium may include the following: an electrical connection having one or more wires, magnetic disk storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape or other magnetic storage devices, a portable computer diskette, a random access memory (RAM), a read-only memory (ROM), an erasable programmable read-only memory (e.g., EPROM, EEPROM, or Flash memory), or any other tangible medium capable of storing information.
  • It should be noted that the system of the present disclosure is illustrated and discussed herein as having various modules and units which perform particular functions. It should be understood that these modules and units are merely schematically illustrated based on their function for clarity purposes, and do not necessarily represent specific hardware or software. In this regard, these modules, units and other components may be hardware and/or software implemented to substantially perform their particular functions explained herein. The various functions of the different components can be combined or segregated as hardware and/or software modules in any manner, and can be useful separately or in combination. Input/output or I/O devices or user interfaces including but not limited to keyboards, displays, pointing devices, and the like can be coupled to the system either directly or through intervening I/O controllers. Thus, the various aspects of the disclosure may be embodied in many different forms, and all such forms are contemplated to be within the scope of the disclosure.
  • Management system 252 is provided to certain members of executive management and leadership of the organization. Managers and leaders provide mission 68, core values 70, vision 42, goals 72, and strategy 44 to controller 260. Inventory system 254 is positioned throughout an organization in locations proximate to inventory, and is used by the workforce to maintain current inventory, including automated inventory checking systems. The status of inventory, which is one portion of inputs/resources 54, is also provided to controller 260. A strategic initiative team may use initiative interface system 256 to update and track situations or problems, objective(s) 46, measure(s) 48, target(s) 50, activities 56, and output(s) 58. In some embodiments, output(s) 58 may be reflected in inventory system 254, which then provides real time updates of output(s) 58. Inputs from the strategic initiative team are provided to controller 260.
  • Controller 260 receives the inputs from management system 252, inventory system 254, and initiative interface system 256 and provides predictive outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62. Because controller 260 may be asked to provide predictions of outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 for situations previously not encountered, controller 260 may require additional programming and databases to support a specific strategic initiative 74. More specifically, a series of potential outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 may be provided in a database. As a strategic initiative 74 proceeds, statistical methods may be used to select from among outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62. Because new outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 may be developed or recognized during strategic initiative 74, a strategic initiative team may include a member whose specific purpose is to maintain an outcome(s) 60 and impact(s) 62 database.
  • In addition to analyzing inputs from the strategic initiative team, controller 260 provides current strategic initiative 74 data and information to initiative interface system 256 for the use of the strategic initiative team, and to communication system 258 for relay to the workforce, stakeholders, and leadership or management. Communication system 258 may include wired and wireless connections to controller 260, and may also include filters to limit dissemination of sensitive aspects of an organization's information to individuals with a need to know. For example, a portion of strategic initiative 74 may include specific profit information for specific products, which may be filtered by controller 260 to limit such information to percentages to certain portions of the workforce, stakeholders, and leadership or management.
  • FIG. 14 provides a strategic initiative module, generally indicated at 300. Strategic initiative module 300 may be located in one or more of the systems of strategic initiative system 250. Process flow 100 may be located in one or more portions of strategic initiative module 300, as will be seen from the description hereinbelow. Strategic initiative module 300 includes a management inputs module 302, a strategic initiative generation module 304, an objectives, measures, and targets module 306, an activities module 308, an inputs/resources module 310, an output(s) module 312, an outcome(s) module 314, an impact(s) module 316, an assumption(s) module 318, and an external influence(s) module 320.
  • Management inputs module 302 receives a plurality of inputs from executive management or leadership, including mission 68, core values 70, vision 42, goals 72, and strategy 44. Management inputs module 302 receives the plurality of inputs and formats the inputs into a form capable of statistical analysis. For example, core values may include subjective characteristics such as customer orientation, environmental respect, and the like. Customer orientation may be received translated by management inputs module 302 and translated or transformed into specific characteristics, such as number of customer complaints, responses to customer surveys, and other numerical characteristics representative of customer orientation. In some instances, management inputs module 302 may transmit a request for clarification of management inputs to strategic initiative generation module 304, which then requires additional input from a member of the strategic initiative team in order to assist strategic initiative module 300 in providing the functions necessary to make a strategic initiative process functional.
  • Once translated into a measurable form, signals are transmitted from management inputs module 302 to strategic initiative generation module 304. Strategic initiative generation module 304 receives management inputs from management inputs module 302 and one or more situations and strategic initiative team inputs 322. Strategic initiative module 304 uses management inputs, situation information, in addition to inputs from the strategic initiative team to generate one or more strategic initiatives 74. Strategic initiative module 304 may analyze situations to suggest one or more strategic initiatives 74, transmitting them to the strategic initiative team by way of interactive strategic initiative outputs 324. The strategic initiative team may accept one of the proposed strategic initiatives or may provide their own strategic initiatives 74 by way of situations and strategic initiative team inputs 322.
  • Once specific strategic initiative(s) 74 are created, they are transmitted to objectives, measures, and targets module 306, where each strategic initiative 74 is populated with objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50. Though not shown, the strategic initiative team may interface with objectives, measures, and targets module 306 to resolve issues with the development of achievable objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50.
  • Objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50 are provided to activities module 308, where specific activities 56 are developed to achieve objectives 46, measures 48, and targets 50. As with previous modules, activities module 308 may interface with the strategic initiative team to resolve issues with the development of activities 56. Activities module 308 also receives data from inputs/resources module 310, which includes information from inventory system 254, and information from assumptions module 318. Assumptions 64 may be required by activities module 308 because assumptions 64 may affect activities 56 determination. For example, activities module 308 may estimate labor inputs in terms of man-hours and schedule, but assumptions may include estimated downtime due to illness, delays in receipt of inputs/resources 54, facilities downtime, and other factors. Assumptions module 318 receives assumption information from strategic initiative team inputs 322. Once specific activities 56 have been developed, created, or determined, activities 56 are provided to output(s) module 312.
  • Output(s) module 312 takes activities 56 and calculates or estimates output(s) 58. In the case of subjective or qualitative outputs, output(s) module 312 may request additional inputs from the strategic initiative team. Output(s) module 312 also receives assumptions 64 from assumptions module 318 and uses assumptions 64 to adjust output(s) 58. Estimated, calculated, or determined output(s) 58 are provided to outcome(s) module 314.
  • Outcome(s) module 314 determines, calculates, or estimates potential outcome(s) 60, using information provided by management module 302 and strategic initiative generation module 304. In the event that outcome(s) module 314 is unable to determine at least one outcome 60, outcome module 314 may provide the potential outcome(s) 60 to the strategic management team, which may then adjust various inputs, including providing additional potential outcome(s) 60 to strategic initiative module 300, in order to better understand or predict potential outcome(s) 314. Generally, each predicted outcome(s) 60 will be associated with a statistically calculated probability or possibility. The strategic initiative team may then adjust various inputs to try to improve the chances of achieving a favorable outcome 60. Outcome(s) module 314 also receives information from external influence(s) module 320, which may affect possible outcome(s) 60. For example, one possible outcome 60 may be an improved volume of output of a specific product. However, external influence 66 may be a decreased demand or increased warranty, and the improved output may be unable to be realized because the current output is sufficient for the revised external conditions. Outcome(s) 60 are then provided to impact(s) module 316.
  • Impact(s) module 316 receives outcome(s) 60 and external influences information from external influences module 320, which determines possible impact(s) 62 using outcome(s) 60 and external influences 66. For example, if outcome 60 is improved output volume, and perhaps a reduced price, impact module 316 may predict, mathematically, an increased customer demand. However, impact module 316 may also predict new market entrants or potential replacement products as potential negative impacts, depending on the sophistication of impact module 316 and strategic initiative module 300.
  • It should be apparent from the foregoing discussion that the strategic initiative team may be in direct communication with modules 306, 308, 310, 312, 314, and 316. The connections to and from the strategic initiative team were not shown to simplify FIG. 14 and improve understanding of FIG. 14.
  • It should also be apparent from the foregoing descriptions that each of the processes and modules shown herein are preferably included at least partially in strategic initiative system 250, and each of the processes shown herein may be included in one or more modules shown herein, such as the modules of strategic initiative module 300.
  • Referring to FIGS. 15-19, an example of integrated model 40 as applied to a specific problem is shown. Referring to FIG. 15, a first objective 330 is shown. In order to realize the first objective, a plurality of projects, St. 1, St. 2, St. 3, and St. 4, are defined and shown in FIGS. 16-19. For each one of the projects, the inputs and resources are shown as requirements. The requirements then lead to one or more intermediary outputs, and finally yield one or more outcomes and outputs. In the case of each of the processes, the integrated model was used to transform the inputs into measurable and definable outputs or outcomes. In each of the projects, the complexity and geography of the projects was such that the systems, processes, and modules described herein were used to implement the transformation. Indeed, in each of the project portions St. 1, St. 2, St. 3, and St. 4, such projects, which may also be described as project modules, would have been impractical to conduct without the presence of the systems, processes, and modules described herein.
  • While various embodiments of the disclosure have been shown and described, it is understood that these embodiments are not limited thereto. The embodiments may be changed, modified and further applied by those skilled in the art. Therefore, these embodiments are not limited to the detail shown and described previously, but also include all such changes and modifications.

Claims (19)

I/we claim:
1. A system for developing a performance management framework, comprising:
a management system, an initiative interface system, a communication system, and a controller connected to the management system, the initiative interface system, and the communication system;
providing a vision, at least one goal, and a strategy to the management system;
developing at least one objective, at least one measure, and at least one target in the initiative interface system, for at least one of a plurality of perspectives, including an organization financial perspective, an organization customer perspective, an organization internal business processes perspective, and an organization learning and growth perspective, using the vision, the at least one goal, and the strategy; and
linking at least one of the organization financial perspective, the organization customer perspective, the organization internal business processes perspective, and the organization learning and growth perspective, to at least one strategic initiative outcome and to at least one strategic initiative impact, and providing at least one of the organization financial perspective, the organization customer perspective, the organization internal business processes perspective, the organization learning and growth perspective, at least one strategic initiative outcome, at least one strategic initiative impact, and providing the link to at least one of a workforce, a management team, and a leadership through the communication system.
2. The system of claim 1, further including a plurality of activities developed from the at least one objective, the at least one measure, and the at least one target, and providing a framework for aligning the at least one goal, the at least one objective, the plurality of activities, the at least one measure, and the at least one strategic initiative impact.
3. The system of claim 1, the at least one objective being a plurality of objectives, and each one of the plurality of perspectives being associated with at least one of the plurality of objectives.
4. The system of claim 1, further including a plurality of activities developed from the at least one objective, the at least one measure, and the at least one target, and providing a framework for aligning the at least one goal, the at least one objective, the plurality of activities, the at least one measure, and the at least one strategic initiative impact.
5. The system of claim 4, further including a plurality of resources required to operate the at least one strategic initiative outcome, and further including a visual representation of a plurality of relationships between the vision, the plurality of resources, the plurality of activities, and the at least one strategic initiative outcome.
6. The system of claim 4, including at least one intended change resulting from the at least one strategic initiative impact.
7. The system of claim 4, including at least one unintended change resulting from the at least one strategic initiative impact.
8. The system of claim 1, including identification of at least one external influence associated with at least one of the at least one strategic initiative outcome and the at least one strategic initiative impact.
9. The system of claim 1, including identification of at least one assumption associated with the strategy.
10. A method of providing a communication tool for an organization, the method comprising:
providing a strategic initiative including a plurality of inputs/resources, a plurality of activities, a plurality of outputs, a plurality of outcomes, an impact, and a plurality of key perspectives, including a financial perspective, a customer perspective, an internal business processes perspective, and a learning and growth perspective; and
transforming the plurality of key perspectives, the plurality of inputs/resources, the plurality of activities, the plurality of outputs into the plurality of outcomes and the impact.
11. The method of claim 10, including a plurality of objectives, and each one of the plurality of key perspectives being associated with at least one of the plurality of objectives.
12. The method of claim 11, further including at least one measure, and at least one target, the plurality of activities being developed from the plurality of objectives, the at least one measure, and the at least one target, and providing a framework for aligning the at least one objective, the plurality of activities, the at least one measure, and the at least one impact.
13. The method of claim 12, further including a template relating the at least one objective, the at least one measure, the at least one target, the plurality of inputs/resources, the plurality of activities, the plurality of outputs, and the at least one impact to the plurality of key perspectives.
14. The method of claim 13, further including at least one strategy, at least one assumption, and at least one external influence, and the template relating the at least one strategy, the at least one assumption, and the at least one external influence to the at least one objective, the at least one measure, the at least one target, the plurality of inputs/resources, the plurality of activities, the plurality of outputs, and the at least one impact to the plurality of key perspectives.
15. The method of claim 10, further including a vision and further including a visual representation of a plurality of relationships between the vision, the plurality of inputs/resources, the plurality of activities, and the plurality of outcomes.
16. The method of claim 10, including at least one intended change resulting from the at least one impact.
17. The method of claim 10, including at least one unintended change resulting from the at least one impact.
18. The method of claim 10, including identification of at least one external influence associated with at least one of the plurality of outcomes and the at least one impact.
19. The method of claim 10, including identification of at least one assumption associated with the strategy.
US14/272,435 2013-05-07 2014-05-07 Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution Pending US20140379435A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201361820539P true 2013-05-07 2013-05-07
US14/272,435 US20140379435A1 (en) 2013-05-07 2014-05-07 Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US14/272,435 US20140379435A1 (en) 2013-05-07 2014-05-07 Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140379435A1 true US20140379435A1 (en) 2014-12-25

Family

ID=52111664

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/272,435 Pending US20140379435A1 (en) 2013-05-07 2014-05-07 Reyada system and method for performance management, communication, strategic planning, and strategy execution

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20140379435A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150193708A1 (en) * 2014-01-06 2015-07-09 International Business Machines Corporation Perspective analyzer
US9720651B2 (en) * 2015-07-15 2017-08-01 Bank Of America Corporation Strategy maintenance system
WO2017152187A1 (en) * 2016-03-04 2017-09-08 Civitas Learning, Inc. Student data-to-insight-to-action-to-learning analytics system and method

Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6411936B1 (en) * 1999-02-05 2002-06-25 Nval Solutions, Inc. Enterprise value enhancement system and method
US20030046125A1 (en) * 2001-09-05 2003-03-06 Nextstrat, Inc. System and method for enterprise strategy management
US20040230463A1 (en) * 2003-05-15 2004-11-18 Results Based Scorecards Inc. Performance management by results-based scorecarding
US20060085255A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-04-20 Hunter Hastings System, method and apparatus for modeling and utilizing metrics, processes and technology in marketing applications
US20080270205A1 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-10-30 Infosys Technologies Limited Program management systems and method thereof
US20080270448A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-10-30 Anthony Clive Lincoln Brennan Business enablement method and system
US20080281651A1 (en) * 2007-05-10 2008-11-13 Anthony Clive Lincoln Brennan Method and system for managing a strategic plan via defining and aligning strategic plan elements
US20090192867A1 (en) * 2008-01-24 2009-07-30 Sheardigital, Inc. Developing, implementing, transforming and governing a business model of an enterprise
US20090288061A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Wachovia Corporation Emerging trends lifecycle management
US20100161360A1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Wachovia Corporation Strategic planning management
US20120259679A1 (en) * 2011-04-07 2012-10-11 Infosys Technologies Limited Method and system for devising and tracking measures for organizational value creation
US8311863B1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2012-11-13 Accenture Global Services Limited Utility high performance capability assessment
US20130339099A1 (en) * 2012-06-15 2013-12-19 Daood Aidroos Method and system for business program and service planning, delivery and management

Patent Citations (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6411936B1 (en) * 1999-02-05 2002-06-25 Nval Solutions, Inc. Enterprise value enhancement system and method
US20030046125A1 (en) * 2001-09-05 2003-03-06 Nextstrat, Inc. System and method for enterprise strategy management
US20040230463A1 (en) * 2003-05-15 2004-11-18 Results Based Scorecards Inc. Performance management by results-based scorecarding
US20060085255A1 (en) * 2004-09-27 2006-04-20 Hunter Hastings System, method and apparatus for modeling and utilizing metrics, processes and technology in marketing applications
US20080270205A1 (en) * 2006-11-21 2008-10-30 Infosys Technologies Limited Program management systems and method thereof
US20080270448A1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-10-30 Anthony Clive Lincoln Brennan Business enablement method and system
US20080281651A1 (en) * 2007-05-10 2008-11-13 Anthony Clive Lincoln Brennan Method and system for managing a strategic plan via defining and aligning strategic plan elements
US20090192867A1 (en) * 2008-01-24 2009-07-30 Sheardigital, Inc. Developing, implementing, transforming and governing a business model of an enterprise
US20090288061A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 Wachovia Corporation Emerging trends lifecycle management
US20100161360A1 (en) * 2008-12-22 2010-06-24 Wachovia Corporation Strategic planning management
US8311863B1 (en) * 2009-02-24 2012-11-13 Accenture Global Services Limited Utility high performance capability assessment
US20120259679A1 (en) * 2011-04-07 2012-10-11 Infosys Technologies Limited Method and system for devising and tracking measures for organizational value creation
US20130339099A1 (en) * 2012-06-15 2013-12-19 Daood Aidroos Method and system for business program and service planning, delivery and management

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150193708A1 (en) * 2014-01-06 2015-07-09 International Business Machines Corporation Perspective analyzer
US9720651B2 (en) * 2015-07-15 2017-08-01 Bank Of America Corporation Strategy maintenance system
WO2017152187A1 (en) * 2016-03-04 2017-09-08 Civitas Learning, Inc. Student data-to-insight-to-action-to-learning analytics system and method

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Panapanaan et al. Roadmapping corporate social responsibility in Finnish companies
Burgoyne et al. The Development of Management and Leadership Capability and its Contribution to Performance: The evidence, the prospects and the research need
Olson Information systems project management
US8200527B1 (en) Method for prioritizing and presenting recommendations regarding organizaion's customer care capabilities
Matthyssens et al. Moving from basic offerings to value-added solutions: Strategies, barriers and alignment
Verweire et al. Integrated performance management: a guide to strategy implementation
Lerner A strategic planning primer for higher education
Kolehmainen-Aitken Decentralization's impact on the health workforce: Perspectives of managers, workers and national leaders
US20050114829A1 (en) Facilitating the process of designing and developing a project
Otoo et al. The capacity development results framework
Phillips Show Me the Money: How to Determine Roi in People, Projects, and Programs: Easyread Large Bold Edition
Aguinis An expanded view of performance management
US20050198486A1 (en) Information technology development transformation
Williams et al. Enterprise programme management
George The lean six sigma guide to doing more with less: cut costs, reduce waste, and lower your overhead
Selig Implementing IT Governance-A Practical Guide to Global Best Practices in IT Management
Patzelt et al. Upper echelons and portfolio strategies of venture capital firms
Paul et al. Business analysis
Parida Development of a multi-criteria hierarchical framework for maintenance performance measurement: Concepts, issues and challenges
Phipps The system design approach to organizational development: The University of Arizona model
Forrester et al. CMMI for services: guidelines for superior service
Tarafdar et al. Examining tactical information technology—Business alignment
Petrides et al. Anatomy of school system improvement: Performance-driven practices in urban school districts
Cotten Seven steps of effective workforce planning
Aithal et al. Applying SWOC Analysis to an Institution of Higher Education

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCV Information on status: appeal procedure

Free format text: ON APPEAL -- AWAITING DECISION BY THE BOARD OF APPEALS

STCV Information on status: appeal procedure

Free format text: BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION RENDERED