US20140358674A1 - Systems and methods for tracking mobile advertising displays - Google Patents

Systems and methods for tracking mobile advertising displays Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140358674A1
US20140358674A1 US14/462,970 US201414462970A US2014358674A1 US 20140358674 A1 US20140358674 A1 US 20140358674A1 US 201414462970 A US201414462970 A US 201414462970A US 2014358674 A1 US2014358674 A1 US 2014358674A1
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display
bicycle
brace
mobile advertising
tracking
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Abandoned
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US14/462,970
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Gary Courter
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Gary Courter
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Priority to US13/898,157 priority Critical patent/US8857084B2/en
Application filed by Gary Courter filed Critical Gary Courter
Priority to US14/462,970 priority patent/US20140358674A1/en
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Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/02Marketing, e.g. market research and analysis, surveying, promotions, advertising, buyer profiling, customer management or rewards; Price estimation or determination
    • G06Q30/0241Advertisement
    • G06Q30/0251Targeted advertisement
    • G06Q30/0265Vehicular advertisement
    • G06Q30/0266Vehicular advertisement based on the position of the vehicle
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62JCYCLE SADDLES OR SEATS; ACCESSORIES PECULIAR TO CYCLES AND NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, e.g. ARTICLE CARRIERS, CYCLE PROTECTORS
    • B62J11/00Supporting devices for attaching articles of definite shape to cycles, e.g. for maps, umbrellas, bottles
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/02Marketing, e.g. market research and analysis, surveying, promotions, advertising, buyer profiling, customer management or rewards; Price estimation or determination
    • G06Q30/0241Advertisement
    • G06Q30/0242Determination of advertisement effectiveness
    • G06Q30/0246Traffic
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F21/00Mobile visual advertising
    • G09F21/04Mobile visual advertising by land vehicles
    • G09F21/045Mobile visual advertising by land vehicles supported by the wheels
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F21/00Mobile visual advertising
    • G09F21/04Mobile visual advertising by land vehicles
    • G09F21/048Advertisement panels on sides, front or back of vehicles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62JCYCLE SADDLES OR SEATS; ACCESSORIES PECULIAR TO CYCLES AND NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, e.g. ARTICLE CARRIERS, CYCLE PROTECTORS
    • B62J99/00Subject matter not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • B62J2099/008Indication devices specially adapted for cycles, e.g. signs or flags

Abstract

Methods for tracking a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle having one or more identifying indicia associated with the display are described. The methods include the steps of coupling a mounting mechanism and a display to the bicycle, operating the bicycle in a location where the display can be viewed by pedestrian, bicycle, and/or motorized traffic, and collecting indicia data from consumers. In some examples, the methods further include analyzing effectiveness of advertising parameters based on the indicia data collected from consumers and adjusting advertisement based on the analysis. In other examples, the methods include paying a cyclist based on the collected indicia data.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/898,157, filed on May 20, 2013, which is hereby incorporated by reference for all purposes.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The present disclosure relates generally to mobile advertising displays. In particular, mobile advertising displays configured to mount to a bicycle are described.
  • Known mobile advertising display systems and methods are not entirely satisfactory for the range of applications in which they are employed. For example, existing mobile advertising displays are unnecessarily large and may be designed to mount to a motor vehicle. Existing mobile advertising displays are often configured to mount to a large surface area, for example, the side of a delivery truck. However, delivery trucks and even smaller motor vehicles are restricted to limited areas, such as highways, streets, and parking garages.
  • In addition, conventional mobile advertising displays configured to mount to a bicycle require a separate trailer to be hitched to, and towed behind, the bicycle. Existing advertising displays configured to mount to a bicycle are bulky and inconvenient; existing displays create an un-aerodynamic profile.
  • The dimension and weight of conventional advertising displays further limit areas that a bicycle can access. The riders of bikes bearing advertising displays are forced to alter riding habits and routes to accommodate the inconvenient bulky trailer. Inconvenient conventional displays can lead to increased commute time, rider fatigue, and an increased likelihood of accidents due to the added weight and girth of the advertising display.
  • Further, existing mobile advertising displays only reach a limited audience. Existing displays may only be displayed in the limited areas that can be accessed by large motor vehicles, or bulky, inconvenient towed trailers. Pedestrian and bike traffic largely ignores motor vehicle advertising. Additionally, even when a bulky bike trailer is used, the intended audience is distracted by the cumbersome trailer and the intended message of the advertising is lost. Indeed, bike trailers are often a source of consternation, and members of the advertising displays' target audience may be less likely to consume a product or service displayed on the advertising displays after a particularly frustrating encounter with conventional advertising displays.
  • Moreover, existing advertising displays lack identifying indicia for advertising displayed on a specific route or bike. Potential advertisers who may desire to reach a particular audience or targeted set of commuters have limited methods of determining the particular bicycle on which they desire to display advertising. Conventional advertising displays lack an efficient identifying system, and valuable logistical information cannot be compiled and extrapolated easily.
  • Existing advertising displays additionally lack identifying indicia for a particular side of a vehicle that may be particularly desirable to an advertiser. Conventional mobile advertising displays typically inefficiently advertise an identical message on each advertising surface. Lack of identifying indicia specific to each advertising surface on conventional advertising displays further limits the effectiveness of existing advertising displays.
  • Thus, there exists a need for mobile advertising display systems and methods that improve upon and advance the design of known mobile advertising display systems and methods. Examples of new and useful mobile advertising display systems and methods relevant to the needs existing in the field are discussed below.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present disclosure is directed to methods for tracking a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle having one or more identifying indicia associated with the display. The methods include the steps of coupling a mounting mechanism and a display to the bicycle, operating the bicycle in a location where the display can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motorized traffic, and collecting indicia data from consumers. In some examples, the methods further include analyzing effectiveness of one or more advertising parameters based on the indicia data and adjusting advertisement based on analysis of the one or more advertising parameters. In some other examples, the methods include paying a cyclist based on the collected indicia data.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of a first example of a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 1, depicting the mobile advertising display mounted on the bicycle frame without a wheel.
  • FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a first example of a mounting mechanism of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 5 is a close-up view of the first example of a mounting mechanism of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 6 is a side perspective view of a second example of a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle including bilaterally mounted advertising displays.
  • FIG. 7 is a front perspective view of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 6, depicting the angle that the advertising displays are supported relative to the bicycle wheel.
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 6, depicting the mobile advertising display mounted on the bicycle frame without a wheel.
  • FIG. 9 is an exploded view of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 10 is an exploded view of a second example of a mounting mechanism of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 11 is a close-up view of the second example of a mounting mechanism of the mobile advertising display shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 12 is a side perspective view of a third example of a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle including bilaterally mounted advertising displays with four braces.
  • FIG. 13 is a front perspective view of the mobile advertising display depicted in FIG. 12, depicting the angle that the advertising displays are supported relative to the bicycle wheel and showing the position of the stabilizer.
  • FIG. 14 is a flow chart of a first example method for using a mobile advertising display mounted to a bicycle.
  • FIG. 15 is a flow chart of a second example method for using a mobile advertising display mounted to a bicycle.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The disclosed mobile advertising displays configured to mount to a bicycle and methods of tracking mobile advertising displays will become better understood through review of the following detailed description in conjunction with the figures. The detailed description and figures provide merely examples of the various inventions described herein. Those skilled in the art will understand that the disclosed examples may be varied, modified, and altered without departing from the scope of the inventions described herein. Many variations are contemplated for different applications and design considerations; however, for the sake of brevity, each and every contemplated variation is not individually described in the following detailed description.
  • Throughout the following detailed description, examples of various mobile advertising displays configured to mount to a bicycle and methods of tracking mobile advertising displays are provided. Related features in the examples may be identical, similar, or dissimilar in different examples. For the sake of brevity, related features will not be redundantly explained in each example. Instead, the use of related feature names will cue the reader that the feature with a related feature name may be similar to the related feature in an example explained previously. Features specific to a given example will be described in that particular example. The reader should understand that a given feature need not be the same or similar to the specific portrayal of a related feature in any given figure or example.
  • With reference to FIGS. 1-5, a first example of a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle, mobile advertising display 100, will now be described. Mobile advertising display 100 includes a mounting mechanism 110, a brace 130, and a display 150. Mobile advertising display 100 is configured to mount to a bicycle 180, which includes a frame 182 and a wheel 184. Mobile advertising display 100 is depicted as unilaterally mounted to frame 182, however, it is additionally contemplated that the mobile advertising display may be bilaterally mounted to frame 182 to display advertising on both sides of wheel 184 as discussed in further examples below.
  • As shown most clearly in FIG. 3, mounting mechanism 110 includes a retaining member 111, a coupling member 112, and a protecting member 113. Mounting mechanism 110 serves to couple mobile advertising display 100 to bike 180.
  • As shown most clearly in FIGS. 3-5, retaining member 111 is configured to retain mounting mechanism 110 proximate frame 182. Retaining member 111 includes a u-shaped bracket 114 and a planar tab 115 coupled to u-shaped bracket 114. Planar tab 115 is configured to receive a threaded shaft coupling member 116. Threaded shaft coupling member 116 is complimentarily configured with coupling member 112 and configured to selectively couple mounting mechanism 110 to brace 130.
  • Coupling member 112 is configured to selectively couple mounting mechanism 110 to brace 130. In one example, as shown in FIG. 2, coupling member 112 is configured as a threaded bore. Acceptable coupling members may also include, but are not limited to, wing nuts, lock nuts, clips, clamps, and pins. Further, coupling members may be comprised of any suitable material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof.
  • As shown most clearly in FIG. 2, protecting member 113 is disposed proximate frame 182 between mounting mechanism 110 and frame 182. Protecting member 113 is complimentarily configured with frame 182 to receive frame 182. Additionally, protecting member 113 is configured to restrict or prevent retaining member 111 from damaging frame 182.
  • In one example, protecting member 113 is comprised of rubber and configured in a sleeve configuration. Additional protecting members may be comprised of any suitable material capable of preventing damage to a bike frame including, but not limited to wood, plastic, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof. Further, protecting members may be configured in any suitable configuration capable of preventing damage to a bike frame including, but not limited to, wraps, sheets, and pressure-relieving disks.
  • In the example depicted in FIG. 2, protecting member 113 is independent of, and wholly separated from, retaining member 111. Alternatively, protecting members may also be fixedly integrated with or removably integrated with retaining members. Additionally or alternatively, protecting members may be fixedly integrated with or removably integrated with bike frames.
  • As shown in FIG. 3, a single mounting mechanism 110 may selectively couple to brace 130, or multiple mounting mechanisms 110 may selectively couple to the same brace 130. In one example multiple mounting mechanisms retain multiple braces vertically spaced from each other. Mounting mechanisms may also retain braces at lesser or greater vertical spaces according to bracing needs.
  • In one example, brace 130 is comprised of polycarbonate material. Polycarbonate is particularly effective as a brace material because it is readily deformable and resilient. Additionally or alternatively, braces may be comprised of any readily deformable and resilient material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, plexiglass, fiberglass, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof.
  • As depicted in FIG. 2, display 150 is selectively coupled to braces 130 by retaining members 160. In one example, retaining members 160 are comprised of a threaded shaft and wing nut. Additionally or alternatively, retaining members may include, but are not limited to, threaded shaft and lock nut, clips, clamps, and pins. Retaining members may additionally include safety elements to enhance visibility of mobile advertising displays, including, but not limited to, reflectors, reflective tape, and flashing illuminated elements.
  • Also shown in FIG. 2, display 150 is selectively coupled to braces 130. Displays may also be fixedly secured to braces. Displays may be fixedly secured to braces by any now known or later developed securing means including, but not limited to, taping, gluing, fusing, welding, casting, and molding. Additionally or alternatively, displays may be selectively coupled to braces to allow the displays to rotate or self-level as the angle of the braces changes relative to the ground.
  • In the example shown in FIG. 1, display 150 is comprised of corrugated plastic. Additionally or alternatively, displays may be comprised of any readily deformable resilient material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, plexiglass, fiberglass, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof. Displays may additionally include safety elements to enhance visibility of mobile advertising displays, including, but not limited to, reflectors, reflective tape, and flashing illuminated elements.
  • Additionally, display 150 is substantially rectangular in shape and displays advertising media. Advertising media includes any displayable message intended to be interpreted by an audience observing display 150. Moreover, advertising media may include audio messages and audio-visual messages depicted by visual, audio, physical or electronic means. Displays may be comprised of any shape or form that facilitates or allows freely pedaling and maneuvering a bicycle, including, but not limited to, circles, squares, triangles, and trapezoids.
  • As depicted in FIG. 2, mobile advertising display 100 further includes identifier 140 selectively mounted to brace 130. Identifier 140 includes identifying information 190, and identifier 140 is selectively mounted to brace 130 using retaining members 160. Moreover, identifier 140 includes backing plate 175, which bolsters or improves the robustness of identifier 140. In one example, backing plate 175 is comprised of 0.875 inch×6.5 inch, 16-gauge steel. However, components of any suitable dimensions may be used. In further examples backing plates may be comprise of any rigid material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, plexiglass, fiberglass, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof.
  • Turning attention to FIGS. 6-11, a second example of a mobile advertising display, mobile advertising display 200, will now be described. Mobile advertising display 200 includes many similar or identical features to mobile advertising display 100. Thus, for the sake of brevity, each feature of mobile advertising display 200 will not be redundantly explained. Rather, key distinctions between mobile advertising display 200 and mobile advertising display 100 will be described in detail and the reader should reference the discussion above for features substantially similar between the two mobile advertising displays.
  • As can be seen in FIG. 6, mobile advertising display 200 includes a first mounting mechanism 210 configured to mount to a frame 282 of a bicycle 280 proximate a first side 221 of a wheel 284. Mobile advertising display 200 further includes a second mounting mechanism 220 configured to mount to frame 282 of bicycle 280 proximate a second side 223 of wheel 284 opposite first side 221. Additionally, mobile advertising display 200 includes first brace 230 selectively coupled to first mounting mechanism 210, and first display 250 selectively retained on first brace 230.
  • Mobile advertising display 200 additionally includes a second brace 235 selectively coupled to a second mounting mechanism 220, and a second display 255 selectively retained on second brace 235. Although mobile advertising display 200 is depicted as bilaterally mounted to frame 282, mobile advertising display 200 may also be unilaterally mounted to frame 282 to display advertising on one side of wheel 284 of bicycle 280.
  • As shown most clearly in FIG. 7, displays 250 and 255 are substantially rectangular in shape and configured to display advertising media. Advertising media includes any displayable message intended to be interpreted by an audience observing displays 250 and 255. Display 250 may display advertising media identical to or different from advertising media displayed on display 255. For example, display 250 may display advertising media targeting pedestrian traffic observing side 221 of wheel 284, while display 255 may display advertising media targeting motor vehicle traffic observing side 223 of wheel 284.
  • Mobile advertising display 200 additionally features a first identifier 240 selectively mounted to first brace 230, a second identifier 245 selectively mounted to second brace 235, and a stabilizer 270. Stabilizer 270 is selectively mounted to first identifier 240 and second identifier 245, and is configured to stabilize first brace 230 relative to second brace 235. Stabilizer 270 is configured to space first identifier 240 and second identifier 245 from wheel 284 to enable wheel 284 to travel freely between first identifier 240 and second identifier 245.
  • In one example, as shown in FIG. 6, stabilizer 270 is comprised of 3/16-inch steel and is configured in a u-shape. Stabilizers may also be comprised of any suitable material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof. Moreover, stabilizers may also be configured in any shape or configuration that spaces the identifiers relative to each other, stabilizes the braces, and allows the wheel to travel freely. Suitable configurations include, but are not limited to, linear, curved, triangular, and angled.
  • As shown in FIG. 8, first identifier 240 is selectively mounted to first brace 230 with retaining members 260. Further, second identifier 245 is selectively mounted to second brace 230 with retaining members 260. First identifier 240 and second identifier 245 include backing plates 275 configured to bolster or improve the robustness of first identifier 240 and second identifier 245. In one example, retaining members 260 are comprised of a threaded shaft and wing nut. Retaining members may also include, but are not limited to, threaded shafts and lock nuts, clips, clamps, and pins.
  • First identifier 240 and second identifier 245 are configured to display identifying information 290. Identifying information 290 facilitates or allows a particular mobile advertising display 200 to be identified. In the example shown in FIG. 6, identifying information 290 is numerical and identical on both first identifier 240 and second identifier 245. Identifying information may also be different on the first identifier compared to the second identifier. Additionally, identifying information may be comprised of any identifying information that facilitates or allows identifying a particular mobile advertising display. Identifying information may be particular to a single bike, or additionally or alternatively, particular to one side of a mobile advertising display.
  • As depicted in FIGS. 9-11, mobile advertising display 200 includes examples of a different form of mounting mechanism, mounting mechanisms 210 and 220. FIGS. 10 and 11 depict mounting mechanism 210 in detail. Mounting mechanism 220 is identical in form and function to mounting mechanism 210.
  • In the example shown in FIG. 6, mounting mechanisms 210 and 220 are configured to mount directly proximate frame 282. Mounting mechanisms may further include protecting members disposed proximate the frame between mounting mechanisms and the frame as discussed above. Additionally or alternatively, mounting mechanisms may be configured to mount directly to or accommodate bike accessories, including, but not limited to, baskets, bag holders, and fender supports.
  • Turning attention to FIGS. 12-13, a third example of a mobile advertising display, mobile advertising display 300, will now be described. Mobile advertising display 300 includes many similar or identical features to mobile advertising displays 100 and 200. Thus, for the sake of brevity, each feature of mobile advertising display 300 will not be redundantly explained. Rather, key distinctions between mobile advertising display 300 and mobile advertising displays 100 and 200 will be described in detail and the reader should reference the discussion above for features substantially similar between the three mobile advertising displays.
  • As depicted in FIG. 12, mobile advertising display 300 is configured to mount to a frame 382 of a bicycle 380 proximate a wheel 384. Mobile advertising display 300 includes a first mounting mechanism 310 configured to mount to frame 382 of bicycle 380 proximate a first side 321 of wheel 384, and a second mounting mechanism 320 configured to mount to frame 382 of bicycle 380 proximate a second side 323 of wheel 384 opposite first side 321.
  • Also depicted in FIG. 12, mobile advertising display 300 additionally includes a third mounting mechanism 318 vertically spaced from first mounting mechanism 310. Third mounting mechanism 318 is configured to mount to frame 382 of bicycle 380 proximate first side 321 of wheel 384.
  • Mobile advertising display 300 further includes a fourth mounting mechanism 319 vertically spaced from second mounting mechanism 320. Fourth mounting mechanism is configured to mount to the frame 382 of bicycle 380 proximate second side 323 of wheel 384 opposite first side 321.
  • Moreover, mobile advertising display 300 includes a first brace 330 selectively coupled to first mounting mechanism 310, and a third brace 332 selectively coupled to third mounting mechanism 318. A first display 350 is selectively retained on both first brace 330 and third brace 332.
  • Additionally, mobile advertising display 300 includes a second brace 335 selectively coupled to second mounting mechanism 330, and a fourth brace 337 selectively coupled to fourth mounting mechanism 319. A second display 355 is selectively retained on both second brace 335 and fourth brace 337.
  • As shown in FIG. 12, mobile advertising display 300 also includes stabilizer 370 selectively mounted to first brace 330 and second brace 335. Stabilizer 370 is configured to stabilize first brace 330 relative to second brace 335, and space first brace 330 and second brace 335 from wheel 384 to enable wheel 384 to travel freely between them. In one example, stabilizer 370 is comprised of 3/16-inch steel, is configured in a u-shape, and stabilizes first brace 330 relative to second brace 335.
  • Stabilizers may additionally or alternatively be selectively mounted to one or more braces to stabilize multiple braces relative to each other and the wheel. Stabilizers may also be comprised of any suitable material including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof. Moreover, stabilizers may also be configured in any shape or configuration that spaces and stabilizes the braces relative to each other and allows the wheel to travel freely between the braces, including, but not limited to, linear, curved, triangular, and angled.
  • As shown most clearly in FIG. 13, first brace 330, third brace 332, second brace 335, and fourth brace 337 are retained at an angle relative to wheel 384. In the example shown in FIG. 13 first display 350 and second display 355 are retained at an angle of 20 degrees by first brace 330, third brace 332, second brace 335, and fourth brace 337 relative to wheel 384. An angle of 20 degrees relative to wheel 384 has been found to be effective to increase or improve the aerodynamic profile of mobile advertising display 300. Further, an angle of 20 degrees facilitates or allows free movement of a rider's feet and legs as the bike's pedals travel.
  • Additionally or alternatively, any angle relative to the wheel which increases or improves the aerodynamic profile of the mobile advertising display may be used. Alternatively, an angle of zero relative to the wheel may also be used; the braces may be retained parallel to the center vertical axis of the wheel.
  • In the example shown in FIG. 12, first brace 330, third brace 332, second brace 335, and fourth brace 337 are comprised of polycarbonate material. Polycarbonate is particularly effective as a brace material because it is readily-deformable and resilient. Additionally or alternatively, braces may be comprised of any readily-deformable resilient material, including, but not limited to, wood, plastic, plexiglass, fiberglass, metal, carbon fiber, composites, and combinations thereof.
  • Turning attention to FIGS. 14 and 15, a first method and a second method of using a mobile advertising display mounted to a bicycle, methods 400 and 500, respectively, will now be described. Specifically, method 400 includes steps for using the mobile advertising display and collecting consumer data for a display mounted on one side of a bicycle having one indicium. Alternatively, method 400 can be used for displaying advertising and collecting consumer data for a display mounted on two sides of a bicycle having one indicium (i.e., the same indicium on both sides of the bicycle. Method 500 includes steps for using the mobile advertising display and collecting consumer data for a display mounted on two sides of a bicycle, each side of the bicycle having a distinct indicium on the display (i.e., a first indicium and a second indicium).
  • As shown in FIG. 14, beginning as steps 402 and 404, a mounting mechanism for a display is coupled to a bicycle and a display having an identifying indicium (e.g., identifiers 140 and 240, etc.) is coupled to the mounting mechanism, respectively. Next, at step 406, the bicycle is operated (i.e., the bicycle is ridden) where the display (i.e., advertising material) can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motor vehicle traffic. During operation of the bicycle, the riding time and/or route can be optionally tracked via GPS at optional step 406. It will be appreciated that the bicycle riding time and/or route can be tracked via any desired system and method known or yet to be discovered.
  • At 410, indicia data is collected from consumers. In one example, as a consumer makes an online purchase, the consumer selects from a list an identifying indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing. In another example, as a consumer makes an in-person purchase, the consumer conveys to the cashier an indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing and the cashier records the purchase and the associated indicium. It will be appreciated that indicia data can be collected from consumers in any desired method that associates a purchase of a product and/or service with a specific mobile display observed by the consumer.
  • The consumer purchase and indicia data can then optionally be used for one or more purposes. In one example, at optional step 412 purchase and indicia data can be analyzed based on one or more advertising parameters to determine effectiveness of advertising. Further, at optional step 414, advertisement (i.e., advertisement parameters) can be adjusted based on the analysis completed in step 412. In this example, advertisement parameters can include one or more of route information, location of display on the bicycle, duration of display advertisement, indemnity of cyclist, time of day of bicycle operation, etc. In another example, at optional step 416, a cyclist can be paid based on the number of consumers that reported the indicium associated with the display that is mounted to the cyclist's bicycle.
  • As shown in FIG. 14, beginning as steps 402 and 404, method 400 includes coupling a mounting mechanism for a display to a bicycle and coupling a display having an identifying indicium (e.g., identifiers 140 and 240, etc.) to the mounting mechanism, respectively. Next, at step 406, the bicycle is operated (i.e., the bicycle is ridden) where the display (i.e., advertising material) can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motor vehicle traffic. During operation of the bicycle, the riding time and/or route can be optionally tracked via GPS at optional step 408. It will be appreciated that the bicycle riding time and/or route can be tracked via any desired system and method known or yet to be discovered.
  • At 410, indicia data is collected from consumers. In one example, as a consumer makes an online purchase, the consumer selects from a list an identifying indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing. In another example, as a consumer makes an in-person purchase, the consumer conveys to the cashier an indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing and the cashier records the purchase and the associated indicium. It will be appreciated that indicia data can be collected from consumers in any desired method that associates a purchase of a product and/or service with a specific mobile display observed by the consumer.
  • The consumer purchase and indicia data can then optionally be used for one or more purposes. In one example, at optional step 412 purchase and indicia data can be analyzed based on one or more advertising parameters to determine effectiveness of advertising. Further, at optional step 414, advertisement (i.e., advertisement parameters) can be adjusted based on the analysis completed in step 412. In this example, advertisement parameters can include one or more of route information, location of display on the bicycle, duration of display advertisement, indemnity of cyclist, time of day of bicycle operation, etc. In another example, at optional step 416, a cyclist can be paid based on the number of consumers that reported the indicium associated with the display that is mounted to the cyclist's bicycle.
  • As shown in FIG. 15, beginning as steps 502-506, method 500 includes coupling a mounting mechanism for a display to a bicycle, coupling a first display having a first identifying indicium (e.g., one of identifiers 240, etc.) to the mounting mechanism, and coupling a second display having a second identifying indicium (e.g., one of identifiers 240, etc.) to the mounting mechanism, respectively. Next, at step 508, the bicycle is operated (i.e., the bicycle is ridden) where the display (i.e., advertising material) can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motor vehicle traffic. During operation of the bicycle, the riding time and/or route can be optionally tracked via GPS at optional step 510. It will be appreciated that the bicycle riding time and/or route can be tracked via any desired system and method known or yet to be discovered.
  • At 512, indicia data is collected from consumers. In one example, as a consumer makes an online purchase, the consumer selects from a list an identifying indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing. In another example, as a consumer makes an in-person purchase, the consumer conveys to the cashier an indicium that he or she observed on a mobile display that advertised the product and/or service that the consumer is purchasing and the cashier records the purchase and the associated indicium. It will be appreciated that indicia data can be collected from consumers in any desired method that associates a purchase of a product and/or service with a specific mobile display observed by the consumer.
  • The consumer purchase and indicia data can then optionally be used for one or more purposes. In one example, at optional step 514 purchase and indicia data can be analyzed based on one or more advertising parameters to determine effectiveness of advertising. Further, at optional step 516, advertisement (i.e., advertisement parameters) can be adjusted based on the analysis completed in step 514. In this example, advertisement parameters can include one or more of route information, location of display on the bicycle, duration of display advertisement, indemnity of cyclist, time of day of bicycle operation, etc. In another example, at optional step 518, a cyclist can be paid based on the number of consumers that reported the indicium associated with the display that is mounted to the cyclist's bicycle.
  • The disclosure above encompasses multiple distinct inventions with independent utility. While each of these inventions has been disclosed in a particular form, the specific embodiments disclosed and illustrated above are not to be considered in a limiting sense as numerous variations are possible. The subject matter of the inventions includes all novel and non-obvious combinations and subcombinations of the various elements, features, functions and/or properties disclosed above and inherent to those skilled in the art pertaining to such inventions. Where the disclosure or subsequently filed claims recite “a” element, “a first” element, or any such equivalent term, the disclosure or claims should be understood to incorporate one or more such elements, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements.
  • Applicant(s) reserves the right to submit claims directed to combinations and subcombinations of the disclosed inventions that are believed to be novel and non-obvious. Inventions embodied in other combinations and subcombinations of features, functions, elements and/or properties may be claimed through amendment of those claims or presentation of new claims in the present application or in a related application. Such amended or new claims, whether they are directed to the same invention or a different invention and whether they are different, broader, narrower or equal in scope to the original claims, are to be considered within the subject matter of the inventions described herein.

Claims (20)

1. A method for tracking a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle having a frame and a wheel, the mobile advertising display being a mounting mechanism configured to mount to the frame of the bicycle proximate the wheel, at least one brace coupled to the mounting mechanism, at least one display retained on the at least one brace, and one or more identifying indicia associated with the at least one display, the method comprising:
coupling the mounting mechanism and the at least one display to the bicycle;
operating the bicycle in a location where the at least one display can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motorized traffic; and
collecting indicia data from consumers.
2. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 1, further comprising tracking one or more of a cycling time, a cycling route of the bicycle, a cycling duration, and a cyclist identity during operation of the bicycle.
3. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 2, wherein tracking one or more of cycling time and route comprises tracking one or more of the cycling time and route via GPS.
4. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 1, further comprising analyzing effectiveness of one or more advertising parameters based on the indicia data from the consumers.
5. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 4, further comprising adjusting advertisement based on analysis of the one or more advertising parameters.
6. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 4, wherein the one or more advertising parameters comprise one or more of route information, a location of the display on the bicycle, a duration of bicycle operation, a time of day of bicycle operation, an identification of an individual cyclist.
7. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 1, wherein the one or more identifying indicia are unique to a specific bicycle, and
wherein the indicia data comprises a number of products purchased associated with the one or more identifying indicia.
8. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 7, further comprising paying a cyclist of the specific bicycle based on the collected indicia data from consumers.
9. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 1, wherein the indicia data comprises a number of products purchased associated with the one or more identifying indicia
10. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 1, wherein the one or more identifying indicia includes one or more of a series of numbers, a series of letters, a series of numbers and letters, a bar code, a data matrix, a QR code, a symbol, and a colored tag.
11. The mobile advertising display of claim 1, wherein the at least one brace comprises a first brace and a second brace coupled to the mounting system, the first brace being disposed on a right side of the bicycle and the second brace being disposed on the left side of the bicycle, and
wherein the at least one display comprises a first display coupled to the first brace and a second display coupled to the second brace, the first display having a first identifying indicium and the second display having a second identifying indicium.
12. The mobile advertising display of claim 11, further comprising analyzing effectiveness of one or more advertising parameters based on the indicia data from the consumers,
wherein the first identifying indicium is different from the second identifying indicium, and
wherein advertising parameters comprise advertisement on the left side of the bicycle and advertisement on the right side of the bicycle.
13. A method for tracking a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle having a frame and a wheel, the mobile advertising display being a mounting mechanism configured to mount to the frame of the bicycle proximate the wheel, at least one brace coupled to the mounting mechanism, at least one display retained on the at least one brace, and one or more identifying indicia associated with the at least one display, the method comprising:
coupling the mounting mechanism and the at least one display to the bicycle;
operating the bicycle in a location where the at least one display can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motorized traffic;
collecting indicia data from consumers;
analyzing effectiveness of one or more advertising parameters based on the indicia data from the consumers; and
adjusting advertisement based on analysis of the one or more advertising parameters.
14. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 13, further comprising tracking one or more of a cycling time, a cycling route of the bicycle, a cycling duration, and a cyclist identity during operation of the bicycle.
15. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 13, wherein the one or more advertising parameters comprise one or more of route information, a location of the display on the bicycle, a duration of bicycle operation, a time of day of bicycle operation, an identification of an individual cyclist.
16. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 13, wherein the one or more identifying indicia are unique to a specific bicycle, and
wherein the indicia data comprises a number of products purchased associated with the one or more identifying indicia.
17. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 13, further comprising paying a cyclist of the specific bicycle based on the collected indicia data from consumers.
18. The method for tracking a mobile advertising display of claim 13, wherein the one or more identifying indicia includes one or more of a series of numbers, a series of letters, a series of numbers and letters, a bar code, a data matrix, a QR code, a symbol, and a colored tag.
19. The mobile advertising display of claim 13, wherein the at least one brace comprises a first brace and a second brace coupled to the mounting system, the first brace being disposed on a right side of the bicycle and the second brace being disposed on the left side of the bicycle,
wherein the at least one display comprises a first display coupled to the first brace and a second display coupled to the second brace, the first display having a first identifying indicium and the second display having a second identifying indicium, the first identifying indicium being different from the second identifying indicium, and
wherein advertising parameters comprise advertisement on the left side of the bicycle and advertisement on the right side of the bicycle.
20. A method for tracking a mobile advertising display configured to mount to a bicycle having a frame and a wheel, the mobile advertising display being a mounting mechanism configured to mount to the frame of the bicycle proximate the wheel, at least one brace coupled to the mounting mechanism, at least one display retained on the at least one brace, and one or more identifying indicia associated with the at least one display, the method comprising:
coupling the mounting mechanism and the at least one display to the bicycle;
operating the bicycle in a location where the at least one display can be viewed by one or more of pedestrian, bicycle, and motorized traffic;
tracking one or more of a cycling time, a cycling route of the bicycle, a cycling duration, and a cyclist identity during operation of the bicycle;
collecting indicia data from consumers, the one or more identifying indicia being unique to a specific bicycle and the indicia data comprising a number of products purchased associated with the one or more identifying indicia;
analyzing effectiveness of one or more advertising parameters based on the indicia data from the consumers, the one or more advertising parameters being one or more of one or more of route information, a location of the display on the bicycle, a duration of bicycle operation, a time of day of bicycle operation, an identification of an individual cyclist; and
adjusting advertisement based on analysis of the one or more advertising parameters.
US14/462,970 2013-05-20 2014-08-19 Systems and methods for tracking mobile advertising displays Abandoned US20140358674A1 (en)

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