US20140330412A1 - Computerized interactive sports system and a method of assessing sports skills of users - Google Patents

Computerized interactive sports system and a method of assessing sports skills of users Download PDF

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US20140330412A1
US20140330412A1 US14/268,042 US201414268042A US2014330412A1 US 20140330412 A1 US20140330412 A1 US 20140330412A1 US 201414268042 A US201414268042 A US 201414268042A US 2014330412 A1 US2014330412 A1 US 2014330412A1
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exercises
users
sports
physical
technical
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Brynjar BJARNASON
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MAELINGAR OG THJALFUN EHF
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MAELINGAR OG THJALFUN EHF
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/063Operations research or analysis
    • G06Q10/0639Performance analysis
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B19/00Teaching not covered by other main groups of this subclass
    • G09B19/003Repetitive work cycles; Sequence of movements
    • G09B19/0038Sports
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H20/00ICT specially adapted for therapies or health-improving plans, e.g. for handling prescriptions, for steering therapy or for monitoring patient compliance
    • G16H20/30ICT specially adapted for therapies or health-improving plans, e.g. for handling prescriptions, for steering therapy or for monitoring patient compliance relating to physical therapies or activities, e.g. physiotherapy, acupressure or exercising
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H50/00ICT specially adapted for medical diagnosis, medical simulation or medical data mining; ICT specially adapted for detecting, monitoring or modelling epidemics or pandemics
    • G16H50/30ICT specially adapted for medical diagnosis, medical simulation or medical data mining; ICT specially adapted for detecting, monitoring or modelling epidemics or pandemics for calculating health indices; for individual health risk assessment

Abstract

A computerized interactive sports system is provided wherein a plurality of sports areas is provided where users undergo physical or technical exercises. Sensor systems associated to the plurality of sports areas for sensing the user's success when undergoing the technical or physical exercises and based thereon output sensor signals. A computer system coupled to the at least one sensor system utilizes the sensor signals for calculating a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing the physical or technical exercises within the at least one sports area. The computer system further associates different classification categories to different sports areas and classifies the scores based thereon, and subsequently stores the scores classified into the at least one classification category. A database is provided that is interactively connected to the stored scores at the computer system for sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a computerized interactive sports system, and to a method of assessing sports skills of users when using such a system.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Systems that couple actual sporting equipment and a computer are known in the art. Many of these systems relate to various golf club devices that embody various ball contact or club swing sensing component. An example of such a system is described in U.S. Pat. No. 7,789,742 that discloses a smart golf club multiplayer system for the internet, where a golf club, a golf club swing detector and/or a golf ball receptacle communicate wirelessly to a personal computer and thereby, if desired, to the internet. This system allows one or more golfers to enter into a competition against each other. Each player may ask the computer who is available to play a contest. Once a player pairs up against another player anywhere in the world and play ensues, the computer and display show each participant's score via animated or graphics that relate to a player's individual performance statistics. A single player may play without an opponent to practice and improve basic golfing skills using the computer to display to track performances.
  • This reference is however more or less related to a golf club system, where the golf club comprises a grip, a shaft, and a club-head and various sets of sensors mounted to the golf club. Moreover, when implemented for competition against other golfers this system relies on that these golfers are available at that time, i.e. that golfers pair up against another player anywhere in the world. However, this may e.g. be difficult due to different time zones. Moreover, this system is not focused on group sports such as soccer.
  • The inventor of the present invention has appreciated that there is thus a need for a computerized interactive sports system that is focused more on, but is not limited to, group sports such as soccer, basketball, football and the like and has in consequence devised the present invention.
  • SUMMARY
  • It would be advantageous to achieve an improved interactive sports system that provides a competing feature between different users without requiring the users to play simultaneously and that is also especially suitable to be implemented for group sports. In general, the invention preferably seeks to mitigate, alleviate or eliminate one or more of the above mentioned disadvantages singly or in any combination. In particular, it may be seen as an object of the present invention to provide an interactive sports system that solves the above mentioned problems, or other problems, of the prior art.
  • To better address one or more of these concerns, in a first aspect of the invention a computerized interactive sports system is provided, comprising:
      • plurality of sports areas where users undergo physical or technical exercises,
      • sensor systems associated to said plurality of sports areas for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting sensor signals,
      • a computer system coupled to said at least one sensor system for utilizing the sensor signals for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area, where said computer system further associates different classification categories to different sports areas and classifies said scores based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category,
      • a database interactively connected to the stored scores at said computer system for sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
  • By the term sports area is according to the present invention meant an area where the users undergo different exercises, e.g. where the users undergo different dribbling skills exercises, shooting skills exercises, sprinting capability exercises etc.
  • The computer system may be provided with forwarding feature that manually or automatically forwards the scores to said database. The communication between the computer system and the database may be via a communication channel such as the Internet. The database may be a storage memory of an external server that the different users have access to.
  • Accordingly, a computerized interactive sports system is provided that is focused more on, but is not limited to, group sports such as soccer, basketball, football and the like, where individualized training is possible. The users can either monitor their own progress within different exercises, e.g. monitor how their dribbling skills have improved, and/or users may compare their scores with scores from different users for different physical or technical exercises, e.g. passing skills, without requiring that other users are performing the physical or technical exercises at the same time.
  • Also, the system may be very practical for training purposes for e.g. providing coaches with insight and feedback designed to facilitate training sessions.
  • In one embodiment, the users undergoing said physical or technical exercises perform the physical or technical exercises at two or more different locations and wherein the physical or technical exercises at the two or more different locations that the users undergo are similar or identical. By the term two or more different locations is as an example meant at different states e.g. within USA, different continents, different countries, different locations within the same town/city etc. By the term similar or identical physical or technical exercises is as an example meant that if a given exercise is sprinting capability, then the exercise must preferably fulfill pre-defined norms such as that the sprinting capability exercise looks the same, e.g. has the same total running length, so that the results between different two or more different locations are comparable. As an example, in location 1 (e.g. New York) there is a first training center or the like that has five different sports areas for five different exercises, in location 2 (e.g. Chicago) there is a second training center that has five different sports areas that are identical to those at location 1, i.e. identical exercises, and in location 3 (e.g. Atlanta) there is a third training center that has five different sports areas identical to those at location 1 and 2. The number of sports areas could of course be less than five, or more than five.
  • In one embodiment, said database is interactively connected to the computer system such that when users undergo said physical or technical exercises the resulting scores are manually or automatically forwarded to said database via a communication channel. Accordingly, the database, which may be a memory at a central server, is manually e.g. by means of a manual sending-operation on the computer system updated, or the computer system may be designed to automatically update the score with the newest scores by e.g. sending the scores automatically once or several times a day. The communication channels may be a wired communication channel, or preferably a wireless communication channel such as the Internet.
  • By the term updating the database is preferably meant either adding the scores for the individual users to the previous scores without deleting the previous scores, or the previous scores may be replaced with the newest score for the user.
  • The computer system may also be designed to send a given user after undergoing the exercises an email or a message with the score results.
  • In one embodiment, a user selected from said users undergoing said physical or technical exercises is associated with an access code for accessing said scores at the database for the user himself and/or other users so as to allow the user to compare his/her score for a given physical or technical exercise(s) with scores for other users that have undergone similar or identical physical or technical exercises. An example of such an access code is a Login number and a Password, e.g. under the condition that the users pay annual subscription fee. As discussed above, the fact that the users undergo similar or identical exercises allows the users to e.g. compete with each other, e.g. who is the fastest forward player, by comparing the category associated to the sprinting capability for all the forward players either within a given country, or worldwide. Also, a given user within a given team can monitor the exact progress for a given sport exercise, without competing with other users. This may e.g. be the case where the user is recovering from injuries or where a trainer has prepared a new training plan for the individual user or the team so that the trainer and the user or the remaining parties of the team can monitor the progress from the new training plan.
  • In one embodiment, the users may access their score and/or score from other users via an intermediate platform such as via Facebook® account, where the login to this intermediate platform may be sufficient to access the database there from, or the database may also require the users to enter an additional login ID.
  • In one embodiment, said at least one set of sensor system associated to at least one sports areas is time-sensing systems adapted to measure the time from starting from where the users start the physical or technical exercises until the users complete the physical or technical exercises. This would e.g. be the scenario where a user, e.g. a soccer player, enters a sports area, e.g. sports area for dribbling exercises, passing and receiving exercise etc., until the user has completed the exercise within this sports area. In this case, said success related signal is the starting and end time signal and the determined score would accordingly be the time the soccer player (user) needed to complete the exercise. Said classification category would then be a category indicating the type of the exercise the soccer player (the user) practiced, i.e. the dribbling or passing and receiving exercise. Said classification may be done via identification codes or ID number that indicates the exercise the soccer player (user) went through. In this case, the time it took the soccer player to complete the exercise would be associated with this classification code/ID that identifies the type of exercise. This may subsequently be automatically stored under the classification code/ID with the time and with the ID number of the soccer player (the user).
  • The time it takes for a user to complete a given exercise within may also be divided into sub-intervals that may be presented to the user when accessing said database. In that way, the user may be provided with more detailed information about the exercise, e.g. how long time it took to perform one particular time of the exercise etc.
  • In one embodiment, said at least one set of sensor system associated to at least one sports area is an integrated laser or radar system for measuring shot velocity of a ball.
  • In one embodiment, said physical or technical exercises are soccer related physical or technical exercises.
  • In one embodiment, said physical or technical exercises are soccer related physical or technical exercises are selected from:
      • a basketball related physical or technical exercises,
      • a baseball related physical or technical exercises,
      • a hockey related physical or technical exercises.
  • This should of course not be construed as being limited to only the above mentioned sports. As an example, if said physical or technical exercises are within the field of soccer, the task may be to measure the soccer skills for different users that may be located at different places, e.g. different states, cities or continents that undergo similar or identical exercises so as to enable a reasonable comparison of the exercises, or the users may be within the same team.
  • In one embodiment, said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area are selected from one or more of the following:
      • a dribbling related exercises,
      • a passing and receiving related exercises,
      • a game action speed related exercises,
      • a finishing proficiency related exercises,
      • shot velocity related exercises,
      • stamina related exercise,
      • running related exercise,
      • jump related exercises,
      • heading ball related exercises.
  • Accordingly, computerized interactive sports system that among other things is capable of providing:
      • series of realistic and applicable sport ‘game action’ measurements,
      • an accurate database for comparative purposes,
      • a record or “benchmark” from which individual improvement can be measured,
      • a series of well-designed measuring instruments that will show players how to improve,
      • a series of measurements that will assist the coach in making observations,
      • correcting technique and providing feedback in the form of a data base,
      • a measurement protocol where the players and coaches can observe and improve,
      • a date base driven evaluation tool designed to chart improvements over time,
      • a fun and challenging environment.
  • Moreover, the computerized interactive sports system according to the present invention provides helpful service to all types of sport players (users) who desire to improve, starting by providing a benchmark measurement. Also, the psychological factor will always play an important role where e.g. serious players that are competitors will most likely continue to improve their selves by monitoring and their scores and comparing their scores with other players, i.e. the system will encourage the players to practice so as to develop themselves as players. Also, the system may be utilized to identify weaknesses and provide coaches and players with feedback to quantify improvements. As an example, the exercises that can be a very useful tool in helping soccer players developing their soccer skills via different soccer related exercises.
  • In one embodiment, before a given user selected from said users undergoes said exercises defined by the sports areas the user related data is entered into the computer system, or in case of a group of users are undergoing said exercises defined by the sports areas the users related data are entered into the computer system, thus allowing the computer to identify the users undergoing said exercises. This means that before undergoing the exercises the user's login may be entered into the computer system so the system is aware of who is undergoing the exercises. If e.g. a group of users are undergoing exercises within the same location a specific order of the users may be setup either manually or automatically by the computer to keep track of which user is undergoing a given which exercise. The user may also be provided with information e.g. visual information via display indicating who is next to undergo a given exercise.
  • In one embodiment, a difficulty level factor is associated to the sports areas indicating the difficulty of the exercises. In that way, a better classification of the scores may be provided and adapted to different age/skills because e.g. the exercise that a four year old girl undergoes will most likely be different from what a professional player undergoes.
  • In one embodiment, said difficulty level factor is adjustable. This means that e.g. that different sports areas may easily be changed and thus the difficulty factor may be changed, e.g. if different group of users is coming to undergo the different sports areas.
  • In a second aspect of the invention a method of assessing sports skills of users is proved, comprising:
      • providing plurality of sports areas where users undergo physical or technical exercises, where the sports area are associated with sensor systems for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting sensor signals,
      • utilizing the sensor signals for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area,
      • associating different classification categories to different sports areas where said scores are classified based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category, and
      • sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
  • In a third aspect of the invention a machine-readable medium is provided having stored thereon data representing sequences of instructions, the sequences of instructions which, when executed by a processor, cause the processor to perform the steps of:
      • collecting sensor signals from users when undergoing physical or technical exercises at plurality of sports areas, where the sports area are associated with sensor systems for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting said sensor signals,
      • utilizing the sensor signals for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area,
      • associating different classification categories to different sports areas and classifying said scores based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category, and
      • sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
  • In general the various aspects of the invention may be combined and coupled in any way possible within the scope of the invention. These and other aspects, features and/or advantages of the invention will be apparent from and elucidated with reference to the embodiments described hereinafter.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Embodiments of the invention will be described, by way of example only, with reference to the drawings, in which
  • FIG. 1 depicts graphically an embodiment of a computerized interactive sports system according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 shows a flowchart of one embodiment of a method according to the present invention of assessing sports skills of users, and
  • FIG. 3 shows one way of presenting such information of scores.
  • DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS
  • FIG. 1 depicts graphically an embodiment of a computerized interactive sports system 100 according to the present invention. The embodiment depicted here shows three different users 105, 108, 110 that are located at three different training places 150-152 in e.g. three different states in USA or e.g. at different places within the same city. The users within each training place undergo a set of exercises at different sports areas 121-123, preferably the same set of exercises, i.e. each sports area defines the exercise that the users undergo. Moreover, each sports area has associated a sensor system 124-126. As depicted here each training place 150-152 is associated with a computer system 106, 107, 111 for capturing and processing the sensor signals 112-114 from different training areas within the training place 150-152.
  • The users 105, 108, 110 could also undergo these exercises at the same location (not shown here). In such cases, only one set of a computer system would be sufficient.
  • For simplicity, in the following it will be assumed that the sports system is a soccer sports system and the users, here below referred to as players 105, 108, 110, are soccer players that are developing their soccer skills. The present invention should of course not be construed as being limited to only soccer, but other sport activities may benefit from the present system, such as basketball, football (American football), basketball, hockey, baseball and the like.
  • Shown here is where a player 105 undergoes a shooting exercise where the task may e.g. be to shoot the ball in all the corners within the sport area 121, where the player preferably stands in the middle of the sports area 121 and receives the ball after each shot, selects the next corner etc., until the player has hit all the corners. The sensor system 124 associated to this particular sports area 121 may be a timer that times how long it takes for the player 105 to complete the exercise. The timing may e.g. be started when the player 105 enters the sports area 121 until the player leaves the sports area 121. This sensor signal 112 is then forwarded/transmitted to the computer system 106 associated to the training place where player 105 is located in either wired or wireless way. The computer system 106 utilizes the received signal from the sensor system 124 to calculate a score for the player for this particular sports area 121, i.e. in this case how long time it took for the user to complete the task of shooting the ball in all the corners, and may subsequently store the score. Other examples of sports area within this particular training place could include sports area for measuring dribbling, sports area for passing and receiving, sports area for game action running, sports area for shooting proficiency and sports area for measuring the shot velocity.
  • In one embodiment, before undergoing the exercises the user's login has been entered into the computer system so the system is aware of who is undergoing the exercises. If e.g. a group of users are undergoing exercises within the same location a specific order of the users may be setup either manually or automatically by the computer to keep track of which user is undergoing a given which exercise.
  • The sports area 121 is preferably classified into a classification category, e.g. CL1 which may stand for a shooting exercise category, and this score for the player 105 which preferably has a player ID or some kind of an account number, is stored in the computer system 106 under this classification category CL1, with the player ID. By doing so it is possible to store the scores for different users and different types of exercises in organized manner. At this training place, there may e.g. be five different sports areas (five different exercises) being categorized as CL1-CL5.
  • Similar principle applies for the other players 108, 110, that are located at said different training places, where e.g. player 108 in training place 151 undergoes among other exercises an heading football exercise with in sports area 122 where the purpose with the may e.g. be to head the football at a particular point within the sports area 122, or the speed of the ball may also be measured. In both cases, sensing devices 125 senses either the time it took until the player hit the sport, or the speed of the ball. In either case, a sensing signal 113 is forwarded/transmitted to the computer 107 where it is processed, and classified as discussed previously. Because the exercise within sports area 122 differs from the exercise at sports area 121 it has a different classification ID, e.g. classification category CL2. This training place may have the same five different sports areas (five different exercises) being categorized as CL1-CL5.
  • For player 110 at training place 152, the example of an exercise shown within a given sports area 123 here relates to measuring the speed of the player 110, e.g. how long time it takes to run back and forth in sports area 123, where the sensing system 126 is simply a timer that measures the time from where the player 110 enters the sports area 123 until the player leaves the sports area 123. The sensing signal 114 is then forwarded/transmitted to a computer system 111 that processes the signal as discussed previously where the resulting score is categorized based on the exercise, in this case the running exercise having e.g. a classification category CL3. Also at this training place 152, there may e.g. be five different sports areas (five different exercises) being categorized as CL1-CL5.
  • Each of said different sports areas are preferably designed such that they are very similar or almost identical so as to allow the players 105, 108, 110 to compare themselves with each other. By having the exercises at the sports areas identical or similar it is possible to categorize the scores irrespective of the location where the players performed the exercises. This would of course mean utilizing common classification categories for the sports areas that might apply Worldwide.
  • Different sensors may be implemented depending on the type of exercise, such as any type of timing sensors, e.g. sensor that utilize a laser or light beam to start and stop the exercise may be used. Also, different kinds of sensors capable of measuring high speed may be implemented for measuring the speed of the ball, or touch sensitive sensors may be implemented for detecting if the ball hits a particular sport within the sports area 122. Other examples of sensors include, but are not limited to, laser technology, radar guns and wireless computer technology to provide instant feedback on the user's performances.
  • The computer systems 106, 107, 111 may as an example be a regular PC computer, any type of portable computer such a tablet computer, smart phone and the like, i.e. computer systems that comprise receivers, microprocessors, storage medium and transmitters.
  • Also, the users may access their scores via e.g. an appropriate “App” on their portable computer devices, e.g. tablet or mobile phones. The access to the scores may also take place via any type of an intermediate platform such as Facebook®, Skype®, Google plus® and the like, where it may be sufficient to enter their login and password to these intermediate platforms.
  • Assuming that the computer systems 106, 107, 111 are at different locations as shown here, the scores may be forwarded/transmitted via e.g. a wireless communication channel such as the Internet 118-120, to a database 102 at e.g. a central computer 101, where the scores along with the classification categories for different players 105, 108, 110 are stored. This forwarding of the scores to the database 102 may be done automatically via an automatic forwarding feature comprises at the computer systems 106, 107, 111 that e.g. forwards the scores once a day or several times a day, e.g. every two hours, or manually where an operator of the computer systems takes care of sending/forwarding the scores to the database 102.
  • The players may be have access to the database 104 via personal online ID, e.g. upon annual subscription fee, where they may evaluate their individual scores and/or composite score at the team (e.g. soccer team), club, regional, and international level. In that way, the players 105, 108, 110 may compare themselves with each other (and other players worldwide) by e.g. comparing their performances within a given classification category with the performances of other players within the same classification category, and thus the system allows the players to establish benchmarks and to set the cross bars for improvements.
  • The above mentioned steps of determining the sensor signals 112-114 into scores and classify them into classification categories may in one embodiment be done at the central computer 101 that receives the “raw” sensor signals and performs the calculation (if needed) to determine the score, classifies the score as discussed above and associates the score to the respective player.
  • In one embodiment, the sport may be played at different levels where e.g. soccer is played and two or more levels. Many players enjoy the game and they may be satisfied playing at a recreational level, whereas other players take the game more seriously and make a commitment to engage at a higher amateur or semiprofessional level. They may train several times a week, work on their skills, fitness, diet and work under the direction of a coach and where their objective is to improve.
  • Collegiate and professional players are typically expected to make a substantial commitment, e.g. sign a contract and aspire to be the absolute best that they can be but the system according to the present invention provides a way for any player who desires to improve.
  • The computerized interactive sports system 100 according to the present invention may be used for players at any age, e.g. from 4 years of age right through to the professional ranks, where it is, as already addressed, designed to provide feedback and a way forward to any player who genuinely wants to become a better player.
  • The selection of said physical or technical exercises is preferably adapted to the various sports, age and use, preferably so that the best “contemporary measuring protocol” that is available is obtained so the most optimal exercise measuring format to identify weaknesses and strengths of the users/players is obtained.
  • FIG. 2 shows a flowchart of one embodiment of a method according to the present invention of assessing sports skills of users.
  • In step (S1) 201, plurality of sports areas is provided where users undergo physical or technical exercises, where the sports area are associated with sensor systems for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting sensor signals. The sports area may as an example be an area where e.g. a soccer player performs soccer related exercises where e.g. the dribbling skills of the users is measured, the shot velocity, endurance exercises and the like. The selection of the sports area is preferably selected such that it is possible to map the strengths and weaknesses for the players within a given sport. If the sport is e.g. soccer, there may e.g. be five different sports areas where the users undergo five different exercises, a dribbling exercise, a passing and receiving exercise, a game action speed, a finishing proficiency, shot velocity.
  • In step (S2) 202, the sensor signals are utilized for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area. This signal may e.g. be the time from where a given user enters the sports area where the user undergoes the exercise, until the user leaves the sports area where different measuring means are used to measure the time.
  • In step (S3) 203, different classification categories are associated to different sports areas where said scores are classified based thereon, and subsequently said scores are classified into said at least one classification category. As an example, said five different sports areas are associated with different classification categories because the exercises are different.
  • In step (S4) 204, said scores classified into said at least one classification category are shared with different users.
  • FIG. 3 shown one way of presenting such information of scores, where a given user called John, which has a login account at the database shown in FIG. 1, has logged into the database to see his score and also to compare his score with scores from other users. It is evident that there are many different ways of presenting such information, e.g. a more graphical way may be used to do so. In this example, John compares his own score for two Categories, e.g. Cat.1 which is a dribbling exercise where the time is measured to complete the dribbling exercise, and Cat. 2 is a shooting exercise where the users may e.g. get three shots where the fastest shot is selected and associated to the users, in this case to John. Moreover, the system discussed in relation to FIG. 1 may be provided with at filter feature that allows the users to select to whom he/she wants to compare with, e.g. whether it is on a worldwide basis, or within a given exercise station, within the soccer team etc. The comparison shown here may be on a country basis where John is the fastest player within Cat. 1 but number 8 within Cat. 2.
  • Also, the comparison that is present here may be for the same strength level of users, i.e. users that are within the same or similar strength level.
  • While the invention has been illustrated and described in detail in the drawings and foregoing description, such illustration and description are to be considered illustrative or exemplary and not restrictive; the invention is not limited to the disclosed embodiments. Other variations to the disclosed embodiments can be understood and effected by those skilled in the art in practicing the claimed invention, from a study of the drawings, the disclosure, and the appended claims. In the claims, the word “comprising” does not exclude other elements or steps, and the indefinite article “a” or “an” does not exclude a plurality. The mere fact that certain measures are recited in mutually different dependent claims does not indicate that a combination of these measured cannot be used to advantage.

Claims (14)

1. A computerized interactive sports system, comprising:
plurality of sports areas where users undergo physical or technical exercises;
sensor systems associated to said plurality of sports areas for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting sensor signals;
a computer system coupled to said at least one sensor system for utilizing the sensor signals for calculating a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area, where said computer system further associates different classification categories to different sports areas and classifies said scores based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category;
a database interactively connected to the stored scores at said computer system for sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
2. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein the users undergoing said physical or technical exercises perform the physical or technical exercises at two or more different locations and wherein the physical or technical exercises at the two or more different locations that the users undergo are similar or identical.
3. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein said database is interactively connected to said computer system such that when users undergo said physical or technical exercises the resulting scores are manually or automatically forwarded to said database via a communication channel.
4. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein a user selected from said users undergoing said physical or technical exercises is associated with an access code for accessing said scores at the database for the user himself and/or other users so as to allow the user to compare his/her score for a given physical or technical exercise(s) with scores for other users that have undergone similar or identical physical or technical exercises.
5. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein said at least one set of sensor system associated to at least one sports area is time-sensing systems adapted to measure the time from starting from where the users start the physical or technical exercises until the users complete the physical or technical exercises.
6. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein said at least one set of sensor system associated to at least one sports area is an integrated laser or radar system for measuring shot velocity of a ball.
7. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein physical or technical exercises are soccer related physical or technical exercises.
8. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein physical or technical exercises are selected from:
a basketball related physical or technical exercises,
a baseball related physical or technical exercises,
a hockey related physical or technical exercises,
a handball.
9. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area are selected from one or more of the following:
a dribbling related exercises,
a passing and receiving related exercises,
a game action speed related exercises,
a finishing proficiency related exercises,
shot velocity related exercises,
stamina related exercise,
running related exercise,
jump related exercises,
heading ball related exercises.
10. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein before a given user selected from said users undergoes said exercises defined by the sports areas the user related data is entered into the computer system, or in case of a group of users are undergoing said exercises defined by the sports areas the users related data are entered into the computer system, thus allowing the computer to identify the users undergoing said exercises.
11. The computerized interactive sports system according to claim 1, wherein difficulty level factor is associated to said sports areas indicating the difficulty of the exercises.
12. The computerized interactive sports system to claim 11, wherein said difficulty level factor is adjustable.
13. A method of assessing sports skills of users, comprising:
providing plurality of sports areas where users undergo physical or technical exercises, where the sports area are associated with sensor systems for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting sensor signals,
utilizing the sensor signals for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area,
associating different classification categories to different sports areas where said scores are classified based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category, and
sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
14. A machine-readable medium having stored thereon data representing sequences of instructions, the sequences of instructions which, when executed by a processor, cause the processor to perform the steps of:
collecting sensor signals from users when undergoing physical or technical exercises at plurality of sports areas, where the sports area are associated with sensor systems for sensing the users success when undergoing said technical or physical exercises and based thereon outputting said sensor signals,
utilizing the sensor signals for determining a score for each individual user indicating the success of the users when undergoing said physical or technical exercises within said at least one sports area,
associating different classification categories to different sports areas and classifying said scores based thereon, and subsequently stores said scores classified into said at least one classification category, and
sharing said scores classified into said at least one classification category with different users.
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