US20140330190A1 - Adjustable Wrist Orthotic - Google Patents

Adjustable Wrist Orthotic Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140330190A1
US20140330190A1 US13/886,363 US201313886363A US2014330190A1 US 20140330190 A1 US20140330190 A1 US 20140330190A1 US 201313886363 A US201313886363 A US 201313886363A US 2014330190 A1 US2014330190 A1 US 2014330190A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
radius
gap
wrist splint
wrist
panel
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Abandoned
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US13/886,363
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Bryan E. Kilbey
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Bryan E. Kilbey
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Priority to US13/886,363 priority Critical patent/US20140330190A1/en
Publication of US20140330190A1 publication Critical patent/US20140330190A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/04Devices for stretching or reducing fractured limbs; Devices for distractions; Splints
    • A61F5/05Devices for stretching or reducing fractured limbs; Devices for distractions; Splints for immobilising
    • A61F5/058Splints
    • A61F5/05841Splints for the limbs
    • A61F5/05858Splints for the limbs for the arms
    • A61F5/05866Splints for the limbs for the arms for wrists, hands, fingers or thumbs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, e.g. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F5/00Orthopaedic methods or devices for non-surgical treatment of bones or joints; Nursing devices; Anti-rape devices
    • A61F5/01Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces
    • A61F5/0102Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces specially adapted for correcting deformities of the limbs or for supporting them; Ortheses, e.g. with articulations
    • A61F5/0104Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces specially adapted for correcting deformities of the limbs or for supporting them; Ortheses, e.g. with articulations without articulation
    • A61F5/0118Orthopaedic devices, e.g. splints, casts or braces specially adapted for correcting deformities of the limbs or for supporting them; Ortheses, e.g. with articulations without articulation for the arms, hands or fingers

Abstract

An adjustable wrist orthotic suitable for the treatment of wrist fractures and similar injuries. The orthotic preferably includes a top panel joined to a bottom panel. The top and bottom panels are preferably joined by a radius connector which spans a “radius gap” between the top and bottom panel. An “ulna gap” may optionally be provided between the top and bottom panels as well. If an ulna gap is present, then an ulna connector is preferably provided to span this gap. A radius lace assembly is provided for adjusting the closure of the radius gap. The radius lace assembly is secured by placing a radius tab attached to a radius lace in a desired position on the exterior of the orthotic. Varying the placement position of the radius tab varies the taper of the radius gap so that the orthotic can accommodate wide variations in forearm geometry.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a non-provisional application claiming priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/642,476 filed on May 4, 2012,
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable.
  • MICROFICHE APPENDIX
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to the field of medical products. More specifically, the invention comprises a wrist orthotic which may be adjusted to accommodate a wide variety of anatomical differences.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Wrist fractures were traditionally placed in plaster casts in order to immobilize the affected anatomy. In recent years, more flexible orthotic devices have replaced plaster casts. These usually encircle the wrist and palm with fabric material. One or more rigid stays are incorporated in the device in order to provide the requisite immobilization of the joint.
  • Elastic panels are used to adapt the orthotic to a range of sizes. Adjustable securing straps also aid proper fitting of the device. However, these adjustments have typically been limited to a relatively narrow range of sizes. Additionally, the geometry of the wrist and forearm varies widely from individual to individual. Some individuals have a moderate wrist, diameter but very little expansion in the forearm when proceeding in the direction toward the elbow. Other individuals have similar wrist geometry but very rapidly expanding forearms.
  • The physician is thereby compelled to maintain a stock of orthotic devices in different sizes and geometries. Even with such a stock on hand, a patient with atypical wrist and forearm geometry may present for treatment. It would therefore be advantageous to provide a single wrist orthotic which could span a wide range of sizes and geometries. The present invention provides such a solution.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • The present invention comprises an adjustable wrist orthotic suitable for the treatment of wrist fractures and similar injuries. The orthotic preferably includes a top panel joined to a bottom panel. The top and bottom panels are preferably joined by a radius connector which spans a “radius gap” between the top and bottom panel. A second “ulna gap” may optionally be provided between the top and bottom panels as well. If an ulna gap is present, then an ulna connector is preferably provided to span this gap. A thumb strap is preferably provided to secure a portion of the device over the palm.
  • A radius lace assembly is provided for adjusting the closure of the radius gap. A second adjustable closure mechanism—such as an ulna lace assembly—is preferably provided for adjusting the closure of the ulna gap when one is present. Both these adjustment features can be used to adjust the overall diameter of the brace. In addition, the radius lace assembly is secured by placing a radius tab attached to a radius lace in a desired position on the exterior of the orthotic. Varying the placement position of the radius tab varies both the width and the taper of the radius gap, so that the orthotic can accommodate wide variations in forearm geometry.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view, showing a wrist splint made according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 1B is an elevation view, showing the attachment of the top and bottom panels using the radius and ulna connectors.
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view, showing the ulna gap.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view, showing the closure of the ulna gap.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view, showing the closure of the radius gap.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view, showing the wrist splint installed on a patient.
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view, showing the use of the radius lace.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view, showing how pulling the radius tab toward the elbow helps conform the splint to a large forearm.
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view, showing how pulling the radius tab toward the hand helps conform the splint to a small forearm.
  • FIG. 9 is a plan view, showing the splint placed on a patient having a large hand and forearm.
  • FIG. 10 is a plan view, showing the splint placed on a patient having a small land and forearm.
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view, showing an alternate embodiment of the ulna gap closure mechanism.
  • REFERENCE NUMERALS IN THE DRAWINGS 10 wrist splint 12 radius tab 14 radius lace 16 bottom panel 18 top panel 20 ulna connector 22 radius connector 24 bottom thumb relief 26 top thumb relief 28 thumb strap 30 tab 31 hook tab 33 first lace anchor 34 fourth eye 36 fifth eye 38 second lace anchor 40 first eye 42 third eye 44 sixth eye 46 eighth eye 48 second eye 50 seventh eye 52 hook panel 54 ulna gap 56 radius gap 58 central passage 60 ulna tab 62 ulna lace 64 loop covering 66 ulna eye 68 ulna tab eye 70 bottom stay pocket 72 top stay pocket 74 thumb 75 wrist 76 first finger 78 forearm 80 divergence angle 82 hand end 84 forearm end 86 strap ring 88 strap 90 strap anchor 92 strap ring anchor
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The wrist splint of the present invention is preferably provided in separate right hand and left hand configurations. The two configurations are mirror images of each other. The following descriptions pertain to a right hand configuration.
  • FIG. 1 shows an overall view of wrist splint 10 in an unsecured state. Top panel 18 is intended to lie over the top of the patient's forearm, wrist, and hand. Bottom panel 16 is intended to lie beneath the same anatomy.
  • The top and bottom panels are preferably shaped to allow at least a portion of the base of the thumb to remain outside the splint. Thus, bottom panel 16 is provided with bottom thumb relief 24 while top panel 18 is provided with top thumb relief 26. The shape of these thumb reliefs may vary according to the treatment modality. If it is desirable to largely immobilize the thumb, then the thumb reliefs will be limited in size. If on the other hand it is desirable to allow the thumb to move, then the thumb reliefs will be larger.
  • Thumb strap 28 is positioned to pass between the thumb and first finger when the splint is installed. The thumb strap is then suitably secured to the balance of the brace. One way to accomplish this objective is through the use of hook and loop fasteners. In such an embodiment, the exterior of top panel 18 (or at least an appropriate portion thereof) is covered in loop material. Thumb strap 28 is provided with hook tab 31, which is used to secure the thumb strap to the top panel. Tab 30 provides an anchor point for joining hook to 31 to thumb strap 28. Whenever hook and loop (“VELCRO”) fastenings are discussed in this application, the reader should understand that the hook panels and loop panel may be reversed as a matter of design choice.
  • Radius connector 22 and ulna connector 20 are preferably provided to retain the top and bottom panels in the desired orientation when the wrist splint is not installed and during the installation process itself In the embodiment shown, the radius and ulna connectors are elastic panels. The term “elastic” in this context simply means that the panels are preferably made of a material that will stretch.
  • FIG. 1 a shows an end view of the wrist splint. The reader will observe that the top and bottom panels are separated by a radius gap 56 and an ulna gap 54. Radius connector 22 spans the radius gap while ulna connector 20 spans the ulna gap.
  • The combination of top panel 18, radius connector 22, bottom panel 16, and ulna connector 20 creates an enclosed central passage 58. This is useful when installing the brace as the patient may simply insert his or her hand through the central passage 58 and pull the wrist splint into the desired position.
  • One or more stays may be added to the top and/or bottom panels to stiffen them. Two top stay pockets 72 are shown in the illustrated embodiment. A single bottom stay pocket 70 is also shown (more bottom stay pockets could be included). The stay pockets receive stiffening stays (such as aluminum bars) which shape the splint in a desired configuration to properly retain the injured skeletal structures.
  • It is desirable to provide two or more stay pockets in many embodiments so that at least one of the pockets will lie over the desired portion of the patient's anatomy. A top stay is typically placed over the dorsal mid-line of a patient's wrist. As the orthotic is adjusted to accommodate differing patient wrist diameters, the stay pockets will move relative to this dorsal mid-line. Multiple stay pockets are preferably provided so that the practitioner may relocate the stay to the correct pocket for the particular patient (the pocket which places the stay over the mid-line).
  • Returning now to FIG. 1, additional features will be described. As discussed previously, the radius gap is spanned by radius connector 22, it is also spanned by radius lace 14, which may be used to selectively adjust the width and shape of the radius gap. Radius tab 12 is connected to the radius lace. It includes features that allow it to be fastened to the rest of the wrist splint. In the embodiment shown, hook panel 52 serves this purpose.
  • The two ends of the radius lace are attached to top panel 18. The first attachment point is first lace anchor 33. From there the radius lace passes through first eye 40 (in bottom panel 16), second eye 48 (in radius tab 12), third eye 42 (in the bottom panel), fourth eye 34 (in the top panel), fifth eye 36 (in the top panel), sixth eye 44 (in the bottom panel), seventh eye 50 (in the radius tab), eighth eye 46 (in the bottom panel), and then to second lace anchor 38 (in the top panel). The portion of radius lace 14 passing between fourth eye 34 and fifth eye 36 passes beneath the top panel 18 in the embodiment shown.
  • Using this configuration for radius lace 14 allows the lace to be tightened by pulling on radius tab 12. The operation of the device is dependent to some extent on the type of lace used. The illustrated embodiments use a cord-type lace which has a round cross section and is relatively slick. Grommets or other suitable friction reducing devices are preferably provided for each of the eyes so that the cord-type lace may smoothly pass through the eyes when h tightened. Other embodiments of the invention may use a band-type lace having a rectangular cross section. A band-type lace produces significantly more friction between the lace and the eyes through which it passes. This phenomenon alters the operation of the invention.
  • In general, the embodiments using a cord-type lace may be adjusted by the patient using only one band. The embodiments using a band-type lace must often be adjusted using two hands—requiring assistance by a second person. The cord-type embodiments would therefore seem to be inherently superior. However, there are instances where the band-type lace is preferred, since it allows a practitioner to set a particular desired geometry. The use of both lace types for the adjustment of the orthotic will be described in detail subsequently.
  • One object of the present invention is to provide a wrist splint which may be adjusted to fit a wide variety of patients. The provision of a radius gap 56 (as shown in FIG. 1B) provides a significant adjustment capacity. This gap may be selectively closed to reduce the circumference of the orthotic—and in fact the edges of the top and bottom panels may be overlapped to produce an even smaller circumference.
  • The adjustment range provided by the radius gap will be sufficient for any patients and it is therefore appropriate to provide an embodiment which only includes a radius gap. For such an embodiment, top panel 18 and bottom panel 16 could be formed as one integral piece. However, an even greater range of adjustment can be obtained by providing a second gap in the circumference of the orthotic. FIG. 1B shows an embodiment providing a second gap—denoted as ulna gap 54.
  • FIG. 2 shows the wrist splint from a vantage point where ulna gap 54 may be readily seen. The width of the ulna gap is preferably made variable by an adjustable closure mechanism. The closure mechanism is preferably adjusted and secured using only one hand (so that the patient may operate the mechanism without assistance).
  • In the version shown in FIG. 2, ulna gap 54 is spanned by ulna lace 62. The two ends of this continuous lace are attached to ulna tab 60. The ulna tab is provided with an attachment feature allowing it to be selectively attached to the balance of the wrist splint. In the embodiment shown, the side of ulna tab facing away from the user includes a VELCRO hook panel. This engages loop covering 64 on the exterior of the wrist splint. Thus, if the user presses ulna tab 60 against the wrist splint it will become engaged and remain in position.
  • Ulna lace 62 is threaded through a series of ulna eyes 66 flanking ulna gap 66—in a manner analogous to the lace on a shoe. A cord-type lace is desirable so that friction is minimized. When the user pulls ulna tab 60 to the right in the orientation shown in the view, ulna lace 62 will tighten and draw the top and bottom panels closer together across ulna gap 54 (and may in fact completely close the ulna gap or even cause the edges of the ulna gap to overlap). FIG. 3 shows the view of FIG. 2 after ulna tab 60 has been pulled to the right. The reader will observe the closure of ulna gap 54. Grommets or other suitable friction reducing devices are provided in the ulna eyes and in ulna tab eye 68 to reduce friction as the ulna lace is being tightened.
  • The configuration shown allows one handed operation so that the user may install the wrist splint and adjust it without assistance. The splint shown is intended for the right wrist. Once the splint is over the wrist, the user may use his or her left thumb and forefinger to grasp ulna tab 60 and pull it to create the desired degree of closure of ulna gap 54. Once this is achieved the user presses the ulna tab against loop covering 64.
  • Of course, many other adjustable closure mechanisms could be used for the ulna gap. FIG. 11 shows a second embodiment. Adjustment of the ulna gap in this embodiment is provided by a pair of straps 88. Each strap 88 is attached to the orthotic via a strap anchor 90 on a first side of the ulna gap. Two strap rings 86 are attached on the opposite side of the ulna gap by a pair of strap ring anchors 92. The straps are provided with VELCRO hook and loop coverings similar to those used for shoe closures.
  • In operation, the user grasps a free end of a strap 88 and pulls it tight. He or she then presses the strap back upon itself to secure it in place. The two straps may be adjusted individually to produce a desired configuration.
  • FIGS. 4 through 10 illustrate the configuration of the radius side of the wrist splint during installation of the splint on a patient's wrist and subsequent adjustment. In FIG. 4, hook panel 31 is secured to a suitable position on the exterior of the splint so that tab 30 and thumb strap 28 are properly positioned. The user may then selectively close radius gap 56 by pulling upward on radius tab 12 as indicated.
  • As mentioned previously, the actual operation of the radius lace assembly is influenced by the type of radius lace used. There are two general types of radius lace which may be used in the device. The first is a cord-type lace. This is a lace having a round cross section and a relatively small diameter. The exterior of a cord-type lace is often provided with a low-friction surface so that it passes easily through the lace eyes.
  • The second type of lace is a band-type lace which has a flat rectangular cross section. The surface of a band-type lace typically has a higher friction surface. Band-type laces are traditionally uses in shoes hie canvas basketball sneakers. They allow a lace passing through many eyes to be progressively tightened, since the lace does not easily slip back through an eye even when tension is removed. The operation of the orthotic splint will be described initially using a cord-type lace. The operational differences produced when using a band-type lace will then be explored.
  • FIGS. 5-10 illustrate the installation of the wrist splint on a patient. In FIG. 5, the splint has been pulled over the patient's wrist 75 into position. Thumb strap 28 is passed between thumb 74 and first finger 76. Hook tab 31 is then pressed against the loop covering on the exterior of top panel 18 to secure the thumb strap in position. The user will next adjust the position of radius tab 12 to selectively close the radius gap around wrist 75.
  • The top and bottom panels each have a hand end 82 and a forearm end 84. The hand end is closest to the fingers while the forearm end is closest to forearm 78. The position of the radius tab 17 when it is attached to the rest of the orthotic determines the overall width of the radius gap and the taper between the top and bottom panels.
  • When using a cord-type lace, the lace will slide easily through the eyes so that constant tension is maintained even when radius tab 12 is pulled in different directions. If the user pulls straight up on radius tab 12—as indicated in FIG. 6—the top and bottom panels will be drawn evenly together. The lace position and the configuration of the panels are preferably set so that a taper suitable for the average patient is produced by drawing the radius tab straight upward. Thus, a moderate taper will be assumed between the top and bottom panels to accommodate the moderately expanding shape of the forearm in the example of FIG. 6. This will allow the splint to conform to an average individual.
  • FIG. 7 shows the application of the wrist splint to a stocky, muscular individual. This individual has a muscular forearm with a wide divergence angle 80. If the wrist splint is tightened conventionally, it will cinch tightly at forearm end 84 while remaining too loose at hand end 82. However, the fact that radius tab 12 may be repositioned allows the user to adjust both the distance between the upper and lower panels and the taper between them.
  • For the patient shown in FIG. 7, radius tab 12 is pulled toward forearm end 84. Lace 14 passes continuously through the eight eyes on the top panel, the bottom panel, and the radius tab. The use of a cord-type lace allows the lace to pass through the eyes with relatively little friction. Thus, when the radius tab is deliberately pulled toward forearm end 84 as shown, this motion tightens the portions of lace 14 lying proximate hand end 82 before the portions lying proximate forearm end 84 draw tight. The lace tends to “adjust itself” by portions passing through some of the eyes so that tension is evened out.
  • Once the radius tab is pulled in this direction and the desired degree of taper is achieved, it is pressed down against the loop material covering the exterior of the wrist splint. The hook panel on the radius tab then holds the radius tab in position. FIG. 9 shows a top view of the wrist splint with the radius tab 12 pressed into position. The wrist splint is thereby appropriately adjusted to accommodate a stocky forearm.
  • Returning to FIG. 7, the reader will observe that the top and bottom panels are drawn more tightly together in the vicinity of the wrist than in the vicinity of the forearm. This produces a taper in the wrist splint as shown. The top and bottom panels are further apart when moving in the direction of the forearm, which produces a taper consistent with divergence angle 80 of forearm 78.
  • FIG. 8 shows the example of an individual with a slim forearm. If the wrist splint is conventionally tightened for such an individual it will tighten around the wrist while remaining slack near forearm cud 84. In order to adjust the orthotic for a patient having a slim forearm, radius tab 12 is pulled toward hand end 82 while it is pulled upward to tighten radius lace 14. This motion causes the portion of radius lace 14 lying proximate forearm end 84 to tighten first, while the portion lying proximate the hand tends to remain slack. The use of a cord-type lace again allows the lace to “adjust itself” in order to create nearly uniform tension. Thus, the top and bottom panels are pulled more tightly together near the forearm. This tends to reduce the “average” taper built into the radius gap and creates a near zero divergence angle 80. Thus, the wrist splint accurately conforms to the slender forearm of the patient shown in FIG. 8.
  • The radius tab is then pressed down against the top panel to lock it in position. A top view of this configuration is shown in FIG. 10. The reader will observe how the radius tab is offset in the direction of the hand. The wrist splint is thereby adjusted to conform to the slender forearm geometry of this particular patient.
  • When using a cord-type lace, the angular offset created by the placement of radius tab 12 must be repeated each time the orthotic is applied. In a sense, the orthotic must be adjusted every time it is applied. A patient will often remove the orthotic to wash, etc. When it is reapplied, radius tab 12 will not be biased toward one position or another (as the relatively low-friction cord-type lace allows it to be easily moved). Thus, the user must properly position radius tab 12 each time.
  • The use of a band-type lace alters the application process for the orthotic. The band-type lace will not adjust itself by the simple operation of moving the radius tab toward the wrist end or forearm end. Instead, a person must manually pull the lace through the eyes in order to obtain the proper distribution. This step is typically performed by a technician when the orthotic is fitted.
  • The technician places the splint on the patient and manually applies tension to the portion of the lace protruding between adjacent eyes to obtain the desired taper of the splint (much like manually pulling on the lace of a tall shoe to obtain a desired fit). Once the desired lace arrangement is obtained, radius tab 12 will naturally be offset toward the hand end or the forearm end (It will move toward the correct position when the user pulls on it to draw the lace tight). The user then presses radius tab 12 against the orthotic to secure it in position.
  • When the orthotic using a band-type lace is removed, lace 14 must be slackened sufficiently to allow the patient's hand to be pulled free. However, the offset of radius tab 12 will tend to remain intact. When the orthotic is next placed on the wrist, the patient can simply pull on the radius tab (without having to pay too much attention to where it should be placed) and the radius tab will tend to return to the position originally set by the technician. Thus, the use of a band-type lace allows the orthotic to be adjusted initially by a technician and, retain the configuration set by the technician. The use of a cord-type lace requires that the configuration be set each time the device is applied.
  • The selection of one type of lace over the other is a question of individual preference. The offset of radius tab 12 (whether set by a technician or the patient) retains the desired taper between top panel 18 and bottom panel 16.
  • Having thus received a description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, those skilled in the art will immediately recognize that many more alternate embodiments are possible. As an example, the radius tab is attached to the orthotic by hook and loop fasteners in the preferred embodiment described. An array of plastic snap closures could be substituted for this approach. In another embodiment, the ulna gap could be eliminated altogether with the top and bottom panels being formed as one continuous piece broken only by the radius gap.
  • Although the preceding description contains significant detail, it should not be viewed as limiting the invention but instead as providing illustrations of the preferred embodiments of the invention. Many other alterations could be made to the embodiments illustrated without altering the substance of the invention. Thus, the scope of the present invention should be defined by the following claims rather than any specific examples given.

Claims (20)

1. A method for attaching a wrist splint to a patient having a hand, a wrist, and a forearm, comprising:
a. providing a wrist splint, including
i. a top panel having a hand end and a forearm end,
ii. a bottom panel having a hand end and a forearm end, said bottom panel offset from said top panel by a radius gap,
iii. providing a radius tab,
iv. providing a radius lace, said radius lace spanning said radius gap, with said radius lace running from a first lace anchor on said top panel proximate said hand end of said top panel, passing through a first eye on said bottom panel, through a second eye on said radius tab, through a third eye on said bottom panel, through a fourth eye on said top panel, through a fifth eye on said top panel, through a sixth eye on said bottom panel, through a seventh eye on said radius tab, through an eighth eye on said bottom panel, to a second lace anchor on said top panel proximate said forearm end of said top panel;
b. installing said wrist splint on said hand, wrist, and forearm, of said patient
c. creating a desired divergence angle between said top panel and said bottom panel by offsetting said radius tab a selected distance from said hand end of said top panel; and
d. attaching said radius tab to said wrist splint in a fixed position.
2. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 1, wherein said wrist splint includes a thumb strap connecting said hand end of said top panel to said hand end of said bottom panel.
3. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 1, wherein said wrist splint includes a radius connector connecting said top panel to said bottom panel across said radius gap.
4. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 1, wherein said wrist splint includes an ulna gap separating said top panel from said bottom panel, with said ulna gap being opposite said radius gap.
5. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 4, wherein said ulna gap in said wrist splint is spanned by an ulna connector.
6. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 4, wherein said ulna gap is spanned by an adjustable closure device.
7. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 1, wherein said radius tab is connected to said wrist splint by a hook and loop fastener.
8. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 1, wherein said radius tab is made large enough to be grasped between a thumb and a forefinger.
9. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 3, wherein said radius connector is an elastic panel.
10. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 5, wherein said ulna connector is an elastic panel.
11. A method for attaching a wrist splint to a patient having a hand, a wrist, and a forearm, comprising:
a. providing a wrist splint, including
i. a top panel having a hand end and a forearm end, said top panel including a loop covering,
ii. a bottom panel having a hand end and a forearm end, said bottom panel offset from said top panel by a radius gap,
iii. providing a radius tab, including a hook panel,
iv. providing a radius lace, said radius lace spanning said radius gap, with said radius lace running through a plurality of eyes located on said top panel, said bottom panel, and said radius tab;
b. installing said wrist splint on said hand, wrist, and forearm, of said patient;
c. creating a desired divergence angle between said top panel and said bottom panel by offsetting said radius tab a selected distance from said hand end of said top panel; and
d. pressing said hook panel on said radius tab against said loop covering on said top panel.
12. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 11, wherein said wrist splint includes a thumb strap connecting said hand end of said top panel to said hand end of said bottom panel.
13. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 11, wherein said wrist splint includes a radius connector connecting said top panel to said bottom panel across said radius gap.
14. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 11, wherein said wrist splint includes an ulna gap separating said top panel from said bottom panel, with said ulna gap being opposite said radius gap.
15. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 14, wherein said ulna gap in said wrist splint is spanned by an ulna connector.
16. A method for attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 14, wherein said ulna gap is spanned by an adjustable closure device.
17. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 12, wherein said thumb strap is attached to said top panel by a hook and loop fastener.
18. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 11, wherein said radius tab is made large enough to be grasped between a thumb and a forefinger.
19. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 13, wherein said radius connector is an elastic panel.
20. A method of attaching a wrist splint as recited in claim 15, wherein said ulna connector is an elastic panel.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CN104688400A (en) * 2015-03-04 2015-06-10 河南中医学院 Elastic clamping plate protection tool for correcting hand ulnar drift deformity caused by rheumatoid arthritis

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