US20140291931A1 - Systems And Methods For Playing A Treasure Hunting Board Game - Google Patents

Systems And Methods For Playing A Treasure Hunting Board Game Download PDF

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US20140291931A1
US20140291931A1 US14/213,295 US201414213295A US2014291931A1 US 20140291931 A1 US20140291931 A1 US 20140291931A1 US 201414213295 A US201414213295 A US 201414213295A US 2014291931 A1 US2014291931 A1 US 2014291931A1
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plurality
player
merchandise
game
worth
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Abandoned
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US14/213,295
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Susan Brommelhorst
Tommy Schlereth
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Negative Image LLC
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The Negative Image, L.L.C.
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Application filed by The Negative Image, L.L.C. filed Critical The Negative Image, L.L.C.
Priority to US14/213,295 priority patent/US20140291931A1/en
Assigned to The Negative Image, L.L.C. reassignment The Negative Image, L.L.C. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BROMMELHORST, SUSAN, SCHLERETH, TOMMY
Priority claimed from US14/257,247 external-priority patent/US20140302928A1/en
Publication of US20140291931A1 publication Critical patent/US20140291931A1/en
Priority claimed from US14/555,189 external-priority patent/US20150080075A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00145Board games concerning treasure-hunting, fishing, hunting
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00063Board games concerning economics or finance, e.g. trading
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00006Board games played along a linear track, e.g. game of goose, snakes and ladders, along an endless track
    • A63F2003/00009Board games played along a linear track, e.g. game of goose, snakes and ladders, along an endless track with an intersection in the track
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00003Types of board games
    • A63F3/00063Board games concerning economics or finance, e.g. trading
    • A63F2003/00066Board games concerning economics or finance, e.g. trading with play money
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2401Detail of input, input devices
    • A63F2009/2411Input form cards, tapes, discs
    • A63F2009/2419Optical
    • A63F2009/242Bar codes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2401Detail of input, input devices
    • A63F2009/2411Input form cards, tapes, discs
    • A63F2009/2419Optical
    • A63F2009/2425Scanners, e.g. for scanning regular characters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2483Other characteristics
    • A63F2009/2485Other characteristics using a general-purpose personal computer
    • A63F2009/2486Other characteristics using a general-purpose personal computer the computer being an accessory to a board game

Abstract

A playable board game wherein players compete to secure the best bargains at garage sales, using both strategy and random chance, using a computerized component to randomize update game content.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/791,686 filed Mar. 15, 2013, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This disclosure is related to the field of entertainment gaming, specifically to board games which simulate modern-day treasuring hunting, including but not limited to estate sales, garage sales, yard sales, rummage sales, public auctions, and the like.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Recently, television programs featuring competitive treasure hunting have grown in popularity. These programs commonly feature locales such as pawn shops, abandoned storage lockers, attic sales, and the like, in which people try to buy or sell hidden treasures. Perhaps not coincidentally, the American tradition of the garage sale, sometimes also called a yard sale or rummage sale, has also grown. These sales give weight to the adage, “one man's trash is another man's treasure,” as homeowners cleanse their basements and garages of unwanted merchandise by selling it at bargain prices.
  • These sales are often held just before a move. Enterprising sellers advertise their sales to maximize the turnout of buyers, and enterprising buyers meticulously plan their weekends of treasure hunting, sometimes going so far as to camp out before a sale opens. It is well-known among regulars that garage sales are quickly picked over, and to be early is to have the best chance of scoring the best bargains and getting the highest value items for the least cost. So widespread is the American tradition of the garage sale that books are published advising both sellers and buyers on how best to maximize their gains.
  • Garage sale treasure hunting has evolved into a form of entertainment, as evidenced by the abundance of TV shows capitalizing on the entertainment value inherent in scoring a great deal. Despite the popularity of this hobby, there are few board games premised upon treasure hunting at garage sales, and there appear to be no board games that simulate competitive treasure hunting at such sales.
  • SUMMARY
  • The following is a summary of the invention which should provide to the reader a basic understanding of some aspects of the invention. This summary is not intended to identify critical components of the invention, nor in any way to delineate the scope of the invention. The sole purpose of this summary is to present in simplified language some aspects of the invention as a prelude to the more detailed description presented below.
  • Because of these and other problems in the art, described herein is a simulation game in which the players take on the role of treasure hunters attempting to score the best deals on merchandise acquired at various residential sales.
  • Described herein, among other things, is a game simulating competitive treasure hunting comprising: a plurality of player position tokens; a game board having a neighborhood depicted thereon including: a plurality of paths divided into a plurality of landable spaces; a plurality of purchasing locations each connected to one of the landable spaces; a plurality of merchandise cards each having: an indication of a merchandise purchasable at one of the plurality of purchasing locations associated with the card when the game is played; an indication of a cost of the merchandise; an indication of a worth of the merchandise; a game currency comprising a plurality of notes in differing denominations; a die; a victory condition incentivizing players playing the board game to acquire a plurality of the plurality of merchandise cards such that the player maximizes the total amount of worth indicated on the plurality of the plurality of merchandise cards acquired by the player; and wherein when a plurality of players play the board game, a plurality of the plurality of merchandise cards corresponding in number to the plurality of players is placed face down at each one of the purchasing locations; and wherein when each player in the plurality of players advances one of the player tokens corresponding to the each player to each purchasing location in the plurality of purchasing locations, the each player may exchange for one of the plurality of the plurality of merchandise cards placed face down at the each purchasing location an amount of the game currency held by the each player equal to the cost of the merchandise indicated on the one of the plurality of the plurality of merchandise cards placed face down at the each purchasing location.
  • In an embodiment, the indication of a worth of the merchandise is a scannable code and the entertainment system further comprises: a computer server communicating over a communications network and comprising a microprocessor and a non-transitory computer-readable storage media having computer-readable instructions which, when executed by the microprocessor, cause the computer server to: receive over the communications network data indicative of a code on one merchandising card in the plurality of merchandising cards scanned by a player of the board game; determine the worth of the item depicted on the scanned merchandise card, the worth being based at least in part on the received data indicative of the scanned code; respond to the received data over the communications network with data indicative of the worth.
  • In another embodiment, the computer-readable instructions, when executed by the microprocessor, cause the computer server to perform a second determination of the worth of the item depicted on the scanned merchandise card and the second determination is different from the determination.
  • In another embodiment, the determination of the worth of the item depicted is based at least in part on a pseudo-randomly generated number.
  • Also described herein, among other things, is a method for playing a game simulating competitive treasure hunting comprising the steps of: providing a plurality of player position tokens; providing a game board having a neighborhood depicted thereon including: a plurality of roads divided into a plurality of landable spaces; a plurality of residences each connected to one of the landable spaces; a final position; providing a plurality of merchandise cards disposed at each one of the residences, each merchandise card having: an indication of a merchandise; an indication of a cost of the merchandise; an indication of a worth of the merchandise; providing a game currency comprising a plurality of notes in differing denominations; providing a die; providing a plurality of players; each player in the plurality of players moving a player position token representing the each player a number of the landable spaces corresponding to a pseudorandom numeric value determined using the die until the player position token is at one of the plurality of residences; when the player position token is at the one of the plurality of residences, the each player exchanging for one of the plurality of merchandise cards disposed at the one of the plurality of residences an amount of the game currency held by the each player equal to the cost indicated on the one of the plurality of merchandise cards; repeating the moving and the exchanging steps at each residence in the plurality of residences; the each player moving the player position token representing the each player a number of the landable spaces corresponding to a pseudorandom numeric value determined using the die until the player position token is at the final position; determining a winner of the board game by summing for the each player the worths indicated on the merchandise cards acquired by the each player and announcing as the winner the the each player having the largest sum.
  • In an embodiment, the indication of a worth of the merchandise is a scannable code and the method further comprises: providing a computer server communicating over a communications network; the computer server receiving from a client connection over the communications network data indicative of a scannable code; the computer server determining the worth of the item depicted on the merchandise card having the scannable code indicated by the received data, the determination based at least in part on the received data; the computer server sending to the client connection data indicative of the determined worth.
  • In an embodiment, the determination of the worth of the item depicted is based at least in part on a pseudo-randomly generated number.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 depicts a layout of an embodiment of the game with a detailed view of a sale card.
  • FIG. 2 depicts a detailed view of a portion of an embodiment of a game board.
  • FIGS. 3A-3I depict a portion of an embodiment of a game board.
  • FIG. 4A depicts an embodiment of a merchandise card having a numeric indication of worth.
  • FIG. 4B depicts an embodiment of a merchandise card having a scannable code indication of worth.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)
  • The following detailed description and disclosure illustrates by way of example and not by way of limitation. This description will clearly enable one skilled in the art to make and use the disclosed systems and methods, and describes several embodiments, adaptations, variations, alternatives and uses of the disclosed systems and apparatus. As various changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the disclosures, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.
  • Generally, this disclosure describes a board game, but it is specifically contemplated that the board game described herein may also include video game components. An embodiment of a treasure hunting game is depicted in FIG. 1. In the depicted embodiment of FIG. 1, players compete with each other to accumulate goods having the highest worth at various sales. Generally, each player on his turn navigates through a neighborhood (107) depicted on a game board (103) by advancing a token (127), representing the player, a pseudo-randomly generated number of spaces (125) along paths (123) on the game board (103) until the token arrives at various residences (109) depicted on the game board (103). The player purchases one item for sale at each residence (109) by exchanging an amount of a simulated game currency (111) for a card (131) indicating the item purchased and its worth (137). After the player has purchased an item at each residence (109), the player navigates to a final position (115), such as a coffee shop (115). When all players have concluded their purchases, the player who has acquired the goods whose total worth (137) indicated on the cards is highest is deemed the victor.
  • Generally speaking, the game (101) includes a game board (103), one or more decks of cards (129), a set of tokens (127) representing the players, a set of game currency (111) comprising sets of bills or notes in different denominations, a set of “Classified Ad” slips (139), and one or more dice (141 and 143). Generally, an organizational tray (113) for these and other components is also included. This tray (113) both stores and organizes game currency (111) during play and also stores the game (101) components when the game (101) is stored and not in use, as well as stores components not used while the game (101) is being played.
  • The game board (103) is generally a rectangular and planar surface made from a lightweight but rigid material, with one side depicting a residential neighborhood (107). Generally, the depicted neighborhood (107) includes multiple paths (123)—generally, roads or streets—some of which may terminate at or near an edge of the board (103). The roads (123) are generally segmented into sequences of landable spaces (125) which can accommodate one or more playing tokens (127). The neighborhood (107) also includes a number of residences (109) at which various sales, such as garage and estate sales, are held during game play. A detailed view of a portion of a game board (103) including a residence (109) is depicted in FIG. 2, and a view of an embodiment of a full game board (103) is depicted in FIG. 3. The items for sale at each such residence (109) are the items indicated on Garage Sale cards (131) placed near each residence (109) during gameplay, as elsewhere described herein.
  • Each residence (109) is generally connected to a space (125) by a driveway. In an embodiment, a residence (109) may be connected to a plurality of spaces (125). In the preferred embodiment, there are ten residences (109), but this amount may vary. Because the number of residences (109) influences the length of game play, the number may be increased or decreased to achieve a desired play duration or play style depending on, among other things, the number of players and the audience. By way of example and not limitation, for a “junior” version of the game targeting younger players with shorter attention spans, there may be fewer residences (109). In a further embodiment, one or more residences (109) may be unused during a game.
  • In an embodiment, the board (103) further depicts a starting position (117) and an ending position (115). In the preferred embodiment, positions (117 and 115) are the same position, namely a coffee shop or other retail location suitable to the theme and design of the neighborhood. It is specifically contemplated that these and other visual design elements may differ in an embodiment, such as for a version of the game focused on a specific theme, or for localization or regionalization.
  • The game board (103) may be foldable, allowing the board (103) to be packaged and stored using less shelf space than the surface area of the board (103). Although a generally rectangular board (103) is described herein, other shapes are specifically contemplated, including circular, ovoid, and other polygonal shapes. It is also specifically contemplated that an embodiment of a board may include non-planar shapes or components, including but not limited to a board (103) which has, or can accommodate, three-dimensional structures.
  • Further, it is specifically contemplated that the board (103) may be configured to facilitate the interconnection of a plurality of boards (103). This may be done by sizing and shaping the edges of a plurality of boards (103) for interlocking, such as with C-cut tabs as in a jigsaw puzzle, or with additional elements to facilitate the mating of a plurality of boards (103), such as a clip to hold the boards (103) in position adjacent to one another.
  • Generally the player tokens (127) are miniature vehicles, including but not limited to vehicles such as moving trucks, cars, campers, vans, sedans, convertibles, trailers, SUVs, and the like. The tokens are sized and shaped such that a plurality of tokens (127) may fit on spaces (125). In a particular embodiment, the specific design of the tokens (127) may vary depending upon localization, regionalization, or other thematic variations on the game's visual design.
  • The game currency (111) is a simulated currency, comprising several sets of simulated bank notes or bills in varying denominations. The design and monetary unit of the game currency (111) is generally dollars and/or a dollar sign, but in an embodiment, the design and monetary unit may differ for localization or other changes in theme. The denominations may also differ in an embodiment, such as to reflect local currency denominations. In an embodiment, there are three denominations of notes. In a further embodiment, the three denominations are $20 notes, $10 notes, and $5 notes. During game play, surplus game currency is generally stored in an organizer tray (113) sized and shaped to accommodate the game currency (111). One player designed as a “banker” is responsible for administering the currency (111). This player may also participate in the game (101) as a player but receives no special benefit or advantage for being the banker.
  • The game includes several decks of cards (129) having different purposes in the game. Each card (129) generally has a distinct image on the back side identifying to which deck the card belongs. The cards (129) may also, in an embodiment, be sized or shaped differently to further distinguish to which deck a card (129) belongs. One of the decks is a deck of Garage Sale cards (131), generally having an indication (133) of an item purchasable at one of the residences, and an indication of a cost (135) and a worth (137) of the item. Generally, the cost (135) indicated is the amount of game currency (111) a player must pay to acquire the card (131), and thus to include the worth (137) of the indicated item towards that player's win total. Values (135 and 137) may differ from embodiment to embodiment, such as to localize values for another currency or accommodate a different theme.
  • In an embodiment, cost (135) is indicated on Garage Sale cards (131) in color-coded stickers designed to resemble garage sale price stickers, with the color corresponding to a price point. In a further embodiment, these price points are multiples of the lowest denomination of game currency (111). In a still further embodiment, these costs (135) are multiples of five. By way of example and not limitation, items which cost (135) five dollars are coded yellow; ten dollars, blue; fifteen, orange; twenty, green; twenty-five, red. In an embodiment, an alternative victory condition provides for scoring based on these colors, making the game more accessible to younger players and encouraging players to make purchasing decisions based on items they like rather than economic considerations.
  • Generally, the game (101) is set up by segregating the various types of cards (129) into decks and shuffling each deck. Each player selects one token (127) to represent that player during the game (101), and the tokens (127) representing all players are placed in a starting position (117). A number of cards (131) from the Garage Sale deck are placed face-down next to each of the depicted residences (109). The number of cards (131) placed at each residence (109) generally corresponds to the number of players playing the game (101). For example, if there are four players, each residence (109) receives four Garage Sale cards (131). Generally, the residences (109) are depicted without garages, and the design on the back of the Garage Sale cards (131) is that of a garage, such that when the Garage Sale cards (131) are placed next to the residences (109) on the game board (103), the combination presents the impression of a residence having a garage. Each player also generally receives a “Classified Ads” slip (139) listing the residences (109) having a sale. This slip (139) is used to track the residences (109) at which the player has already purchased an item. Each player also generally receives an amount of initial game currency (111), which amount may vary depending upon the rule set being utilized and/or the number of players participating. In an embodiment, each player receives $100 in game currency (111) to start the game. In a further embodiment, each player receives this currency in the form of three $20 notes, three $10 notes, and two $5 notes.
  • An object of the game (101) is to navigate one's token (127) to each of the residences (109) and purchase an item at each indicated on a Garage Sale (or, as the case may be, Estate Sale) card (131) at each residence (109) for the amount of game currency (111) indicated on the card (131) as the cost (135) for the item. When a player arrives at a residence (109), the player may privately browse the items for sale at that residence (109) at that time and may, but need not, purchase any one such item. Generally, the player may only purchase from among the items in the Garage Sale cards (131) placed next to the residence (109), but as elsewhere described herein, there are mechanics by which the player may have the opportunity to purchase additional items from the master deck of sale cards. In an embodiment, the player need only disclose the cost of the item purchased to the other players. When the player purchases the item, the player gives to the bank an amount of game currency (111) equal to the Cost (135) of the item indicated on the card (131), and the player receives the card (131) for the purchased item and may count its worth (137) in the player's total for purposes of determining a winner. Other players then cannot purchase that item at that residence (109). In an embodiment, the player need not reveal to other players the worth (137) of the item purchased, nor any special attributes that the item has or bestows upon the player. In a further embodiment, an item may be purchased at a cost other than the indicated cost (135) under certain circumstances including, but not limited to, where the player plays a Haggle card temporarily modifying the game's general mechanics, as elsewhere described herein.
  • When the player has purchased an item from each of the residences (109) in play, the player then navigates his token (127) to the final position (115). When all players have completed these tasks, the victor is determined by calculating which player's purchases, as reflected on the Garage Sale cards (131) accumulated during the course of play, have the largest total worth of goods purchased. In an embodiment using the Estate Sale cards, the worth of any Estate Sale cards the players has acquired is also included in the calculation.
  • Generally, on his or her turn a player moves a token (127) representing that player across the playing surface (105) by an amount of spaces (125) equal to a movement amount generated randomly or pseudo-randomly. The movement amount is generally determined randomly using one or more six-sided polyhedral die (141) with the values 1 through 6 indicated upon the sides, as is well known in the art, which the player rolls to determine the maximum number of spaces the player may move the token for that turn. While it generally is anticipated that six-sided polyhedron dice (141) are used, any configuration of die is contemplated, including but not limited to 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, and 20-sided dice. In an alternate embodiment, the number of moves is determined through another chance means, such as a spinner or card. Generally, the number of moves for a given turn is randomly or pseudo-randomly determined, and the range of possible values is calibrated to the particular layout off the board (103), with the goal of allowing sufficient movement that gameplay progresses at an entertaining pace, but not so fast that the first few players to move tend to acquire an insurmountable advantage.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the player generally must move the full amount of spaces (125) rolled by advancing the token (127) along a path (123) without reversing direction. However, the player need not always exhaust the movement amount. By way of example and not limitation, it is specifically contemplated that where a player has sufficient movement to reach a residence (109) or bank (119), the player may conclude the movement portion of his or her turn upon reaching that residence (109) or bank (119) even if further movement remains available.
  • In an embodiment, the game (101) further includes a deck of Haggle cards (129). In such an embodiment, each player generally is dealt one Haggle card (129) face-down at the beginning of each game, which may be used on a player's turn if the player's token (127) is at a residence (109). A Haggle card (129) may be played on a player's turn if the player is at a residence. The player generally announces his intention to use a Haggle card (129) before beginning to browse the Garage Sale (131) cards at the residence (109), and is thereafter bound by the content of the card. Haggle cards temporarily alter the general game play rules for that player. For example, a Haggle card may allow the player to purchase additional items at the residence (109) during that turn, or may require the player to forfeit the remainder of his turn. Because the player does not know what benefit or burden his Haggle card (129) may impart, whether and when to play a Haggle card is a strategic decision each payer must make.
  • In an embodiment, the game (101) further includes Bank and/or ATM cards (129) having an indication of an amount of game currency. Generally, the initial currency (111) each player starts with is insufficient for the player to purchase an item at each residence (109), requiring the player to make at least one trip to a bank (119) or an ATM space (121). When a player arrives at (119 or 121), the player draws an ATM card (129) and receives the amount of game currency (111) indicated thereon, if any. Although a player must land upon an ATM space (121) by exact movement count to use the ATM feature, a player may terminate his turn upon reaching a bank (119) even if the player has not exhausted his movement points.
  • In an embodiment, a residence (109) may be designated as having an estate sale rather than a garage sale, and special estate rules and cards may apply. In such an embodiment, a number of Estate Sale cards are placed next to a residence (109) designed as hosting an estate sale. The number of cards (129) used is generally the same as the number of players. All items purchased at a residence (109) hosting an estate sale generally cost the same amount as each other—such as, by way of example and not limitation, $50 in game currency (111)—and a player cannot browse the items or select which item the player will purchase. Instead, the player must blindly purchase the top item drawn from the Estate Sale cards at that residence. It is generally contemplated that the Estate Sale cards are drawn from a special, separate deck from the Garage Sale cards (131). In an embodiment using the estate sale deck, each player must purchase an estate sale item. It is specifically contemplated that the estate sale may be implemented as a separate board attachable to the main board (103) as elsewhere described herein, such as through an expansion pack.
  • When a player concludes the movement portion of his or her turn and his or her token (127) lands upon a space already occupied by a token (127) belonging to another player, the player so landing rolls a special six-sided polyhedral die (143) if both players possess at least one Garage Sale card (131). The outcome of this roll (143) may require the players to engage in swapping or taking of one or more of said players' cards (131). For example, in an embodiment the die (143) roll may allow one player to blindly take one card from the another player's hand. Similarly, in a further embodiment, the die roll may require both players to blindly swap cards. The results may or may not be revealed to the rest of the players, depending upon the rule set used. In an embodiment, the die roll may not require any players to swap or take cards.
  • The game (101) may be expanded using expansion packs. These expansion packs may include the same or similar elements including but not limited to a game board, cards, playing tokens, and additional and further items which alter or augment game play. In an embodiment, an expansion game board (103) is connected to the base game board as elsewhere described herein. In an embodiment, the expansion game board depicts a road so that when the expansion game board is connected to the base game board (103), a path (123) on the base game board (103) continues unto the expansion game board, effectively continuing a road that, without the expansion, is a dead-end on the base game board (103) alone.
  • The game may be augmented, supplemented, or implemented via a computer software application, such as a standalone game or a mobile device application. In one such embodiment, the game includes a mobile device application which can use an optical scanning means, such as an iPhone camera, to scan a bar code on a Garage Sale (131) or other card (129) including but not limited to an Estate Sale card, which provides the player with the worth of the item. In this embodiment, the worth of items may be randomized or otherwise vary from game to game without requiring additional or supplemental decks of cards. In an embodiment, the application also tracks the game progress, such as by tracking a player's point total or progress towards a victory condition, which houses have been visited. In a still further embodiment, cards (131) do not include a worth, and players do not learn the worth of any items purchased until the game concludes, at which point the application reveals the values. In a still further embodiment, special attributes of Garage Sale (131) or Estate Sale cards may be randomized and learned only when the game concludes. In an embodiment, these features are implemented through a web site interface.
  • In an embodiment, an alternative scoring system is used which disregards item worth (135) and instead awards points towards victory based upon randomly- or pseudorandomly-assigned numeric values associated with a color-coded price point. By way of example and not limitation, all items having a RED price point (i.e., twenty-five dollars) may be worth 10 points towards victory, while all items having a YELLOW price point (i.e., five dollars) may be worth 25 points towards victory. This system adds interest and flexibility for the game to be adapted for play by players who recognize colors but do not yet appreciate the game's economic mechanics. In an embodiment, the point value of items collect tallied towards determining a victory is randomly determined only after all purchases have been made.
  • While this invention has been disclosed in connection with certain preferred embodiments, this should not be taken as a limitation to all of the provided details. Modifications and variations of the described embodiments may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention, and other embodiments should be understood to be encompassed in the present disclosure as would be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art.

Claims (7)

1. An game simulating competitive treasure hunting comprising:
a plurality of player position tokens;
a game board having a neighborhood depicted thereon including:
a plurality of paths divided into a plurality of landable spaces;
a plurality of purchasing locations each connected to one of said landable spaces;
a plurality of merchandise cards each having:
an indication of a merchandise purchasable at one of said plurality of purchasing locations associated with said card when said game is played;
an indication of a cost of said merchandise; an indication of a worth of said merchandise;
a game currency comprising a plurality of notes in differing denominations;
a die;
a victory condition incentivizing players playing said board game to acquire a plurality of said plurality of merchandise cards such that the player maximizes the total amount of worth indicated on said plurality of said plurality of merchandise cards acquired by said player; and
wherein when a plurality of players play said board game, a plurality of said plurality of merchandise cards corresponding in number to the plurality of players is placed face down at each one of said purchasing locations; and
wherein when each player in said plurality of players advances one of said player tokens corresponding to said each player to each purchasing location in said plurality of purchasing locations, said each player may exchange for one of said plurality of said plurality of merchandise cards placed face down at said each purchasing location an amount of said game currency held by said each player equal to said cost of said merchandise indicated on said one of said plurality of said plurality of merchandise cards placed face down at said each purchasing location.
2. The game of claim 1, wherein said indication of a worth of said merchandise is a scannable code and said entertainment system further comprises:
a computer server communicating over a communications network and comprising a microprocessor and a non-transitory computer-readable storage media having computer-readable instructions which, when executed by said microprocessor, cause said computer server to:
receive over said communications network data indicative of a code on one merchandising card in said plurality of merchandising cards scanned by a player of said board game;
determine the worth of the item depicted on said scanned merchandise card, said worth being based at least in part on said received data indicative of said scanned code;
respond to said received data over said communications network with data indicative of said worth.
3. The game of claim 2, wherein said computer-readable instructions, when executed by said microprocessor, cause said computer server to perform a second determination of the worth of the item depicted on said scanned merchandise card and said second determination is different from said determination.
4. The game of claim 3, wherein said determination of the worth of the item depicted is based at least in part on a pseudo-randomly generated number.
5. A method for playing a game simulating competitive treasure hunting comprising the steps of:
providing a plurality of player position tokens;
providing a game board having a neighborhood depicted thereon including:
a plurality of roads divided into a plurality of landable spaces;
a plurality of residences each connected to one of said landable spaces;
a final position;
providing a plurality of merchandise cards disposed at each one of said residences, each merchandise card having:
an indication of a merchandise;
an indication of a cost of said merchandise;
an indication of a worth of said merchandise;
providing a game currency comprising a plurality of notes in differing denominations;
providing a die;
providing a plurality of players;
each player in said plurality of players moving a player position token representing said each player a number of said landable spaces corresponding to a pseudorandom numeric value determined using said die until said player position token is at one of said plurality of residences;
when said player position token is at said one of said plurality of residences, said each player exchanging for one of said plurality of merchandise cards disposed at said one of said plurality of residences an amount of said game currency held by said each player equal to said cost indicated on said one of said plurality of merchandise cards;
repeating said moving and said exchanging steps at each residence in said plurality of residences;
said each player moving said player position token representing said each player a number of said landable spaces corresponding to a pseudorandom numeric value determined using said die until said player position token is at said final position;
determining a winner of said board game by summing for said each player said worths indicated on said merchandise cards acquired by said each player and announcing as the winner the said each player having the largest sum.
6. The method of claim 5, wherein said indication of a worth of said merchandise is a scannable code and said method further comprises:
providing a computer server communicating over a communications network;
said computer server receiving from a client connection over said communications network data indicative of a scannable code;
said computer server determining the worth of the item depicted on said merchandise card having said scannable code indicated by said received data, said determination based at least in part on said received data;
said computer server sending to said client connection data indicative of said determined worth.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein said determination of the worth of the item depicted is based at least in part on a pseudo-randomly generated number.
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US14/257,247 US20140302928A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-04-21 Systems And Methods For Playing A Treasure Hunting Board And Video Game
US14/555,189 US20150080075A1 (en) 2013-03-15 2014-11-26 Systems And Methods For Playing A Treasure Hunting Board And Video Game

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