US20140270268A1 - Headset systems and methods - Google Patents

Headset systems and methods Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140270268A1
US20140270268A1 US14/186,179 US201414186179A US2014270268A1 US 20140270268 A1 US20140270268 A1 US 20140270268A1 US 201414186179 A US201414186179 A US 201414186179A US 2014270268 A1 US2014270268 A1 US 2014270268A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
digital audio
transducer
audio player
player
comprises
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Abandoned
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US14/186,179
Inventor
Amir A. Abolfathi
Jason R. SHELTON
Reza Kassayan
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Soundmed LLC
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Sonitus Medical Inc
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Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US11/845,712 priority Critical patent/US20080064993A1/en
Priority to US12/464,310 priority patent/US8224013B2/en
Priority to US13/493,722 priority patent/US8660278B2/en
Application filed by Sonitus Medical Inc filed Critical Sonitus Medical Inc
Priority to US14/186,179 priority patent/US20140270268A1/en
Assigned to SONITUS MEDICAL, INC. reassignment SONITUS MEDICAL, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ABOLFATHI, AMIR A., KASSAYAN, REZA, SHELTON, JASON R.
Publication of US20140270268A1 publication Critical patent/US20140270268A1/en
Assigned to SONITUS (ASSIGNMENT FOR THE BENEFIT OF CREDITORS), LLC reassignment SONITUS (ASSIGNMENT FOR THE BENEFIT OF CREDITORS), LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SONITUS MEDICAL, INC.
Assigned to SOUNDMED, LLC reassignment SOUNDMED, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: SONITUS (ASSIGNMENT FOR THE BENEFIT OF CREDITORS), LLC
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R1/00Details of transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • H04R1/08Mouthpieces; Microphones; Attachments therefor
    • H04R1/083Special constructions of mouthpieces
    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B33/00Constructional parts, details or accessories not provided for in the preceding groups
    • G11B33/02Cabinets; Cases; Stands; Disposition of apparatus therein or thereon
    • G11B33/06Cabinets; Cases; Stands; Disposition of apparatus therein or thereon combined with other apparatus having a different main function
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R1/00Details of transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • H04R1/10Earpieces; Attachments therefor ; Earphones; Monophonic headphones
    • H04R1/1091Details not provided for in groups H04R1/1008 - H04R1/1083
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R3/00Circuits for transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B33ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
    • B33YADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, i.e. MANUFACTURING OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL [3-D] OBJECTS BY ADDITIVE DEPOSITION, ADDITIVE AGGLOMERATION OR ADDITIVE LAYERING, e.g. BY 3-D PRINTING, STEREOLITHOGRAPHY OR SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING
    • B33Y70/00Materials specially adapted for additive manufacturing
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B33ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
    • B33YADDITIVE MANUFACTURING, i.e. MANUFACTURING OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL [3-D] OBJECTS BY ADDITIVE DEPOSITION, ADDITIVE AGGLOMERATION OR ADDITIVE LAYERING, e.g. BY 3-D PRINTING, STEREOLITHOGRAPHY OR SELECTIVE LASER SINTERING
    • B33Y80/00Products made by additive manufacturing
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R2460/00Details of hearing devices, i.e. of ear- or headphones covered by H04R1/10 or H04R5/033 but not provided for in any of their subgroups, or of hearing aids covered by H04R25/00 but not provided for in any of its subgroups
    • H04R2460/13Hearing devices using bone conduction transducers

Abstract

A digital audio player device can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form an intraoral MP3 player. In another embodiment, the device provides an electronic and transducer device that can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form a DAP. Such an oral appliance may be a custom-made device fabricated from a thermal forming process utilizing a replicate model of a dental structure obtained by conventional dental impression methods. The electronic and transducer assembly may receive incoming sounds either directly or through a receiver to process and amplify the signals and transmit the processed sounds via a vibrating transducer element coupled to a tooth or other bone structure, such as the maxillary, mandibular, or palatine bone structure.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/493,722 filed Jun. 11, 2012 (now U.S. Pat. No. 8,660,278 issued Feb. 25, 2014) which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/464,310 filed May 12, 2009 (now U.S. Patent No. 8,224.013 issued Jul. 17, 2012) which is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/845,712 filed Aug. 27, 2007, the contents of which are hereby incorporated in their entirety.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • A digital audio player (DAP), more commonly referred to as an MP3 player, is a consumer electronics device that stores, organizes and plays audio files. Some DAPs are also referred to as portable media players as they have image-viewing and/or video-playing support. The MP3 player is the most recent in an evolution of music formats that have helped consumers enjoy their tunes. Records, 8-track tapes, cassette tapes and CDs—none of these earlier music formats provide the convenience and control that MP3 players deliver. With an MP3 player in hand or pocket, a consumer can create personalized music lists and carry thousands of songs wherever they go.
  • The MP3 file format revolutionized music distribution in the late 1990s, when file-swapping services and the first portable MP3 players made their debut. MP3, or MPEG Audio Layer III, is one method for compressing audio files. MPEG is the acronym for Moving Picture Experts Group, a group that has developed compression systems for video data, including that for DVD movies, HDTV broadcasts and digital satellite systems.
  • Using the MP3 compression system reduces the number of bytes in a song, while retaining sound that is near CD-quality. Consider that an average song is about four minutes long. On a CD, that song uses about 40 megabytes (MB), but uses only 4 MB if compressed through the MP3 format. On average, 64 MB of storage space equals an hour of music. A music listener who has an MP3 player with 1 GB (approximately 1,000 MB) of storage space can carry about 240 songs or the equivalent of about 20 CDs. Songs stored on traditional CDs are already decompressed, so it takes more CDs to store the same amount of songs. (Some CDs support MP3 files.)
  • DAPs find natural uses such as listening to music or instructional audio during workouts. However the problem is that many workouts tend to be intense and involve different activities. However, conventional MP3 player can get in the way of activity and can require wrapping the player on the arm or the leg. Moreover, DAPs use headphones that can fall out while the users run, jog or jump.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In one aspect, an intra-oral digital audio player includes a mouth wearable housing; a data storage device positioned in the mouth wearable housing to store digital audio; a transducer mounted on the mouth wearable housing and in vibratory communication with one or more teeth; and a linking unit to receive audio content and coupled to the data storage device.
  • In another aspect, a method for rendering audio content includes storing audio content in a data storage device positioned in a mouth wearable housing; intraorally wearing the mouth wearable housing; and vibrating one or more teeth to play the audio content.
  • In another aspect, a digital audio player device can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form an intraoral MP3 player. In another embodiment, the device provides an electronic and transducer device that can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form a DAP. Such an oral appliance may be a custom-made device fabricated from a thermal forming process utilizing a replicate model of a dental structure obtained by conventional dental impression methods. The electronic and transducer assembly may receive incoming sounds either directly or through a receiver to process and amplify the signals and transmit the processed sounds via a vibrating transducer element coupled to a tooth or other bone structure, such as the maxillary, mandibular, or palatine bone structure.
  • Advantages of preferred embodiments may include one or more of the following. The bone conduction DAP is easy to wear and take off in use, and is further inconspicuous in appearance during the user's wearing thereof. The device can be operated within the oral cavity, minimizing weight and size discomfort for the wearer. Comparing with headphones, the device avoids covering the ears of the listener. This is important if (a) the listener needs to have the ears unobstructed (to allow them to hear other sounds in the environment), or (b) to allow them to plug the ears (to prevent hearing damage from loud sounds in the environment). The system is a multi-purpose communication platform that is rugged, wireless and secure. The system provides quality, hands-free, yet inconspicuous entertainment capability for outdoor activities.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1A shows examples of various methods or interfaces in which an exemplary bone conduction digital audio player (DAP) device may communicate.
  • FIG. 1B illustrates one embodiment with a flash memory or a micro-disk drive to store music files such as MP3 files, among others.
  • FIG. 1C shows another embodiment with memory to store music files and a. broadcast receiver to play broadcast content as well as MP3 files, for example.
  • FIG. 1D shows an exemplary intra-oral housing for the DAP of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 2A illustrates a perspective view of the lower teeth showing one exemplary location for placement of the removable oral appliance DAP device.
  • FIG. 2B illustrates another variation of the removable oral appliance in the form of an appliance which is placed over an entire row of teeth in the manner of a mouthguard.
  • FIG. 2C illustrates another variation of the removable oral appliance which is supported by an arch.
  • FIG. 2D illustrates another variation of an oral appliance configured as a mouthguard.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a detail perspective view of the oral appliance positioned upon the user's teeth utilizable in combination with a transmitting assembly external to the mouth and wearable by the user in another variation of the device.
  • FIG. 4 shows an illustrative configuration of the individual components in a variation of the oral appliance device having an external transmitting assembly with a receiving and transducer assembly within the mouth.
  • FIG. 5 shows an illustrative configuration of another variation of the device in which the entire assembly is contained by the oral appliance within the user's mouth.
  • FIG. 6A shows a partial cross-sectional view of an oral appliance placed upon a tooth with an electronics/transducer assembly adhered to the tooth surface via an adhesive.
  • FIG. 6B shows a partial cross-sectional view of a removable backing adhered onto an adhesive surface.
  • FIG. 7 shows a partial cross-sectional view of another variation of an oral appliance placed upon a tooth with an electronics/transducer assembly pressed against the tooth surface via an osmotic pouch.
  • FIG. 8 shows a partial cross-sectional view of another variation of an oral appliance placed upon a tooth with an electronics/transducer assembly pressed against the tooth surface. via one or more biasing elements.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates another variation of an oral appliance having an electronics assembly and a transducer assembly separated from one another within the electronics and transducer housing of the oral appliance.
  • FIGS. 10 and 11 illustrate additional variations of oral appliances in which the electronics and transducer assembly are maintainable against the tooth surface via a ramped surface and a biasing element.
  • FIG. 12 shows yet another variation of an oral appliance having an interfacing member positioned between the electronics and/or transducer assembly and the tooth surface.
  • FIG. 13 shows yet another variation of an oral appliance having an actuatable mechanism for urging the electronics and/or transducer assembly against the tooth surface.,
  • FIG. 14 shows yet another variation of an oral appliance having a cam mechanism for urging the electronics and/or transducer assembly against the tooth surface.
  • FIG. 15 shows yet another variation of an oral appliance having a separate transducer mechanism positionable upon the occlusal surface of the tooth for transmitting vibrations.
  • FIG. 16 illustrates another variation of an oral appliance having a mechanism for urging the electronics and/or transducer assembly against the tooth surface utilizing a bite-actuated mechanism.
  • FIG. 17 shows yet another variation of an oral appliance having a composite dental anchor for coupling the transducer to the tooth.
  • FIGS. 18A and 18B show side and top views, respectively, of an oral appliance variation having one or more transducers which may be positioned over the occlusal surface of the tooth.
  • FIGS. 19A and 19B illustrate yet another variation of an oral appliance made from a shape memory material in its pre-formed relaxed configuration and its deformed configuration when placed over or upon the user's tooth, respectively, to create an interference fit.
  • FIG. 20 illustrates yet another variation of an oral appliance made from a pre-formed material in which the transducer may be positioned between the biased side of the oral appliance and the tooth surface.
  • FIG. 21 illustrates a variation in which the oral appliance may be omitted and the electronics and/or transducer assembly may be attached to a composite dental anchor attached directly to the tooth surface.
  • FIGS. 22A and 22B show partial cross-sectional side and perspective views, respectively, of another variation of an oral appliance assembly having its occlusal surface removed or omitted for user comfort.
  • FIGS. 23A and 23B illustrate perspective and side views, respectively, of an oral appliance which may be coupled to a screw or post implanted directly into the underlying bone, such as the maxillary or mandibular bone.
  • FIG. 24 illustrates another variation in which the oral appliance may be coupled to a screw or post implanted directly into the palate of a user.
  • FIGS. 25A and 25B illustrate perspective and side views, respectively, of an oral appliance which may have its transducer assembly or a coupling member attached to the gingival surface to conduct vibrations through the gingival tissue and underlying bone.
  • FIG. 26 illustrates an example of how multiple oral appliance DAP assemblies or transducers may be placed on multiple teeth throughout the user's mouth.
  • FIGS. 27A and 27B illustrate perspective and side views, respectively, of an oral appliance (similar to a variation shown above) which may have a DAP unit positioned adjacent to or upon the gingival surface to physically separate the DAP from the transducer to attenuate or eliminate feedback.
  • FIG. 28 illustrates another variation of a removable oral appliance supported by an arch and having a DAP unit integrated within the arch.
  • FIG. 29 shows yet another variation illustrating at least one DAP and optionally additional DAP units positioned around the user's mouth and in wireless communication with the electronics and/or transducer assembly.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIGS. 1A-1D show an exemplary intra-oral entertainment system that includes a mouth wearable DAP 1. In one embodiment, the DAP has a data storage device such as a solid-state memory 6. An embedded software application allows users to transfer MP3 files to the player. The DAP also includes utilities for copying music from the radio, CDs, radio or Web sites and the ability to organize and create custom lists of songs in the order the user wants to hear them (Playlist). The DAP 1 can contain a radio receiver 7 such as an AM/FM receiver. One exemplary radio receiver is the Si473x AM/FM radio receiver which is fully integrated from antenna input to audio output-requiring only two external components. Additionally, the DAP 1 includes a linking unit 8 such as a wireless transceiver (Bluetooth, wireless USB) or a wired transceiver (USB cable) that enables a computer 2 to place music content into the memory 6 or to modify the content of the memory 6 accordingly. For example, the computer 2 can have a Bluetooth transceiver at a charging station 3 that communicates with the Bluetooth transceiver linking unit 8 in the DAP 1. The DAP 1 can receive the data transmitted over the Bluetooth protocol and drive a bone conduction transducer 9 to render or transmit sound to the user. Alternatively, the DAP 1 can receive FM transmission from air FM station 4 through a radio receiver 7 (FIG. 1C) and drive the bone conductor transceiver 9 to transmit sound to the user.
  • The DAP 1 can be remotely controlled through a handheld controller (not shown). For example, the handheld controller allows the user to adjust playback volume, play and pauses and navigate between tracks. In one embodiment, a squeeze control allows the user to pause/play (single squeeze) and skip to the next track (double squeeze). In another embodiment, a bite control allows the user to pause/play (single bite) and skip to the next track (double bite).
  • The memory can be solid-state memory or can be a mechanical memory such as a Microdrive, available from IBM. The advantage to solid-state memory is that there are no moving parts, which means better reliability and no skips in the music. However, the Microdrive type memory provides larger capacity to store more songs.
  • Other components of the player that are not shown can include the following: USB data port, microprocessor, digital signal processor (DSP), display, playback controls, audio port, amplifier, and power supply, for example. The microprocessor controls the operation of the player. It monitors user input through the playback controls, displays information about the current song on the LCD panel and sends directions to the DSP chip that tells the DSP exactly how to process the audio. To do this, the player retrieves the song from memory 6, decompresses the MP3 encoding using the DSP if needed. The player then runs the decompressed bytes through a digital-to-analog converter into sound waves and amplifies the analog signal, and drives the transducer to contact the tooth or teeth and allow the song to be heard through bone conduction.
  • In certain embodiments, the players also have built-in AM or FM radio tuner, providing users with an additional source of entertainment. Radio listeners can record the tunes from their favorite stations in the MP3 format, among others, and add the song to their playlist. In yet other embodiments, the players include an FM transmitter to playback the stored music on an external FM radio using unused frequencies.
  • The music content can be purchased from stores such as Apple's iTunes, or alternatively the user can use a ripper to copy songs from CDs to the memory. An MP3 encoder can compress the song into the MP3 format to be played from an MP3 player.
  • Although MP3 is perhaps the most well-known file format, there are other file formats that can be played on MP3 players. While most MP3 players can support multiple formats, not all players support the same formats. Here are a few of the file formats that can be played on different players:
      • WMA—Windows Media Audio
      • WAV—Waveform Audio
      • MIDI—Music Instrument Digital Interface.
      • AAC—Advanced Audio Coding
      • Ogg Vorbis—A free, open and un-patented music format
      • ADPCM—Adaptive Differential Pulse Code Modulation
      • ASF—Advanced Streaming Format
      • VQF—Vector Quantization Format
      • ATRAC—Sony's Adaptive Transform Acoustic Coding 3
  • The DAP 1 can be used for swimming or in wet environment activities. The DAP 1 can be wirelessly connected to other devices via RF or electromagnetic, Bluetooth for either real time data transfer or sending data to the memory.
  • The DAP 1 can be a custom oral device. The device can include a housing having a shape which is conformable to at least a portion of at least one tooth; an actuatable transducer disposed within or upon the housing and in vibratory communication with a surface of the at least one tooth; and a wireless communication transceiver coupled to the transducer to provide received sound to the user and to provide communication for the user. The headset can be an oral appliance having a shape which conforms to the at least one tooth. The transducer can include an electronic assembly disposed within or upon the housing and in communication with a transducer. The linking unit 8 can be a transceiver compatible with an 802 protocol, cellular protocol, or Bluetooth protocol. In other embodiments, the device provides an electronic and transducer device that can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form a medical tag containing user identifiable information. Such an oral appliance may be a custom-made device fabricated from a thermal forming process utilizing a replicate model of a dental structure obtained by conventional dental impression and/or imaging methods. The electronic and transducer assembly may receive incoming sounds either directly or through a receiver to process and amplify the signals and transmit the processed sounds via a vibrating transducer element coupled to a tooth or other bone structure, such as the maxillary, mandibular, or palatine bone structure.
  • The computer 2 can communicate with the linking unit 8 through a USB connection, among others. The USB connection can be activated when the device 1 is plugged into a recharging station 3 for recharging the battery in the DAP 1. In one embodiment, the DAP 1 can be mounted on a battery charging system for use with an induction charger to charge the intraoral appliance 1. The battery charging system can charge a number of devices. Accordingly, a plurality of such devices can be simultaneously, and efficiently, charged using a single induction charger.
  • The recharging station 3 can include a base charger coil with an open end defined to receive the DAP charger coil portion. When an energy storage device such as a battery needs to be recharged, the appliance charger coil portion is placed on the open end of the charger base so that the appliance charger coil and the base charger coil in combination complete an electromagnetic flux for inductive charging.
  • In one embodiment, the coil portion picks up electromagnetic energy emanating from the charger base station. The energy is in the form of electrical current which is provided to a charger regulator. The charger regulator boosts the voltage and smoothes out variations in the received energy using one or more filters. One or more filters can be used to remove electrical noise. The regulated DC output is provided to a charger which converts the energy into a suitable form for charging a energy storage device such as a super-capacitor or a battery, among others. The charger can be optimized for different battery technology. For example, NiCad batteries require a certain set charging characteristics, and Lithium Ion batteries require another set charging characteristics. The charger customizes the energy provided by the charger regulator for the specific chemistry or requirements of the battery to optimize the battery charging operation. The connection between the charger and the battery can be separated after charging to minimize size and/or weight of the portable appliance. The energy from the battery is provided to a second regulator that provides the voltage needed by the electronics in the DAP appliance.
  • In one embodiment, the DAP has a housing having a shape which is conformable to at least a portion of at least one tooth; an actuatable transducer disposed within or upon the housing and in vibratory communication with a surface of the at least one tooth; and a wireless communication transceiver coupled to the transducer to provide received sound to the user and to provide communication for the user. The DAP device can be an oral appliance having a shape which conforms to the at least one tooth. An electronic assembly can be disposed within or upon the housing and which is in communication with the transducer.
  • In another embodiment, the device 1 provides an electronic and transducer device 9 that can be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon a removable oral appliance or other oral device to form a medical tag containing user identifiable information. Such an oral appliance may be a custom-made device fabricated from a thermal forming process utilizing a replicate model of a dental structure obtained by conventional dental impression methods. The electronic and transducer assembly may receive incoming sounds either directly or through a receiver to process and amplify the signals and transmit the processed sounds via a vibrating transducer element coupled to a tooth or other bone structure, such as the maxillary, mandibular, or palatine bone structure.
  • As shown in FIG. 1B, a user's mouth and dentition 10 is illustrated showing one possible location for removably attaching the DAP assembly 14 upon or against at least one tooth, such as a molar 12 The user's tongue TG and palate PL are also illustrated for reference. An electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 may be attached, adhered, or otherwise embedded into or upon the assembly 14, as described below in further detail.
  • FIG. 2A shows a perspective view of the user's lower dentition illustrating the DAP assembly 14 comprising a removable oral appliance 18 and the electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 positioned along a side surface of the assembly 14. In this variation, oral appliance 18 may be fitted upon two molars 12 within tooth engaging channel 20 defined by oral appliance 18 for stability upon the user's teeth, although in other variations, a single molar of tooth may be utilized. Alternatively, more than two molars may be utilized for the oral appliance 18 to be attached upon or over. Moreover, electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 is shown positioned upon a side surface of oral appliance 18 such that the assembly 16 is aligned along a buccal surface of the tooth 12; however, other surfaces such as the lingual surface of the tooth 12 and other positions may also be utilized. The figures are illustrative of variations and are not intended to be limiting; accordingly, other configurations and shapes for oral appliance 18 are intended to be included herein.
  • FIG. 2B shows another variation of a removable oral appliance in the form of an appliance 15 which is placed over an entire row of teeth in the manner of a mouth guard. In this variation, appliance 15 may be configured to cover an entire bottom row of teeth or alternatively an entire upper row of teeth. In additional variations, rather than covering the entire rows of teeth, a majority of the row of teeth may be instead be covered by appliance 15. Assembly 16 may be positioned along one or more portions of the oral appliance 15.
  • FIG. 2C shows yet another variation of an oral appliance 17 having an arched configuration. In this appliance, one or more tooth retaining portions 21, 23, which in this variation may be placed along the upper row of teeth, may be supported by an arch 19 which may lie adjacent or along the palate of the user. As shown, electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 may be positioned along one or more portions of the tooth retaining portions 21, 23. Moreover, although the variation shown illustrates an arch 19 which may cover only a portion of the palate of the user, other variations may be configured to have an arch which covers the entire palate of the user.
  • FIG. 2D illustrates yet another variation of an oral appliance in the form of a mouthguard or retainer 25 which may be inserted and removed easily from the user's mouth. Such a mouthguard or retainer 25 may be used in sports where conventional mouthguards are worn; however, mouthguard or retainer 25 having assembly 16 integrated therein may be utilized by persons, hearing impaired or otherwise, who may simply hold the mouthguard or retainer 25 via grooves or channels 26 between their teeth for receiving instructions remotely and communicating over a distance.
  • Generally, the volume of electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 may be minimized so as to be unobtrusive and as comfortable to the user when placed in the mouth. Although the size may be varied, a volume of assembly 16 may be less than 800 cubic. millimeters. This volume is, of course, illustrative and not limiting as size and volume of assembly 16 and may be varied accordingly between different users.
  • Moreover, removable oral appliance 18 may be fabricated from various polymeric or a combination of polymeric and metallic materials using any number of methods, such as computer-aided machining processes using computer numerical control (CNC) systems or three-dimensional printing processes, e.g., stereolithography apparatus (SLA), selective laser sintering (SLS), and/or other similar processes utilizing three-dimensional geometry of the user's dentition, which may be obtained via any number of techniques. Such techniques may include use of scanned dentition using intra-oral scanners such as laser, white light, ultrasound, mechanical three-dimensional touch scanners, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), other optical methods, etc.
  • In forming the removable oral appliance 18, the appliance 18 may be optionally formed such that it is molded to fit over the dentition and at least a portion of the adjacent gingival tissue to inhibit the entry of food, fluids, and other debris into the oral appliance 18 and between the transducer assembly and tooth surface. Moreover, the greater surface area of the oral appliance 18 may facilitate the placement and configuration of the assembly 16 onto the appliance 18.
  • Additionally, the removable oral appliance 18 may be optionally fabricated to have a shrinkage factor such that when placed onto the dentition, oral appliance 18 may be configured to securely grab onto the tooth or teeth as the appliance 18 may have a resulting size slightly smaller than the scanned tooth or teeth upon which the appliance 18 was formed. The fitting may result in a secure interference fit between the appliance 18 and underlying dentition.
  • In one variation, with assembly 14 positioned upon the teeth, as shown in FIG. 3, an extra-buccal transmitter assembly 22 located outside the user's mouth may be utilized to receive auditory signals for processing and transmission via a wireless signal 24 to the electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 positioned within the user's mouth, which may then process and transmit the processed auditory signals via vibratory conductance to the underlying tooth and consequently to the user's inner ear.
  • The transmitter assembly 22, as described in further detail below, may contain a music data storage assembly as well as a transmitter assembly and may be configured in any number of shapes and forms worn by the user, such as a watch, necklace, lapel, phone, belt-mounted device, etc.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a schematic representation of one variation of DAP assembly 14 utilizing an extra-buccal transmitter assembly 22, which may generally comprise data storage 30 for storing sound/musical content and which is electrically connected to processor 32 for processing the audio signals. Processor 32 may be connected electrically to transmitter 34 for transmitting the processed signals to the electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 disposed upon or adjacent to the user's teeth. The data storage 30 and processor 32 may be configured to handle audio signals in any practicable range, but may be configured in one variation to process auditory signals ranging from, e.g., 250 Hertz to 20,000 Hertz.
  • Power supply 36 may be connected to each of the components in transmitter assembly 22 to provide power thereto. The transmitter signals 24 may be in any wireless. form utilizing, e.g., radio frequency, ultrasound, microwave, Blue Tooth® (BLUETOOTH SIG, Bellevue, Wash.), etc. for transmission to assembly 16. Assembly 22 may also optionally include one or more input controls 28 that a user may manipulate to adjust various acoustic parameters of the electronics and/or transducer assembly 16, such as acoustic focusing, volume control, filtration, muting. frequency optimization, sound adjustments, and tone adjustments, etc.
  • The signals transmitted 24 by transmitter 34 may be received by electronics and/or transducer assembly 16 via receiver 38, which may be connected to an internal processor for additional processing of the received signals. The received signals may be communicated to transducer 40, which may vibrate correspondingly against a surface of the tooth to conduct the vibratory signals through the tooth and bone and subsequently to the middle ear to facilitate hearing of the user. Transducer 40 may be configured as any number of different vibratory mechanisms. For instance, in one variation, transducer 40 may be an electromagnetically actuated transducer. In other variations, transducer 40 may be in the form of a piezoelectric crystal having a range of vibratory frequencies, e.g., between 250 to 4000 Hz.
  • Power supply 42 may also be included with assembly 16 to provide power to the receiver, transducer, and/or processor, if also included. Although power supply 42 may be a simple battery, replaceable or permanent, other variations may include a power supply 42 which is charged by inductance via an external charger. Additionally, power supply 42 may alternatively be charged via direct coupling to an alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) source. Other variations may include a power supply 42 which is charged via a mechanical mechanism, such as an internal pendulum or slidable electrical inductance charger as known in the art, which is actuated via, e.g., motions of the jaw and/or movement for translating the mechanical motion into stored electrical energy for charging power supply 42.
  • In another variation of assembly 16, rather than utilizing an extra-buccal transmitter, DAP assembly 50 may be configured as an independent assembly contained entirely within the user's mouth, as shown in FIG. 5. Accordingly, assembly 50 may include an internal DAP 52 in communication with an on-board processor 54. Music source 52 may comprise any number of different types of content sources such as flash memoir to store MP3 files and/or AM/FM transceiver to receive music from the air, as described above. Processor 54 may be used to process any received audio signals for filtering and/or amplifying the signals and transmitting them to transducer 56, which is in vibratory contact against the tooth surface. Power supply 58, as described above, may also be included within assembly 50 for providing power to each of the components of assembly 50 as necessary.
  • In order to transmit the vibrations corresponding to the received auditory signals efficiently and with minimal loss to the tooth or teeth, secure mechanical contact between the transducer and the tooth is ideally maintained to ensure efficient vibratory communication. Accordingly, any number of mechanisms may be utilized to maintain this vibratory communication.
  • In one variation as shown in FIG. 6A, a partial cross-sectional view of a removable oral appliance 60 is shown placed over or upon a tooth TH. Electronics and/or transducer housing 62 may be seen defined along oral appliance 60 such that housing 62 is aligned or positioned adjacent to a side surface, buccal and/or lingual surface, of the tooth TH. Housing 62 may provide protection to the electronics and/or transducer assembly from the environment of the mouth.
  • An electronics and/or transducer assembly 64 may be simply placed, embedded, or encapsulated within housing 62 for contacting the tooth surface. In this variation, assembly 64 may be adhered against the tooth surface via an adhesive surface or film 66 such that contact is maintained between the two. As shown in FIG. 6B, a removable backing 68 may be adhered onto adhesive surface 66 and removed prior to placement upon the tooth surface. In this manner, assembly 64 may be replaced upon the tooth as necessary with additional electronics and/or transducer assemblies.
  • Aside from an adhesive film 66, another alternative may utilize an expandable or swellable member to ensure a secure mechanical contact of the transducer against the tooth. As shown in FIG. 7, an osmotic patch or expandable hydrogel 74 may be placed between housing 62 and electronics and/or transducer assembly 72. After placement of oral appliance 60, hydrogel 74 may absorb some fluids, either from any surrounding fluid or from a fluid introduced into hydrogel 74, such that hydrogel 74 expands in size to force assembly 72 into contact against the tooth surface. Assembly 72 may be configured to define a contact surface 70 having a relatively smaller contact area to facilitate uniform contact of the surface 70 against the tooth. Such a contact surface 70 may be included in any of the variations described herein. Additionally, a thin encapsulating layer of surface 76 may be placed over housing 62 between contact surface 70 and the underlying tooth to prevent any debris or additional fluids from entering housing 62.
  • Another variation is shown in FIG. 8, which shows electronics and/or transducer assembly 80 contained within housing 62. In this variation, one or more biasing elements 82 e.g., springs, pre-formed shape memory elements, etc., may be placed between assembly 80 and housing 62 to provide a pressing force on assembly 80 to urge the device against the underlying tooth surface, thereby ensuring mechanical contact.
  • In yet another variation, the electronics may be contained as a separate assembly 90 which is encapsulated within housing 62 and the transducer 92 may be maintained separately from assembly 90 but also within housing 62. As shown in FIG. 9, transducer 92 may be urged against the tooth surface via a spring or other biasing element 94 and actuated via any of the mechanisms described above.
  • In other variations as shown in FIG. 10, electronics and/or transducer assembly 100 may be configured to have a ramped surface 102 in apposition to the tooth surface. The surface 102 may be angled away from the occlusal surface of the tooth. The assembly 100 may be urged via a biasing element or spring 106 which forces the ramped surface 102 to pivot about a location 104 into contact against the tooth to ensure contact for the transducer against the tooth surface.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates another similar variation in electronics and/or transducer assembly 110 also having a ramped surface 112 in apposition to the tooth surface. In this variation, the ramped surface 112 may be angled towards the occlusal surface of the tooth. Likewise, assembly 110 may be urged via a biasing element or spring 116 which urges the assembly 110 to pivot about its lower end such that the assembly 110 contacts the tooth surface at a region 114.
  • In yet another variation shown in FIG. 12, electronics and/or transducer assembly 120 may be positioned within housing 62 with an interface layer 122 positioned between the assembly 120 and the tooth surface. Interface layer 122 may be configured to conform against the tooth surface and against assembly 120 such that vibrations may be transmitted through layer 122 and to the tooth in a uniform manner. Accordingly, interface layer 122 may be made from a material which attenuates vibrations minimally. Interface layer 122 may be made in a variety of forms, such as a simple insert, an O-ring configuration, etc. or even in a gel or paste form, such as denture or oral paste, etc. Additionally, layer 122 may be fabricated from various materials, e.g., hard plastics or polymeric materials, metals, etc.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates yet another variation in which electronics and/or transducer assembly 130 may be urged against the tooth surface via a mechanical mechanism. As Shown, assembly 130 may be attached to a structural member 132, e.g., a threaded member or a simple shaft, which is connected through housing 62 to an engagement member 134 located outside housing 62. The user may rotate engagement member 134 (as indicated by rotational arrow 136) or simply push upon member 134 (as indicated by linear arrow 138) to urge assembly 130 into contact against the tooth. Moreover, actuation of engagement member 134 may be accomplished manually within the mouth or through the user's cheek or even through manipulation via the user's tongue against engagement member 134.
  • Another variation for a mechanical mechanism is illustrated in FIG. 14. In this variation, electronics and/or transducer assembly 140 may define a portion as an engaging surface 142 for contacting against a cam or lever mechanism 144. Cam or lever mechanism 144 may be configured to pivot 146 such that actuation of a lever 148 extending through housing 62 may urge cam or lever mechanism 144 to push against engaging surface 142 such that assembly 140 is pressed against the underlying tooth surface.
  • In yet another variation, the electronics 150 and the transducer 152 may be separated from one another such that electronics 150 remain disposed within housing 62 but transducer 152, connected via wire 154, is located beneath dental oral appliance 60 along an occlusal surface of the tooth, as shown in FIG. 15. In such a configuration, vibrations are transmitted via the transducer 152 through the occlusal surface of the tooth. Additionally, the user may bite down upon the oral appliance 60 and transducer 152 to mechanically compress the transducer 152 against the occlusal surface to further enhance the mechanical contact between the transducer 152 and underlying tooth to further facilitate transmission therethrough.
  • In the variation of FIG. 16, another example for a bite-enhanced coupling mechanism is illustrated where electronics and/or transducer assembly 160 defines an angled interface surface 162 in apposition to a correspondingly angled engaging member 164. A proximal end of engaging member 164 may extend through housing 62 and terminate in a pusher member 166 positioned over an occlusal surface of the tooth TH. Once oral appliance 60 is initially placed over tooth TH, the user may bite down or otherwise press down upon the top portion of oral appliance 60, thereby pressing down upon pusher member 166 which in turn pushes down upon engaging member 164, as indicated by the arrow. As engaging member 164 is urged downwardly towards the gums, its angled surface may push upon the corresponding and oppositely angled surface 162 to urge assembly 160 against the tooth surface and into a secure mechanical contact.
  • In yet another variation, an electronics and/or transducer assembly 170 may define a channel or groove 172 along a surface for engaging a corresponding dental anchor 174, as shown in FIG. 17. Dental anchor 174 may comprise a light-curable acrylate-based composite material adhered directly to the tooth surface. Moreover dental anchor 174 may be configured in a shape which corresponds to a shape of channel or groove 172 such that the two may be interfitted in a mating engagement. In this manner, the transducer in assembly 170 may vibrate directly against dental anchor 174 which may then transmit these signals directly into the tooth TH.
  • FIGS. 18A and 18B show partial cross-sectional side and top views, respectively, of another variation in which oral appliance 180 may define a number of channels or grooves 184 along a top portion of oral appliance 180. Within these channels or grooves 184, one or more transducers 182, 186, 188, 190 may be disposed such that they are in contact with the occlusal surface of the tooth and each of these transducers may be tuned to transmit frequencies uniformly. Alternatively, each of these transducers may be timed to transmit only at specified frequency ranges. Accordingly, each transducer can be programmed or preset for a different frequency response such that each transducer may be optimized for a different frequency response and/or transmission to deliver a relatively high-fidelity sound to the user.
  • In yet another variation, FIGS. 19A and 19B illustrate an oral appliance 200 which may be pre-formed from a shape memory polymer or alloy or a superelastic material such as a Nickel-Titanium alloy, e.g., Nitinol. FIG. 19A shows oral appliance 200 in a first configuration where members 202, 204 are in an unbiased memory configuration. When placed upon or against the tooth TH, members 202, 204 may be deflected into a second configuration where members 202′, 204′ are deformed to engage tooth TH in a secure interference fit, as shown in FIG. 19B. The biased member 204′ may be utilized to press the electronics and/or transducer assembly contained therein against the tooth surface as well as to maintain securement of the oral appliance 200 upon the tooth TH.
  • Similarly, as shown in FIG. 20, removable oral appliance 210 may have biased members to secure engage the tooth TH, as above. In this variation, the ends of the members 212, 214 may be configured into curved portions under which a transducer element 218 coupled to electronics assembly 216 may be wedged or otherwise secured to ensure mechanical contact against the tooth surface.
  • FIG. 21 shows yet another variation in which the oral appliance is omitted entirely. Here, a composite dental anchor or bracket 226, as described above, may be adhered directly onto the tooth surface. Alternatively, bracket 226 may be comprised of a biocompatible material, e.g., stainless steel, Nickel-Titanium, Nickel, ceramics, composites, etc., formed into a bracket and anchored onto the tooth surface. The bracket 226 may be configured to have a shape 228 over which an electronics and/or transducer assembly 220 may be slid over or upon via a channel 222 having a corresponding receiving configuration 224 for engagement with bracket 226. In this manner, assembly 220 may be directly engaged against bracket 226, through which a transducer may directly vibrate into the underlying tooth TH. Additionally, in the event that assembly 220 is removed from the tooth TH, assembly 220 may be simply slid or rotated off bracket 226 and a replacement assembly may be put in its place upon bracket 226.
  • FIGS. 22A and 22B show partial cross-sectional side and perspective views, respectively, of yet another variation of an oral appliance 230. In this variation, the oral appliance 230 may be configured to omit an occlusal surface portion of the oral appliance 230 and instead engages the side surfaces of the tooth TH, such as the lingual and buccal surfaces only. The electronics and/or transducer assembly 234 may be contained, as above, within a housing 232 for contact against the tooth surface. Additionally, as shown in FIG. 22B, one or more optional cross-members 236 may connect the side portions of the oral appliance 230 to provide some structural stability when placed upon the tooth. This variation may define an occlusal surface opening 238 such that when placed upon the tooth, the user may freely bite down directly upon the natural occlusal surface of the tooth unobstructed by the oral appliance device, thereby providing for enhanced comfort to the user.
  • In yet other variations, vibrations may be transmitted directly into the underlying bone or tissue structures rather than transmitting directly through the tooth or teeth of the user. As shown in FIG. 23A, an oral appliance 240 is illustrated positioned upon the user's tooth, in this example upon a molar located along the upper row of teeth. The electronics and/or transducer assembly 242 is shown as being located along the buccal surface of the tooth. Rather than utilizing a transducer in contact with the tooth surface, a conduction transmission member 244, such as a rigid or solid metallic member, may be coupled to the transducer in assembly 242 and extend from oral appliance 240 to a post or screw 246 which is implanted directly into the underlying bone 248, such as the maxillary bone, as shown in the partial cross-sectional view of FIG. 23B. As the distal end of transmission member 244 is coupled directly to post or screw 246, the vibrations generated by the transducer may be transmitted through transmission member 244 and directly into post or screw 246, which in turn transmits the vibrations directly into and through the bone 248 for transmission to the user's inner ear.
  • FIG. 24 illustrates, a partial cross-sectional view of an oral appliance 250 placed upon the user's tooth TH with the electronics and/or transducer assembly 252 located along the lingual surface of the tooth. Similarly, the vibrations may be transmitted through the conduction transmission member 244 and directly into post or screw 246, which in this example is implanted into the palatine bone PL. Other variations may utilize this arrangement located along the lower row of teeth for transmission to a post or screw 246 drilled into the mandibular bone.
  • In yet another variation, rather utilizing a post or screw drilled into the underlying bone itself, a transducer may be attached, coupled, or otherwise adhered directly to the gingival tissue surface adjacent to the teeth. As shown in FIGS. 25A and 25B, an oral appliance 260 may have an electronics assembly 262 positioned along its side with an electrical wire 264 extending therefrom to a transducer assembly 266 attached to the gingival tissue surface 268 next to the tooth TH. Transducer assembly 266 may be attached to the tissue surface 268 via an adhesive, structural support arm extending from oral appliance 260, a dental screw or post, or any other structural mechanism. In use, the transducer may vibrate and transmit directly into the underlying gingival tissue, which may conduct the signals to the underlying bone.
  • For any of the variations described above, they may be utilized as a single device or in combination with any other variation herein, as practicable, to achieve the desired hearing level in the user. Moreover, more than one oral appliance device and electronics and/or transducer assemblies may be utilized at any one time. For example, FIG. 26 illustrates one example where multiple transducer assemblies 270, 272, 274, 276 may be placed on multiple teeth. Although shown on the lower row of teeth, multiple assemblies may alternatively be positioned and located along the upper row of teeth or both rows as well. Moreover, each of the assemblies may be configured to transmit vibrations within a uniform frequency range. Alternatively in other variations, different assemblies may be configured to vibrate within non-overlapping frequency ranges between each assembly. As mentioned above, each transducer 270, 272, 274, 276 can be programmed or preset for a different frequency response such that each transducer may be optimized for a different frequency response and/or transmission to deliver a relatively high-fidelity sound to the user.
  • Moreover, each of the different transducers 270, 272, 274, 276 can also be programmed to vibrate in a manner which indicates the directionality of sound played by the DAP worn by the user. For example, different transducers positioned at different locations within the user's mouth can vibrate in a specified manner by providing sound or vibrational queues to inform the user which direction a sound arises relative to an orientation of the user. For instance, a first transducer located, e.g., on a user's left tooth, can be programmed to vibrate for sound originating from the user's left side. Similarly, a second transducer located, e.g., on a user's right tooth, can be programmed to vibrate for sound originating from the user's right side. In this manner, multi-directional sound such as THX sound can be played for the user's enjoyment. Other variations and queues may be utilized as these examples are intended to be illustrative of potential variations.
  • In variations where the one or more DAPs are positioned in intra-buccal locations, the DAP may be integrated directly into the electronics and/or transducer assembly, as described above. However, in additional variation, the DAP unit may be positioned at a distance from the transducer assemblies. In one example, similar to a variation shown above, DAP unit 282 may be separated from electronics and/or transducer assembly 280, as shown in FIGS. 27A and 27B. In such a variation, the DAP unit 282 positioned upon or adjacent to the gingival surface 268 may be electrically connected via wire(s) 264.
  • Although the variation illustrates the DAP unit 282 placed adjacent to the gingival tissue 268, unit 282 may be positioned upon another tooth or another location within the mouth. For instance, FIG. 28 illustrates another variation 290 which utilizes an arch 19 connecting one or more tooth retaining portions 21, 23, as described above. However, in this variation, the DAP unit 294 may be integrated within or upon the arch 19 separated from the transducer assembly 292. One or more wires 296 routed through arch 19 may electrically connect the DAP unit 294 to the assembly 292. Alternatively, rather than utilizing a wire 296, DAP unit 294 and assembly 292 may be wirelessly coupled to one another, as described above.
  • In yet another variation for separating the DAP from the transducer assembly, FIG. 29 illustrates another variation where at least one DAP 302 (or optionally any number of additional DAPs 304, 306) may be positioned within the mouth of the user while physically separated from the electronics and/or transducer assembly 300. In this manner, the one or optionally more DAPs 302, 304, 306 may be wirelessly coupled to the electronics and/or transducer assembly 300.
  • The applications of the devices and methods discussed above are not limited to the treatment of hearing loss but may include any number of further treatment applications. Moreover, such devices and methods may be applied to other treatment sites within the body. Modification of the above-described assemblies and methods for carrying out the invention, combinations between different variations as practicable, and variations of aspects of the invention that are obvious to those of skill in the art are intended to be within the scope of the claims.

Claims (21)

1. An intra-oral digital audio player, comprising:
a. a mouth wearable housing which comprises a custom oral device;
b. a data storage device positioned in the mouth wearable housing to store digital audio;
c. a transducer mounted on the mouth wearable housing and in vibratory communication with one or more teeth, wherein the transducer comprises a bone conduction transducer; and
d. a linking unit to receive audio content and coupled to the data storage device.
2. The digital audio player of claim 1 further comprising a radio receiver in communication with the linking unit to receive AM or FM broadcast content.
3. The digital audio player of claim 1 wherein the mouth wearable housing comprises an oral appliance having a shape which conforms to the one or more teeth.
4. The digital audio player of claim 1 wherein the transducer further comprises an electronic assembly disposed within or upon the housing and in communication with the transducer.
5. The digital audio player of claim 1 wherein the linking unit further comprises a transceiver compatible with one of: an 802 protocol, cellular protocol, wireless USB protocol.
6. The digital audio player of claim 1 further comprising:
a. a player charger coil defining a first portion of an electromagnetic loop; and
b. a charger base having a base charger coil defining a second portion of the electromagnetic loop, wherein the player charger coil and the base charger coil in combination transfer energy for inductive charging.
7. The digital audio player of claim 6 further comprising a charger circuit coupled to the player coil portion.
8. The digital audio player of claim 7 wherein the charger circuit comprises a regulator circuit coupled to a charging circuit.
9. The digital audio player of claim 1 wherein the data storage device comprises MP3 content.
10. The digital audio player of claim 1 further comprising a remote controller in communication with the digital audio player.
11. The digital audio play of claim 10 wherein the remote controller comprises a squeeze control with a bite control to allow the user to pause/play (single bite) and skip to another track (double bite).
12. An intra-oral digital audio player, comprising:
a. a mouth wearable housing which comprises a custom oral device;
b. a data storage device to store digital audio;
c. a transducer mounted within or upon the mouth wearable housing and in vibratory communication with one or more teeth, wherein the transducer comprises a bone conduction transducer;
d. a linking unit to receive audio content and in communication with the data storage device; and
e. a remote controller in communication with the digital audio player to adjust playback volume, play and pause and navigate between tracks.
13. The digital audio player of claim 12 further comprising a radio receiver in communication with the linking unit to receive AM or FM broadcast content.
14. The digital audio player of claim 12 wherein the mouth wearable housing comprises an oral appliance having a shape which conforms to the one or more teeth.
15. The digital audio player of claim 12 wherein the transducer further comprises an electronic assembly disposed within or upon the housing and in communication with the transducer.
16. The digital audio player of claim 12 wherein the linking unit comprises a transceiver compatible with one of: an 802 protocol, cellular protocol, wireless USB protocol.
17. The digital audio player of claim 15 further comprising:
a. a player charger coil defining a first portion of an electromagnetic loop; and
b. a charger base having a base charger coil defining a second portion of the electromagnetic loop, wherein the player charger coil and the base charger coil in combination transfer energy for inductive charging.
18. The digital audio player of claim 17 further comprising a charger circuit coupled to the player coil portion.
19. The digital audio player of claim 18 wherein the charger circuit comprises a regulator circuit coupled to a charging circuit.
20. The digital audio player of claim 12 wherein the data storage devices comprises MP3 content.
21. The digital audio player of claim 12 wherein the remote controller comprises a squeeze control with a bite control to allow the user to pause/play (single bite) and skip to another track (double bite).
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US13/493,722 US8660278B2 (en) 2007-08-27 2012-06-11 Headset systems and methods
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