US20140260073A1 - Roof Repair Composition and Method for Repairing Roof Shingles - Google Patents

Roof Repair Composition and Method for Repairing Roof Shingles Download PDF

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US20140260073A1
US20140260073A1 US14208376 US201414208376A US2014260073A1 US 20140260073 A1 US20140260073 A1 US 20140260073A1 US 14208376 US14208376 US 14208376 US 201414208376 A US201414208376 A US 201414208376A US 2014260073 A1 US2014260073 A1 US 2014260073A1
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method
roof
water
aqueous medium
shingles
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US14208376
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Edward Steven Seroka
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Edward Steven Seroka
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04GSCAFFOLDING; FORMS; SHUTTERING; BUILDING IMPLEMENTS OR OTHER BUILDING AIDS, OR THEIR USE; HANDLING BUILDING MATERIALS ON THE SITE; REPAIRING, BREAKING-UP OR OTHER WORK ON EXISTING BUILDINGS
    • E04G23/00Working measures on existing buildings
    • E04G23/02Repairing, e.g. filling cracks; Restoring; Altering; Enlarging
    • E04G23/0281Repairing or restoring roofing or roof covering
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08GMACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS OBTAINED OTHERWISE THAN BY REACTIONS ONLY INVOLVING UNSATURATED CARBON-TO-CARBON BONDS
    • C08G18/00Polymeric products of isocyanates or isothiocyanates
    • C08G18/06Polymeric products of isocyanates or isothiocyanates with compounds having active hydrogen
    • C08G18/08Processes
    • C08G18/0838Manufacture of polymers in the presence of non-reactive compounds
    • C08G18/0842Manufacture of polymers in the presence of non-reactive compounds in the presence of liquid diluents
    • C08G18/0861Manufacture of polymers in the presence of non-reactive compounds in the presence of liquid diluents in the presence of a dispersing phase for the polymers or a phase dispersed in the polymers
    • C08G18/0866Manufacture of polymers in the presence of non-reactive compounds in the presence of liquid diluents in the presence of a dispersing phase for the polymers or a phase dispersed in the polymers the dispersing or dispersed phase being an aqueous medium
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09DCOATING COMPOSITIONS, e.g. PAINTS, VARNISHES OR LACQUERS; FILLING PASTES; CHEMICAL PAINT OR INK REMOVERS; INKS; CORRECTING FLUIDS; WOODSTAINS; PASTES OR SOLIDS FOR COLOURING OR PRINTING; USE OF MATERIALS THEREFOR
    • C09D191/00Coating compositions based on oils, fats or waxes; Coating compositions based on derivatives thereof
    • C09D191/06Waxes
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/66Sealings
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D1/00Roof covering by making use of tiles, slates, shingles, or other small roofing elements
    • E04D1/12Roofing elements shaped as plain tiles or shingles, i.e. with flat outer surface
    • E04D1/20Roofing elements shaped as plain tiles or shingles, i.e. with flat outer surface of plastics; of asphalt; of fibrous materials
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04DROOF COVERINGS; SKY-LIGHTS; GUTTERS; ROOF-WORKING TOOLS
    • E04D7/00Roof covering exclusively consisting of sealing masses applied in situ; Gravelling of flat roofs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/26Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component, the element or component having a specified physical dimension
    • Y10T428/263Coating layer not in excess of 5 mils thick or equivalent

Abstract

The present invention relates to a method for repairing a shingle roof comprising the steps of providing a base aqueous medium selected from the group consisting of urethane, polyurethane, wax particulates dispersed in water, and butyl ether, and mixtures thereof; providing additives selected from the group consisting of sand, silica, polymer particles, plastic fibers, and fiberglass fibers, and mixtures thereof, applying the aqueous medium to a shingle roof, forming a first layer, applying the additives to the first layer, and drying the layers.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a nonprovisional of, and claims the benefit of, U.S. Patent Application Ser. No. 61/792,111, filed Mar. 15, 2013, which is entitled “Roof Repair Composition and Method for Repairing Roof Shingles.”
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to a composition and method of use for repairing asphalt shingles in residential roofs using a urethane and/or wax composition dispersed in water.
  • Residential roofs are exposed to the elements, including rain, snow, ice, and wind. Roofs will wear in response to the elements and it is not uncommon for a house to experience roof shingle damage due to any of these elements. This often will be apparent via leaking or water damage. As this occurs during the winter months, roofing shingles are intermittently covered with snow and ice, and until the season ends, it is difficult to perform maintenance, or complete roof repair/replacement. In response, it is desirable to have a way of repairing damage that could be implemented during the brief periods when there is no snow or ice on the damaged shingles and the outside air temperature is higher; have minimal cosmetic changes to the existing roof; and could be applied to a large area in a short period of time without standing on damaged shingles.
  • As a residential asphalt (bitumen) shingled roof ages, the shingle material hardens. This hardening makes the shingles more brittle. Shingles become susceptible to cracking, which can lead to water infiltration, which leads to roof leaks. Specifically, small cracks, if not repaired, allow ice to form in the cracks, and the cracks can become larger due to the environmental influences. On older roofs, the weight of the repairer traversing or standing on brittle shingles while repairing the damaged shingles can cause further cracking or damage to shingles, or can cause damage to shingles that originally had no damage. It is apparent that a method of repair which eliminates or reduces the necessity of the repairer being on the roof is advantageous.
  • A number of patents and publications offer various repair solutions. For example, U.S. patent publication 2012/0322913 to Fontenot, III et al., teaches a durable substrate coating and process which can be applied as a liquid over an existing roof. Japanese patent publication JP2012251094A, teaches a low pollution, high weather resistance coating or coatings that are applied to the outer wall of a building as a repair water-based coating composition. U.S. Pat. No. 6,001,906 to Golumbic, teaches a coating which is a combination of polyurethane and wax for use in providing a coating for leather and vinyl materials. U.S. Pat. No. 4,661,532 to Morin, teaches a hydrophobic foaming polyurethane composition repair composition containing two substrates (one of which contains coal tar) which are mixed at time of application to hard, rigid, foam mass to repair surface defects. U.S. Pat. No. 4,576,987 to Crockatt et al., teaches aqueous water-repellant coatings that are primarily intended for exterior wood surfaces, using a large proportion of paraffin wax for sealing and finely divided silica to hold the particles in stable suspension. U.S. Pat. No. 4,390,678 to LaBelle et al., teaches a one package heat curable polyurethane composition useful for adhesive bonding of similar and dissimilar materials, an injection molding compound and for sheet molding repair of fiberglass.
  • Product literature for TK-9030, manufactured by: TK Products. Division of Sierra Corporation Crack Repair teaches a low viscosity urethane/polyurea hybrid. For use as a low viscosity sealant for deep crack repair of bridge decks and concrete slabs. Product literature for FASTENAL® GEOCEL®, manufactured by GEOCEL Corp., teaches a polyurethane roof tile adhesive/sealant used as a one part roof tile adhesive sealant used in the application of roof tile, valley tile, wall tile or broken tile.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a method for repairing a shingle roof comprising the steps of providing a base aqueous medium selected from the group consisting of urethane, polyurethane, wax particulates dispersed in water, and butyl ether, and mixtures thereof; providing additives selected from the group consisting of sand, silica, polymer particles, plastic fibers, and fiberglass fibers, and mixtures thereof, applying the aqueous medium to a shingle roof, forming a first layer, applying the additives to the first layer, and drying the layers. The coating composition can also include suspended color pigment in solution.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention generally relates to a composition and method of use for repairing asphalt shingles in residential roofs. Specifically, it is a coating composition consisting of a base aqueous medium of 1) urethane 2) polyurethane and/or 3) wax composition dispersed in water. It can further include alkyd polymer, butyl ethers, (butoxyethanol, specifically 2-butoxyethanol), and paraffin wax. This invention includes a method of protecting the surface of a substrate, comprising: (1) applying to the surface a thin coating of a non-toxic, water-based, colloidal coating composition, and (2) drying the coating to evaporate the water, so that a tough, durable film is formed on the surface which is bonded firmly to said surface. Silica (sand) may be added to the aqueous medium to enhance the sealing of small cracks. Flat shredded plastic particulates or light aggregates may be added to the material surface between applications of chemical media to aid in the sealing of larger cracks. The sand and other additives will be discussed in greater detail below, following the discussion of the chemical components (polyurethane, wax, etc.). The aqueous medium dries rapidly to form a durable film.
  • The present invention achieves long term repairs, with minimal cosmetic impact. It attempts to increase the life of mature residential roofs, saving natural resources used in the manufacture of new shingled roofs. Current residential roofs, using shingles, require material and time-intensive process(es) to repair shingles. The present invention attempts to repair damage ranging between minor to more severe shingle damage using non-invasive repair techniques, with reduced repair time and without shingle replacement. This repair mechanism is to be applied to a large area in a short period of time. Further, roof repair personnel, preferably, should not need to be on the roof to facilitate repair. This enhances personnel safety and reduces the possibility of further cracking and other physical damage to shingles, and/or avoids damage to previously undamaged shingles.
  • The chemical media of the invention serve as a transport mechanism for wax particles or urethane to the shingle surfaces and cracks. They may soften older, brittle shingles, allowing better adhesion of paraffin wax particulates or urethane. Application can be accomplished via paint sprayer, paint roller, paint brush, sponge, or pouring. Roof repair personnel do not need to be on the roof to facilitate repair.
  • Color/pigmentation can be added to help blend the color of the repair media to the existing roof shingles. This can also be used to differentiate the color of the repaired area versus surrounding shingles to prevent workers/contractors from traversing on the repaired area.
  • Particulate sand is added to the aqueous medium prior to application to enhance the sealing of small cracks. Flat shredded plastic particulates or light aggregates are manually applied to the material surface between applications of chemical media to aid in the sealing of larger cracks.
  • With respect to the coating, this invention uses water as the carrying agent or medium for the film forming material, and thereby avoids the problems associated with hydrocarbon based coatings. Moreover, a resin, or mixture of resins, is used as the film forming material which has the proper flexibility and abrasion resistance for the application preferably without the need for inclusion of plasticizers into the coating. For example, a coating applied to asphalt shingles in snowy areas must be more durable and tougher than one applied to a roof in a warmer climate, but plasticizers can be used to improve durability. Flexibility and abrasion resistance are inversely related, such that an increase in flexibility results in a decrease in abrasion resistance, and vice versa Roofing shingles can be bent to conform to shapes. Like materials in general, bending of the shingles past their ‘elastic limit’ can result in fine cracks in the shingles, affecting their waterproofing and abrasion properties. As used herein, the term “plasticizer” means an additive that makes a coating or material more plastic or moldable; it can impregnate or coat something, usually to make it waterproof. Moldability softens the parent material, thereby affecting durability. The primary goal of this invention is not to soften, or make the base shingle more moldable, but to provide a coating. Plasticizers can also be applied to the surface for waterproofing.
  • The coating composition of the present invention has several features, no single one of which is solely responsible for its desirable attributes. Without limiting the scope of this invention as expressed by the claims which follow, its more prominent features will now be discussed briefly. After considering this discussion, one will understand how the features of this invention provide its advantages, which include high impact and abrasion resistance, excellent elongation and flexibility, outstanding stain and chemical resistance, early film integrity, fast dry-to-handle properties, air drying, outstanding toughness, excellent adhesion to heat- and solvent-sensitive substrates, compatible with anionic pigments and dispersing agents, water thinnable, suitable for white and light pastel shades, usable as primer and topcoat, stable to repeated freeze/thaw cycles, low solvent content, non-flammable, water clean-up, creates a high heat resistance barrier, high gloss, if desired, and is non-toxic and safe to use.
  • After evaporation of the water carrying agent, the polyurethane and wax combine to form a tough film bonded to the surface of the substrate to which the coating composition is applied. The coating, in some instances, is absorbed by asphalt substrates, and this tends to improve the bond between the film and the substrate.
  • The composition may be clear or pigmented, that is, transparent, translucent or opaque. A major portion of solids present in the composition are polyurethane and a minor portion of solids present in the composition are wax. It is believed that the polyurethane and wax interact synergistically to provide a barrier for a substrate which unexpectedly has a high heat and abrasion resistance. The film formed on, for example, asphalt shingles, creates a high heat resistant barrier. The film without flattening agents has a high gloss. This combination of polyurethane, wax and other additives and processes are mainly responsible for the desirable attributes of this invention.
  • The composition is applied as a coating to the surface of a substrate, and dries rapidly in air at ambient temperatures of about 40° F.-90° F., and 50% or less relative humidity. High relative humidity will increase the drying time of the material, increasing the time span between applications of different coats of material. As this is a liquid based medium, it must have adequate time to permeate the shingle substrate, filling any cracks in the surface, to form a tough, durable film that is bonded firmly to the surface. High temperatures will cause the liquid barrier to evaporate faster, reducing the permeation of the shingle substrate. In cold temperatures or high humidity conditions, hot air may be used to speed the rate of drying. This can be accomplished using any means known in the art, including but not limited to, heat guns, hair dryers, and fans, for example. The composition can be self-drying, such that it dries in ambient temperatures and no additional drying means are required. The composition may be used to coat such materials as, for example, asphalt shingles, leather, vinyl polymers, flexible and semi-rigid plastics, rubber, polycarbonate, reaction-injection molding compound, thermoplastic polyurethane, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, wood, aluminum, and galvanized metal. The preferred use is on asphalt shingles.
  • A polyurethane colloid is used as the principal ingredient of the composition of this invention. One of the desirable features of the polyurethane used in this invention is that it forms a flexible film. A characteristic of the polyurethane film is that it has a percent elongation in the range between about 150 and about 700. Although an aromatic polymer may be used, the film tends to yellow or darken over time, and consequently, an aromatic polymer is unsuitable when a clear, transparent film is desired. The particles of polyurethane vary widely in size, but the major portion range between about 200 and about 800 microns.
  • Other ingredients may include co-solvents, flattening agents, rheology control compounds, mar resistant additives such as a silicone polymer or a fluorocarbon polymer, acrylic resins, and dyes or pigments. The co-solvents extend drying times, which may be desirable in some applications, and improve substrate wetting.
  • Since the film will be exposed for prolonged periods of time to sunlight, it will be desirable to blend with the composition ultraviolet light stabilizers. However, the composition can be formulated to be essentially free of ultraviolet light stabilizers as separate additives.
  • As noted above, this invention includes additional additives to aid in the repair of damaged shingles. Introduction of particulate sand into a homogenous solution of the chemical medium aids in sealing cracks in worn shingles. The sand consists of clean, hard, uncoated grains, free from organic matter, alkali, and vegetable matter. The present invention functions to repair small to medium size cracks, which commercially available aqueous media did not effectively seal or repair. Additional particulate material was needed, which in the homogenous state, aided in sealing small to medium cracks. Sand is used due to its abundance in nature, variable particulate size and minimal environmental impact. When a spray gun is used to apply the product, the maximum particulate size is regulated by the nozzle opening size of spray gun. The particulate size should pass through a #30 sieve (0.0154 inch wire diameter) or smaller. The amount of sand added to mixture should be 0 to 10% of mixture volume. Mixture volume can be increased, but due to the resultant thicker consistency of the medium, use of spray equipment may not be possible. When the medium is applied using a brush, paint brush or sponge, larger particulate sizes can be used. This particulate size can pass through a sieve size 100 (0.0043 wire diameter) or larger wire diameter. The sand can be added to aqueous medium at the time of manufacture of the medium, or added to the medium at job site prior to application(s).
  • In addition to sand, introduction of a layer of lightweight aggregates, flat shredded plastic particulates, added between applications of coating composition aids in the sealing of cracks in worn shingles. This is used to repair larger cracks since the flat plastic particulates close larger cracks. The chemical medium cements the plastic particulates in position.
  • These lightweight aggregates should be clean, hard, uncoated grains, free from organic matter, alkali, and vegetable matter. They should pass through a sieve size 4 (0.060 inches) up to ⅛″ in size. They can be introduced as a thin layer between applications of coating composition to aid in the sealing of larger holes and cracks in worn shingles. Larger plastic additives can be used. These would be roughly thumbnail sized, clear or colored, made from thin gauge plastic sheets. This could involve recycling existing plastic sheets, or virgin material.
  • When applying a second, or multiple coats, the prior coat must be allowed to partially dry until it is tacky to the touch. If the coat completely dries, that is, dries until it is dry/smooth to the touch, with no tackiness, subsequent layers will have difficulty bonding to the earlier layer(s), or not bond at all.
  • Use of commercially available asphalt-saturated fiberglass mesh can also be applied between the applications of coating compositions. This will provide a uniform matrix for silica and light aggregates to adhere. Use of color additives to second coating of composition may reduce color variations with surrounding unrepaired shingles. Use of mesh will have texture differentiations between repaired and surrounding shingles. An example of commercially available asphalt-saturated fiberglass mesh is HENRY® 181—black asphalt saturated glass fabric, manufactured by Henry Company. 2911 Slauson Ave. Huntington Park, Calif. 90255.
  • As noted above, color pigmentation can be added to the invention. This can be done by the medium supplier at time of purchase to approximate pigmentation of surrounding shingles or to differentiate pigmentation of repair area versus surrounding area. Alternatively, liquid pigment can be added to base aqueous medium at the job site. Composition of pigment to medium can be established to match the color of existing shingles, or colored to contrast or differentiate repair area versus surrounding area. This can blend the color of the repair media to the existing roof shingles to help ‘mask’ the repair, or differentiate the color of the repaired area versus surrounding shingles to prevent workers/contractors from traversing on the repaired area. An example of commercially available color pigment is QUIKRETE® liquid cement color, in red/charcoal.
  • Precautions must be used in application of chemical media to prevent environmental damage. Run-off and overspray of the chemical medium must be controlled.
  • Current commercially available roof repair media have a viscosity level that can make application difficult. Flow is difficult due to the high to medium viscosities of the repair media. Such repair media with high viscosity must be applied by trowel. The installer must be directly on roof to apply. Lower viscosity repair media can be poured directly onto the roofing surface. Using such a pouring method is only recommended for flat roof repairs and not recommended for roof surfaces with a pitch. Personnel must be in close proximity to repair area to apply the medium. Chemical media of the present invention uses media having a range of viscosities, which permit application of repair composition via paint sprayer, paint roller, paint brush, brushes, and/or sponge. Examples of viscosities: High viscosity—material is thick, mud-like; application is by trowel and brush. Medium viscosity: material is thick, but can be poured, but is still too thick to be sprayed. Thick and medium viscosity repair media require longer cure times after application due to the density of the media. By using commercially available extension rods, range of application can be increased so it may not be necessary for personnel to be on the roof for application.
  • With proper repair process, roofing repair described in the present invention will not have adverse environmental consequences. The repair mechanism identified herein will not seal direct openings between roofing shingles through roof underlayment, for example, if branch falls through roof.
  • The following examples provide a further understanding of the compositions of the inventions and include a best mode. As used herein, “Light” duty repair comprises repairs to pinholes 0.0″ to 1/32″; cracks up to 1/32″ wide and less than or equal to ½″ long. “Moderate” duty repair comprises repairs to pinholes greater than 1/32″ diameter and less than or equal to 1/16″ diameter; cracks greater than 1/32″ wide and less than or equal to 1/16″ wide and less than or equal to ½″ long.
  • Example I Light Roofing Repair Needed
  • Select urethane or water based paraffin medium. Color pigmentation medium can be added to medium by supplier. Mix color to either match existing surrounding shingles to ‘mask’ the repair area or add color to ‘differentiate’ repair area (for example ‘red’). To visually alert the homeowner or contractors of the repair area.
  • Clean roofing surface to remove any dirt, grime. Apply absorbent material (cloth, paper) in gutters under repair area to absorb any overflow or overspray of aqueous medium. Discard used materials using same process as directed by manufacturer.
  • Add sand to mixture. 0% to 10% of mixture volume. If mixture is to be sprayed, in order to prevent clogging, ensure that sand particulate size is less than orifice size of spray mechanism and decrease volume of sand to mixture. Larger sand particulate size and mixture percentage (up to 10%) can be used if mixture is to be brushed, rolled or sponged onto surface. Increasing the ratio of sand to the base media beyond this limit can reduce the adhesive properties of the resins and/or paraffin to the roofing surface.
  • If color pigmentation has not been added to medium, add liquid pigmentation per instructions above. Follow color pigmentation manufacturers instructions.
  • Weather: Preferred temperature range 50° F. through 90° F. Relative humidity up to 50%. Do not apply if lower than 40° F., or if rain is expected within 24 hours. Apply medium liberally. Spray mechanism can be used, watching overspray. Commercially available extensions can be used with paint brush, roller, brush, sponge to increase range of application. So it may not be necessary to be on roof to apply medium.
  • Testing has shown that best results are obtained if a second coating is used and applied within two hours. After the second coating is applied and while this coat is still moist, a light coating of silica sand or light aggregate can be applied. This will impart roughness to the surface of the repaired shingles, in contrast to the smoother surface texture provided by the urethane and/or polyurethane coat(s). This surface roughness will slow the rate of water run-off from the roof to the gutters, more closely approximating the run-off rate of surrounding shingles.
  • Example II Moderate Roofing Repair Needed
  • In addition to all steps identified in example I above, the following steps are added:
  • After application of the first coating of the medium, add a layer of flat shredded plastic particulates, to aide in the sealing of cracks in worn shingles. Thumbnail sized plastic particulates can be clear or have color pigment. Plastic particulates can lay on the surface of the medium or can be pressed into the medium with a brush or roller. Flat plastic particulates close larger cracks. Chemical medium cements the plastic particulates in position. Apply second coating (or more—a plurality of coatings) of chemical medium. Apply a coating of silica sand or light aggregate
  • Example III Moderate Roofing Repair Needed
  • In addition to all steps identified in example I above, the following steps are added:
  • After application of the first coating of the medium, add a layer of lightweight aggregates, to aide in the sealing of cracks in worn shingles. Lightweight aggregates close larger cracks. Chemical medium cements the aggregates in position. Apply second coating of chemical medium. Apply a coating of silica sand or light aggregate
  • Example IV Moderate to Severe Roofing Repair Needed
  • In addition to all steps identified in example I above, the following steps are added:
  • After application of the first coating of the medium, add a layer of asphalt-saturated fiberglass mesh. This will provide a uniform matrix for silica and light aggregates to adhere. Apply a layer of lightweight aggregates as identified in example III. Apply second coating of chemical medium. Apply a coating of silica sand or light aggregate
  • Example of commercially available medium: SHERWIN WILLIAMS®, DECKSCAPES®. Exterior deck stain. Advanced waterborne formula. Clear sealer. 6403-59287. The Sherwin Williams Company. Cleveland, Ohio 44115
  • Example of commercially available medium: BEHR®, Water Proofing Wood Protector. Natural. No. 300. BEHR Process Corporation. Santa Anna, Calif. 92704. www.behr.com.
  • Example of commercially available medium: HELMSMAN®, MINWAX®. Indoor/outdoor spar urethane. Water based. Clear gloss. MINMAX Company. Upper Saddle River, N.J. 07458.
  • This invention also includes the product coated with the composition of this invention. Such product comprises a substrate having a surface covered by a solid, thin barrier which adheres firmly to the surface and is formed upon evaporation of water after the application of a non-toxic, water-based, colloidal coating composition including a thermoplastic, elastomeric polyurethane and wax dispersible in water. The film has a thickness ranging between about 5 and about 100 microns.
  • Although the invention has been described in detail with reference to particular examples and embodiments, the examples and embodiments contained herein are merely illustrative and are not an exhaustive list. Variations and modifications of the present invention will readily occur to those skilled in the art. The present invention includes all such modifications and equivalents. The claims alone are intended to set forth the limits of the present invention.

Claims (8)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A method for repairing a shingle roof comprising the steps of:
    providing a base aqueous medium selected from the group consisting of urethane, polyurethane, wax particulates dispersed in water, and butyl ether, and mixtures thereof;
    providing additives selected from the group consisting of sand, silica, polymer particles, plastic fibers, and fiberglass fibers, and mixtures thereof,
    applying said aqueous medium to a shingle roof, forming a first layer,
    applying said additives to said first layer, and
    drying said layers.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1 further comprising applying additional said aqueous medium, forming a plurality of layers and applying additional said additives to said plurality of layers.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1 wherein said wax particulates are paraffin wax.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1 wherein said butyl ether is 2-butoxyethanol.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1 wherein said additives comprise sand in amount 0-10% by volume of the aqueous medium.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1 wherein the aqueous medium is applied using a means selected from sprayed on, rolled on, brushed on, sponged on, poured on, and combinations thereof.
  7. 7. The method of claim 1 wherein drying said layers is done using a means selected from fan, hair dryer, heat gun, and self-drying, and combinations thereof.
  8. 8. A shingle comprising
    a substrate having a surface covered by a solid, thin barrier that adheres firmly to the surface and is formed upon evaporation of water after the application of a non-toxic, water-based, colloidal coating composition including a thermoplastic, elastomeric polyurethane and wax dispersible in water,
    wherein said film has a thickness ranging between about 5 and about 100 microns.
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US20080115444A1 (en) * 2006-09-01 2008-05-22 Kalkanoglu Husnu M Roofing shingles with enhanced granule adhesion and method for producing same

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150059283A1 (en) * 2013-09-05 2015-03-05 Garrick David Brown Method of roof repair

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