US20140236329A1 - Method for calculating momentum - Google Patents

Method for calculating momentum Download PDF

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US20140236329A1
US20140236329A1 US14/181,669 US201414181669A US2014236329A1 US 20140236329 A1 US20140236329 A1 US 20140236329A1 US 201414181669 A US201414181669 A US 201414181669A US 2014236329 A1 US2014236329 A1 US 2014236329A1
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game
momentum
method
points
worth
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Frank DiSomma
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Frank DiSomma
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/06Indicating or scoring devices for games or players, or for other sports activities
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q10/00Administration; Management
    • G06Q10/06Resources, workflows, human or project management, e.g. organising, planning, scheduling or allocating time, human or machine resources; Enterprise planning; Organisational models
    • G06Q10/063Operations research or analysis
    • G06Q10/0639Performance analysis

Abstract

A method of calculating Momentum, using multiple variables. A method of calculating an individual's, event's, sports event's, game's, club's, leagues, group's, organization's, or team's Momentum, using multiple variables. This invention can be used in various sports, activities, performances, or events to calculate a particular individual's, group's, and/or team's Momentum and measure it against the opposing individual's, group's, and/or team's Momentum in real time at any moment during, prior (can be up until the start of the game) or post the event.

Description

    CLAIM UNDER 35 U.S.C. 119(e)
  • This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) of any U.S. Provisional Utility Application No. 61/765,732, having a filing date of Feb. 17, 2013.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to the use of a method for calculating, tracking, and displaying Momentum, as defined below in the “DEFINITIONS” section, and relates to a method of calculating Momentum, using multiple variables. This invention relates to a method and/or system, which can be used in various sports and/or other events to calculate a particular team's Momentum, and/or an individual's, individual players in a game, or even any type of group's Momentum and measure it against the opposing team's and/or an individual's, or even any type of group's Momentum in real time at any moment during the event. The use of a method for calculating Momentum, the methods of calculating Momentum, the resulting Momentum which is calculated and the comparison of one (1) entity's Momentum to one (1) or more others' can be educational, newsworthy, entertaining, etc.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Various methods of calculating and analyzing the statistics of an event, such as a professional sports game are well known in the art. For example, there is a method and system for detecting certain events occurring and analyzing such events' occurrence to predict the probability of future events occurring, and there is a system for collecting the performance metrics and data of individual players in a game. Such data can be used by the team to make future plays or game plans for their team. Additionally, there is a system and method for automatically updating sports tracking data into meaningful sports statistics and performance measurements.
  • The above prior art all disclose a specific system or formula that must be used to execute the method and do not disclose flexible variables, Point Values, as defined below in the “DEFINITIONS” section, or events (i.e., “Drivers” as defined below in the “DEFINITIONS” section) that the user of the method can select or input into the calculation. In addition, much of the prior art requires that players in the team wear special gear in order to capture and calculate their player metrics, and to collect data or information required to perform the method or formula. The present invention does not require special equipment, special gear, or a special device to execute the present invention, method, and/or formula. The present invention is more accessible to a wide range of users.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention creates more enjoyment and excitement for the user and/or spectator(s) while watching and/or following a sports game(s) or other event(s). In one (1) embodiment, the present invention is a method which allows user(s) and/or spectators to look at real time statistics and data to calculate Momentum changes in real time, as every game, event or play occurs, or prior to or following such occurrence, based on the use pre-derived formulas during the course of a game and including user input. The present invention can be used as a Momentum Meter, Momentum Scale, and/or Momentum Calculator as defined below in the “DEFINITIONS” section. By way of non-limiting example, the calculations can be done on at least one computer, or other smart device, mobile device, calculating device, remote or cloud or web based or virtual system or device, by running software, in part or whole, that executes the method. The invention generally relates to the use of a method for calculating Momentum, methods of calculating Momentum, the resulting Momentum which is calculated and the comparison of one (1) entity's Momentum to one (1) or more others' Momentum, which can be educational, newsworthy, entertaining, etc.
  • Drivers are certain plays or events in the game or event that are used in a pre-derived formula to calculate the Momentum of each team or participant. The Drivers are also given a set of Point Values, as defined in the “DEFINITIONS” section, which are multiplied by at least one set of Multipliers, as defined in the “DEFINITIONS” section, to calculate Momentum. Drivers and their respective Values, as defined in the “DEFINITIONS” section, as well as the Multiplier(s) can all selected or determined and set by the user. The present invention allows the user to input already streaming data from existing source(s) into at least one formula and/or input the data themselves manually, in whole or in part. The formula can update each teams' Momentum automatically as the formula receives such data, and as the data is continuously updated.
  • The Momentum of each team or participant can be graphed on a timeline, or other type of graph, table, chart, diagram, and/or other representation model, etc., so each team's Momentum at each time point in the game, or a total Momentum at the end of the game or any time within the game, can appear on the graph, chart, diagram, table, or other type of representation, model, or visual and/or sensory tool. The Momentum of each team in a game can be graphed together on at least one (1) graph, chart, diagram, table, or other type of representation, model, or visual and/or sensory tool and compared. The Momentum of each team can be used for various purposes, including, but not limited to, determining the probability of a team winning, using another factor besides scores to determine which team was superior in a game, ranking of teams, and a hobby for sports fans. This method can be used and applied to a variety of sports, such as, but not limited to basketball, hockey, golf, tennis, baseball, soccer, boxing, mixed martial arts, racing, horse racing, bowling, sports includes in the Olympics, and football, whether professional or not, and whether fantasy or not.
  • This invention relates to a method and/or system, which can be used in various sports and/or other events to calculate a particular team's Momentum, and/or an individual's, or individual players in a game, or even any type of group's Momentum and measure it against the opposing team's and/or an individual's, or even any type of group's Momentum in real time or not and at any moment(s) during the event(s). The event, live performance, competition, game, program, sports event, presentation, etc. that the user(s) is pursuing obtaining Momentum information from or for can be any of a wide variety of events such as for example musical performances, plays, sports events, contests, competitions, singing contests, comedy contests, films, television programming, etc. The events can be in series, a grouping, single events, event(s) between individual(s), and/or team(s) or other group(s).
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows an example of a set of Drivers in a baseball game with the respective value of each Driver;
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B show an example of the input of Drivers into computer software that occurred during a baseball game and their respective Point Values and a team's Momentum for the 1st inning, in FIG. 2A, and for the 9th inning in FIG. 2B;
  • FIG. 3 shows a final Momentum of an away team and a home team in a baseball game;
  • FIG. 4 shows a graph of a team's Momentum at the end of each inning in a baseball game;
  • FIG. 5 shows a home team's Momentum versus an away team's Momentum charted against the time passed in a football game in a combined graph;
  • FIG. 6 shows professional football teams' full names and examples of abbreviations for their name;
  • FIG. 7 shows an example of Drivers, Multipliers, Momentums of an away team and home team, and scores of a game;
  • FIGS. 8A-8Q shows a play-by-play of a Football Momentum Meter AFC Championship;
  • FIGS. 9A-9B show a play-by-play of a Baseball Momentum Meter;
  • FIG. 10A-10F show another example of a Football Momentum Meter from a Thanksgiving Day game;
  • FIG. 11 shows an example of another embodiment of a Momentum Meter;
  • FIG. 12 shows an example of how the embodiment of the type of Momentum Meter shown in FIG. 11 can be included while watching a sports game;
  • FIG. 13 shows an example of a Momentum Meter for a complete baseball game;
  • FIG. 14 shows an example of a Momentum Meter for a complete football game;
  • FIG. 15 shows an example of yet another Momentum Meter;
  • FIGS. 15A-15B show another example of a Momentum Meter;
  • FIG. 16 shows an example of the Momentum Meter of FIG. 15 for an away team and for a home team;
  • FIG. 17 shows an example of the Momentum Meter of FIG. 15 for an away team and for a home team;
  • FIG. 18 shows an example of another Momentum Meter;
  • FIG. 19 shows an example of another Momentum Meter; and
  • FIG. 20 shows another example of how the embodiment of the type of Momentum Meter shown in FIG. 11 can be included while watching a sports game.
  • Not shown in the figures are the steps of automatically inputting already streaming data from existing sources described further below.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS AND INVENTION
  • In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment, reference is made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which it is shown, by way of illustration, a specific embodiment in which the invention may be practiced. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • In the following detailed description of various embodiments of the invention, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of various aspects of one (1) or more embodiments of the invention. However, one (1) or more embodiments of the invention may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known methods, procedures, and/or components have not been described in detail so as not to unnecessarily obscure aspects of embodiments of the invention.
  • In the method at least one pre-derived formula can be used to calculate Momentum and its change for a team or other type of individual(s) or group(s) in a sports game or other event(s) using real time or other data. The method can utilize already streaming data from existing sources and/or manually input data or both in calculating Momentum. Examples of the factors used in the method are Drivers, Point Values, and Multipliers. The invention can be used in calculating the Momentum and its changes for opposing teams in a variety of sports, including, but not limited to, tennis, golf, basketball, baseball, football, hockey, soccer, etc. Two (2) of the embodiments of this invention are shown being used to calculate the Momentum of opposing teams in football, and baseball games. In no way should this language be interpreted as an express limitation for this invention to be limited in its use. This invention is meant to be used and enabled to be applied to a variety of sports and/or events, further comprising, but not limited to, basketball, golf, soccer, tennis, lacrosse, etc.
  • It is beneficial to know the Momentum during a game and/or event, since the score of a game and/or event doesn't always tells the entire story of the matchup between the teams. The winning team may be playing poorly and the losing team might actually have more Momentum at a particular time. Showing or describing the Momentum not only increases appeal to viewers or listeners by adding visual and/or quantifiable appeal to a broadcast, but it also tells the story of where you are at a point in a game.
  • The present invention includes the use of one (1) or more formulas to quantify the Momentum which can be felt by those involved in competition or at the venue of the competitive event. Using formulas provides consistency for comparing various games within the same sport or competition, removes bias within competition, maintains consistency within a specific game or competition, and reduces costs with minimal man-power.
  • The Momentum Meter of the invention can be changed to any kind of chart or other type of representation and for use with or in almost any kind of competition, event or measurement.
  • FIG. 1 shows an example of a set of symbols representing Drivers 1 and shows an example of corresponding Point Values 2 in a baseball game. Following are the definitions of the symbols included in FIG. 1, and a description of whether a symbols is utilized for an offensive play or a defensive play:
  • Off/Def Symbol Symbol Definition DEF K Strikeout DEF 123 one-two-three inning DEF LOB Runner left on base DEF LOB2 Two left on base DEF LOB3 Bases left loaded DEF FO Foul out DEF I Injury DEF DP Double play DEF C Great catch OFF H Hit OFF BB Walk OFF PB Past ball OFF HR Homerun OFF GL_RBI Game leading RBI OFF RBI RBI OFF E Error OFF SB Stolen base OFF 2B Double OFF GT_RBI Game-tieing RBI OFF 2RBI Two RBIs OFF 3RBI Three RBIs OFF 4RBI Four RBIs OFF WP Wild pitch OFF 3B Triple
  • Drivers are plays or events that occur in a sports game or other event that are factors that the invention can use to determine an impact of the Momentum of an individual and/or team. For example, if a user determines a double play is a Driver, the Momentum of the pitching team, which made the double play, would increase a certain amount and the Momentum of the batting team would decrease. If a player strikes out, then the batting team's Momentum would decrease and the pitching team's Momentum would increase. Each Driver 1 has a respective Point Value 2, which can be set by the user. In the example shown in FIG. 1, the user has set the Point Value for a homerun (HR) at “8” and a run batted in (RBI) at “5”, so getting a homerun would increase the Momentum of the batting team more than a run batted in.
  • FIGS. 2A-2B show an example of the input of Drivers 3 that occurred during a baseball game, and their respective Point Values 4 based on real time streaming data, into computer software. For example, if the away team gets a homerun at the top of the ninth inning, that information will automatically be transported from the real time streaming data, and the destined numeric value for the Driver 4 would automatically be generated. Each Driver's numeric value can then be used to calculate the team's Momentum 5 for the inning, as shown in FIG. 3. FIGS. 2A and 2B are examples of different matchups between two (2) teams. FIG. 2A shows the data for the first inning played and varying percentages of Momentum for the top and the bottom of the first inning for each team. FIG. 2B shows data for the ninth inning
  • FIG. 3 shows the final Momentum of an away team 5 and a home team 6 in a baseball game. The final Momentum of each team is calculated based on the sum of the team's Momentums after each inning. The final Momentum could be the sum with a higher value weighing on the current inning because Momentum can be a snapshot of a current moment. The higher a team's Momentum is, the better the team performed, or is performing, relative to the opposing team.
  • FIG. 4 shows an example of a computer software-generated graph of a team's Momentum at the end of each inning in a baseball game. The user can see the change in a team's Momentum after every inning Momentum changes can help users predict whether a team would win or allow the user to perceive the game in a different way and base their predictions on which team would win in areas other than scores. The Momentum changes can also show a team's progression throughout a game, play-by-play. For example, if a baseball team manages to get to third base every inning, but does not score throughout a game, that team's Momentum would be higher than a team, which only manages to get to second base throughout a game, even though both teams' scores are zero.
  • FIG. 5 shows an example of a combined graph of a home team's Momentum 7 versus an away team's Momentum 8 charted against the time elapsed in a football game. In FIG. 5, the home team's Momentum was significantly lower than the away team's Momentum in the first half, and the home team took the lead in the second half in both Momentum and score. The graph makes comparison of two (2) competing teams' Momentums easy.
  • FIG. 6 shows professional football teams' full names 9 and examples of abbreviations for their names 10. By providing the abbreviations of teams' names, computer software can readily identify the designated Drivers from already streaming data from outside sources and import the information to be used in the present invention for a calculation of Momentum. For example, an outside source may abbreviate Tampa Bay Buccaneers as “TB,” and if this is made known to the computer software, every time a driver occurs, which is favorable or damaging to the Tampa Bay's Momentum, such information is imported into the software and used in the calculation of Tampa Bay's Momentum.
  • FIG. 7 shows an example of Drivers 11 with corresponding Point Values 11A, Multipliers 12, final Momentums of an away team 13 and home team 14, and scores of the game 15 in a football game. Examples of Drivers 11 in FIG. 7 include, offensive plays, including (i) yards gained per play: 10, 15, 20, and/or 30 yards; (ii) getting a First Down Conversion; (iii) getting a Third Down Conversion; (iv) getting a Fourth Down Conversion; (v) starting field position and any penalties by either the offense or defense, which translates into more Momentum to the non-penalized side; (vi) defensive plays, including tackle for loss, sack, fumble, interception, turnovers on downs, blocked or missed kicks, and/or punts; (vii) missed field goals at goal line, ten (10) yard line, twenty (20) yard line, thirty (30) yard line and/or forty (40) yard line; and (viii) scoring plays, including touchdowns, field goals, extra points, safety, and/or two (2) point conversions. The method can use one (1) or more of these Drivers 11 and/or different and/or additional types of Drivers 11.
  • The Drivers (11) for a football game can vary from user to user. For example, the user in FIG. 7 designated different Drivers for the defense and offense. Here, the Momentum of a team is decreased if a penalty is found against the team. However, in practice, a user can designate any type or amount of Drivers desired, so the Drivers can vary from user to user.
  • The Multipliers 12 can also be varied from user to user. For example, in FIG. 7, a few of the Multipliers are based on how many minutes are left in the game, whether the team is winning, field position of the ball when the Driver occurred, and whether the team is the home team. Examples of several Multipliers 12 are shown in FIG. 7, including end-game Multiplier, drive Multiplier, score Multiplier, lead Multiplier, field position Multiplier and home team Multiplier. The method can use any one (1) or more of these Multipliers 12 and/or different and/or additional types of Multipliers 12, since the Multipliers 12 can be varied by the user. Also shown in FIG. 7 are the final Momentums of an away team 13 and home team 14. In this example, the final Momentums can be subject to a fourth quarter adjustment 17 to account for the spread.
  • FIGS. 8A through 8Q are an example of a play-by-play for a football game where FIG. 8B is a vertical continuation of FIG. 8A, and FIG. 8C is a vertical continuation of FIG. 8B, and so on.
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B are an example of a play-by-play for a baseball game where FIG. 9B is a vertical continuation of FIG. 9B.
  • FIGS. 10A through 10F are an example of a Football Momentum Meter for a Superbowl Championship FIG. 10B is a vertical continuation of FIG. 10A, and FIG. 10C is a vertical continuation of FIG. 10B, and so on. FIGS. 10A through 10F show the Momentum in a play-by-play manner. FIG. 10A details examples of Momentum Points 19, Full-Game Momentum 21 and Live Momentum 23 for each team, here the Green Bay Packers (GB) and the Detroit Lions (DET). FIG. 10A also includes an example of a Momentum Key 27 showing the shadings used to indicate Full Momentum, Moderate Momentum, Slight Momentum, and a Momentum Changing Play.
  • FIG. 11 shows an example of a Momentum Meter. This example shows a Momentum Meter 150 for a game between the Green Bay Packers, indicated by symbol 153, and the Detroit Lions, indicated by symbol 155. Various plays can be selected using back a play key 157 or forward a play key 159. The play chosen is then displayed in display section 163. A representation of the Momentum for the selected play can be shown by the placement of arrow 167. In FIG. 11, an arrow 167 is shown in the middle between the two (2) teams' symbols 153, 157. This placement of arrow 167 would show that each team has a Momentum of fifty percent (50%). When a play is selected and the factors are determined to be in one (1) team's gain of Momentum and/or one (1) team's loss of Momentum, the arrow will point to either teams symbols 153 or 157 to indicate a net Momentum gain for that team. The more the arrow goes to one (1) side, the higher the Momentum for that team. For example, the placement of arrow 167 at the point of dashed line 169 would indicate a net Momentum of approximately seventy five percent (75%) in favor of the Detroit Lions, indicated by symbol 155. The semi-circle shaped meter indicator 171 of Momentum Meter 150 can include markings, number, etc. to indicate a number and/or percentage value of Momentum.
  • FIG. 12 shows an example of how the embodiment of the type of Momentum Meter shown in FIG. 11 can be included while watching a sports game to illustrate a measurement of Momentum before, during and/or after the game.
  • Momentum charts like those in FIGS. 13 and 14 can be used by commentators to show trends throughout a game or for post-game analysis. Momentum values, charts, graphs, etc. can be useful for pre-game too. The Momentum relating to teams or two (2) sides prior to the game or event can also be provided by the present invention and can be used, for example, by sponsors (e.g., Modells® Momentum Miter).
  • FIG. 15 shows an example of another Momentum Meter, which is further illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17.
  • FIGS. 15A and 15B show examples of yet another Momentum Meter. FIG. 15B is a horizontal continuation of FIG. 15A. FIG. 15 B includes sample formulas that yield the snap shot Momentum values in the set of snap shot columns AT and AU. Columns AP and AQ in FIG. 15B can also used to calculate the total points that drive the Momentum. FIG. 15A includes examples of end-game Multipliers 29, drive Multipliers 31, position Multipliers 33. The total Points Value 39 for each team is also shown in FIG. 15A. FIG. 15 B includes examples of spread Multipliers 35, and lead Multipliers 37.
  • FIG. 16 shows an example of the Momentum Meter of FIG. 15 for an away team and for a home team.
  • FIG. 17 shows an example of the Momentum Meter of FIG. 15 for an away team and for a home team.
  • FIG. 18 shows an example of another Momentum Meter.
  • FIG. 19 shows an example of another Momentum Meter.
  • FIG. 20 shows another example of how the embodiment of the type of Momentum Meter shown in FIG. 11 can be included while watching a sports game.
  • One (1) purpose of the present invention is to provide people with a different way of looking at and analyzing a sports game. The present invention provides a story to the game and recaps the game better than a mere scoring summary. If a person was unable to see a game, the present invention could provide a more detailed set of information regarding the game than a scoring summary would. While scores give the ultimate outcome of the game, the changes in Momentum throughout the game give a clearer picture of what really happened in and during the game. As stated above, scores, by themselves, are limited in their capacity in determining which team played better in a game when the scores are very similar or tied. Scores do not describe the full essence of a game. For example, a baseball game may result in a tie score, but a mere scoring summary would not indicate that the losing team had more hits than the winning team. In such an example, the losing team's Momentum would be higher than the winning team's, indicating that the losing team played a better game even though they had the lesser score at the end of the game. A person could not tell this based on the score alone, but would be able to determine which team played a better game from looking at the Momentum of the time and/or changes in Momentum over time. In addition, Momentums can track a game more completely than the final scores, because they can be used to determine where a losing team started taking a lead and outperforming the winning team.
  • The factors, Point Values and Multipliers, could be personalized to the each user's preferences. Users of the present invention can determine the Drivers, Points Values, and Multipliers in each individual game and designate Point Values to each Driver and Multiplier as they see appropriate. One (1) user might think a sack in a football game should be weighed heavily in the calculation of the Momentum and would adjust the Point Value for a sack accordingly, whereas another user might disagree and give a sack a lesser or no Point Value.
  • Examples of factors that can be taken into consideration when considering Momentum in a football game include, but are not limited to, (i) minutes remaining; (ii) length of drive; (iii) spread of the game; (iv) lead change; (v) field position; (vi) home team advantage; (vii) yards gained per play; (viii) new set of downs; (ix) starting field position; (x) penalties; (xi) turnover on downs; (xii) tackle for loss; (xiii) sack; (xiv) interception/fumble; (xv) blocked kicks; (xvi) punts; (xvii) field goal (FG) missed; and (xviii) all scoring plays, among others.
  • Examples of factors that can be taken into consideration when considering Momentum in a baseball game include, but are not limited to, (i) home field advantage; (ii) current inning; (iii) spread of the game; (iv) runners in scoring position; (v) strikeouts; (vi) 1-2-3 innings; (vii) runners left on base; (viii) foul outs; (ix) double plays; (x) 1B; (xi) 2B; (xii) 3B; (xiii) HR; (xiv) RBIs; (xv) errors; (xvi) lead changes; (xvii) stolen bases; (xviii) walks/HBP; (xix) wild pitches; and (xx) outs in inning, among others. For example, these factors can be used in a formula to calculate Momentum for baseball. For example, the formula can be built in Microsoft Excel and updated automatically by streaming play-by-play data.
  • The present invention can be carried out on computer software or via any other electronic means or mechanism, which can be programmed to calculate and chart the changes in Momentum and final Momentum of each team in a sports game. Two (2) competing teams' Momentum can also be charted together in a single graph for comparison purposes. The pre-derived formula can be entered in the software along with Drivers and Multipliers and their respective Point Values. Real time streaming data from outside sources can be imported into the software, and the software can identify the Drivers and what Multipliers are applicable at the time the Drivers occurred. There will be a continuous calculation and update in the Momentum of each team throughout the game. A final Momentum can be calculated at the end of the game and displayed. The final Momentum can be calculated based on the average of a team's Momentum throughout the game.
  • The following are examples of Point Values for a variety of Drivers:
      • K has a Point Value of 2;
      • 123 has a Point Value of 5;
      • LOB has a Point Value of 3;
      • LOB2 has a Point Value of 6;
      • LOB 3 has a Point Value of 8;
      • FO has a Point Value of 1.5
      • I has a Point Value of 7.5;
      • DP has a Point Value of 9;
      • C has a Point Value of 5;
      • H has a Point Value of 4;
      • BB has a Point Value of 2.5;
      • PB has a Point Value of 2.5
      • HR has a Point Value of 8;
      • GL_RBI has a Point Value of 10;
      • RBI has a Point Value of 5;
      • E has a Point Value of 5.5;
      • SB has a Point Value of 3;
      • 2B has a Point Value of 6;
      • GT_RBI has a Point Value of 9;
      • 2RBI has a Point Value of 6;
      • 3RBI has a Point Value of 7;
      • 4RBI has a Point Value of 8;
      • WP has a Point Value of 2.5; and
      • 3B has a Point Value of 7.
  • The invention can include measuring Momentum of teams, games, leagues, whether professional or not, and even individuals in individualized sports like golf, tennis, swimming, and track and field events, among others. The Momentum can be calculated using this invention in many areas other than sports as there are many other areas where someone or something is rated, such politics. The information input and/or received can be of any kind of manual input, historical input, and/or “live input”. The information input and/or received is not limited to “streaming data” because we can get Momentum from things other than just “streaming data.”
  • For example, one (1) working model for football reads play-by-play data live from the Internet and calculates Momentum in Microsoft Excel.
  • Example of a Football Momentum Formula
  • Point Values are given for the following offensive plays:
      • 10-14 yard gain on a play
      • 15-19 yard gain on a play
      • 20-29 yard gain on a play
      • 30+ yard gain on a play
      • 1st down
      • 3rd down conversion
      • 4th down conversion
      • Starting drive on opponents side of field
      • Penalty
      • Field Goal
      • Touchdown
      • Extra Point
      • 2 pt Conversion
      • Misc. (can be used for key injury)
        Point Values are also given for the following defensive plays:
      • Turnover on downs
      • Tackle for loss
      • Sack
      • Interception
      • Fumble
      • Blocked kick
      • Forced punt
      • Missed FG under 10 yards
      • Missed FG 10-19 yards
      • Missed FG 20-29 yards
      • Missed FG 30-39 yards
      • Missed FG 40+ yards
      • Penalty
      • Touchdown
      • Misc. (can be used for key injury)
        The Point Values from the above plays are added and multiplied by neutral factors listed below:
      • Minutes remaining in the game
      • Each consecutive play on a drive
      • Tie game
      • 3 point game
      • 8 point game
      • 16 point game
      • Over 2 TD game
      • Lead change in the game
      • Lead change in 4th quarter
      • Line of scrimmage within 10 yard-line
      • Line of scrimmage 10-19 yard-line
      • Line of scrimmage 20-29 yard-line
      • Line of scrimmage 30-39 yard-line
      • Line of scrimmage between 40 yard-lines
      • Home field advantage
      • Point differential is within 3 points and offense within 35 yard-line (field goal range)
    Example of a Baseball Momentum Formula
  • Point Values are given for the following offensive plays:
      • Walk
      • Single
      • Double
      • Triple
      • Home-Run
      • RBI
      • 2 RBIs
      • 3 RBIs
      • 4 RBIs
      • Error
      • Stolen Base
      • Passed Ball
      • Wild Pitch
      • Misc. (can be used for key injury)
        Point Values are also given for the following defensive plays:
      • Strike-out
      • 123 inning
      • Double-play
      • Triple-play
      • Runner left on base
      • 2 runners left on base
      • 3 runners left on base
      • Caught stealing
      • Misc. (can be used for key injury)
        Point Values from the above plays are added and multiplied by the factors below:
      • Bases Loaded (offense only)
      • Runner on 3B with 1 out or less (defense only)
      • Runner on 2B or 3B with no outs (defense only)
      • Strike-out with runner on 2B or 3B (defense only)
      • Increase in innings
      • Home field advantage
      • Tie Game
      • 1 run game
      • 2 run game
      • 3 run game
      • 4 run game
      • 5 or more runs
      • Lead change
      • Consecutive Momentum plays (ex. Back to back hits, or back to back Ks)
  • The present invention is also directed to a database and method of using the same. For example, after gathering Momentum data for a particular sport a database can be built if the same formula is used for each game of the sport, and can be used for creating new statistics for teams and individuals. Further, a database of Momentum can also be used as at least one (1) factor in predicting the outcome and winners of events.
  • An example of the steps of automatically inputting already streaming data from existing sources utilized in the present embodiment can comprise the below described steps. The software can be set up to import real time streaming data from outside sources by the following steps:
  • Step 1—Select the sports line tab of a pre-set excel sheet;
  • Step 2—Left click on any empty cell;
  • Step 3—Click on edit query;
  • Step 4—There will be an open window that says edit web query;
  • Step 5—Which brings you to a pre-set streaming website i.e. cbssports.com to keep it or go to different one (1); and
  • Step 6—For NFL football go to NFL tab, go to scores, select game, select game tracker, select full play by play, hit import in edit quarry window.
  • DEFINITIONS
  • “Drivers” [Driver(s)]: particular play(s) or event(s) that occur in a game(s) that a user(s) of the present invention selects or deems to have impact, either positively or negatively; they are factors in changes occurring to Momentum.
  • “Momentum”: a team's (or person(s), entities, group(s), leagues, sports, etc.) synergy in a game(s) and/or event(s), defined by how well the team(s), individual(s), group(s), or entity(s) play(s) and/or perform(s) as a whole (or in part) or at any given real time or other moment(s) and incorporating certain Drivers, Point Values, and Multipliers being utilized in at least one pre-determined formula yielding Momentum calculations as defined herein. This term is used universally by all commentators and analysts while describing which opponent has the advantage or edge at a specific moment in competition.
  • A “Momentum Calculation” is the Point Value (for each Driver(s)) multiplied by at least one Multiplier.
  • “Momentum Meter”, “Momentum Scale”, and “Momentum Calculator” are all nicknames or short form describers used to describe this invention or what it does. A Momentum Meter is something that designates or gives you Momentum information, the whole process.
  • “Multiplier(s)” [Multipliers]: set or specifically allocated numerical amount(s) by which point(s) located to, allocated to, or associated with at least one particular Driver(s) (play or event) are multiplied by to determine Momentum.
  • “Points” or “Point Values” or “Point Value(s)”: each Driver(s) (play or event) which affects Momentum is given, or allocated, at least one specific Point Value(s) to be used in calculating Momentum. The Point Values can be allocated by at least one (1) of the following; selected from a pre-determined menu, users input, or a formula, third party supplied information or data, and can further change by formula or otherwise.
  • “User re-play or re-occurrence”: each of the times the user(s) or a new user(s) views a particular historic or past game(s) (game that has already been played) or a hypothetical. The user and/or the new user might decide to determine Momentum differently from the original game or hypothetical. For example, the user and/or the new user can add or delete or otherwise change the Drivers, Multipliers, Point Values and even the formula used to determine Momentum.
  • Additionally a “Misc” (i.e., miscellaneous) input category(s) for Drivers that effect Momentum that are not tied to the game directly may be added. For example a manual input decided by a user to adjust for things such as a “black-out” or a star player being injured could be added and the Point Value can be adjusted accordingly.
  • NO(s). IN FIGURES Number Description  1 Drivers  2 Point Value of each Driver  3 Drivers  4 Point Value of each Driver  5 Final Momentum of a away team  6 Final Momentum of a home team  7 Home team's Momentum  8 Away team's Momentum  9 Professional football teams' full names 10 Abbreviations for professional football teams' full names 11 Drivers  11A Point Values 12 Multipliers 13 Momentums of an away team 14 Momentums of a home team 15 Scores of a game 17 4th quarter adjustment 19 Momentum Points 21 Full-Game Momentum 23 Live Momentum 27 Momentum Key 29 End-game multipliers 31 Drive multipliers 33 Position multipliers 35 Spread multipliers 37 Lead multipliers 39 Total Points Value 150  Momentum Meter 153  Green Bay Packers symbol 155  Detroit Lions symbol 157  Back a play key 159  Forward a play key 159 163  Display section 167  Arrow 169  Dashed line 171  Meter indicator
  • The foregoing description of the embodiments of the invention has been presented for the purposes of illustration and description. While multiple embodiments are disclosed, still other embodiments of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the above detailed description, which shows and describes illustrative embodiments of the invention. As will be realized, the invention is capable of modifications in various obvious aspects, all without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Accordingly, the detailed description is to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not restrictive. Also, although not explicitly recited, one (1) or more embodiments of the invention may be practiced in combination or conjunction with one (1) another. Furthermore, the reference or non-reference to a particular embodiment of the invention shall not be interpreted to limit the scope the invention. It is intended that the scope of the invention not be limited by this detailed description, nor by the specific claims and the equivalents drafted herein.

Claims (31)

What is claimed is:
1. A method to calculate Momentum of one (1) or more entities participating in at least one event, comprising:
a. selecting from, designating, and/or creating a Driver(s), utilizing, accessing, executing, and/or creating at least one formula particular to the at least one event to calculate Momentum based on factor(s) during the at least one event, any particular event, play, or occurrence, such factor(s) being a Driver(s), calculating on at least one of a computing device, calculating device, smart device, mobile device, computer, computer or virtual network, with software for executing the method;
b. selecting from, creating, and/or designating a number of Point(s) associated to each Driver(s);
c. selecting from, designating, and/or creating additional factor(s) being Multiplier(s);
d. multiplying the Point(s) by the Multiplier(s) selected, designated, and/or created; and
e. generating, utilizing, and/or accessing the Momentum of each of the one (1) or more entities in real time and/or other time.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising the additional step of charting and/or displaying the Momentum of at least one (1) of the one (1) or more entities on at least one (1) graph, table, chart, display, and/or other representation.
3. The method of claim 2, further comprising charting the Momentum of at least two (2) teams, groups, and/or entities on at least one (1) graph, table, chart, and/or other representation.
4. The method of claim 1, in which the Driver(s), Point(s), and Multiplier(s) are variable(s) and can be set by at least one user(s).
5. The method of claim 1, in which streaming data from outside sources can be imported into the software and used in the calculation(s) of Momentum.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the Driver(s) in step (a) of claim 1 in a football game comprises one (1) or more of the following:
a. yards gained per play: 10, 15, 20, and/or 30 yards;
b. getting a first down, First Down Conversion, Second Down Conversation, Third Down Conversion, and/or Fourth Down Conversion;
c. defensive plays, including tackle for loss, tackle, sack, fumble, interception, turnover, turnovers on downs, blocked or missed kicks, and/or punts, onside kick;
d. penalties by either the offense or defense, which translates into more Momentum to the non-penalized side;
e. all scoring plays, including touchdowns, field goals, extra points, safety, and/or two (2) point conversions;
f. missed field goals at goal line, 10 yard line, 20 yard line, 30 yard line and/or 40 yard line; and/or
g. any reversal after an official review.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the Multiplier(s) in step (c) of claim 1 in a football game is/are dependent upon at least one (1) or more of the below factors:
a. Time remaining in the game;
b. Field position of where the events occur;
c. Length of the drive;
d. Spread of the game; and/or
e. Change in the lead.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the Driver(s) in step (a) of claim 1 in a baseball game comprises one (1) or more of the following:
a. “K” for strikeout;
b. “123” for a “one-two-three” inning;
c. “LOB” for runner left on base;
d. “LOB2” for two left on base;
e. “LOB3” for bases left loaded;
f. “FO” for foul out;
g. “I” for injury;
h. “DP” for double play;
i. “C” for great catch;
j. “H” for hit;
k. “BB” for walk;
l. “PB” for past ball;
m. “HR” for homerun;
n. “GL_RBI” for game leading RBI;
o. “RBI” for RBI;
p. “E” for error;
q. “SB” for stolen base;
r. “2B” for double;
s. “GT_RBI” for game-tieing RBI;
t. “2RBI” for two RBIs;
u. “3RBI” for three RBIs;
v. “4RBI” for four RBIs;
w. “WP” for wild pitch; or
x. “3B” for triple.
9. The method of claim 1, where the Multiplier(s) in step (c) in claim 1 in a baseball game is dependent upon one (1) or more of the below factors:
a. Bases Loaded (offense only)
b. Runner on 3B with 1 out or less (defense only)
c. Runner on 2B or 3B with no outs (defense only)
d. Strike-out with runner on 2B or 3B (defense only)
e. Increase in innings
f. Home field advantage
g. Tie Game
h. 1 run game
i. 2 run game
j. 3 run game
k. 4 run game
l. 5 or more runs
m. Lead change
n. Consecutive Momentum plays (ex. Back to back hits, or back to back Ks)
10. The method of claim 1, wherein steps (a) through (c) in claim 1 can be applied to various sports.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein the formula used in step (a) in claim 1 is particular to a specific game.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the formula, Driver(s), Point(s), and/or Multiplier(s) used in a particular game can be reset by the user(s), and/or by each user in a re-play (re-occurrence) of the game.
13. A method to calculate Momentum, comprising:
a. at least one user(s) utilizing, accessing, executing, and/or creating at least one formula particular to an event(s) to calculate the Momentum;
b. selecting from, designating, and/or creating certain Driver(s);
c. selecting from, creating, and/or designating Point Value(s) for each Driver(s);
d. selecting from, designating, and/or creating certain Multiplier(s) corresponding to Driver(s) and/or Point Value(s);
e. multiplying certain Point Value(s) associated with certain Driver(s) by the corresponding Multiplier(s); and
f. generating the Momentum.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the Momentum generated is of and/or for at least one (1) individual, person, team, sports game, club, league, organization, and/or group.
15. The method of claim 13, wherein the Momentum is generated for at least one (1) event, competition, contest, game, sports game, activity, performance, and/or sport.
16. The method of claim 13, wherein the method to calculate Momentum, further comprises utilizing at least one formula particular to each sport, sport game, event, competition, contest, activity, performance, and/or game.
17. The method of claim 13, wherein the method to calculate Momentum, further comprises utilizing at least one formula particular to each event to calculate the Momentum based on certain factor(s) being Driver(s).
18. The method of claim 13, wherein the method to calculate Momentum, further comprises utilizing at least one formula particular to each event to calculate the Momentum based on certain play(s), occurrence(s), and/or event(s), known as Driver(s), made during at least one particular game, sport, sport game, event, competition, contest, activity, performance, and/or other event, on at least one of a computing device, calculating device, computer, mobile device, smart device, computer and/or virtual network, with software executing the method.
19. The method of claim 13, wherein the method to calculate Momentum, further comprises generating the Momentum of at least two (2) competitors in at least one event in real time or other time.
20. The method of claim 13, further comprising the additional step of charting the Momentum of at least one (1) competitor in an event(s) on at least one (1) graph, table, chart, display, or other representation.
21. The method of claim 13, further comprising charting the Momentum of at least two (2) competitors in an event(s) on at least one (1) graph, chart, table, display, and/or other representation.
22. The method of claim 13, wherein the Driver(s), Point Value(s), and/or Multiplier(s) are variable and can be set by a user(s).
23. The method of claim 13, further comprising importing streaming data from outside sources into the method, software, and/or system, and calculating the Momentum based on at least the streaming data, in part or in whole.
24. The method of claim 13, wherein the Driver(s) in a football game comprises at least one (1) or more of the following:
a. yards gained per play: 10+/15+/20+/30+ yards;
b. getting a First Down, Second Down Conversion, Third Down Conversion, or Fourth Down Conversion;
c. defensive plays, including tackle for loss, tackle, sack, fumble, interception, turnover, turnovers on downs, onside kick, and/or blocked or missed kicks;
d. penalties by either the offense or defense, which translates into more Momentum to the non-penalized side;
e. all scoring plays, including touchdowns, field goals, extra points, safety, and/or two (2) point conversions; and/or
f. any reversal after an official review.
25. The method of claim 13, wherein the Multiplier(s) in a football game is dependent upon one (1) or more of the below factors:
a. Time remaining in the game;
b. Field position of where the events occur;
c. Length of the drive;
d. Spread of the game; and/or
e. Change(s) in the lead.
26. The method of claim 13, wherein the Driver(s) in a baseball game comprise one (1) or more of the following:
a. “K” for strikeout;
b. “123” for a “one-two-three” inning;
c. “LOB” for runner left on base;
d. “LOB2” for two left on base;
e. “LOB3” for bases left loaded;
f. “FO” for foul out;
g. “I” for injury;
h. “DP” for double play;
i. “C” for great catch;
j. “H” for hit;
k. “BB” for walk;
l. “PB” for past ball;
m. “HR” for homerun;
n. “GL_RBI” for game leading RBI;
o. “RBI” for RBI;
p. “E” for error;
q. “SB” for stolen base;
r. “2B” for double;
s. “GT_RBI” for game-tieing RBI;
t. “2RBI” for two RBIs;
u. “3RBI” for three RBIs;
v. “4RBI” for four RBIs;
w. “WP” for wild pitch; or
x. “3B” for triple.
27. The method of claim 13, wherein the Multiplier(s) in a baseball game is dependent upon one (1) or more of the below factors:
a. Bases Loaded (offense only);
b. Runner on 3B with 1 out or less (defense only);
c. Runner on 2B or 3B with no outs (defense only);
d. Strike-out with runner on 2B or 3B (defense only);
e. Increase in innings;
f. Home field advantage;
g. Tie Game;
h. 1 run game;
i. 2 run game;
j. 3 run game;
k. 4 run game;
l. 5 or more runs;
m. Lead change; and/or
n. Consecutive Momentum plays (ex. Back to back hits, or back to back Ks).
28. The method in claim 13, wherein the Multiplier(s) in a baseball game are used in connection with one (1) or more of the below Drivers and/or Point Values:
a. “K” is an abbreviation for strikeout, and is worth 2.5 points;
b. “123” is an abbreviation for a “one-two-three” inning, and is worth 5 points;
c. “LOB” is an abbreviation for runner left on base, and is worth 3 points;
d. “LOB2” is an abbreviation for two left on base, and is worth 6 points;
e. “LOB3” is an abbreviation for bases left loaded, and is worth 8 points;
f. “FO” is an abbreviation for foul out, and is 1.5 worth points;
g. “I” is an abbreviation for injury, and is worth 7.5 points;
h. “DP” is an abbreviation for double play, and is worth 9 points;
i. “C” is an abbreviation for great catch, and is worth 5 points;
j. “H” is an abbreviation for hit, and is worth 4 points;
k. “BB” is an abbreviation for walk, and is worth 2.5 points;
l. “PB” for past ball, and is worth 2.5 points;
m. “HR” is an abbreviation for homerun, and is worth 8 points;
n. “GL_RBI” is an abbreviation for game leading RBI, and is 10 worth points;
o. “RBI” is an abbreviation for RBI, and is 5 worth points;
p. “E” is an abbreviation for error, and is 5.5 worth points;
q. “SB” is an abbreviation for stolen base, and is 3 worth points;
r. “2B” is an abbreviation for double, and is worth 6 points;
s. “GT_RBI” is an abbreviation for game-tieing RBI, and is 9 worth points;
t. “2RBI” is an abbreviation for two RBIs, and is worth 6 points;
u. “3RBI” is an abbreviation for three RBIs, and is worth 7 points;
v. “4RBI” is an abbreviation for four RBIs, and is worth 8 points;
w. “WP” is an abbreviation for wild pitch, and is worth 2.5 points; or
x. “3B” is an abbreviation for triple, and is worth 7 points.
29. The method in claim 13, wherein steps (a) through (e) can be applied to various sports and/or events.
30. The method in claim 13, wherein the at least one formula used in step (a) is particular to a specific game.
31. The method in claim 13, wherein at least one of the formula(s), Driver(s), Point(s), and Multiplier(s) used in a particular game or other event can be reset by user(s) each user re-play (re-occurrence) of the game or other event.
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