US20140216704A1 - Method for operating an hvac system - Google Patents

Method for operating an hvac system Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140216704A1
US20140216704A1 US13/761,603 US201313761603A US2014216704A1 US 20140216704 A1 US20140216704 A1 US 20140216704A1 US 201313761603 A US201313761603 A US 201313761603A US 2014216704 A1 US2014216704 A1 US 2014216704A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
building
time
max
min
temperature
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/761,603
Inventor
Yicheng Wen
William Jerome Burke
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Haier US Appliance Solutions, Inc.
Original Assignee
General Electric Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by General Electric Co filed Critical General Electric Co
Priority to US13/761,603 priority Critical patent/US20140216704A1/en
Assigned to GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY reassignment GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: Burke, William Jerome, WEN, YICHENG
Publication of US20140216704A1 publication Critical patent/US20140216704A1/en
Assigned to HAIER US APPLIANCE SOLUTIONS, INC. reassignment HAIER US APPLIANCE SOLUTIONS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F27/00Control arrangements or safety devices specially adapted for heat-exchange or heat-transfer apparatus
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/30Control or safety arrangements for purposes related to the operation of the system, e.g. for safety or monitoring
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/62Control or safety arrangements characterised by the type of control or by internal processing, e.g. using fuzzy logic, adaptive control or estimation of values
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/62Control or safety arrangements characterised by the type of control or by internal processing, e.g. using fuzzy logic, adaptive control or estimation of values
    • F24F11/63Electronic processing
    • F24F11/64Electronic processing using pre-stored data
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F11/00Control or safety arrangements
    • F24F11/62Control or safety arrangements characterised by the type of control or by internal processing, e.g. using fuzzy logic, adaptive control or estimation of values
    • F24F11/63Electronic processing
    • F24F11/65Electronic processing for selecting an operating mode

Abstract

A method for operating an HVAC system is provided. The method includes providing a model for an indoor temperature, y, of a building, providing predicted future outdoor temperatures, and calculating an activation time or an adjustment time interval for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures. Operation of the HVAC system can be improved with the activation time or the adjustment time interval.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present subject matter relates generally to HVAC systems, such as residential or commercial HVAC systems, and methods for operating the same.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Commercial and residential buildings or structures are commonly equipped with systems for regulating the temperature of air within the building for purposes of e.g., comfort, protection of temperature sensitive contents, etc. Sometimes referred to as heating, ventilating, and air conditioning or HVAC systems, such systems typically include one or more components for changing the temperature of air (i.e. air treatment components as used herein) along with one or more components for causing movement of air (i.e. blowers as used herein). For example, a refrigerant based heat pump may be provided for heating or cooling air. Alternatively, or in addition thereto, electrically resistant heat strips and/or gas burners may be provided for heating air. One or more blowers or fans may be provided for causing the heated or cooled air to circulate within the building in an effort to treat all or some controlled portion of air in the building. Ducting and vents may be used to help distribute and return air from different rooms or zones within the building.
  • During heating and/or cooling of air, HVAC systems consume energy. In particular, HVAC systems' energy consumption can account for more than fifty percent of a building's total energy consumption. Despite consuming large amounts of energy, HVAC systems are generally set to a specific operating temperature, and the HVAC systems operate to maintain an associated building at the specific operating temperature.
  • Certain HVAC systems also include features for switching the specific operating temperature between a high set temperature and a low set temperature to conserve energy. In particular, such HVAC systems can be programmed to switch between the high set temperature and the low set temperature at specific times. However, switching between the high and low set temperatures can create certain problems. In particular, HVAC systems require a certain amount of time to heat and or cool the building. Thus, the associated building's temperature can lag behind the specific operating temperature of the HVAC system, and such temperature lag can be uncomfortable or unpleasant to occupants of the associated building.
  • Accordingly, methods for operating HVAC systems that can account for temperature lags between various operating temperatures of the HVAC system would be useful. In particular, methods for operating HVAC systems that that can preheat and/or precool an associated building in order to account for temperature lags between various operating temperatures of the HVAC system would be useful.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present subject matter provides a method for operating an HVAC system. The method includes providing a model for an indoor temperature, y, of a building, providing predicted future outdoor temperatures, and calculating an activation time or an adjustment time interval for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures. Operation of the HVAC system can be improved with the activation time or the adjustment time interval. Additional aspects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in part in the following description, or may be apparent from the description, or may be learned through practice of the invention.
  • In a first exemplary embodiment, a method for operating an HVAC system is provided. The HVAC system is configured for cooling air within a building, heating air within the building, or both. The method includes providing a model for an indoor temperature, y, of the building, providing predicted future outdoor temperatures, and calculating an adjustment time interval for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures.
  • In a second exemplary embodiment, a method for operating an HVAC system is provided. The HVAC system is configured for cooling air within a building, heating air within the building, or both. The method includes providing a model for an interior temperature, y, of the building, providing predicted future exterior temperatures of the building, calculating an activation time for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures.
  • These and other features, aspects and advantages of the present invention will become better understood with reference to the following description and appended claims. The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A full and enabling disclosure of the present invention, including the best mode thereof, directed to one of ordinary skill in the art, is set forth in the specification, which makes reference to the appended figures.
  • FIG. 1 provides a schematic representation of an exemplary building as may be used with the present subject matter.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a method for operating an HVAC system according to an exemplary embodiment of the present subject matter.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a method for operating an HVAC system according to an additional exemplary embodiment of the present subject matter.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Reference now will be made in detail to embodiments of the invention, one or more examples of which are illustrated in the drawings. Each example is provided by way of explanation of the invention, not limitation of the invention. In fact, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made in the present invention without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. For instance, features illustrated or described as part of one embodiment can be used with another embodiment to yield a still further embodiment. Thus, it is intended that the present invention covers such modifications and variations as come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.
  • FIG. 1 provides a schematic representation of an exemplary building 100 as may be used with the present subject matter. Building 100 includes an HVAC system 110. HVAC system 110 is configured for providing heated air to building 100, providing cooled air to building 100, or both. In particular, building 100 defines an inside or interior 102. Interior 102 of building 100 is separated or segregated from an exterior or outside 104. HVAC system 110 can heat and/or cool interior 102 of building 100.
  • As will be understood by those skilled in the art, HVAC system 110 can be any suitable mechanism for heating and/or cooling interior 102 of building 100. In the exemplary embodiment shown in FIG. 1, HVAC system 110 includes an air treatment component 118 for heating and/or cooling air and at least one blower 119 for directing heated and/or cooled air into interior 102 of building 100, e.g., via a duct system within building 100. As an example, air treatment component 118 can be a heat pump that provides for both heating and cooling of the air circulated by blower 119 of HVAC system 110. Alternatively, air treatment component 118 of HVAC system 110 can be a heater based on e.g., one or more gas burners or electric strips.
  • HVAC system 110 also includes a thermostat 112 for controlling HVAC system 110 and measuring a temperature of interior 102. A user can set an operating temperature of HVAC system 110 with thermostat 112, and HVAC system 110 can operate to maintain interior 102 of building 100 at the operating temperature. Further, HVAC system 110 includes a temperature sensor 116, such as a thermocouple or thermistor, for measuring a temperature of exterior 104 of building 100.
  • HVAC system 110 also includes a processing device or controller 114, e.g., positioned within thermostat 112. Various operational processes or methods for operating HVAC system 110 can be programmed into controller 114. As used herein, “controller” may include a memory and one or more microprocessors, CPUs or the like, such as general or special purpose microprocessors operable to execute programming instructions or micro-control code associated with operation of HVAC system 110. The memory may represent random access memory such as DRAM, or read only memory such as ROM or FLASH. In one embodiment, the processor executes programming instructions stored in memory. The memory may be a separate component from the processor or may be included onboard within the processor.
  • It should be understood that the shape and configuration of building 100 shown in FIG. 1 is provided by way of example only. Buildings having different shapes, configurations, different numbers of rooms, hallways, etc.—both residential and commercial—may be used with the present subject matter. Further, the location of HVAC system 110 relative to building 100 is also provided by way of example only.
  • As will be understood by those skilled in the art, HVAC system 110 can operate to maintain building 100 at a first operating temperature when building 100 is unoccupied. Conversely, HVAC system 110 can operate to maintain building 100 at a second operating temperature when building 100 is occupied. Controller 114 can adjust HVAC system 110 between the first and second operating temperatures, e.g., in order to conserve energy and/or reduce operating costs of HVAC system 110. However, the first operating temperature can be uncomfortable, e.g., too hot or too cold, to occupants of building 100 relative to the second operating temperature.
  • HVAC system 110 requires time to heat and/or cool interior 102 of building 100 and adjust a temperature of interior 102. As discussed in greater detail below, the present subject matter provides methods for operating an HVAC system, such as HVAC system 110. Such methods can assist with improving performance of HVAC system 110, e.g., during heating and/or cooling of interior 102 of building 100 between the first and second operating temperatures.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a method 200 for operating an HVAC system according to an exemplary embodiment of the present subject matter. Method 200 can be used to operate any suitable HVAC system, such as HVAC system 110 (FIG. 1). As an example, controller 114 of HVAC system 110 can be programmed to implement method 200. Utilizing method 200, an adjustment time interval for HVAC can be calculated. The adjustment time interval can assist with improving operation of HVAC system 110 as discussed in greater detail below.
  • At step 210, a model for an indoor temperature, y, of building 100 is provided. The model for y can be programmed into controller 114 such that controller 114 can calculate a predicted future indoor temperature of building 100, e.g., a predicted future temperature of interior 102. The model for y can utilize any suitable input to calculate y. For example, y can be calculated based at least in part upon a previous indoor temperature of building 100, a previous outdoor temperature of building 100, and/or a previous operational state of HVAC system 110, e.g., whether HVAC system 110 is on or off.
  • The model for y can be any suitable model for simulating or modeling the heat dynamics of building 100. As an example, the model for y can be a second order linear model, e.g., such that the model for y is given as

  • y k =a 1 y k−1 +a 2 y k−2 +b 1 v k−1 +b 2 u k−1
  • where
      • yk is an indoor temperature of building 100 at time k,
      • yk−1 is an indoor temperature of building 100 at time k−1,
      • yk−2 is an indoor temperature of building 100 at time k−2,
      • vk−1 is an outdoor temperature at time k−1,
      • uk−1 is an operating state of HVAC system 110 at time k−1, and
      • a1, a2, b1, and b2 are constants.
        As will be understood by those skilled in the art, the model for y provided above is a discrete-time auto-regressive model with exogenous inputs, and constants a1, a2, b1, and b2 can be determined utilizing recursive least-square techniques or any other suitable technique. As an example, controller 114 can receive indoor temperature measurements from thermostat 112, outdoor temperature measurements from temperature sensor 116, and operating states from HVAC system 110 over time and calculate constants a1, a2, b1, and b2 in order to identify the model for y.
  • The model for y provided above can also be provided as a state space model. Thus, the model for y can be given as

  • X k+1 =AX k +BU k
  • where

  • X k =[y k y k−1]T,
  • and

  • U k =[v k u k]T.
  • As discussed above, the model for y can be any suitable model in alternative exemplary embodiments. Thus, the model provided above is not intended to limit the present subject matter in any aspect and is provided by way of example only.
  • At step 220, predicted future outdoor temperatures are provided. As an example, controller 114 can receive the predicted future outdoor temperatures, e.g., predicted future temperatures of exterior 104 of building 100, at step 220. The predicted future outdoor temperatures can come from any suitable source. For example, the predicted future outdoor temperatures can be based on weather forecast data or historical weather data.
  • As an example, weather forecast data generally includes a daily maximum temperature and a daily minimum temperature. Further, outdoor temperatures generally have a sinusoidal shape between the daily maximum temperature and the daily minimum temperature. Thus, the predicted future outdoor temperatures can be provided using the following:
  • f ( t ) = { T max ( k ) + T min ( k ) 2 - T max ( k ) - T min ( k ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t min ( k ) ) t max ( k ) - t min ( k ) ) t [ t min ( k ) , t max ( k ) ) T max ( k ) + T min ( k + 1 ) 2 + T max ( k ) - T min ( k + 1 ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t max ( k ) ) t min ( k + 1 ) - t max ( k ) ) t [ t max ( k ) , t min ( k + 1 ) )
  • where
      • Tmax(k) is a maximum temperature on day k,
      • Tmin(k) is a minimum temperature on day k,
      • tmax(k) is a time of day for Tmax(k), and
      • tmin(k) is a time of day for Tmin(k).
        Utilizing the above formula, the predicted future outdoor temperatures can be provided throughout the day despite only having the daily maximum temperature and the daily minimum temperature from the weather forecast data. As discussed above, the predicted future outdoor temperatures can be determined in any suitable manner. Thus, the formula provided above is provided by way of example only and is not intended to limit the present subject matter.
  • At step 230, the adjustment time interval for HVAC system 110 is calculated. The adjustment time interval can correspond to a period of time required for HVAC system 110 to adjust an indoor temperature of building 100 from an initial temperature, T0, to a final temperature, Tf, where T0 and Tf are unequal. Thus, HVAC system 110 can heat and/or cool interior 102 of building 100 between T0 and Tf within the adjustment time interval.
  • As an example, controller 114 can calculate the adjustment time interval at step 230 utilizing at least the model for y of step 210 and the predicted future outdoor temperatures of step 220. In particular, controller 114 can calculate the adjustment time interval with the following:
  • y f = CA k x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 CA N - i - 1 BU i where C = [ 1 0 ] , A = [ a 1 a 2 1 0 ] , B = [ b 1 b 2 1 0 ] , x k 0 = [ y k 0 y k 0 - 1 ] , U i = [ v i u i ] ,
  • and
  • N=kf−k0 where k0 is an initial time at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is an initial temperature, yk 0 , and kf is a final time at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is a final temperature, yk f .
  • Further, utilizing the above process, the adjustment time interval can be calculated in order to minimize energy consumption of HVAC system 110. For example, the adjustment time interval can be calculated with the following:
  • T CA N x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 ( CA N - i - 1 B ) 1 v i k * k f - 1 while T < T f do T T + ( CA k f - k * B ) 2 k * k * - 1 end while
  • where
      • T is the indoor temperature of building 100 and
      • k* is a time value.
        With the adjustment time interval calculated at step 230, operation of HVAC system 110 can be improved. For example, controller 114 can determine an initial time, k* or t0, at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is T0 and a final time, tf, at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is Tf. The adjustment time interval can correspond to the difference between t0 and tf. Controller 114 can also activate HVAC system 110 at t0 such the indoor temperature of building 100 is Tf at tf. In such a manner, method 200 can assist with preheating and/or precooling interior 102 of building 100.
  • As will be understood by those skilled in the art, controller 114 can be programmed to adjust the operating temperature of HVAC system 110 between T0 and Tf. As an example, HVAC system 110 can operate to maintain building 100 at one of T0 or Tf when building 100 is unoccupied. Conversely, HVAC system 110 can operate to maintain building 100 the other of T0 and Tf when building 100 is occupied. Controller 114 can adjust HVAC system 110 between T0 and Tf, e.g., in order to conserve energy and/or reduce operating costs of HVAC system 110.
  • With the activation time interval calculated at step 230, controller 114 can operate HVAC system 110 to pre-heat and/or pre-cool interior 102 of building 100 between T0 and Tf. Such pre-heating or pre-cooling can increase comfort of occupants within building 100 and improve satisfaction of such occupants with HVAC system 110. For example, before such occupants enter or return to building 100, controller 114 can operate to adjust interior 102 of building 100 from T0 to Tf such the building 100 is pre-heated or pre-cooled and comfortable for such occupants.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a method 300 for operating an HVAC system according to an additional exemplary embodiment of the present subject matter. Method 300 can be used to operate any suitable HVAC system, such as HVAC system 110 (FIG. 1). As an example, controller 114 of HVAC system 110 can be programmed to implement method 300. Utilizing method 300, an activation time for HVAC system 110 can be calculated. The activation time can assist with improving operation of HVAC system 110 as discussed in greater detail below.
  • Like in step 210 of method 200 (FIG. 2), a model for an indoor temperature, y, of building 100 is provided at step 310. The model for y provided in step 310 can be any suitable model for y, such as the model for y discussed above in method 200. The model for y can be programmed into controller 114 such that controller 114 can calculate a predicted future indoor temperature of building 100, e.g., a predicted future temperature of interior 102.
  • Like in step 220 of method 200 (FIG. 2), predicted future outdoor temperatures are provided at step 320. The predicted future outdoor temperatures can come from any suitable source, such as described above in method 200. As an example, controller 114 can receive the predicted future outdoor temperatures, e.g., predicted future temperatures of exterior 104 of building 100, at step 320.
  • At step 330, the activation time for HVAC system 110 is calculated. The activation time can correspond to a time at which HVAC system 110 is activated in order to adjust an indoor temperature of building 100 from an initial temperature, T0, to a final temperature, Tf, where T0 and Tf are unequal. Thus, HVAC system 110 can heat and/or cool interior 102 of building 100 between T0 and Tf by activating HVAC system 110 at the activation time.
  • As an example, controller 114 can calculate the activation time at step 330 utilizing at least the model for y of step 310 and the predicted future outdoor temperatures of step 320. In particular, controller 114 can calculate the activation time with the following:
  • y f = CA k x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 CA N - i - 1 BU i where C = [ 1 0 ] , A = [ a 1 a 2 1 0 ] , B = [ b 1 b 2 1 0 ] , x k 0 = [ y k 0 y k 0 - 1 ] , U i = [ v i u i ] ,
  • and
  • N=kf−k0 where k0 is the activation time at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is an initial temperature, yk 0 , and kf is a final time at which the indoor temperature of building 100 is a final temperature, yk f .
  • Further, utilizing the above process, the activation time can be calculated in order to minimize energy consumption of HVAC system 110. For example, the activation time can be calculated with the following:
  • T CA N x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 ( CA N - i - 1 B ) 1 v i k * k f - 1 while T < T f do T T + ( CA k f - k * B ) 2 k * k * - 1 end while
  • where
      • T is the indoor temperature of building 100 and
      • k* is the activation time.
        With the activation time calculated at step 330, operation of HVAC system 110 can be improved. For example, controller 114 can activate or turn on HVAC system 110 at the activation time such the indoor temperature of building 100 is Tf at a final time, tf. In such a manner, method 300 can assist with preheating and/or precooling interior 102 of building 100, e.g., in a similar manner as described above for method 200.
  • This written description uses examples to disclose the invention, including the best mode, and also to enable any person skilled in the art to practice the invention, including making and using any devices or systems and performing any incorporated methods. The patentable scope of the invention is defined by the claims, and may include other examples that occur to those skilled in the art. Such other examples are intended to be within the scope of the claims if they include structural elements that do not differ from the literal language of the claims, or if they include equivalent structural elements with insubstantial differences from the literal languages of the claims.

Claims (19)

What is claimed is:
1. A method for operating an HVAC system, the HVAC system configured for cooling air within a building, heating air within the building, or both, the method comprising:
providing a model for an indoor temperature, y, of the building;
providing predicted future outdoor temperatures;
calculating an adjustment time interval for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the adjustment time interval corresponds to a period of time required for the HVAC system to adjust the indoor temperature of the building from an initial temperature, T0, to a final temperature, Tf, wherein T0 and Tf are unequal.
3. The method of claim 2, further comprising:
determining an initial time, t0, at which the indoor temperature of the building is T0 and a final time, tf, at which the indoor temperature of the building is Tf, the adjustment time interval corresponding to the difference between t0 and tf; and
activating the HVAC system at t0 such the indoor temperature of the building is Tf at tf.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the model for y comprises a second order linear model.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein the model for y comprises

y k =a 1 y k−1 +a 2 y k−2 +b 1 v k−1 +b 2 u k−1
where
yk is an indoor temperature of the building at time k,
yk−1 is an indoor temperature of the building at time k−1,
yk−2 is an indoor temperature of the building at time k−2,
vk−1 is an outdoor temperature at time k−1,
uk−1 is an operating state of the HVAC system at time k−1, and
a1, a2, b1, and b2 are constants.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the adjustment time interval with the following:
y f = CA k x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 CA N - i - 1 BU i where C = [ 1 0 ] , A = [ a 1 a 2 1 0 ] , B = [ b 1 b 2 1 0 ] , x k 0 = [ y k 0 y k 0 - 1 ] , U i = [ v i u i ] ,
and
N=kf−k0 where k0 is an initial time at which the indoor temperature of the building is an initial temperature, yk 0 , and kf is a final time at which the indoor temperature of the building is a final temperature, yk f .
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the adjustment time interval in order to minimize energy consumption of the HVAC system.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the adjustment time interval with the following:
T CA N x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 ( CA N - i - 1 B ) 1 v i k * k f - 1 while T < T f do T T + ( CA k f - k * B ) 2 k * k * - 1 end while
where
T is the indoor temperature of the building and
k* is a time value.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of providing predicted future outdoor temperatures comprises determining predicted future outdoor temperatures based upon weather forecast data.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein said step of providing predicted future outdoor temperatures comprises providing predicted future outdoor temperatures using the following:
f ( t ) = { T max ( k ) + T min ( k ) 2 - T max ( k ) - T min ( k ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t min ( k ) ) t max ( k ) - t min ( k ) ) t [ t min ( k ) , t max ( k ) ) T max ( k ) + T min ( k + 1 ) 2 + T max ( k ) - T min ( k + 1 ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t max ( k ) ) t min ( k + 1 ) - t max ( k ) ) t [ t max ( k ) , t min ( k + 1 ) )
where
Tmax(k) is a maximum temperature on day k,
Tmin(k) is a minimum temperature on day k,
tmax(k) is a time of day for Tmax(k), and
tmin(k) is a time of day for Tmin(k).
11. A method for operating an HVAC system, the HVAC system configured for cooling air within a building, heating air within the building, or both, the method comprising:
providing a model for an interior temperature, y, of the building;
providing predicted future exterior temperatures of the building;
calculating an activation time for the HVAC system utilizing at least the model for y and the predicted future outdoor temperatures.
12. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
turning on the HVAC system at the activation time; and
running the HVAC system in order to adjust the indoor temperature of the building from an initial temperature, T0, to a final temperature, Tf, after said step of turning on.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein the model for y comprises a second order linear model.
14. The method of claim 13, wherein the model for y comprises

y k =a 1 y k−1 +a 2 y k−2 +b 1 v k−1 +b 2 u k−1
where
yk is an indoor temperature of the building at time k,
yk−1 is an indoor temperature of the building at time k−1,
yk−2 is an indoor temperature of the building at time k−2,
vk−1 is an outdoor temperature at time k−1,
uk−1 is an operating state of the HVAC system at time k−1, and
a1, a2, b1, and b2 are constants.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the activation time with the following:
y f = CA k x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 CA N - i - 1 BU i where C = [ 1 0 ] , A = [ a 1 a 2 1 0 ] , B = [ b 1 b 2 1 0 ] , x k 0 = [ y k 0 y k 0 - 1 ] , U i = [ v i u i ] ,
and
N=kf−k0 where k0 is the activation time at which the indoor temperature of the building is an initial temperature, yk 0 , and kf is a final time at which the indoor temperature of the building is a final temperature, yk f .
16. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the activation time in order to minimize energy consumption of the HVAC system.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein said step of calculating comprises calculating the activation time with the following:
T CA N x k 0 + i = 0 N - 1 ( CA N - i - 1 B ) 1 v i k * k f - 1 while T < T f do T T + ( CA k f - k * B ) 2 k * k * - 1 end while
where
T is the indoor temperature of the building and
k* is the activation time.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein said step of providing predicted future outdoor temperatures comprises determining predicted future outdoor temperatures based upon weather forecast data.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein said step of providing predicted future outdoor temperatures comprises providing predicted future outdoor temperatures using the following:
f ( t ) = { T max ( k ) + T min ( k ) 2 - T max ( k ) - T min ( k ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t min ( k ) ) t max ( k ) - t min ( k ) ) t [ t min ( k ) , t max ( k ) ) T max ( k ) + T min ( k + 1 ) 2 + T max ( k ) - T min ( k + 1 ) 2 cos ( π ( t - t max ( k ) ) t min ( k + 1 ) - t max ( k ) ) t [ t max ( k ) , t min ( k + 1 ) )
where
Tmax(k) is a maximum temperature on day k,
Tmin(k) is a minimum temperature on day k,
tmax(k) is a time of day for Tmax(k), and
tmin(k) is a time of day for Tmin(k).
US13/761,603 2013-02-07 2013-02-07 Method for operating an hvac system Abandoned US20140216704A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/761,603 US20140216704A1 (en) 2013-02-07 2013-02-07 Method for operating an hvac system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/761,603 US20140216704A1 (en) 2013-02-07 2013-02-07 Method for operating an hvac system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140216704A1 true US20140216704A1 (en) 2014-08-07

Family

ID=51258295

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/761,603 Abandoned US20140216704A1 (en) 2013-02-07 2013-02-07 Method for operating an hvac system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20140216704A1 (en)

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2016109415A (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-20 台達電子工業股▲ふん▼有限公司Delta Electronics,Inc. Temperature control system and temperature control method
FR3031598A1 (en) * 2015-01-13 2016-07-15 Ecometering improves thermal device
US10203136B2 (en) * 2013-09-30 2019-02-12 Daikin Industries, Ltd. Air conditioning system and method for controlling same

Citations (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5937940A (en) * 1993-06-30 1999-08-17 Ford Global Technologies, Inc. Method and system for predicting air discharge temperature in a control system which controls an automotive HVAC system
US20030139854A1 (en) * 2002-01-24 2003-07-24 Kolk Richard A. Energy consumption estimation using real time pricing information
US20050194455A1 (en) * 2003-03-21 2005-09-08 Alles Harold G. Energy usage estimation for climate control system
US20050279844A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2005-12-22 Rick Bagwell Method and apparatus for controlling space conditioning in an occupied space
US20080083834A1 (en) * 2006-10-04 2008-04-10 Steve Krebs System and method for selecting an operating level of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system
US20090099699A1 (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-04-16 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for using a network of thermostats as tool to verify peak demand reduction
US20100070234A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2010-03-18 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for evaluating changes in the efficiency of an hvac system
US20100070084A1 (en) * 2008-09-16 2010-03-18 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for calculating the thermal mass of a building
US20100211224A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-08-19 EnaGea LLC Heating and cooling control methods and systems
US20100318227A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-12-16 Ecofactor, Inc. System, method and apparatus for just-in-time conditioning using a thermostat
US20110166913A1 (en) * 2010-01-04 2011-07-07 Daniel Buchanan Energy consumption reporting and modification system
US20110290893A1 (en) * 2010-05-26 2011-12-01 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for using a mobile electronic device to optimize an energy management system
US8090477B1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-01-03 Ecofactor, Inc. System and method for optimizing use of plug-in air conditioners and portable heaters
US20120065783A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Nest Labs, Inc. Thermodynamic modeling for enclosures
US20120259469A1 (en) * 2009-12-16 2012-10-11 John Ward Hvac control system and method
US20120305661A1 (en) * 2011-05-31 2012-12-06 Ecobee, Inc. HVAC Controller with Predictive Set-Point Control
US20130085614A1 (en) * 2011-09-30 2013-04-04 Johnson Controls Technology Company Systems and methods for controlling energy use in a building management system using energy budgets
US20130087630A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-11 Lennox Industries Inc. Hvac personal comfort control
US8452457B2 (en) * 2011-10-21 2013-05-28 Nest Labs, Inc. Intelligent controller providing time to target state
US20130173064A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2013-07-04 Nest Labs, Inc. User-friendly, network connected learning thermostat and related systems and methods
US20130179373A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Trane International Inc. Systems and Methods for Estimating HVAC Operation Cost
US20130268125A1 (en) * 2012-04-05 2013-10-10 Yoky Matsuoka Continuous intelligent-control-system update using information requests directed to user devices
US20130268129A1 (en) * 2010-12-31 2013-10-10 Nest Labs, Inc. Hvac control system with interchangeable control units
US8600561B1 (en) * 2012-09-30 2013-12-03 Nest Labs, Inc. Radiant heating controls and methods for an environmental control system
US20130338837A1 (en) * 2012-06-14 2013-12-19 Ecofactor, Inc. System and method for optimizing use of individual hvac units in multi-unit chiller-based systems
US20130338839A1 (en) * 2010-11-19 2013-12-19 Matthew Lee Rogers Flexible functionality partitioning within intelligent-thermostat-controlled hvac systems
US20140000836A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-02 Jingyang Xu Method for Operating Building Climate Control System Using Integrated Temperature and Humidity Models
US8630742B1 (en) * 2012-09-30 2014-01-14 Nest Labs, Inc. Preconditioning controls and methods for an environmental control system
US20140052300A1 (en) * 2010-12-31 2014-02-20 Nest Labs, Inc. Inhibiting deleterious control coupling in an enclosure having multiple hvac regions
US20140067132A1 (en) * 2012-08-30 2014-03-06 Honeywell International Inc. Hvac controller with regression model to help reduce energy consumption
US20140142875A1 (en) * 2012-11-16 2014-05-22 General Electric Company Appliance operation state detection
US20140156083A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-06-05 General Electric Company Temperature gradient reduction using building model and hvac blower
US20140222396A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 General Electric Company Method for predicting hvac energy consumption
US20140222219A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 General Electric Company Method for opearting an hvac system
US8918219B2 (en) * 2010-11-19 2014-12-23 Google Inc. User friendly interface for control unit
US20150094914A1 (en) * 2004-02-26 2015-04-02 Geelux Holding, Ltd. Method and apparatus for biological evaluation
US20150192911A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2015-07-09 Earth Networks, Inc. Optimizing and controlling the energy consumption of a building
US9104211B2 (en) * 2010-11-19 2015-08-11 Google Inc. Temperature controller with model-based time to target calculation and display
US20160041541A1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2016-02-11 Johnson Controls Technology Company Systems and methods for detecting changes in energy usage in a building

Patent Citations (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5937940A (en) * 1993-06-30 1999-08-17 Ford Global Technologies, Inc. Method and system for predicting air discharge temperature in a control system which controls an automotive HVAC system
US20030139854A1 (en) * 2002-01-24 2003-07-24 Kolk Richard A. Energy consumption estimation using real time pricing information
US20050279844A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2005-12-22 Rick Bagwell Method and apparatus for controlling space conditioning in an occupied space
US20050194455A1 (en) * 2003-03-21 2005-09-08 Alles Harold G. Energy usage estimation for climate control system
US20150094914A1 (en) * 2004-02-26 2015-04-02 Geelux Holding, Ltd. Method and apparatus for biological evaluation
US20080083834A1 (en) * 2006-10-04 2008-04-10 Steve Krebs System and method for selecting an operating level of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system
US20090099699A1 (en) * 2007-08-03 2009-04-16 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for using a network of thermostats as tool to verify peak demand reduction
US20100070234A1 (en) * 2007-09-17 2010-03-18 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for evaluating changes in the efficiency of an hvac system
US20100070084A1 (en) * 2008-09-16 2010-03-18 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for calculating the thermal mass of a building
US20100211224A1 (en) * 2008-12-19 2010-08-19 EnaGea LLC Heating and cooling control methods and systems
US20100318227A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-12-16 Ecofactor, Inc. System, method and apparatus for just-in-time conditioning using a thermostat
US20160041541A1 (en) * 2009-06-22 2016-02-11 Johnson Controls Technology Company Systems and methods for detecting changes in energy usage in a building
US20120259469A1 (en) * 2009-12-16 2012-10-11 John Ward Hvac control system and method
US20110166913A1 (en) * 2010-01-04 2011-07-07 Daniel Buchanan Energy consumption reporting and modification system
US20110290893A1 (en) * 2010-05-26 2011-12-01 John Douglas Steinberg System and method for using a mobile electronic device to optimize an energy management system
US8090477B1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-01-03 Ecofactor, Inc. System and method for optimizing use of plug-in air conditioners and portable heaters
US20120065783A1 (en) * 2010-09-14 2012-03-15 Nest Labs, Inc. Thermodynamic modeling for enclosures
US20130338839A1 (en) * 2010-11-19 2013-12-19 Matthew Lee Rogers Flexible functionality partitioning within intelligent-thermostat-controlled hvac systems
US9104211B2 (en) * 2010-11-19 2015-08-11 Google Inc. Temperature controller with model-based time to target calculation and display
US8918219B2 (en) * 2010-11-19 2014-12-23 Google Inc. User friendly interface for control unit
US20130268129A1 (en) * 2010-12-31 2013-10-10 Nest Labs, Inc. Hvac control system with interchangeable control units
US20140052300A1 (en) * 2010-12-31 2014-02-20 Nest Labs, Inc. Inhibiting deleterious control coupling in an enclosure having multiple hvac regions
US20120305661A1 (en) * 2011-05-31 2012-12-06 Ecobee, Inc. HVAC Controller with Predictive Set-Point Control
US20130085614A1 (en) * 2011-09-30 2013-04-04 Johnson Controls Technology Company Systems and methods for controlling energy use in a building management system using energy budgets
US20130087630A1 (en) * 2011-10-07 2013-04-11 Lennox Industries Inc. Hvac personal comfort control
US8452457B2 (en) * 2011-10-21 2013-05-28 Nest Labs, Inc. Intelligent controller providing time to target state
US20160047569A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2016-02-18 Google Inc. User-friendly, network connected learning thermostat and related systems and methods
US20130173064A1 (en) * 2011-10-21 2013-07-04 Nest Labs, Inc. User-friendly, network connected learning thermostat and related systems and methods
US20130179373A1 (en) * 2012-01-06 2013-07-11 Trane International Inc. Systems and Methods for Estimating HVAC Operation Cost
US20150192911A1 (en) * 2012-01-23 2015-07-09 Earth Networks, Inc. Optimizing and controlling the energy consumption of a building
US9098096B2 (en) * 2012-04-05 2015-08-04 Google Inc. Continuous intelligent-control-system update using information requests directed to user devices
US20130268125A1 (en) * 2012-04-05 2013-10-10 Yoky Matsuoka Continuous intelligent-control-system update using information requests directed to user devices
US20130338837A1 (en) * 2012-06-14 2013-12-19 Ecofactor, Inc. System and method for optimizing use of individual hvac units in multi-unit chiller-based systems
US20140000836A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-02 Jingyang Xu Method for Operating Building Climate Control System Using Integrated Temperature and Humidity Models
US20140067132A1 (en) * 2012-08-30 2014-03-06 Honeywell International Inc. Hvac controller with regression model to help reduce energy consumption
US8600561B1 (en) * 2012-09-30 2013-12-03 Nest Labs, Inc. Radiant heating controls and methods for an environmental control system
US8630742B1 (en) * 2012-09-30 2014-01-14 Nest Labs, Inc. Preconditioning controls and methods for an environmental control system
US20140142875A1 (en) * 2012-11-16 2014-05-22 General Electric Company Appliance operation state detection
US20140156083A1 (en) * 2012-12-05 2014-06-05 General Electric Company Temperature gradient reduction using building model and hvac blower
US20140222219A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 General Electric Company Method for opearting an hvac system
US20140222396A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 General Electric Company Method for predicting hvac energy consumption

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10203136B2 (en) * 2013-09-30 2019-02-12 Daikin Industries, Ltd. Air conditioning system and method for controlling same
JP2016109415A (en) * 2014-12-04 2016-06-20 台達電子工業股▲ふん▼有限公司Delta Electronics,Inc. Temperature control system and temperature control method
FR3031598A1 (en) * 2015-01-13 2016-07-15 Ecometering improves thermal device
EP3045999A1 (en) * 2015-01-13 2016-07-20 Ecometering Improved thermal device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
JP3948355B2 (en) Vehicle air-conditioning system
Olesen et al. A better way to predict comfort: The new ASHRAE standard 55-2004
US20110253796A1 (en) Zone-based hvac system
Kolokotsa et al. Advanced fuzzy logic controllers design and evaluation for buildings’ occupants thermal–visual comfort and indoor air quality satisfaction
CN101809514B (en) Application of microsystems for comfort control
US5810078A (en) Apparatus and method for the environmental control of vehicle interiors
US20090050703A1 (en) HVAC&amp;R System Control Utilizing On-Line Weather Forecasts
US9188356B2 (en) Air conditioning system and method for managing server room
US5172856A (en) Control apparatus for air-conditioning
US5850968A (en) Air conditioner with selected ranges of relative humidity and temperature
US7757504B2 (en) Air conditioning controller
JP5132334B2 (en) Air conditioning control device and an air conditioning control system using the same
US20050277381A1 (en) System to control environmental conditions in a living space
CN103303096A (en) Control strategy for a zonal heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system of a vehicle
CN101134450B (en) System and method for operating air conditioner using solar heat
US20140349563A1 (en) Air conditioning apparatus and air conditioning control method
US6668917B1 (en) Energy saving defog/device operation strategy and control scheme for vehicles
CN104251538A (en) Air conditioner and control method and control device thereof
BR112012011657A2 (en) device electronic control, heating, ventilation, air conditioning or coolant HVAC &amp; R, system for automatic control of a heating, ventilation, air conditioning or cooling HVAC &amp; R and method to automatically control and manage the demand and load operation of a charging unit hVAC &amp; r
CN104165440B (en) Air conditioning speed control method and system
US5267450A (en) Air conditioning apparatus
US20120305662A1 (en) Battery temperature adjusting system and battery charging system
US10242129B2 (en) HVAC zoning devices, systems, and methods
US20060273183A1 (en) Method of dehumidifying an indoor space using outdoor air
US9090144B2 (en) Automotive air conditioning system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, NEW YORK

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:WEN, YICHENG;BURKE, WILLIAM JEROME;REEL/FRAME:029774/0193

Effective date: 20130204

AS Assignment

Owner name: HAIER US APPLIANCE SOLUTIONS, INC., DELAWARE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:038951/0577

Effective date: 20160606

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION