US20140143864A1 - System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware - Google Patents

System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140143864A1
US20140143864A1 US13/904,547 US201313904547A US2014143864A1 US 20140143864 A1 US20140143864 A1 US 20140143864A1 US 201313904547 A US201313904547 A US 201313904547A US 2014143864 A1 US2014143864 A1 US 2014143864A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
turn
interface
hardware
networked computing
switch
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/904,547
Inventor
Gary S. Miliefsky
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
SNOOPWALL LLC
Original Assignee
SNOOPWALL LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US201261729202P priority Critical
Application filed by SNOOPWALL LLC filed Critical SNOOPWALL LLC
Priority to US13/904,547 priority patent/US20140143864A1/en
Assigned to SNOOPWALL LLC reassignment SNOOPWALL LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MILIEFSKY, GARY S.
Publication of US20140143864A1 publication Critical patent/US20140143864A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/14Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for detecting or protecting against malicious traffic
    • H04L63/1441Countermeasures against malicious traffic
    • H04L63/1475Passive attacks, e.g. eavesdropping or listening without modification of the traffic monitored
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L43/00Arrangements for monitoring or testing packet switching networks
    • H04L43/08Monitoring based on specific metrics
    • H04L43/0805Availability
    • H04L43/0817Availability functioning
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/14Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for detecting or protecting against malicious traffic
    • H04L63/1408Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for detecting or protecting against malicious traffic by monitoring network traffic
    • H04L63/1416Event detection, e.g. attack signature detection
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L63/00Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security
    • H04L63/20Network architectures or network communication protocols for network security for managing network security; network security policies in general

Abstract

A computer implemented method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices includes providing a graphical user interface (GUI) and displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device. Next, providing a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device. Next, providing a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device. Next, monitoring status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface. Upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface providing a warning signal, turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED CO-PENDING APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a non-provisional application of and claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 61/729,202 filed on Nov. 21, 2012 and entitled “System and methods for data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware detection, alerting and blocking” which is commonly assigned and the contents of which are expressly incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a system and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in networked computing devices.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Networked computing devices have a high risk for being attacked by malicious code for gaining remote access, eavesdropping and spying. In particular, Windows™ computing devices, iPhone™, Android™ and Windows™ Phone are incredibly high risk environments for being spied upon without the end-user's knowledge. Many search engine resulting links such as those of BING™ and of GOOGLE™ contain drive-by malware that allows for remote espionage and provides access to sensitive information stored in the networked computing devices. This unauthorized access to sensitive information provides an increased opportunity for cyber-crime. Currently available anti-virus, anti-malware, and anti-spyware applications focus on trying to detect malware based on known signatures or behavior. However, new types of malware are being developed constantly and the currently available firewall, intrusion detection, intrusion prevention, anti-virus, anti-malware, and anti-spyware applications cannot detect, prevent or react to most of the new types of malware.
  • In particular, none of the currently available security utilities can answer these questions: Which ports or device interfaces are open? Is the wireless port enabled? Is it connected to a network? Is the Bluetooth or Infrared Interface enabled? Is the webcam on? Is the universal serial bus (USB) port enabled? Is the microphone on? Some of the currently available security applications come with keylogger detection utilities. However, there are no guarantees that these applications will also stop keyboard eavesdropping. Most users want SKYPE™ and Microsoft instant messaging (IM) on in order to be able to communicate and therefore numerous communication ports remain open. Malware may use these open ports to phone home to callback uniform resource locators (URLs). Spyware may use these open ports to send eavesdropping information to those who are maliciously eavesdropping, unbeknownst to the victim or the plethora of security utilities.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for improved systems and methods for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in networked computing devices.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • This present invention provides a system and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in networked computing devices.
  • In general, in one aspect the invention provides a computer-implemented method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices. The method includes providing a graphical user interface (GUI) and displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device. Next, providing a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device. Next, providing a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device. Next, monitoring status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface. Upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface providing a warning signal, turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
  • Implementations of this aspect of the invention may include one or more of the following features. Upon resolving the unauthorized change of status of the specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across the specific hardware device interface, turning on the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-on switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-on-off switch. Activation of the turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches is initiated locally by a user of the networked computing device, or remotely by an administrator of the networked computing device. The networked computing device includes a central processing unit (CPU), a security application, and a display. The security application provides computer implemented operations and instructions that monitor, detect and block data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware across all available hardware device interfaces in each of the networked computing device. The CPU executes the computer implemented instruction provided by the security application, and the display displays the GUI. The method further includes providing a first table comprising a list of applications and authorized status of each available hardware device interface for each application and storing the first table in a database. The method further includes providing a second table comprising a list of known malicious applications and storing the second table in the database. The method further includes providing a server configured to access the one or more networked computing devices via a network connection. The server comprises a command center, a dashboard, a toolbar, a taskbar, a standalone GUI and an application programmer's interface (API). The command center is configured to manage remotely security applications in the one or more networked computing devices. The method further includes creating rules and policies and installing them in the security applications of the one or more networked computing devices and the server via the command center. The method further includes summarizing and presenting in the dashboard real-time events occurring in the one or more networked computing devices and the server. The method further includes displaying the status of all available hardware device interfaces in the toolbar for the one or more networked computing devices and the server. Communications between the server and the one or more networked computing devices comprise secure communications protocols. The secure communication protocols comprise one of secure socket layer (SSL), or transport layer security (TLS). The server further comprises a real-time kernel driver and a rootkit ‘system’ healer. The real-time kernel constantly monitors the status of all controlling interfaces and settings and in the event a hacker or malicious code tampers with the security applications, the rootkit “system” healer restores the security applications. The available hardware device interfaces may be a keyboard, mouse, touchscreen, webcam, USB hardware device interface, microphone, Flash memory, Infrared, Bluetooth, Ethernet, Wireless, LAN, WAN, VPN, text messaging interfaces, telephone interfaces, modem, cellular, GPS interfaces, gesture based interfaces or eye-motion based interfaces. The turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches comprise slidably activated switches, or comprise pressure-activated switches. The networked computing devices may be personal computers, servers, desktops, laptops, mobile phones, iPhones™, iPads™, iTouches™, Droids™, Blackberry™ devices, Windows™ phone, Android™ phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or tablet devices. The warning signal may be a visual warning signal or an acoustical warning signal. The visual warning signal comprises flashing of the specific hardware device interface image in the GUI. The method further includes, prior to installing a new application in any of the one or more networked computing devices, sending a message comprising the hardware device interfaces to which the new application requests access and asking for installation permission and which hardware device interfaces should be blocked.
  • In general, in another aspect, the invention features a system for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices including a graphical user interface (GUI) displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device, a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device, a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device, and a security application. The security application is configured to monitor status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface, and upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface providing a warning signal and turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
  • In general, in another aspect, the invention features a computer program product for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices. The computer program product is stored on a computer readable medium and includes computer code for providing a graphical user interface (GUI) and displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device, computer code for providing a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device, computer code for providing a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device, computer code for monitoring status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface, computer code for providing a warning signal, upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface and computer code for turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
  • Among the advantages of this invention may be one or more of the following. The present invention broadly monitors and protects all the high-risk hardware device ports and interfaces that are accessible by both the end-user and software applications, including modern malware.
  • The Snoopwall technology of the present invention complements prior art security applications, which usually monitor network traffic across network traffic ports. Network traffic ports may be opened for allowing Internet communications. In one example, port 80 is opened for allowing World Wide Web communications via the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP). In another example, port 21 is opened for allowing file transfers via the file transfer protocol (FTP). Prior art security applications focus on monitoring these network traffic ports for malicious traffic and review packets of data traveling over these network traffic ports. The Snoopwall technology of the present invention does not need to eavesdrop on any network traffic packets or data as it is designed to monitor access to the actual Ethernet hardware device ports and to alert end-users about any new attempted access to these hardware device ports. The Snoopwall technology of the present invention does not need any information or frequent updates about the types of traffic that may flow across the many (up to 65535) network traffic ports using many different protocols. Therefore, the Snoopwall technology of the present invention complements prior art security applications and techniques and provides a more efficient method of blocking access to the network through the actual hardware device interface ports such as Ethernet, Wireless Ethernet, among others.
  • The Snoopwall technology of the present invention is focused on the root cause of data leakage, i.e., access to the high-risk hardware interface ports, while prior art security applications focus on detecting the signatures of the malware payload or the malware behavior. Therefore, the Snoopwall technology of the present invention is applicable against any type of malware including new or not yet detected types of malware, whereas the prior art security applications are applicable only to already known malware. In particular, the Snoopwall technology of the present invention is applicable against advanced persistent threats (APTs) malware, which is malware that is nearly impossible to detect or remove. The Snoopwall technology of the present invention is also applicable against zero-day (O-day) or other new forms of malware. As the Snoopwall technology of the present invention focuses on the management of the high-risk hardware interface ports, it will not require any updates for malware signatures or malware behavioral heuristics. The only necessary updates for the Snoopwall technology to properly secure an end-user environment would be only when new high-risk hardware interface ports are created, which is a very infrequent event. This is not only uniquely complementary to existing security utilities, it is a completely radical approach—focusing on the areas where data is leaked from, instead of focusing on the detection of each possible piece of new malware being delivered to the end-user system in some form of payload or application.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of the network architecture of a system 80 for blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware applications according to this invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of the computing device 92A of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of one embodiment of a graphical user interface (GUI) 100 used in the computing device 92A of FIG. 2;
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram of the components of system 80 of FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 5-FIG. 8 depict an embodiment of a GUI, used in a mobile communication device for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and malicious spyware; and
  • FIG. 9 depicts a table used to set permissions and denials for specific applications.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • In general, the present invention relates to eavesdropping and spyware blocking technology, and more specifically it relates to systems and methods for blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware technology in networked devices by controlling access to various high-risk data ports or hardware device interfaces. These high risk ports include Webcam, USB, Microphone, Flash Memory, Infrared, Bluetooth, Wireless, LAN, WAN, VPN, Cellular and GPS interfaces, among others.
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a client-server system 80 for blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware applications according to one embodiment of this invention includes computing devices 92A, 92B, mobile communication devices 92C, personal digital assistant devices 92D, Tablet/iPad™ device 92F and a server 92E. Devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F are connected to each other and to the server 92E via a network 90. In other embodiments, system 80 includes additional computing devices including personal computers, servers, desktops, laptops, iPhones, iPads, iTouches, Droids, Blackberry devices, Windows phone, Android phones, or other tablet devices, among others.
  • In one example, networked computing device 92A includes a central processing unit (CPU) 96, software applications 97, access ports (or hardware device interfaces) 102A - - - 102N, memory 98, database 99, a Snoopwall application 200, and a display 94, as shown in FIG. 2. The Snoopwall application 200 provides computer implemented operations and instructions that monitor, detect and block data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware of the computing device 92A. In particular, application 200 provides functionalities for monitoring, detecting and blocking data leakage and eavesdropping in the data stored in database 99, memory 98, and in operations executed by the CPU 96. These functionalities include monitoring information flow across all ports 102A . . . 102N and closing of selected ports when data leakage, eavesdropping or spyware are detected. Snoopwall application 200 also presents a graphical user interface (GUI) 100, as shown displayed in display 94 of FIG. 2. Database 99 includes a list of applications 300 and information whether each application is allowed to run on the specific computing device and to which ports of the computing device should have access, as shown in FIG. 9. The user of the computing device 92A and the administrator of the client-server system 80 are allowed to manually enter permissions and denials of applications in list 300 and set access to specific ports and store the information in database 99. Database 99 also stores a list of known malicious applications that should not be allowed to run on the computing device or have access to any or specific ports.
  • Snoopwall application 200 also reviews each application prior to installing or running it on a device and determines the associated application unique signature and the requests for access to the high-risk access ports by the application. Application 200 stores this information in the database 99 and informs the user of the application prior its installation. In one example, the application ANGRYBIRDSFORAPPLE.exe is downloaded to a Windows™ iTunes™ platform and the Snoopwall application 200 reviews the downloaded file to determine which device ports the downloaded application tries to access. It was found that the ANGRYBIRDSFORAPPLE.exe application tries to access the GPS, USB, Bluetooth, Internet, webcam and microphone, whereas the ANGRYBIRDSFORAPPLE.exe application is not supposed to have access to these hardware device ports. This information is stored in the database 99 in the list of applications and is shared and communicated to all end-users. When users try to install the ANGRYBIRDSFORAPPLE.exe application in their iPad™ tablet, the Snoopwall application 200 sends out a message to them informing them that the application they want to install tries to access the above mentioned device ports and asks them if they really want to install this application and if they want to block access of the application to any or all of the above mentioned device ports.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, GUI 100 displays in real time the status of all access ports (or hardware device interface) 102A . . . 102N. In the example of FIG. 3, ports 102A . . . 102N, are arranged linearly within a toolbar 100A. In other examples, ports 102A . . . 102N are depicted in other geometric arrangements including vertical arrangements, horizontal arrangements, circular arrangements, or along any other geometric or random configuration. Examples of access ports include Webcam 102A, USB port 102B, Microphone 102C, Flash Memory 102D, Infrared 102E, Bluetooth 102F, Wireless 102G, LAN, WAN, VPN, Cellular and GPS interfaces 102H, keyboard, mouse, touchscreen, Ethernet, text messaging interfaces, telephone interfaces, modem, gesture based interfaces, eye-motion based interfaces, or other enhanced input/output (i/o) interfaces, among others. GUI 100 also displays a Turn-All-ON button 104, a Turn-All-OFF button 103 and port specific On and Off buttons 105, 106.
  • When data leakage, eavesdropping or spyware software are detected in any of ports 102A . . . 102N, the port turns red, flashes and sends an acoustical warning signal. The user has the option to turn off manually the specific port by activating the corresponding Off button 106 in order to block the detected data leakage, eavesdropping or spyware software. The user has also the option to turn off manually all access ports by activating the Turn-All-OFF button 103. The ports may be enabled when the problem has been resolved by activating either the Turn-All-ON button 104 or the port specific On button 105. The system also provides automatic turning Off of all ports or specific ports when data leakage, eavesdropping or spyware software are detected in any of ports 102A . . . 102N. The system also provides automatic turning ON of all ports or specific ports when the problem is resolved.
  • System 80 also includes Client-Server capabilities to allow information technology managers to control remotely any or al of the above mentioned ports in any or all of the individual devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F from server 92E. These Client-Server capabilities provide real-time manual, semi-automatic and automatic detection, alerting, blocking and controlling access to various high-risk data ports in cases when data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware applications are detected.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, the management interface for client-server system 80 includes a command center 212, a dashboard 214, a toolbar 100A, a taskbar or systray and popup alerts 216, standalone GUI 110, application programmers interface (API) 220, secure communication protocol 228, network interface 230, device driver interface library 222, real-time kernel driver 224, Rootkit “system healer” 226, and remotely managed “Snoopwall” systems 232, 234.
  • In the example of FIG. 1, command center 212 runs in the administrator's computing device (i.e., server-A 92E) and is used for managing the Snoopwall security utilities running in the remote system endpoints 232, 234 of the networked computing devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92F, as well as the Snoopwall security utilities running in the administrator's computing device 92E. Command center 212 helps create rules and policies in groups and roll them out to the Snoopwall security utilities running in the one or more remote system endpoints as well as to the Snoopwall security utilities running on the administrator's computing device. Dashboard 214 summarizes real-time events from one or more remote system endpoints 232, 234 as well as real-time events running on the administrator's system. Toolbar 100A allows configuration changes and alerts through a simple graphical user interface (GUI), as shown in FIG. 3. Toolbar 100A can also be minimized to be a Taskbar or Systray 216 until the user interacts with the system or when events occur requiring Popup Alerts.
  • Standalone GUI 110 provides the system core functionalities to the standalone computing devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F. These core functionalities include obtaining help, setting options, features, performing updates and other end-user functions. API 220 is accessible through secure, trusted interfaces 230, 222, 224, 226, and allows abstraction of the command center 212, dashboard 214, toolbar 100A, taskbar 216, and standalone GUI 110 to the endpoint systems 232, 234. API 220 provides flexibility in how it displays events, controls and results, while the core functionality is available through this centralized set of function calls.
  • The remotely managed endpoint systems 232, 234 of the computing devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F connect to the server 92E via a network interface 230. Secure communication protocols 228 such as secure socket layer (SSL), or transport layer security (TLS) are used in the connections and communications between the remotely managed endpoint systems 232, 234 of the computing devices 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F and the server 92E. Core functionality exposed by the API 220 is derived from the device driver interface library 222 to manage Webcam 102A, USB port 102B, Microphone 102C, Flash Memory 102D, Infrared 102E, Bluetooth 102F, Wireless 102G, LAN, WAN, VPN, Cellular and GPS interfaces 102H, and to ensure that control is not subverted by a hacker or malicious software. Real-time kernel driver 224 constantly monitors the status of the controlling interface and settings and in the event a hacker or malicious code are able to tamper with the “Snoopwall” application, a Rootkit “system” healer 226 is installed to capture these rare but high risk events and thereby to restore the “Snoopwall” application and to block data leakage.
  • In the standalone configuration, the Snoopwall client application 200 depicts all available ports in the standalone GUI 110 and provides visual alerts about each high-risk data leakage port's state, i.e., whether it is open or closed or if there is an attempt to open one of these ports. If a port is opened and unauthorized data transfer is detected across this port, the GUI shows a flashing icon of this port. In other embodiments, an acoustical warning signal is also sent. The user of the device and/or the remote administrator have the ability to enable or disable any or all of the displayed high-risk ports. As was mentioned above, these high-risk ports include Webcam 102A, USB port 102B, Microphone 102C, Flash Memory 102D, Infrared 102E, Bluetooth 102F, Wireless 102G, LAN, WAN, VPN, Cellular and GPS interfaces 102H. In the case of the keyboard being attacked, the functionality of the keyboard is not disabled while the keyboard is protected against keyloggers. In the case when the USB port is being eavesdropped, the USB port is disabled while the keyboard and mouse devices remain operational. In addition, password and/or token access can be enabled as an additional security option so that no third-party can take over a high-risk data leakage port without being prompted for a password or token.
  • Configuration options allow for an auto-shutoff interval to be set on one or more selected high-risk data leakage ports, an auto-alert interval and method such as popup window or email, password, token and proxy server settings as well as update server information. The Snoopwall application 200 may be written using any programming language, including C, C++, Java with database interfaces into a Structured Query Language (SQL) database and/or text files containing critical user, application and ports information, among others. However, since each Snoopwall application for each standalone device has a different GUI, Kernel, Driver, Rootkit and Secure Communication methodologies, the code of the Snoopwall application is customized to ensure it functions securely and can self-heal on any operating system (OS) including Windows™ XP, Windows™ 7, Windows™ 8, iPhone™, iPad™, iTouch™ OS Editions, Android™ OS, Linux OS, BSD, Unix, Blackberry OS, Microsoft Phone and Tablet operating systems, among others.
  • In the Client-Server system configuration, the Snoopwall server 92E contains all the codes of the Snoopwall clients to ensure that the local systems 92A, 92B, 2C, 92D, 92F are secure from eavesdropping. Server 92E also includes the built-in application programmers interface (API) 220, dashboard 214, command center 212, toolbar 100A, and taskbar or systray and popup alerts 216. API 220 allows for remote control, alerts and updates from Snoopwall client systems in the same WAN, LAN or multi-VLAN segments through authentication. Dashboard 214 displays in real-time the status of the ports in each Snoopwall client and which Snoopwall clients have changed their profile. Command center 212 allows making changes in single Snoopwall clients or creating groups and pushing changes to these groups. The Snoopwall Server code also includes industry standard logging using SYSLOG format about the key events of Snoopwall clients and the server itself. As was mentioned above, Snoopwall application 200 may be written using any programming language, and the code is customized so that it can run on one or more operating systems including Windows™ 2000, Windows™ NT, Windows™ XP, Windows™ 7 and Windows™ 8 as well as Linux, BSD and Unix, among others.
  • Referring to FIG. 5 and FIG. 6, Snoopwall application 200A for a mobile phone 92C includes a GUI screen 120 that depicts a privacy meter indicator 122, the amount of CPU used 124, the battery voltage used 126, the storage capacity used 127, the memory capacity used 125, and the battery power level 123. GUI 120 also includes a toolbar 121, a button for initiating a privacy audit function 128 and a take control button 129. Activating the take control button 129 presents a new GUI screen 130, shown in FIG. 7. GUI screen 130 depicts the status of all high risk ports including microphone 131, Bluetooth interface 132, GPS 133, storage 134, USB 135, Infrared interface 136, Wi-Fi interface 137, camera 138, SMS messaging port 139 and the phone port 140. Next to each port there is a slidably activated button 150 that can be set to the On position 150 a or the Off position 150 b and thereby to enable or disable the corresponding port. Screen 130 also includes images of the active applications 145 and allows the user to turn on or off the applications by sliding button 150 to the On position 150 a or the Off position 150 b, as shown in FIG. 8.
  • In operation, every networked computing device 92A, 92B, 92C, 92D, 92F is equipped with an anti-eavesdropping utility, i.e., a Snoopwall application 200, that complements all existing firewalls and all anti-virus programs. With the Snoopwall application 200 installed, a user can easily see which data ports are open, which ports are closed and if there is unauthorized data leakage (eavesdropping) across a port. The user receives visual alerts when there is unauthorized eavesdropping across a port and has the option to select which ports to keep open and which port to disable. Ports may be disabled completely and remain closed until the user unlocks them with a secret password. As was mentioned above, there are two versions of the Snoopwall application, the consumer (also known as the “standalone” configuration) edition and the enterprise edition (also known as the “client-server” configuration). The enterprise edition includes a command center 212, dashboard 214 and remote management API 220. Whether operating in the standalone or in the client-server configuration, the Snoopwall application enables computing device managers and owners to finally take control of these devices and truly know if there is any attempt to eavesdrop on them through high risk data leakage ports.
  • Several embodiments of the present invention have been described. Nevertheless, it will be understood that various modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, other embodiments are within the scope of the following claims.

Claims (23)

What is claimed is:
1. A computer implemented method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices comprising:
providing a graphical user interface (GUI) and displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
providing a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device;
providing a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
monitoring status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface;
upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface providing a warning signal; and
turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising upon resolving the unauthorized change of status or unauthorized data traffic across the specific hardware device interface, turning on the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-on switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-on-off switch.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein activation of the turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches is initiated locally by a user of the networked computing device.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein activation of the turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches is initiated remotely by an administrator of the networked computing device.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein said networked computing device comprises a central processing unit (CPU), a security application, and a display, wherein the security application provides computer implemented operations and instructions that monitor, detect and block data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware across all available hardware device interfaces in each of the networked computing device; wherein the CPU executes the computer implemented instruction provided by the security application, and wherein the display displays the GUI.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising providing a first table comprising a list of applications and authorized status of each available hardware device interface for each application and storing said first table in a database.
7. The method of claim 6, further comprising providing a second table comprising a list of known malicious applications and storing said second table in said database.
8. The method of claim 1 further comprising providing a server configured to access the one or more networked computing devices via a network connection and wherein said server comprises a command center, a dashboard, a toolbar, a taskbar, a standalone GUI and an application programmers interface (API), and wherein said command center is configured to manage remotely security applications in the one or more networked computing devices.
9. The method of claim 8, further comprising creating rules and policies and installing them in the security applications of the one or more networked computing devices and the server via the command center.
10. The method of claim 8, further comprising summarizing and presenting in the dashboard real-time events occurring in the one or more networked computing devices and the server.
11. The method of claim 8, further comprising displaying the status of all available hardware device interfaces in the toolbar for the one or more networked computing devices and the server.
12. The method of claim 8, wherein communications between the server and the one or more networked computing devices comprise secure communications protocols.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein said secure communication protocols comprise one of secure socket layer (SSL), or transport layer security (TLS).
14. The method of claim 8, wherein the server further comprises a real-time kernel driver and a rootkit ‘system’ healer, and wherein the real-time kernel constantly monitors the status of all controlling interfaces and settings and in the event a hacker or malicious code tampers with the security applications, the rootkit “system” healer restores the security applications.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein the available hardware device interfaces comprise one or more of keyboard, mouse, touchscreen, webcam, USB hardware device interface, microphone, Flash memory, Infrared, Bluetooth, Ethernet, Wireless, LAN, WAN, VPN, text messaging interfaces, telephone interfaces, modem, cellular, GPS interfaces, gesture based interfaces or eye-motion based interfaces.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein the turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches comprise slidably activated switches.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein the turn-on, turn-off, turn-all-on, turn-all-off switches comprise pressure activated switches.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein the networked computing devices comprise one of personal computers, servers, desktops, laptops, mobile phones, iPhones™, iPads™, iTouches™, Droids™, Blackberry™ devices, Windows™ phone, Android™ phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or tablet devices.
19. The method of claim 1, wherein the warning signal comprises a visual warning signal or an acoustical warning signal.
20. The method of claim 11, wherein the visual warning signal comprises flashing of the specific hardware device interface image in the GUI.
21. The method of claim 1, further comprising, prior to installing a new application in any of the one or more networked computing devices, sending a message comprising the hardware device interfaces to which the new application requests access and asking for installation permission and which hardware device interfaces should be blocked.
22. A system for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices comprising:
a graphical user interface (GUI) displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device;
a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
a security application configured to monitor status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface, and upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface providing a warning signal and turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
23. A computer program product for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware in one or more networked computing devices, wherein said computer program product is stored on a computer readable medium and comprises:
computer code for providing a graphical user interface (GUI) and displaying all available hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
computer code for providing a turn-on switch and a turn-off switch for each displayed hardware device interface in each networked computing device;
computer code for providing a turn-all-on switch and a turn-all-off switch for all displayed hardware device interfaces in each networked computing device;
computer code for monitoring status of each available hardware device interface and data traffic across each available hardware device interface;
computer code for providing a warning signal, upon detecting an unauthorized change of status of a specific hardware device interface or unauthorized data traffic across a specific hardware device interface; and
computer code for turning off the specific hardware device interface by activating the turn-off switch for the specific hardware device interface or the turn-all-off switch.
US13/904,547 2012-11-21 2013-05-29 System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware Abandoned US20140143864A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201261729202P true 2012-11-21 2012-11-21
US13/904,547 US20140143864A1 (en) 2012-11-21 2013-05-29 System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/904,547 US20140143864A1 (en) 2012-11-21 2013-05-29 System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware
PCT/US2013/043240 WO2014081468A1 (en) 2012-11-21 2013-05-30 System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware
US14/285,769 US9942269B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2014-05-23 Effectively preventing data leakage, spying and eavesdropping through a networked computing device by controlling access to a plurality of its device interfaces

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/285,769 Continuation US9942269B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2014-05-23 Effectively preventing data leakage, spying and eavesdropping through a networked computing device by controlling access to a plurality of its device interfaces

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140143864A1 true US20140143864A1 (en) 2014-05-22

Family

ID=50729261

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/904,547 Abandoned US20140143864A1 (en) 2012-11-21 2013-05-29 System and method for detecting, alerting and blocking data leakage, eavesdropping and spyware
US14/285,769 Active US9942269B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2014-05-23 Effectively preventing data leakage, spying and eavesdropping through a networked computing device by controlling access to a plurality of its device interfaces

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14/285,769 Active US9942269B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2014-05-23 Effectively preventing data leakage, spying and eavesdropping through a networked computing device by controlling access to a plurality of its device interfaces

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (2) US20140143864A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2014081468A1 (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150215330A1 (en) * 2014-01-30 2015-07-30 Shine Security Ltd. Methods and systems of controlling distribution of personal data over network(s)
US20150215804A1 (en) * 2014-01-30 2015-07-30 Shine Security Ltd. Network traffic event management at the client terminal level
WO2016064930A1 (en) * 2014-10-21 2016-04-28 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for application security analysis
US20170083705A1 (en) * 2015-09-22 2017-03-23 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Apparatus and method for analyzing malicious code in multi-core environment
WO2017075087A1 (en) 2015-10-27 2017-05-04 Blackberry Limited Detecting resource access
US9838391B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-12-05 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for privately performing application security analysis
US9866572B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2018-01-09 International Business Machines Corporation Monitoring use of a sensor of a computing device
US9954873B2 (en) 2015-09-30 2018-04-24 The Mitre Corporation Mobile device-based intrusion prevention system
US10008814B1 (en) * 2017-02-15 2018-06-26 Holster Lab LLC Microphone muting device
US10270804B2 (en) * 2014-08-13 2019-04-23 F-Secure Corporation Detection of webcam abuse
WO2019164623A1 (en) * 2018-02-22 2019-08-29 Motorola Solutions, Inc. Disabling a digital assistant during a conference call based on security level
WO2019246024A1 (en) * 2018-06-18 2019-12-26 A7Technology Inc. Systems and methods for computer security
US10764860B2 (en) 2015-10-27 2020-09-01 Blackberry Limited Monitoring resource access

Families Citing this family (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB201521137D0 (en) * 2015-12-01 2016-01-13 Qatar Foundation For Education Science And Community Dev Honeybot: Mobile Honeypot detection and isolation techniques for adhoc malicious communications
US10333949B1 (en) * 2016-03-15 2019-06-25 Symantec Corporation Proactive protection of mobile operating system malware via blocking of infection vector
CN106454498B (en) * 2016-11-03 2019-06-04 四川长虹电器股份有限公司 The method of Android platform management USB device
WO2018227559A1 (en) * 2017-06-16 2018-12-20 深圳市海和高新技术有限公司 Wireless communication device
CN108683662B (en) * 2018-05-14 2020-08-14 深圳市联软科技股份有限公司 Individual online equipment risk assessment method and system

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060253712A1 (en) * 2003-05-13 2006-11-09 Francois-Dominique Armingaud System for real-time healing of vital computer files
US7353538B2 (en) * 2002-11-08 2008-04-01 Federal Network Systems Llc Server resource management, analysis, and intrusion negation
US20090106834A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Andrew Gerard Borzycki Systems and methods for enhancing security by selectively opening a listening port when an incoming connection is expected
US8271642B1 (en) * 2007-08-29 2012-09-18 Mcafee, Inc. System, method, and computer program product for isolating a device associated with at least potential data leakage activity, based on user input
US20130054962A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Deepak Chawla Policy configuration for mobile device applications
US20130055347A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Deepak Chawla Hardware interface access control for mobile applications
US8590033B2 (en) * 2008-09-25 2013-11-19 Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. One button security lockdown of a process control network
US8650620B2 (en) * 2010-12-20 2014-02-11 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Methods and apparatus to control privileges of mobile device applications

Family Cites Families (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP0610677A3 (en) 1993-02-12 1995-08-02 Ibm Bimodal communications device driver.
JP2000503154A (en) * 1996-01-11 2000-03-14 エムアールジェイ インコーポレイテッド System for controlling access and distribution of digital ownership
US6189050B1 (en) * 1998-05-08 2001-02-13 Compaq Computer Corporation Method and apparatus for adding or removing devices from a computer system without restarting
US7743407B2 (en) * 2001-08-13 2010-06-22 Qualcomm Incorporated Using permissions to allocate device resources to an application
US20030084340A1 (en) 2001-10-31 2003-05-01 Schertz Richard L. System and method of graphically displaying data for an intrusion protection system
US7269851B2 (en) * 2002-01-07 2007-09-11 Mcafee, Inc. Managing malware protection upon a computer network
US7146638B2 (en) * 2002-06-27 2006-12-05 International Business Machines Corporation Firewall protocol providing additional information
US6782000B2 (en) 2002-10-31 2004-08-24 Ciena Corporation Method, system and storage medium for providing a cross connect user interface
US7739693B2 (en) 2002-11-25 2010-06-15 Sap Ag Generic application program interface for native drivers
US8127359B2 (en) * 2003-04-11 2012-02-28 Samir Gurunath Kelekar Systems and methods for real-time network-based vulnerability assessment
US7310664B1 (en) * 2004-02-06 2007-12-18 Extreme Networks Unified, configurable, adaptive, network architecture
JP2007529807A (en) * 2004-03-17 2007-10-25 コーニンクレッカ フィリップス エレクトロニクス エヌ ヴィ Method and device for generating authentication status list
US7417953B2 (en) * 2004-11-01 2008-08-26 Alcatel Lucent Port re-enabling by monitoring link status
US8291063B2 (en) * 2005-03-04 2012-10-16 Netapp, Inc. Method and apparatus for communicating between an agent and a remote management module in a processing system
US8140664B2 (en) 2005-05-09 2012-03-20 Trend Micro Incorporated Graphical user interface based sensitive information and internal information vulnerability management system
US7421625B2 (en) * 2005-05-26 2008-09-02 Microsoft Corporation Indicating data connection and status conditions
CN1852129A (en) * 2005-07-08 2006-10-25 华为技术有限公司 Apparatus port monitoring system and method
US7752436B2 (en) 2005-08-09 2010-07-06 Intel Corporation Exclusive access for secure audio program
US7712132B1 (en) 2005-10-06 2010-05-04 Ogilvie John W Detecting surreptitious spyware
US8554748B1 (en) * 2005-11-30 2013-10-08 Netapp, Inc. Method and apparatus for differential file based update for embedded systems
US8011013B2 (en) * 2006-07-19 2011-08-30 Quickvault, Inc. Method for securing and controlling USB ports
IL186275D0 (en) * 2007-09-25 2008-08-07 Newvaltech Knowledge Services Telecommunication policy program systems, processes and devices
US8935741B2 (en) 2008-04-17 2015-01-13 iAnywhere Solutions, Inc Policy enforcement in mobile devices
GB0815587D0 (en) * 2008-08-27 2008-10-01 Applied Neural Technologies Ltd Computer/network security application
US9043919B2 (en) * 2008-10-21 2015-05-26 Lookout, Inc. Crawling multiple markets and correlating
CA2722980C (en) * 2009-12-01 2019-01-08 Inside Contactless Process for controlling access to a contactless interface in a contact and contactless double communication interface integrated circuit
US8539584B2 (en) * 2010-08-30 2013-09-17 International Business Machines Corporation Rootkit monitoring agent built into an operating system kernel
KR20120096983A (en) * 2011-02-24 2012-09-03 삼성전자주식회사 Malware detection method and mobile terminal therefor
US9053337B2 (en) * 2011-06-07 2015-06-09 Blackberry Limited Methods and devices for controlling access to a computing resource by applications executable on a computing device
US9390251B2 (en) 2011-08-08 2016-07-12 Intel Corporation Delivering data from a range of input devices over a secure path to trusted services in a secure element
US9507967B2 (en) 2012-02-15 2016-11-29 Blackberry Limited Thwarting attacks that involve analyzing hardware sensor output
US8595489B1 (en) * 2012-10-29 2013-11-26 Google Inc. Grouping and ranking of application permissions
EP2784714A1 (en) 2013-03-28 2014-10-01 Alcatel Lucent Method of preventing access to sensitive data of a computing device
US9208349B1 (en) 2015-01-13 2015-12-08 Snoopwall, Inc. Securing data gathering devices of a personal computing device while performing sensitive data gathering activities to prevent the misappropriation of personal user data gathered therewith

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7353538B2 (en) * 2002-11-08 2008-04-01 Federal Network Systems Llc Server resource management, analysis, and intrusion negation
US20060253712A1 (en) * 2003-05-13 2006-11-09 Francois-Dominique Armingaud System for real-time healing of vital computer files
US8271642B1 (en) * 2007-08-29 2012-09-18 Mcafee, Inc. System, method, and computer program product for isolating a device associated with at least potential data leakage activity, based on user input
US20090106834A1 (en) * 2007-10-19 2009-04-23 Andrew Gerard Borzycki Systems and methods for enhancing security by selectively opening a listening port when an incoming connection is expected
US8590033B2 (en) * 2008-09-25 2013-11-19 Fisher-Rosemount Systems, Inc. One button security lockdown of a process control network
US8650620B2 (en) * 2010-12-20 2014-02-11 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Methods and apparatus to control privileges of mobile device applications
US20130054962A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Deepak Chawla Policy configuration for mobile device applications
US20130055347A1 (en) * 2011-08-31 2013-02-28 Deepak Chawla Hardware interface access control for mobile applications

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150215330A1 (en) * 2014-01-30 2015-07-30 Shine Security Ltd. Methods and systems of controlling distribution of personal data over network(s)
US20150215804A1 (en) * 2014-01-30 2015-07-30 Shine Security Ltd. Network traffic event management at the client terminal level
US20180070261A1 (en) * 2014-01-30 2018-03-08 Shine Security Ltd. Network traffic event management at the client terminal level
US9807639B2 (en) * 2014-01-30 2017-10-31 Shine Security Ltd. Network traffic event management at the client terminal level
US10270804B2 (en) * 2014-08-13 2019-04-23 F-Secure Corporation Detection of webcam abuse
US10623435B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2020-04-14 Proofpoint, Inc. Application security analysis
WO2016064930A1 (en) * 2014-10-21 2016-04-28 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for application security analysis
US9967278B2 (en) 2014-10-21 2018-05-08 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for application security analysis
US10097576B2 (en) * 2014-10-21 2018-10-09 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for application security analysis
US9838391B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2017-12-05 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for privately performing application security analysis
US10270769B2 (en) 2014-10-31 2019-04-23 Proofpoint, Inc. Privately performing application security analysis
US20190182247A1 (en) * 2014-10-31 2019-06-13 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and Methods for Security Analysis of Applications on User Mobile Devices While Maintaining User Application Privacy
US10505933B2 (en) * 2014-10-31 2019-12-10 Proofpoint, Inc. Systems and methods for security analysis of applications on user mobile devices while maintaining user application privacy
US10778698B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2020-09-15 International Business Machines Corporation Monitoring use of a sensor of a computing device
US10225267B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2019-03-05 International Business Machines Corporation Monitoring use of a sensor of a computing device
US9866572B2 (en) 2014-11-20 2018-01-09 International Business Machines Corporation Monitoring use of a sensor of a computing device
US9965631B2 (en) * 2015-09-22 2018-05-08 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Apparatus and method for analyzing malicious code in multi-core environment using a program flow tracer
US20170083705A1 (en) * 2015-09-22 2017-03-23 Electronics And Telecommunications Research Institute Apparatus and method for analyzing malicious code in multi-core environment
US9954873B2 (en) 2015-09-30 2018-04-24 The Mitre Corporation Mobile device-based intrusion prevention system
CN108370499A (en) * 2015-10-27 2018-08-03 黑莓有限公司 Resource is detected to access
US10764860B2 (en) 2015-10-27 2020-09-01 Blackberry Limited Monitoring resource access
EP3369191A4 (en) * 2015-10-27 2019-05-22 BlackBerry Limited Detecting resource access
WO2017075087A1 (en) 2015-10-27 2017-05-04 Blackberry Limited Detecting resource access
US10008814B1 (en) * 2017-02-15 2018-06-26 Holster Lab LLC Microphone muting device
WO2019164623A1 (en) * 2018-02-22 2019-08-29 Motorola Solutions, Inc. Disabling a digital assistant during a conference call based on security level
GB2585771A (en) * 2018-02-22 2021-01-20 Motorola Solutions Inc Disabling a digital assistant during a conference call based on security level
WO2019246024A1 (en) * 2018-06-18 2019-12-26 A7Technology Inc. Systems and methods for computer security

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US9942269B2 (en) 2018-04-10
US20170324775A9 (en) 2017-11-09
US20140359768A1 (en) 2014-12-04
WO2014081468A1 (en) 2014-05-30

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10333990B2 (en) Policy management
US10348771B2 (en) Learned behavior based security
US9846776B1 (en) System and method for detecting file altering behaviors pertaining to a malicious attack
US10701036B2 (en) System, method, and computer program for preventing infections from spreading in a network environment using dynamic application of a firewall policy
US10375101B2 (en) Computer implemented techniques for detecting, investigating and remediating security violations to IT infrastructure
US10515211B2 (en) Use of an application controller to monitor and control software file and application environments
US9740859B2 (en) Threat detection using reputation data
US10516531B2 (en) Key management for compromised enterprise endpoints
US10382459B2 (en) Threat detection using a time-based cache of reputation information on an enterprise endpoint
JP6147309B2 (en) Computer program, system, method and apparatus
US10516682B2 (en) Forensic analysis of computing activity
US10375116B2 (en) System and method to provide server control for access to mobile client data
US10666686B1 (en) Virtualized exploit detection system
US10558800B2 (en) Labeling objects on an endpoint for encryption management
D’Orazio et al. Data exfiltration from Internet of Things devices: iOS devices as case studies
US10489588B2 (en) Endpoint malware detection using an event graph
US10375572B2 (en) User interface for security protection and remote management of network endpoints
US10447708B2 (en) Server drift monitoring
CA2968201C (en) Systems and methods for malicious code detection
EP3298527B1 (en) Secured access control to cloud-based applications
US20180316720A1 (en) System and Method for Process Hollowing Detection
US9680849B2 (en) Rootkit detection by using hardware resources to detect inconsistencies in network traffic
US10673902B2 (en) Labeling computing objects for improved threat detection
US9571512B2 (en) Threat detection using endpoint variance
GB2506237B (en) Security access protection for user data stored in a cloud computing facility

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: SNOOPWALL LLC, NEW HAMPSHIRE

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MILIEFSKY, GARY S.;REEL/FRAME:030664/0359

Effective date: 20130614

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION