US20140098445A1 - Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter - Google Patents

Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140098445A1
US20140098445A1 US13588657 US201213588657A US2014098445A1 US 20140098445 A1 US20140098445 A1 US 20140098445A1 US 13588657 US13588657 US 13588657 US 201213588657 A US201213588657 A US 201213588657A US 2014098445 A1 US2014098445 A1 US 2014098445A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
power
invention
alarm
device
appliance
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13588657
Inventor
Donald Randolph Hooper
Original Assignee
Donald Randolph Hooper
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02HEMERGENCY PROTECTIVE CIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS
    • H02H3/00Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection
    • H02H3/16Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection responsive to fault current to earth, frame or mass
    • H02H3/162Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection responsive to fault current to earth, frame or mass for ac systems
    • H02H3/165Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection responsive to fault current to earth, frame or mass for ac systems for three-phase systems
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B17/00Fire alarms; Alarms responsive to explosion
    • G08B17/06Electric actuation of the alarm, e.g. using a thermally-operated switch
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08BSIGNALLING OR CALLING SYSTEMS; ORDER TELEGRAPHS; ALARM SYSTEMS
    • G08B17/00Fire alarms; Alarms responsive to explosion
    • G08B17/10Actuation by presence of smoke or gases automatic alarm devices for analysing flowing fluid materials by the use of optical means
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02HEMERGENCY PROTECTIVE CIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS
    • H02H1/00Details of emergency protective circuit arrangements
    • H02H1/0007Details of emergency protective circuit arrangements concerning the detecting means
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02HEMERGENCY PROTECTIVE CIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS
    • H02H3/00Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection
    • H02H3/16Emergency protective circuit arrangements for automatic disconnection directly responsive to an undesired change from normal electric working condition with or without subsequent reconnection ; integrated protection responsive to fault current to earth, frame or mass
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LELECTRIC EQUIPMENT OR PROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES, IN GENERAL
    • B60L3/00Electric devices on electrically-propelled vehicles for safety purposes; Monitoring operating variables, e.g. speed, deceleration, power consumption
    • B60L3/0023Detecting, eliminating, remedying or compensating for drive train abnormalities, e.g. failures within the drive train
    • B60L3/0069Detecting, eliminating, remedying or compensating for drive train abnormalities, e.g. failures within the drive train relating to the isolation, e.g. ground fault or leak current
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60LELECTRIC EQUIPMENT OR PROPULSION OF ELECTRICALLY-PROPELLED VEHICLES; MAGNETIC SUSPENSION OR LEVITATION FOR VEHICLES; ELECTRODYNAMIC BRAKE SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLES, IN GENERAL
    • B60L3/00Electric devices on electrically-propelled vehicles for safety purposes; Monitoring operating variables, e.g. speed, deceleration, power consumption
    • B60L3/04Cutting off the power supply under fault conditions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01RMEASURING ELECTRIC VARIABLES; MEASURING MAGNETIC VARIABLES
    • G01R31/00Arrangements for testing electric properties; Arrangements for locating electric faults; Arrangements for electrical testing characterised by what is being tested not provided for elsewhere
    • G01R31/02Testing of electric apparatus, lines or components, for short-circuits, discontinuities, leakage of current, or incorrect line connection
    • G01R31/024Arrangements for indicating continuity or short-circuits in electric apparatus or lines, leakage or ground faults
    • G01R31/025Testing short circuits, leakage or ground faults
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H2239/00Miscellaneous
    • H01H2239/054Acoustic pick-up, e.g. ultrasonic
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H83/00Protective switches, e.g. circuit-breaking switches, or protective relays operated by abnormal electrical conditions otherwise than solely by excess current
    • H01H83/20Protective switches, e.g. circuit-breaking switches, or protective relays operated by abnormal electrical conditions otherwise than solely by excess current operated by excess current as well as by some other abnormal electrical condition
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01HELECTRIC SWITCHES; RELAYS; SELECTORS; EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE DEVICES
    • H01H83/00Protective switches, e.g. circuit-breaking switches, or protective relays operated by abnormal electrical conditions otherwise than solely by excess current
    • H01H83/20Protective switches, e.g. circuit-breaking switches, or protective relays operated by abnormal electrical conditions otherwise than solely by excess current operated by excess current as well as by some other abnormal electrical condition
    • H01H83/22Protective switches, e.g. circuit-breaking switches, or protective relays operated by abnormal electrical conditions otherwise than solely by excess current operated by excess current as well as by some other abnormal electrical condition the other condition being unbalance of two or more currents or voltages
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02T90/10Technologies related to electric vehicle charging
    • Y02T90/14Plug-in electric vehicles

Abstract

The current invention is an automatic AC power interruption system built into a portable power strip or a portable casing or integrated into an appliances control circuitry. The invention monitors the environment for hazard alarms, for example, a T3 signal smoke detector alarm, and responds by tripping open the power supply circuit to the power strip's receptacles and thus interrupts AC power to the protected appliances the user has chosen to plug into them. One alternate form of the invention uses a portable casing that can be plugged into a power receptacle and, when a hazard alarm is detected, trip off the nearest GFCI. Other alternate forms of the invention are integrated within an individual appliance's control circuitry and may interrupt power using a built-in switch or by tripping off the nearest GFCI device. The invention's purpose is to help prevent death, injury, and property damage by preventing fires or facilitating fire suppression; more particularly, by interrupting electrical power to problematic appliances, such as toasters, space heaters, battery chargers, stoves, and motors, when a hazardous condition alarm is emitted. It further interrupts power to the problematic appliances when a detector emits an alarm indicating toxic fumes, natural gas, radon, carbon monoxide, or whatever other detector-alarm the consumer installs in the area to be protected.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • Provisional Application 61/575,177 (Aug. 17, 2011) Donald Randolph Hooper
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Wherever electrical circuits provide power to appliances, motors, and other equipment, it is desirable to electronically monitor the environment for hazardous conditions and, when detected, generate an audible alarm to warn people and protect property. For example, smoke detectors generate an audible alarm, but other detectors may warn of toxic fumes, flammable gases, radon, carbon monoxide, fire, or other hazardous conditions. The invention will interrupt electric power to select circuits when it detects a hazardous condition alarm in order to prevent personal injuries, prevent fires, facilitate fire suppression, and protect property. The source of the alarm signal could be any audible, visible or invisible light, radio frequency, or other type signal, or combination of signals, generated by a device tuned to detect the presence of hazardous conditions. The invention may protect a power strip, wall outlet, or electrical panel circuit, or the invention may be integrated into the control circuitry of an individual appliance or machine.
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention is in the field of electricity. More particularly, the present invention is in the technical field of electrical safety devices.
  • The present invention relates generally to devices that control and distribute alternating current (AC) electric power from receptacles to appliances, motors, or other equipment and, when an alarm signal is detected, automatically interrupt the flow of electric power in order to prevent personal injuries, prevent fires, facilitate fire suppression, and protect property. More particularly, without limiting the scope of the invention's applications, four embodiments of the invention are:
      • FIRST EMBODIMENT: an alarm sensor with circuit interrupter integrated in a power strip
      • SECOND EMBODIMENT: an alarm sensor and circuit interrupter integrated in an appliance's control circuitry
      • THIRD EMBODIMENT: an alarm sensor with control circuit in a portable casing that trips off a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)
      • FOURTH EMBODIMENT: an alarm sensor with control circuit integrated in an appliance's control circuitry that trips off a GFCI
  • 2. Description of Prior Art
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,508,568 issued to Alex Mammen on Apr. 16, 1996, describes a receptacle safety de-energizer that responds to an audible smoke alarm signal by disconnecting power to its one or two receptacles. It is intended to completely cover the existing wall outlet and provide an external appearance similar to that of a standard electrical receptacle. This arrangement has the disadvantage of hiding the original outlet with a seemingly permanent receptacle. The consumer may inadvertently plug in an appliance that is intended to remain fully powered at all times. Also, its appearance may cause the consumer to believe they must purchase an additional unit for every outlet in the building, rather than move a portable unit as needed, thus discouraging its use and safety benefits. This emphasizes the need for a simple portable unit that does not obstruct the user's choice between an interrupt or non-interrupt circuit receptacle.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,154,402, issued to Michael Dayoub on Dec. 26, 2006, describes a power strip with a built-in smoke only detector and auto-shutoff, with indicators and switches, all in a single unit. This arrangement requires the power strip be permanently mounted nearby and above the appliance to be monitored for smoke, and additional appliances plugged into its receptacles may not be protected. This emphasizes the need for a simple portable power strip separate from the hazard detector and able to respond to any smoke detector alarm within its range.
  • U.S. Pat. App. No. 2008/0018484 Al published for Merrell Sager on Jan. 24, 2008, describes an automatic power interruption system wherein a smoke detector broadcasts a radio frequency (RF) alarm to a remote RF receiver that causes a specific circuit breaker in the electrical panel box to be tripped open. The disadvantages of this arrangement include that power is interrupted to all appliances on the circuit tripped, it requires professional installation, and it is difficult to reset the circuit while monitoring for the defective appliance. This emphasizes the need for a simple portable unit where the appliances, plugs, and reset button are nearby the operator.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,522,035, issued to InnovAlarm Corp. on Apr. 21, 2009, for a sound monitoring and alarm response method, system and device that detects a variety of smoke alarm signals and generates a wake-up alarm at the consumer's bedside. The disadvantage of this bedside monitor is that it does not, and is not intended to, interrupt power to any appliance. This emphasizes the need for a simple portable unit to automatically interrupt power (an ignition source) to specific appliances and circuits at any time of day or night when a hazard alarm is emitted.
  • This emphasizes the need for a simple portable unit where the appliances, plugs, and reset button are nearby the operator.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 7,522,035, issued to InnovAlarm Corp. on Apr. 21, 2009, for a sound monitoring and alarm response method, system and device that detects a variety of smoke alarm signals and generates a wake-up alarm at the consumer's bedside. The disadvantage of this bedside monitor is that it does not, and is not intended to, interrupt power to any appliance. This emphasizes the need for a simple portable unit to automatically interrupt power (an ignition source) to specific appliances and circuits at any time of day or night when a hazard alarm is emitted.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The FIRST EMBODIMENT of the invention is a power strip casing and internal components that cut off alternating current (AC) electrical power to its receptacles when a hazard alarm is detected. During normal operation, power flows through the power strip to the user AC outlets and then to whatever appliances are plugged in. When an alarm signal from a hazard detector is sensed, the control circuitry shuts off power to all outlet receptacles on the power strip until the user manually resets the device. The first embodiment of the invention does not require the AC receptacle into which it is plugged be protected with any type of GFCI device.
  • The SECOND EMBODIMENT of the invention integrates the invention into the control circuitry of an appliance, machine or other equipment. During normal operation, power flows to an appliance, machine, or other equipment and, when a hazard alarm is sensed, the invention initiates a controlled shutdown and power cut off. The second embodiment of the invention does not require the AC circuit with which it is connected be protected with any type of GFCI device.
  • The THIRD EMBODIMENT of the invention is a small portable casing with internal components, openings, and a standard three-prong electrical plug, which can be plugged into a power strip, wall outlet, or other electrical receptacle. During normal operation, power flows to whatever appliances are plugged into a power strip, wall outlet, or other receptacle, including the invention. When the invention senses a hazard alarm, it creates an amperage variance sufficient to trip off the nearest GFCI, which cuts off AC electrical power to all appliances plugged into the corresponding power strip, wall outlet, or electrical panel. AC power is restored to the receptacles by the consumer pressing the affected GFCI's reset button. The third embodiment of the invention requires the AC circuit into which it is plugged be protected with a standard GFCI device.
  • The FOURTH EMBODIMENT of the invention integrates the invention into the control circuitry of an appliance, machine or other equipment. During normal operation, power flows to an appliance, machine, or other equipment and, when a hazard alarm is sensed, the invention initiates a controlled shutdown and then generates an amperage variance to trip off the nearest GFCI. The fourth embodiment of the invention requires the AC circuit into which it is plugged be protected with a standard GFCI device.
  • In all embodiments of the invention, the hazard alarm signal sensor typically monitors for an audible smoke detector alarm, but may detect any audible, visible or invisible light, radio frequency, or other type of signal, or combination of signals, generated by a device tuned to detect the presence of hazardous conditions. In addition, the alarm sensor may be adjustable to respond to whatever frequency or pattern the hazard alarm emits.
  • The first embodiment (power strip, no GFCI) and third embodiment (portable casing, GFCI) of the invention have these new features:
  • The first embodiment (power-strip) and third embodiment (portable casing) of the invention have these new features:
  • The invention is simple; that is, it can be unplugged from one outlet and, moved, and plugged into another outlet, ready to respond to hazard alarm signals in the new environment.
  • The invention only operates on appliances the user chooses to plug into its power-strip, wall outlet or electrical panel; the invention neither hides nor obstructs other unused wall outlets, thus providing the user a choice of AC power sources.
  • It supports the existing features of the outlet into which it is plugged; that is, it will not interfere with the normal operations of the source outlet, such as ground fault interrupt, arc fault circuit breaker, surge protection, uninterruptable power supply, and power overload circuit breaker.
  • The invention responds to all types of hazard alarms within its range that match its hazard alarm definitions.
  • When the invention has interrupted power to its receptacles, the user can plainly see which appliances are plugged into the invention in order to determine which, if any, created smoke or other fumes and thus caused the pre-existing hazard detector to emit its hazard alarm. The second embodiment (integrated, no GFCI) and fourth embodiment (integrated, GFCI) of the invention have these new features:
  • It responds to all types of hazard alarms within its range that match its hazard alarm definition.
  • The invention interrupts power to the appliance, machine or other equipment until the user is satisfied that it is not the cause of the alarm or until it is repaired and the user must manually reset the power.
  • The invention can be incorporated within particular models of appliances, machines, or other equipment as a built-in safety feature.
  • These and other features of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an external illustration of the housing, commonly referred to as a power strip, for the invention's first embodiment.
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the electronic flow within the power strip housing for the invention's first embodiment.
  • FIG. 3 is an illustration of the interaction of the hazard-detected signal, or trigger voltage, with the circuit interruption switch to shut off AC power to the receptacles for the invention's first embodiment.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective external illustration of the portable casing of the invention's third embodiment.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the electronic flow within the portable casing of the invention's third embodiment.
  • FIG. 6 is a an illustration of the interaction of the hazard-detected signal, or trigger voltage, with the amperage variance switch to trip off GFCI power to the receptacles in the third embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring now to the invention in more detail, in FIG. 1 there is shown an external illustration of the power strip circuit interrupter. The invention appears much like any power strip with one noticeable difference being an alarm detector access hole 12 on the housing 10 which allows hazard alarm signals into the enclosure for the purpose of audible alarm detection. The invention consists of a housing 10 for electronic components, an AC power cord with male plug 16 to receive supplied AC power 18, and AC receptacles 14 to provide power to other devices plugged into the invention.
  • The preferred embodiment of the housing 10 is a metal box with one or more AC receptacles 14, such as NEMA 5-15R, for appliances to plug in and receive AC power. The housing 10 contains the main power ON/OFF switch 20 to manually connect or disconnect power to the entire device, including to the receptacles 14 and thus to the consumer attached appliances, not shown. Optionally, the housing 10 may contain a main power ON/OFF indicator light emitting diode (LED) as a separate component 22 or incorporated into the main power ON/OFF switch 20. The housing 10 contains a manually operated reset switch 24 to re-enable power to the receptacles 14 after power has been interrupted. A hazard condition indicator LED 26 on the housing 10 can be provided to show the AC power circuit to the receptacles 14 is in a tripped, or open, condition due to detection of a hazard alarm. An optional hazard alarm test button 28 to emit an audible alarm may be included. A conventional AC cord with male plug 16 is used to attach the power strip to a standard 120V AC power outlet. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the invention can be manufactured to operate with any other AC voltage, including without limitation 220V AC.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the first embodiment of the invention described above can be modified into the second embodiment as follows: Industry producers may choose to incorporate the circuitry of the first embodiment of the invention into the control circuit of a single device being protected. In this case, the housing would be modified or eliminated entirely and the device housing would be modified to accommodate the invention. This second embodiment would not require the AC circuit with which it is connected be protected with any type of GFCI device.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art of making power strip housings that any number or variety of brackets, hooks, slots, or mounting holes, or none at all, can be incorporated into the housing 10 and is nonessential to the invention. Further, the consumer is responsible for placement of the invention within reach of the appliance cords, and any special mounting methods used to locate the housing, or whether it simply lays flat on a counter or floor. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the number or configuration of AC receptacles 14 is nonessential to the invention. One or more rows of AC receptacles 14 can be used to accommodate the needs of the industry or consumer.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that industry producers may choose to include surge protection, a ground fault circuit breaker, a main power ON/OFF indicator light 22, a hazard alarm test button 28, a ground fault circuit test button, or any other accoutrement common to a power strip, without affecting the novelty of the invention. Moreover, the number, type, or configuration of external lights, buttons, and switches is nonessential to the invention, except that the invention must have at least a main power ON/OFF switch 20, reset switch 24, hazard condition indicator LED 26, and alarm detector access hole 12.
  • Referring now to the invention shown in FIG. 2 which shows a block diagram of the electronic flow within the power strip, input AC power 18 is routed first through the main power ON/OFF switch 20 and then, if present, through the ground fault circuit breaker and surge protection components 30. A typical off-the-shelf ground fault circuit breaker 30, such as Hwawon Electronic's HW-15-MB, would be suitable, but industry producers could use any ground fault and circuit overload protection that meets their target consumers' needs.
  • AC power is conducted to both the hazard alarm detector components 32 and the circuit interrupter switch 34, which is controlled by the invention's hazard alarm detector components 32. In its preferred first embodiment, the circuit interrupter switch 34 is a mechanical relay such as Electronic Inc.'s R25-5A16-120 16 Amp 120V AC SPDT relay, but it could be any other type housing 10 contains a manually operated reset switch 24 to re-enable power to the receptacles 14 after power has been interrupted. A hazard condition indicator LED 26 on the housing 10 can be provided to show the AC power circuit to the receptacles 14 is in a tripped, or open, condition due to detection of a hazard alarm. An optional hazard alarm test button 28 to emit an audible alarm may be included. A conventional AC cord with male plug 16 is used to attach the power strip to a standard 120V AC power outlet. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the invention can be manufactured to operate with any other AC voltage, including without limitation 220V AC. housing 10 contains a manually operated reset switch 24 to re-enable power to the receptacles 14 after power has been interrupted. A hazard condition indicator LED 26 on the housing 10 can be provided to show the AC power circuit to the receptacles 14 is in a tripped, or open, condition due to detection of a hazard alarm. An optional hazard alarm test button 28 to emit an audible alarm may be included. A conventional AC cord with male plug 16 is used to attach the power strip to a standard 120V AC power outlet. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the invention can be manufactured to operate with any other AC voltage, including without limitation 220V AC.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the first embodiment of the invention described above can be modified into the second embodiment as follows: Industry producers may choose to incorporate the circuitry of the first embodiment of the invention into the control circuit of a single device being protected. In this case, the housing would be modified or eliminated entirely and the device housing would be modified to accommodate the invention. This second embodiment would not require the AC circuit with which it is connected be protected with any type of GFCI device.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art of making power strip housings that any number or variety of brackets, hooks, slots, or mounting holes, or none at all, can be incorporated into the housing 10 and is nonessential to the invention. Further, the consumer is responsible for placement of the invention within reach of the appliance cords, and any special mounting methods used to locate the housing, or whether it simply lays flat on a counter or floor. It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the number or configuration of AC receptacles 14 is nonessential to the invention. One or more rows of AC receptacles 14 can be used to accommodate the needs of the industry or consumer.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that industry producers may choose to include surge protection, a ground fault circuit breaker, a main power ON/OFF indicator light 22, a hazard alarm test button 28, a ground fault circuit test button, or any other accoutrement common to a power strip, without affecting the novelty of the invention. Moreover, the number, type, or configuration of external lights, buttons, and switches is nonessential to the invention, except that the invention must have at least a main power ON/OFF switch 20, reset switch 24, hazard condition indicator LED 26, and alarm detector access hole 12.
  • Referring now to the invention shown in FIG. 2 which shows a block diagram of the electronic flow within the power strip, input AC power 18 is routed first through the main power ON/OFF switch 20 and then, if present, through the ground fault circuit breaker and surge protection components 30. A typical off-the-shelf ground fault circuit breaker 30, such as Hwawon Electronic's HW-15-MB, would be suitable, but industry producers could use any ground fault and circuit overload protection that meets their target consumers' needs.
  • AC power is conducted to both the hazard alarm detector components 32 and the circuit interrupter switch 34, which is controlled by the invention's hazard alarm detector components 32. In its preferred first embodiment, the circuit interrupter switch 34 is a mechanical relay such as Electronic Inc.'s R25-5A16-120 16 Amp 120V AC SPDT relay, but it could be any other type of electronically controlled switch. When the circuit interrupter switch 34 is in the closed state, AC power is conducted through the circuit interrupter switch 34 to the AC Receptacles 14. When the hazard alarm detector components 32 detect a hazard alarm signal, power is supplied to the hazard indicator led 26 and a hazard detected signal 36 is transmitted to the circuit interrupter switch 34, opening the switch and preventing AC power from reaching the ac receptacles.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that a variety of placement strategies and electromagnetic shielding can be used in the preferred embodiment to protect electrical components from disruptive electrical fields generated during the relay's switch action without affecting the invention.
  • It will also be obvious to those skilled in the art that the first embodiment of the invention described above can be modified into the second embodiment as follows: Industry producers may choose to incorporate the circuitry of the first embodiment of the invention into the control circuit of a single device being protected. In this case, the housing would be modified or eliminated entirely and the device housing would be modified to accommodate the invention. This second embodiment would not require the AC circuit with which it is connected be protected with any type of GFCI device.
  • Now referring to the invention shown in FIG. 3, which is an illustration of the interaction of the hazard-detected signal 36, or trigger voltage, with the circuit interrupter switch 34. The hazard alarm detector components 32 draw AC power for hazard signal detection and logic purposes. In its preferred embodiment, hazard alarm detector 32 components are constituted by a microphone 38 and an application integrated circuit 40 (not shown) or, in the alternative, a field programmable gate array (FPGA)(not shown). The application integrated circuit 40, or FPGA, is a commercially available integrated circuit which amplifies the current from the microphone 38 and executes its algorithm to determine whether to output the alarm condition to the hazard condition indicator LED 26, the circuit interrupter switch 34, or other electrical devices. The application integrated circuit 40, or FPGA, algorithm shall be programmable to detect the Temporal 3, or T3, signal pattern described in ANSI standard S3.42 1990, at all audible frequencies, including 3100 Hz and 520 Hz. The application integrated circuit 40 may optionally include a manual control to adjust which alarm frequency constitutes a hazardous alarm signal.
  • For example, the Alarm sensor, U.S. Pat. No. 7,477,144, currently incorporated in the Lifetone Bedside Fire Alarm Clock, may be used as the hazard alarm detector components 32 to produce the hazard-detected (trigger) signal 36 because it is specifically tuned to recognize and react to both the common 3100 Hz smoke detector signal and the T3 520 Hz acoustic pattern signal at all audible frequencies.
  • When the application integrated circuit 40, or FPGA, determines that a hazardous condition alarm has been detected, it sends a hazard-detected signal 36, or trigger voltage, to the circuit interrupter switch 34 to open, which interrupts the flow of AC power to the AC receptacles 14.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the hazardous alarm signal detection technology selected is immaterial to the patent. In its preferred first embodiment as described above, the method is detection of audible frequencies with a microphone 38 and amplification and analysis by an application integrated circuit 40, or FPGA. The invention could exploit other technologies, whether in existence and unknown to the invention or those developed or improved in the future, without affecting the novelty of the invention.
  • The advantages of the present first embodiment of the invention include, without limitation, it is simple to install and operate, it is portable, it only operates on the appliances the user chooses to plug into its receptacles, it does not hide or obstruct wall outlets, it does not interfere with existing features of the AC power source outlet, it responds to all audible hazard alarm signals that match its definitions, and the user can plainly see and test all of the appliances plugged into the device.
  • The advantages of the second embodiment of the invention include, without limitation its is integrated into the electronic controls of an, appliance, machine or other equipment, it does not interfere with the existing features of the AC power source, it responds to all hazard alarm signals that match its definitions and the operator or technician can plainly inspect and test the appliance, machine or other equipment prior to resetting AC power to the control electronics. Referring now to the third embodiment of the invention in more detail, in FIG. 5 there is shown a perspective view external illustration of the Sensor-Activated Circuit Interrupter's portable casing 42. The casing's 42 dimensions are not critical except that it must hold all the required components and not obstruct adjacent receptacles when plugged into a power strip. FIG. 5 shows a typical placement of the standard three-prong plug 44, which includes hot, neutral, and ground prongs on the bottom of the casing 42. The main power ON indicator LED 46 and alarm detector access hole 48 are best located on the top surface of the casing 42; i.e., on the surface opposite from the standard three-prong plug 44. This arrangement facilitates visual inspection of the main power ON indicator LED 46 by the user and unobstructed reception of alarm signals into the alarm detector access hole 48. The alarm detector access hole 48 allows hazard alarm signals into the enclosure for detection by the hazard alarm detector components 50, not shown. The main power ON indicator LED 46 simply indicates that AC power is being supplied to the unit through the standard three-prong plug 44 and a no-light condition means the unit is either not plugged in or no power is available at the receptacle. Turning the unit on or off is accomplished by the user manually plugging or unplugging the unit from an AC power source 56, not shown. The invention is tested by the consumer manually activating the hazard alarm test button, not shown; e.g., on a smoke detector, and observing the main power ON indicator LED 46 turns off and AC power 56 is not available to the targeted appliances. The invention is reset by the consumer manually pressing the GFCI's reset button, not shown, on the affected power strip, wall outlet, or electrical panel.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the invention can be manufactured to operate with any other AC voltage, including without limitation 220V AC.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art of making electrical component casings that any number or variety of brackets, hooks, slots, holes, or none at all, can be incorporated into the portable casing 42 and is nonessential to the invention. Moreover, the number, type, or configuration of external lights, buttons, and switches is nonessential to the invention, except that the third embodiment of the invention must have at least a standard three-prong plug 44, a, main power ON indicator LED 46, and an alarm detector access hole 48.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the third embodiment of the invention described above can be modified into the fourth embodiment as follows: Industry producers may choose to incorporate the circuitry of the third embodiment of the invention into the control circuit of a single device being protected. In this case, the housing would be modified or eliminated entirely and the device housing would be modified to accommodate the invention. This fourth embodiment would require the AC circuit with which it is connected be protected with a standard GFCI device.
  • Referring now to the third embodiment of the invention in more detail, in FIG. 6 there is shown a block diagram of the electronic flow within the portable casing 42. Input AC power 56 is routed from the standard three-prong plug 44, shown in FIG. 5, through the main power ON LED 46 to the hazard alarm detector components 50, which includes a microphone 60, not shown, or other signal detector for audible, visible or invisible light, radio frequency, or other type of hazard alarm signal. When a matching signal is detected, the application integrated circuit 52 generates a hazard detected signal 58 that triggers the amperage variance switch 54 to generate an amperage variance back to the AC power 56 source sufficient to trip off the nearest GFCI, not shown. This embodiment requires a GFCI device in the consumer's AC power circuit, either in a power strip, wall outlet, or other receptacle connected to the electrical panel.
  • Now referring to the invention shown in FIG. 7, which is an illustration of the interaction of the hazard-detected signal 58 with the amperage variance switch 54. The hazard alarm detector components 50 draw AC power 56 for hazard signal detection and logic purposes. In its preferred embodiment, the hazard alarm detector components 50 are constituted by a microphone 60, not shown, and an application integrated circuit 52 or, in the alternative, a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The application integrated circuit 52, or FPGA, is a commercially available integrated circuit which amplifies the current from the microphone 60 and executes its algorithm to determine whether to output a hazard detected signal 58 to the amperage variance switch 54, or not. When the application integrated circuit 52, or FPGA, determines that a hazardous condition alarm has been detected, it sends a hazard-detected (trigger) signal 58, or trigger voltage, to the amperage variance switch 54 to generate an amperage variance back to the AC power 56 source sufficient to trip off the nearest GFCI, not shown. The application integrated circuit 52, or FPGA, algorithm shall be programmable to detect the Temporal 3, or T3, signal pattern described in ANSI standard 53.42 1990, at all audible frequencies, including 3100 Hz and 520 Hz. The application integrated circuit 52 may optionally include a manual control to adjust which alarm frequency constitutes a hazardous alarm signal.
  • It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the hazardous alarm signal detection technology selected is immaterial to the patent. In its preferred third embodiment as described above, the method is detection of audible frequencies with a microphone 60 and amplification and analysis by an application integrated circuit 52, or FPGA. The invention could exploit other technologies, whether in existence and unknown to the invention or those developed or improved in the future, without affecting the novelty of the invention.
  • The advantages of the present invention include, without limitation, it is simple to install and operate, it is portable, or is integrated into the appliance, it only operates on the appliances the user chooses to plug into the nearest GFCI circuit, it does not hide or obstruct wall outlets, it does not interfere with existing features of the AC power source outlet, it responds to all audible hazard alarm signals that match its definitions, and the user can plainly see and test all of the appliances plugged into the common GFCI circuit.
  • In broad embodiment, the present invention is a sensor that may detect hazard alarm signals of any type, but typically a smoke detector alarm signal, and, when detected, interrupts AC power to a specific circuit. In the first embodiment, the invention is integrated into a power strip and uses its built-in switch to interrupt power to all appliances plugged into its receptacles. In the second embodiment, the invention is integrated into an individual appliance's control circuitry and uses its built-in switch to interrupt power to that one appliance. In the third embodiment, the invention is in a portable casing that can be plugged into a typical GFCI receptacle and interrupts power by tripping off the GFCI. In the fourth embodiment, the invention is integrated into an individual appliance's control circuitry and interrupts power by tripping off the nearest GFCI
  • In broad embodiment, the present invention is a signal activated circuit interrupter that allows AC power to flow to one or more outlet receptacles during normal operation, but interrupts the power when an audible or other hazard alarm signal is emitted by a variety of hazardous condition detectors, for example, a smoke detector. The invention can be incorporated into a power strip, a portable casing, or integrated into an appliance's control circuitry.
  • While the foregoing written description of the invention enables one of ordinary skill to make and use what is considered presently to be the best mode thereof, those with ordinary skill will understand and appreciate the existence of variations, combinations, and equivalents of the specific embodiment, method, and examples herein. The invention should therefore not be limited by the above described embodiment, method, and examples, but by all embodiments and methods within the scope and spirit of the invention.

Claims (5)

    Therefore I claim:
  1. 1. A device for sensing the reason for and provides the signal or means for interrupting appliance or machine power which:
    a. receives and converts to electrical impulses, sound or other signals (fire alarm audible, radio frequency, or direct wired from a thermocouple or other device.) from an external to the appliance or machine or integrated in the appliance or machine sensor-signal generator
    b. transmits the appropriate activation signal via electrical, radio frequency, or optical signal to an integral or external circuit interrupter, circuit breaker or valve or other turn-off device.
  2. 2. A device of claim 1, wherein it is enclosed in a power strip configuration/circuit breaker capability.
  3. 3. A device of claim 1, wherein the device interacts directly with the internal safety circuitry of the appliance or machine. causing upon receipt of the signal the interruption of the power to the appliance or device.
  4. 4. A device of claim 1, where in the device is enclosed in an extension of the electric circuit outlet said enclosure also includes the shut-off circuitry necessary to interrupt the flow of power to the appliance or machine.
  5. 5. A device of claim 1 wherein the device interacts with a GFIC equipped circuit interrupter
US13588657 2011-08-17 2012-08-17 Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter Abandoned US20140098445A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201161575177 true 2011-08-17 2011-08-17
US13588657 US20140098445A1 (en) 2011-08-17 2012-08-17 Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13588657 US20140098445A1 (en) 2011-08-17 2012-08-17 Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter
US14552929 US9444244B2 (en) 2011-08-17 2014-11-25 Signal-activated circuit interrupter

Related Child Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14552929 Continuation US9444244B2 (en) 2011-08-17 2014-11-25 Signal-activated circuit interrupter
US14552929 Continuation-In-Part US9444244B2 (en) 2011-08-17 2014-11-25 Signal-activated circuit interrupter

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140098445A1 true true US20140098445A1 (en) 2014-04-10

Family

ID=50432480

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13588657 Abandoned US20140098445A1 (en) 2011-08-17 2012-08-17 Signal Activated Circuit Interrupter
US14552929 Active 2033-01-14 US9444244B2 (en) 2011-08-17 2014-11-25 Signal-activated circuit interrupter

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US14552929 Active 2033-01-14 US9444244B2 (en) 2011-08-17 2014-11-25 Signal-activated circuit interrupter

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US20140098445A1 (en)

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140028097A1 (en) * 2012-07-24 2014-01-30 Dennis Harold AUGUR Electrical outlet adapter with automatic power-on and power-off of peripheral outlets
US20140334640A1 (en) * 2013-05-08 2014-11-13 Shuen Yung CHAN Audio signal control of electrical outlet strip
US20150001937A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-01 Calvin Wang Adjustable Electrical-Power Outlet Strip
US20150022351A1 (en) * 2013-07-16 2015-01-22 Leeo, Inc. Electronic device with environmental monitoring
US9103805B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-08-11 Leeo, Inc. Environmental measurement display system and method
US9116137B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-08-25 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US20150262468A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 Wei-Li YANG Power socket temperature alarm device
US20150269821A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2015-09-24 Michael L. Haynes Systems and Methods for Controlling Electrical Current and Associated Appliances and Notification Thereof
US9170625B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-10-27 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
DE102014005774A1 (en) * 2014-04-23 2015-10-29 Holger Kollenbroich Fire adapter device
US9213327B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-12-15 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
USD746234S1 (en) * 2011-04-27 2015-12-29 Quirky Incorporated Reconfigurable plug strip
US9280681B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-08 Leeo, Inc. Environmental monitoring device
US9304590B2 (en) 2014-08-27 2016-04-05 Leen, Inc. Intuitive thermal user interface
US9372477B2 (en) 2014-07-15 2016-06-21 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US20160204613A1 (en) * 2013-08-06 2016-07-14 Bedrock Automation Plattforms Inc. Smart power system
US9445451B2 (en) 2014-10-20 2016-09-13 Leeo, Inc. Communicating arbitrary attributes using a predefined characteristic
US20160329673A1 (en) * 2015-05-05 2016-11-10 James Doyle McCormick Surge Protected Extension Cord with Multiple Outlet Sections
US20160343225A1 (en) * 2014-01-24 2016-11-24 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for alarm service using user status recognition information in electronic device
GB2539164A (en) * 2015-02-17 2016-12-14 Radford Alan Protective master switch
US9537266B1 (en) * 2014-10-10 2017-01-03 Justin James Leach Power strips with voice message playback
US20170018925A1 (en) * 2015-07-15 2017-01-19 Tricklestar Ltd Advanced Power Strip Having a High Level Interface
US9801013B2 (en) 2015-11-06 2017-10-24 Leeo, Inc. Electronic-device association based on location duration
US9865016B2 (en) 2014-09-08 2018-01-09 Leeo, Inc. Constrained environmental monitoring based on data privileges
US20180109130A1 (en) * 2016-10-19 2018-04-19 Ta Hsing Electric Wire & Cable Co., Ltd. Power device with multiple electrifying modes
US10026304B2 (en) 2014-10-20 2018-07-17 Leeo, Inc. Calibrating an environmental monitoring device
US10084272B1 (en) * 2017-03-23 2018-09-25 Group Dekko, Inc. Modular electrical receptacle

Families Citing this family (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9980356B2 (en) * 2013-01-04 2018-05-22 Cree, Inc. Lighting fixture with integral circuit protection
US9737192B2 (en) * 2014-01-28 2017-08-22 Haier Us Appliance Solutions, Inc. Door latch interruption upon detection of current leakage
US9600998B2 (en) * 2014-07-16 2017-03-21 Joel Lee MUMEY System, apparatus, and method for sensing gas
US10056722B1 (en) 2015-04-26 2018-08-21 Jamal A Ingram Devices and methods for providing electrical power

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4370692A (en) * 1978-10-16 1983-01-25 General Electric Company Ground fault protective system requiring reduced current-interrupting capability
US20050286184A1 (en) * 2004-06-22 2005-12-29 Steve Campolo Electrical power outlet strip
US7764472B2 (en) * 2001-06-26 2010-07-27 Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete Gmbh Method for checking electrical safety of a household appliance and corresponding household appliance

Family Cites Families (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3213321A (en) 1963-05-31 1965-10-19 Charles F Dalziel Miniature differential circuit breaker
US3376477A (en) 1965-12-06 1968-04-02 Hubbell Inc Harvey Protective circuit
US3525018A (en) 1968-06-27 1970-08-18 Hubbell Inc Harvey Ground leakage current interrupter
US3611038A (en) 1969-09-08 1971-10-05 Purex Corp Ltd Ground fault and high current responsive circuit breaker utilizing amplified signals
US3772569A (en) 1972-09-05 1973-11-13 Rucker Co Ground fault protective system
US4171944A (en) 1977-09-01 1979-10-23 Jack B. Hirschmann Combined smoke detection and furnace shut off device
FR2523339B1 (en) 1982-03-12 1985-04-19 Guglielmetti Vg Electro
US4991145A (en) 1988-08-03 1991-02-05 Rabbit Systems, Inc. Infra-sonic detector and alarm with self adjusting reference
US5162777A (en) 1990-12-21 1992-11-10 Kolbatz Klaus Peter Submerged alarm device for monitoring swimming pools
US5508568A (en) 1994-05-10 1996-04-16 Mammen; Alex Receptacle safety deenergizer
US5945924A (en) 1996-01-29 1999-08-31 Marman; Douglas H. Fire and smoke detection and control system
US5999384A (en) 1997-08-25 1999-12-07 Square D Company Circuit interrupter with arcing fault protection and PTC (positive temperature coefficient resistivity) elements for short circuit and overload protection
US6553100B1 (en) 2000-11-07 2003-04-22 At&T Corp. Intelligent alerting systems
ES2291707T3 (en) 2002-10-02 2008-03-01 COMBUSTION SCIENCE & ENGINEERING, INC. Method and apparatus for indicating an alarm of a smoke detector.
US20050280961A1 (en) 2004-06-18 2005-12-22 Steve Campolo Leakage current detection interrupter with sensor module for detecting abnormal non-electrical conditions
US7148797B2 (en) 2004-07-23 2006-12-12 Innovalarm Corporation Enhanced fire, safety, security and health monitoring and alarm response method, system and device
US20080018484A1 (en) 2006-07-20 2008-01-24 Sager Merrell C Appliance and utility sentry
US8244405B2 (en) * 2008-02-29 2012-08-14 Bsafe Electrix, Inc. Electrical monitoring and control system
US8203308B1 (en) * 2009-04-20 2012-06-19 Yazaki North America, Inc. Method and circuit for providing a balancing current in a charge circuit interrupt device

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4370692A (en) * 1978-10-16 1983-01-25 General Electric Company Ground fault protective system requiring reduced current-interrupting capability
US7764472B2 (en) * 2001-06-26 2010-07-27 Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete Gmbh Method for checking electrical safety of a household appliance and corresponding household appliance
US20050286184A1 (en) * 2004-06-22 2005-12-29 Steve Campolo Electrical power outlet strip

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150269821A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2015-09-24 Michael L. Haynes Systems and Methods for Controlling Electrical Current and Associated Appliances and Notification Thereof
USD746234S1 (en) * 2011-04-27 2015-12-29 Quirky Incorporated Reconfigurable plug strip
US20140028097A1 (en) * 2012-07-24 2014-01-30 Dennis Harold AUGUR Electrical outlet adapter with automatic power-on and power-off of peripheral outlets
US9103805B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-08-11 Leeo, Inc. Environmental measurement display system and method
US9280681B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-08 Leeo, Inc. Environmental monitoring device
US20140334640A1 (en) * 2013-05-08 2014-11-13 Shuen Yung CHAN Audio signal control of electrical outlet strip
US9235247B2 (en) * 2013-05-08 2016-01-12 Shuen Yung CHAN Audio signal control of electrical outlet strip
US9385489B2 (en) * 2013-06-26 2016-07-05 Calvin Wang Adjustable electrical-power outlet strip
US20150001937A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-01 Calvin Wang Adjustable Electrical-Power Outlet Strip
US9324227B2 (en) 2013-07-16 2016-04-26 Leeo, Inc. Electronic device with environmental monitoring
US20150022351A1 (en) * 2013-07-16 2015-01-22 Leeo, Inc. Electronic device with environmental monitoring
US8947230B1 (en) * 2013-07-16 2015-02-03 Leeo, Inc. Electronic device with environmental monitoring
US9070272B2 (en) 2013-07-16 2015-06-30 Leeo, Inc. Electronic device with environmental monitoring
US9778235B2 (en) 2013-07-17 2017-10-03 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US20160204613A1 (en) * 2013-08-06 2016-07-14 Bedrock Automation Plattforms Inc. Smart power system
US20160343225A1 (en) * 2014-01-24 2016-11-24 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for alarm service using user status recognition information in electronic device
US20150262468A1 (en) * 2014-03-13 2015-09-17 Wei-Li YANG Power socket temperature alarm device
DE102014005774A1 (en) * 2014-04-23 2015-10-29 Holger Kollenbroich Fire adapter device
DE102014005774B4 (en) * 2014-04-23 2016-12-22 Holger Kollenbroich Fire adapter device
US9213327B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-12-15 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US9170625B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-10-27 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US9116137B1 (en) 2014-07-15 2015-08-25 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US9372477B2 (en) 2014-07-15 2016-06-21 Leeo, Inc. Selective electrical coupling based on environmental conditions
US9304590B2 (en) 2014-08-27 2016-04-05 Leen, Inc. Intuitive thermal user interface
US10078865B2 (en) 2014-09-08 2018-09-18 Leeo, Inc. Sensor-data sub-contracting during environmental monitoring
US10043211B2 (en) 2014-09-08 2018-08-07 Leeo, Inc. Identifying fault conditions in combinations of components
US9865016B2 (en) 2014-09-08 2018-01-09 Leeo, Inc. Constrained environmental monitoring based on data privileges
US10102566B2 (en) 2014-09-08 2018-10-16 Leeo, Icnc. Alert-driven dynamic sensor-data sub-contracting
US9537266B1 (en) * 2014-10-10 2017-01-03 Justin James Leach Power strips with voice message playback
US10026304B2 (en) 2014-10-20 2018-07-17 Leeo, Inc. Calibrating an environmental monitoring device
US9445451B2 (en) 2014-10-20 2016-09-13 Leeo, Inc. Communicating arbitrary attributes using a predefined characteristic
GB2539164A (en) * 2015-02-17 2016-12-14 Radford Alan Protective master switch
US20160329673A1 (en) * 2015-05-05 2016-11-10 James Doyle McCormick Surge Protected Extension Cord with Multiple Outlet Sections
US20170018925A1 (en) * 2015-07-15 2017-01-19 Tricklestar Ltd Advanced Power Strip Having a High Level Interface
US9801013B2 (en) 2015-11-06 2017-10-24 Leeo, Inc. Electronic-device association based on location duration
US20180109130A1 (en) * 2016-10-19 2018-04-19 Ta Hsing Electric Wire & Cable Co., Ltd. Power device with multiple electrifying modes
US10084272B1 (en) * 2017-03-23 2018-09-25 Group Dekko, Inc. Modular electrical receptacle

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20150077243A1 (en) 2015-03-19 application
US9444244B2 (en) 2016-09-13 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3522595A (en) Self-contained fire detecting and warning apparatus
US6456471B1 (en) Test, reset and communications operations in an ARC fault circuit interrupter with optional memory and/or backup power
US8335062B2 (en) Protective device for an electrical supply facility
US5706155A (en) Ground fault circuit interrupter incorporating miswiring prevention circuitry
US7049910B2 (en) Circuit interrupting device with reset lockout and reverse wiring protection and method of manufacture
US6477021B1 (en) Blocking/inhibiting operation in an arc fault detection system
US6654219B1 (en) Arc fault detector with diagnostic indicator
US7164564B1 (en) Shorted SCR lockout and indication
US6252407B1 (en) Ground fault circuit interrupter miswiring prevention device
US20110216453A1 (en) Protective device for an electrical supply facility
US7400477B2 (en) Method of distribution of a circuit interrupting device with reset lockout and reverse wiring protection
US7319574B2 (en) Arc fault detection apparatus, method and system for an underground electrical conductor
US7323638B1 (en) Wall box receptacle with modular plug-in device
US6552888B2 (en) Safety electrical outlet with logic control circuit
US20100060469A1 (en) Communication interface apparatus for an electrical distribution panel, and system and electrical distribution panel including the same
US4447846A (en) Computer environment protector
US6829123B2 (en) Device safety system and method
US20140254050A1 (en) Protective device for an electrical supply facility
US7256973B1 (en) Miswire protection switch compression spring
US5508568A (en) Receptacle safety deenergizer
US7209048B1 (en) Device for monitoring and alerting of a power disruption to electrical equipment or an appliance
WO2000074192A1 (en) Fail safe fault interrupter
US20080180866A1 (en) Combined arc fault circuit interrupter and leakage current detector interrupter
US20130329331A1 (en) Wireless Branch Circuit Energy Monitoring System
US20090160663A1 (en) Electrical ground protection device, circuit tester and method of circuit condition detection