US20140068966A1 - Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components. - Google Patents

Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20140068966A1
US20140068966A1 US13524999 US201213524999A US20140068966A1 US 20140068966 A1 US20140068966 A1 US 20140068966A1 US 13524999 US13524999 US 13524999 US 201213524999 A US201213524999 A US 201213524999A US 20140068966 A1 US20140068966 A1 US 20140068966A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
components
force
system
invention
energy
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13524999
Inventor
Timothy Roy Chaffin
Original Assignee
Timothy Roy Chaffin
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/181Resiliency achieved by the structure of the sole
    • A43B13/183Leaf springs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B13/00Soles; Sole and heel units
    • A43B13/14Soles; Sole and heel units characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B13/18Resilient soles
    • A43B13/187Resiliency achieved by the features of the material, e.g. foam, non liquid materials

Abstract

A new self-contained energy transfer system for shoes, which absorbs stores and releases energy and can be adapted to any footwear; engineered to provide the correct biomechanical sequence of events during the gait cycle, eliminating the need for a flexible articulation of the shoe at the toe break.
It is composed of two reactionary plates attached at the toe end and open at the heel end. Between the top reaction plate and the lower reaction plate is a series of lineally arched progressively resistant spring components. The toe end of the inner component functions as a fulcrum for the reaction plates as they are fastened together at the heel end which places the complete unit in tension. Tensioning the unit removes any play or slack within the components providing an efficient energy transfer system; the same principle as stringing an archer's bow.

Description

  • [0001]
    Please provide a 5-15 word description of what your invention is or does.
  • [0002]
    Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components.
  • [0000]
    Do any of the following statements apply to your invention?
    The invention was known or used in the U.S. before I invented it.
    The invention was patented or published anywhere in the world before I invented it.
    The invention has been in public use or on sale in the U.S. for over one year.
    The invention was patented or published anywhere in the world more than one year ago.
  • [0003]
    No
  • [0000]
    Why are you seeking patent protection? Check all that apply
  • [0004]
    I want to make and sell my invention.
  • [0005]
    I want to prevent my competitors from making, using, and selling my invention.
  • [0006]
    I want to receive credit for my invention for personal or professional reasons.
  • [0000]
    Did you invent your invention alone, or with the help of others?
  • [0007]
    I invented the invention alone.
  • [0000]
    Which of the following statements describes the ownership of the invention?
  • [0008]
    I (we) own all the rights to the invention.
  • [0000]
    Please select the one category that best describes your invention.
  • [0009]
    Mechanical device or system
  • [0000]
    Please describe the problem that your invention solves.
  • [0010]
    When walking and running human feet strike the ground and are impacted by a ground reaction force equal to their body mass x their velocity. Shoes provide some protection and comfort by absorbing part of this force but often not enough to avoid discomfort, fatigue, and/or injury to the body.
  • [0000]
    Please briefly describe how your invention solves this problem.
  • [0011]
    My invention is a carbon fiber suspension system which can be incorporated into the soles of shoes. My invention increases the amount of the ground reaction force a user's shoes absorb that otherwise would have to be absorbed by the user's body. The suspension system absorbs stores and releases energy through-out the gait cycle. The system works on the principle of force equals mass times velocity. As the system absorbs force, the velocity of the mass is reduced before it impacts the ground.
  • [0000]
    In one or two sentences, please describe how your invention is different from anything that currently exists.
  • [0012]
    My invention is a wholly, self-contained interactive free-floating shared load lineal spring suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber lineal springs and other components which automatically and efficiently distributes applied force from high to low among the components of the system, allowing a smooth, progressive, force reducing, loading and unloading cycle as the user moves through their gait cycle from heel strike, to mid stance, to toe off.
  • Specifications of Invention
  • [0013]
    Please list and describe each component of your invention
  • [0014]
    COMPONENT TREE
  • [0015]
    All components are made of carbon fiber laminate unless otherwise noted. See FIGS. 1 through 13 below for a diagram illustrating the shape, size, configuration, and assembly, where applicable, of the components.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 1
    Complete System:
    Ref # Figure # Name Description
    #1 1 & 13 Energy Assembled system, with internal force
    System reducing components installed, with #2
    pretensioned and fastened together at
    the heal area using components #6 and
    #7 to close and fasten #2. In low profile
    configurations, pretensioning is performed
    by bonding components #3, #4, #10, #14
    and #15 at heel aspect (see FIG. 13).
  • [0000]
    TABLE 2
    Assembled Chassis of Energy System:
    Ref # Figure # Name Description
    #2 2 Chassis #3 and #4 bound together at the toe aspect
    Frame of the frame using binding material #5 and
    polyadhesive glue.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 3
    Chassis Frame Components:
    Ref # Figure # Name Description
    #3 3 Foot Distributes force from and transmitted to
    Reactionary the foot and body.
    Surface
    #4 4 Ground Distributes force from and transmitted to
    Reactionary the ground.
    Surface
    #5 5 Binding 38 mm 100% polyester with a thickness of
    Material 0.5 mm used together with polyadhesive
    glue to bind various parts together. For
    example, it is used to connect components
    #3 and #4 to each other at the toe aspect
    to create #2.
    #6 6 Tensioning Bracket on top of #8 with holes on the
    Connector sides for fastening #7. #7 is fastened to
    Bracket #6 using a screw and barrel nut.
    #7 5 Tensioning Elastic strap that fastens around #4 and is
    Strap pulled tight and attached to #6 to fasten
    and tension #2 together at the rear portion
    of #1.
    #8 6 Tensioning 1 mm plastic spacer on top of #3 and
    Spacer below #6.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 4
    Internal Force Reducing Components of Energy System:
    Ref # Figure # Name Description
     #9 7 Force Distributes and absorbs force applied from
    Reducing both #3 and #4.
    Component
    #10 8 Force Composed of (2) #12 components mirror
    Reducing imaged to each other, bound together at
    Component the ends by #5 and polyadhesive glue
    Spring
    #11 9 Force Same as #10, but only has one end of the
    Reducing mirrored components bound. Open end
    Component accepts force reducing spring #10.
    Carrier
    Spring
    #12 10 Force Distributes and absorbs force applied from
    Reducing both #3 and #4. Creates an energy
    Component bridge and bonding surfaces to stabilize
    rear and front springs and also reinforces
    mid-section of #3.
    #13 8 Force Same as #10 composed of (2) #12
    Reducing components mirror imaged to each other,
    Component bound together at the ends by #5 and
    Spring polyadhesive glue.
    #14 11 Heel Force Filler between component #4 and #9.
    Reducing Allows bonding point to #4 for #10. Made
    Component from large open cell, light weight
    Filler orthopedic grade shock absorbing material
    (Solflex ® Ultra Cloud ®).
    #15 12 Heel Force Filler between component #3 and #9.
    Reducing Allows bonding point to #3 for #10. Made
    Component from large open cell, light weight
    Cushion orthopedic grade shock absorbing material
    (Solflex ® Ultra Cloud ®).
    #18 1 Fastener Self-Adhesive Hook and Loop and/or
    other flexible material.
  • [0016]
    Please describe the relationship between the components or elements
  • [0017]
    The chassis frame (#2) is pre-loaded under tension by the fastening of the heel ends of #3 and #4. While tensioning, the chassis frame conforms around the internal components while using #13 as a fulcrum. The contact points between the chassis and the internal components, and the contact points of the internal components with each other, are bonded to #18. As the chassis (#2) is tensioned, #2 provides compression to the internal components.
  • [0018]
    The chassis (#2) and the internal components (#5-#15) act together as a complete unit. A complete unit is an Energy System (#1). #1 incorporates an interactive free-floating, shared load system between the chassis and the internal components. #1 is a self-contained unit, pre-loaded under tension. Pre-loading the system creates the most efficient transfer of energy within the system. The same principle is applied when an archer's bow is strung. #1 is designed to progressively reduce, store, and return the force of impact. Impact being when the foot hits the ground.
  • [0019]
    #1 is a progressive force reducing system engineered with a shared load system between the chassis and the internal components. The internal carbon fiber components and the carbon fiber chassis frame are lineal springs. As the lineal springs compress under load, they elongate. #18 allows elongation and the translation of force amongst the internal components and the chassis. Without a rigid non-yielding connection of the components to each other, they exist in a type of free-floating system. Free-floating allows unhindered, independent functions of the individual components and the chassis, providing efficient energy transfer.
  • [0020]
    #1's component system allows for an efficient transfer of energy. This transfer of energy is immediate from high to low, obtaining an equilibrium of forces absorbed by #1. Equilibrium allows a smooth, progressive, force rate reduction within the system from the applied force of foot impact. #1 slows down the velocity of foot impact while absorbing the force. The impact force compresses the components of #1. The stored impact force within the compressed system is then released progressively as an energy return to the user during unloading of the system.
  • [0021]
    In the rear or heel area of #1, are two #9 carbon components which provide a dual function. First, they function as a positioning devise for #10. This positioning allows #10 to function as the center of rotation (the transition axis of heel strike to mid-stance). #10 simulates and is positioned to duplicate the natural bio-mechanical ankle joint. Secondly, the #9 components reinforce #3 and #4 during the initial phase of heel strike.
  • [0022]
    In the midsection of #1, #12 reinforces #3 during mid-stance and acts as an energy bridge between #10 and #13. #12 also provides a bonding surface for #10 and #13.
  • [0023]
    In the front section of #1, #13 acts as the main force reducing component from mid-stance to toe off. #13 returns its stored energy to the user towards the completion of toe off. #13 also functions as the fulcrum for #3 and #4 to create tension within #2 when #2 is fastened at the heel end. #13 is positioned to duplicate the natural biomechanical M-P joint.
  • [0024]
    The open cell structure of #14, #15 and #18 provides a flexible material for force transmission. #14 and #15 also limits the terminal travel of the heel aspect of #3 and #4 at heel strike. #14 and #15 also provide bonding surfaces for #9, #3, #4 and #10.
  • [0000]
    How does the invention work? Specify how each component or element functions individually to cause the whole invention to perform its desired function.
  • [0025]
    See Table 5 and 6.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 5
    Function of Components
    Ref # Function
     #1 #1 is designed to progressively reduce, store and return the energy absorbed
    from foot impact. #1 slows down the velocity of the foot impact force, while
    absorbing and storing some of the impact force. The impact force
    compresses the components of #1. The stored impact force within the
    compressed system is then released as an energy return to the user during
    unloading of the system.
     #2 Functions to provide a chassis for the placement and connection of the
    internal components; provides pretensioning compression to #1. It absorbs
    and returns force from and to the foot and body.
     #3 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the foot and
    body; an anatomical reactionary surface.
     #4 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the ground; a
    ground reactionary surface.
     #5 Functions as a binding material for the force reducing components.
     #6 Functions as a connector bracket for tensioning #2
     #7 Functions as a tensioning strap for #2
     #8 Functions as a spacer between #3 and #6 to reduce sound from friction
     #9 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the foot and
    body. Reinforces #3 and #4 at heel strike.
    #10 and #13 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the foot and
    body; duplicates anatomical joint axes.
    #11 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the foot and
    body. Carrier component to accept other force reducing component springs
    such as #10
    #12 Flexes under load and functions to distribute force from and to the foot and
    body; bridges and provides bonding surface for #10 and #13 and reinforces
    mid-section of #3 and/or #4.
    #14 Functions as a mounting surface for #10, #9 and #4; limits heel travel and
    cushions #4 at heel strike
    #15 Functions as a mounting surface of #10, #9, and #3; limits heel travel and
    cushions #3 at heel strike.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 6
    How the invention works as the user steps through their gait cycle
    Gait Load Rear area Middle area Front area
    Cycle Cycle of #1 of #1 of #1
    Heel #1 #2 compresses #2 expands #2 & 13
    Strike stores #4 compresses expands
    energy more quickly than
    #3
    #10 begins to
    compress
    #9, #14 & #15
    compresses
    Heel #1 #2 compresses to #2 compresses #2 & #13
    Strike stores maximum load compresses
    to Mid energy #10 compresses to #10 compresses
    Stance max load to max load
    #14 & #15 #12 compresses
    compress
    #9 reinforces #3 &
    #4
    Mid #1 #2 compressed #2 compressed #2 & #13
    Stance stores #10 compressed #10 compressed compressed
    energy #14 & #15 start to #12 compressed
    decompress
    Mid #1 #2 expands #2 expands #2 expands
    Stance releases #10 expands
    to toe energy #14 & #15 expands #12 expands
    off to resting position
    #13 expands
    Toe off #1 Returns to Returns to Returns to
    releases resting resting resting
    energy position position position
    Note:
    Components compress and decompress progressively throughout the gait cycle.

    Which elements are necessary? Which elements are optional? What elements could be added to make the invention work better?
  • [0026]
    The general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the function of the system as a whole remain constant. Implementing the invention for a different class of application (such as a work shoe) may result in reconfiguration, but the general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the function of the system as a whole remain constant. Examples of changes which may be employed for different implementations in the same application class and/or for different application classes, may include but are not limited to: #1 as a whole and/or its components can be altered in size, i.e., the length, the height, the width and/or position of the apex of the internal lineal springs, and/or length and width and apex of #3 and #4 of #2. Also, the configuration and the number of the internal components can be altered or rearranged. Force reducing components can be nested together—#11 and #10 and/or #10 positioned inside of another #10. Additional cushions and filler components, such as #14 and #15 can be added in additional locations. A different method of pretensioning #2 and connecting #3 and #4 at the heel aspect can be implemented (see FIG. 13). Also the ratio of carbon fibers per mm in relation to the specifics of the carbon manufacturer can be adjusted higher or lower from the stated manufacturer's specifics in components #3, #4, #9, #10, #11, #12 and #13 to modify the force absorbing effects of the components. A higher concentration yields less flexibility and a lower concentration yields more flexibility. Adjusted ratios up to 20% or more, in greater or lower percentages, can be used to customize the system for more or less force reduction. Additional or different reinforcing materials including but not limited to Kevlar, glass fiber, aluminum, or spring metals of various compositions, could be substituted for, or added to the carbon fiber reinforcement material, in some or all of the components. Additional or different matrix materials including but not limited to epoxy resin, polyimide resin, unsaturated polyester resin, polysulfonic resin, polyethersulfonic resin, polycarbonate resin, polyetherketone resin, polyetheretherketone resin, aromatic polyamide resin, polyetherimide resin, thermoplastic polyimide resin, or thermoplastic polyurethane could be substituted or added in some or all of the components. It is therefore to be understood that many possible modifications and variations of the configuration of the system and its components maybe necessary and/or can be employed in different application classes, and/or implementations within the same application class, while still retaining the general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the system as a whole, without departing from the scope of the invention. It is therefore intended that this patent will cover such modifications and variations that fall within the true scope of the invention.
  • [0000]
    How would a person make the invention?
  • [0027]
    They would create molds from the drawings provided. Use a carbon fiber layup with 2-ply, +/−45 degree weaving in a vacuum lamination process with a resin component. The molds produce the shapes of the components and then the components are shaped to dimension for their application and shoe size. Once the components are shaped the assemblies are made by binding, positioning, attaching, gluing, tensioning and fastening the various parts as described above and illustrated in the diagrams.
  • [0000]
    How can the components or elements be shuffled, interchanged, or reconfigured to cause the invention to perform an identical or similar function?
  • [0028]
    The general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the function of the system as a whole remain constant. Implementing the invention for a different class of application (such as a work shoe) may result in reconfiguration, but the general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the function of the system as a whole remain constant. Examples of changes which may be employed for different implementations in the same application class and/or for different application classes, may include but are not limited to: #1 as a whole and/or its components can be altered in size, i.e., the length, the height, the width and/or position of the apex of the internal lineal springs, and/or length and width and apex of #3 and #4 of #2. Also, the configuration and the number of the internal components can be altered or rearranged. Force reducing components can be nested together—#11 and #10 and/or #10 positioned inside of another #10. Additional cushions and filler components, such as #14 and #15 can be added in additional locations. A different method of pretensioning #2 and connecting #3 and #4 at the heel aspect can be implemented (see FIG. 13). Also the ratio of carbon fibers per mm in relation to the specifics of the carbon manufacturer can be adjusted higher or lower from the stated manufacturer's specifics in components #3, #4, #9, #10, #11, #12 and #13 to modify the force absorbing effects of the components. A higher concentration yields less flexibility and a lower concentration yields more flexibility. Adjusted ratios up to 20% or more, in greater or lower percentages, can be used to customize the system for more or less force reduction. Additional or different reinforcing materials including but not limited to Kevlar, glass fiber, aluminum, or spring metals of various compositions, could be substituted for, or added to the carbon fiber reinforcement material, in some or all of the components. Additional or different matrix materials including but not limited to epoxy resin, polyimide resin, unsaturated polyester resin, polysulfonic resin, polyethersulfonic resin, polycarbonate resin, polyetherketone resin, polyetheretherketone resin, aromatic polyamide resin, polyetherimide resin, thermoplastic polyimide resin, or thermoplastic polyurethane could be substituted or added in some or all of the components. It is therefore to be understood that many possible modifications and variations of the configuration of the system and its components maybe necessary and/or can be employed in different application classes, and/or implementations within the same application class, while still retaining the general geometry, characteristics, and interrelated functions of the components and the system as a whole, without departing from the scope of the invention. It is therefore intended that this patent will cover such modifications and variations that fall within the true scope of the invention.
  • [0000]
    How would a person use this invention? Be specific about the steps involved.
  • [0029]
    The invention is designed to be manufactured into the sole of a shoe using common manufacturing techniques and adapted to any type of shoe for any specific application; the shoe would then be used for the purpose intended.
  • [0000]
    Can this invention be used in a different way or another field of technology?
  • [0030]
    In a modified form it could be adapted to applications that utilize high efficiency shared load lineal spring systems.

Claims (10)

  1. 1. That the energy transfer system is an independent unit wholly contained within itself, allowing the unit to achieve its intended purpose while adapted to any type of footwear.
  2. 2. That the system consists of two reactionary plates of a convex and concave curvature attached at the toe end and open at the heel end, serving as a chassis for containment of the inner components.
  3. 3. (canceled)
  4. 4. That the component springs are of two single lineal arches mirrored to each other and bound at the end creating a modified ellipse.
  5. 5. (canceled)
  6. 6. (canceled)
  7. 7. (canceled)
  8. 8. (canceled)
  9. 9. (canceled)
  10. 10. (canceled)
US13524999 2012-09-11 2012-09-11 Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components. Abandoned US20140068966A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13524999 US20140068966A1 (en) 2012-09-11 2012-09-11 Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13524999 US20140068966A1 (en) 2012-09-11 2012-09-11 Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20140068966A1 true true US20140068966A1 (en) 2014-03-13

Family

ID=50231744

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13524999 Abandoned US20140068966A1 (en) 2012-09-11 2012-09-11 Suspension system for shoes comprised of carbon fiber springs and other components.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20140068966A1 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150027000A1 (en) * 2013-07-26 2015-01-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US20150033579A1 (en) * 2013-07-31 2015-02-05 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having tubular members
US20150040432A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2015-02-12 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with a midsole structure
US20150167768A1 (en) * 2013-12-16 2015-06-18 Jing Zhao Carbon Fiber Composite Springs And Method of Making Thereof
CN105394876A (en) * 2015-11-27 2016-03-16 琪尔特有限公司 Bionic kangaroo running shoe sole
US20160183633A1 (en) * 2014-12-31 2016-06-30 Chinook Asia Llc Footwear having a flex-spring sole

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4566206A (en) * 1984-04-16 1986-01-28 Weber Milton N Shoe heel spring support
US5367790A (en) * 1991-07-08 1994-11-29 Gamow; Rustem I. Shoe and foot prosthesis with a coupled spring system
US5435079A (en) * 1993-12-20 1995-07-25 Gallegos; Alvaro Z. Spring athletic shoe
US5701686A (en) * 1991-07-08 1997-12-30 Herr; Hugh M. Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US5875567A (en) * 1997-04-21 1999-03-02 Bayley; Richard Shoe with composite spring heel
US6318001B1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2001-11-20 Yan-Yee Lee Springy sports shoe
US20020166184A1 (en) * 1999-05-11 2002-11-14 Lindqvist Wilhelm Ove Shoe system with a resilient shoe insert
US20030200677A1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2003-10-30 Abraham Carl J. Enhanced impact and energy absorbing product for footwear, protective equipment, floors, boards, walls, and other surfaces
US20030208929A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2003-11-13 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Shoe cartridge cushioning system
US6860034B2 (en) * 2001-04-09 2005-03-01 Orthopedic Design Energy return sole for footwear
US6865824B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2005-03-15 Levert Francis E. Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US20050102857A1 (en) * 2003-11-14 2005-05-19 Yen Chao H. Shoe sole having heel cushioning device
US20050155254A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Smith Steven F. Track shoe with heel plate and support columns
US20050268488A1 (en) * 2004-06-07 2005-12-08 Hann Lenn R Shoe apparatus with improved efficiency
US7100308B2 (en) * 2003-11-21 2006-09-05 Nike, Inc. Footwear with a heel plate assembly

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4566206A (en) * 1984-04-16 1986-01-28 Weber Milton N Shoe heel spring support
US5367790A (en) * 1991-07-08 1994-11-29 Gamow; Rustem I. Shoe and foot prosthesis with a coupled spring system
US5701686A (en) * 1991-07-08 1997-12-30 Herr; Hugh M. Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US6029374A (en) * 1991-07-08 2000-02-29 Herr; Hugh M. Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US5435079A (en) * 1993-12-20 1995-07-25 Gallegos; Alvaro Z. Spring athletic shoe
US5875567A (en) * 1997-04-21 1999-03-02 Bayley; Richard Shoe with composite spring heel
US20020166184A1 (en) * 1999-05-11 2002-11-14 Lindqvist Wilhelm Ove Shoe system with a resilient shoe insert
US6318001B1 (en) * 2000-07-20 2001-11-20 Yan-Yee Lee Springy sports shoe
US6865824B2 (en) * 2000-10-19 2005-03-15 Levert Francis E. Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US6860034B2 (en) * 2001-04-09 2005-03-01 Orthopedic Design Energy return sole for footwear
US20030208929A1 (en) * 2002-03-22 2003-11-13 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Shoe cartridge cushioning system
US20030200677A1 (en) * 2002-04-26 2003-10-30 Abraham Carl J. Enhanced impact and energy absorbing product for footwear, protective equipment, floors, boards, walls, and other surfaces
US20050102857A1 (en) * 2003-11-14 2005-05-19 Yen Chao H. Shoe sole having heel cushioning device
US7100308B2 (en) * 2003-11-21 2006-09-05 Nike, Inc. Footwear with a heel plate assembly
US20050155254A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Smith Steven F. Track shoe with heel plate and support columns
US20050268488A1 (en) * 2004-06-07 2005-12-08 Hann Lenn R Shoe apparatus with improved efficiency

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150027000A1 (en) * 2013-07-26 2015-01-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US9451805B2 (en) * 2013-07-26 2016-09-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having primary and secondary members
US20150033579A1 (en) * 2013-07-31 2015-02-05 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having tubular members
US9456657B2 (en) * 2013-07-31 2016-10-04 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with support assembly having tubular members
US20150040432A1 (en) * 2013-08-07 2015-02-12 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with a midsole structure
US9687042B2 (en) * 2013-08-07 2017-06-27 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear with a midsole structure
US20150167768A1 (en) * 2013-12-16 2015-06-18 Jing Zhao Carbon Fiber Composite Springs And Method of Making Thereof
US20160183633A1 (en) * 2014-12-31 2016-06-30 Chinook Asia Llc Footwear having a flex-spring sole
US9668540B2 (en) * 2014-12-31 2017-06-06 Chinook Asia Llc Footwear having a flex-spring sole
CN105394876A (en) * 2015-11-27 2016-03-16 琪尔特有限公司 Bionic kangaroo running shoe sole

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5593457A (en) Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5621985A (en) Jumping assist system
US6852132B1 (en) Artificial limbs incorporating superelastic supports
US6406500B1 (en) Foot prosthesis having curved forefoot
US7107235B2 (en) Method of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US4865612A (en) Prosthetic foot
US5037444A (en) Prosthetic foot
US4843737A (en) Energy return spring shoe construction
US5469638A (en) Forefoot spring apparatus
US5509936A (en) Dual leaf spring strut system
US5019109A (en) Multi-axial rotation system for artificial ankle
US20090064536A1 (en) Energy storage and return spring
US4822363A (en) Modular composite prosthetic foot and leg
US6397496B1 (en) Article of footwear
US20110061265A1 (en) Custom article of footwear and method of making the same
US6675500B1 (en) Shock-absorbing sole for footwear, especially but not exclusively sporting footwear
US5458656A (en) Energy-storing prosthesis leg pylon vertical shock leg
US5258039A (en) Energy storing composite prosthetic foot
US5549714A (en) Symes foot prosthesis
US5070629A (en) Sweet spot sole construction
US3589359A (en) Unidirectional fiberglass composite drop-foot brace
US20090320330A1 (en) Footwear with improved bottom assembly
US6019795A (en) Curved prosthesis
US2343701A (en) Footwear
US6568102B1 (en) Shoe having shock-absorber element in sole