US20140011423A1 - Communication system, method and device for toys - Google Patents

Communication system, method and device for toys Download PDF

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Publication number
US20140011423A1
US20140011423A1 US13680245 US201213680245A US2014011423A1 US 20140011423 A1 US20140011423 A1 US 20140011423A1 US 13680245 US13680245 US 13680245 US 201213680245 A US201213680245 A US 201213680245A US 2014011423 A1 US2014011423 A1 US 2014011423A1
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Prior art keywords
phone
doll
cell
transmitter
button
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13680245
Inventor
Deborah Wong Simmons
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Uneeda Doll Co Ltd
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Uneeda Doll Co Ltd
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/36Details; Accessories
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H3/00Dolls
    • A63H3/28Arrangements of sound-producing means in dolls; Means in dolls for producing sounds
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H2200/00Computerized interactive toys, e.g. dolls

Abstract

A communication system, method, and device for a talking Doll using communication signals, including a Transmitter Cell Phone shaped to resemble a modern smartphone, a computer chip unit at the Doll, a computer chip unit at the Transmitter Cell Phone, a first transceiver at the Doll and a second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone. The computer chip units in the Doll and Transmitter Cell Phone are programmed to recognize the lack of signal and to respond to signals received from the opposite device (i.e. the Doll or Transmitter Cell Phone), to exchange signals between the first transceiver and the second transceiver, and to respond to user-selected sequential operation signals from either the first transceiver or the second transceiver, which enables the Doll to verbally and/or physically react to each chosen sequential operation.

Description

  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) of any U.S. provisional application(s) listed below.
  • [0002]
    Application No. 61/667,746 Filing date Jul. 3, 2012.
  • [0003]
    This invention was not made pursuant to any federally-sponsored research and/or development.
  • THE FIELD OF INVENTION
  • [0004]
    The communication system, method and device of the present invention relate to communicating toys.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0005]
    Toys and dolls are used to provide children with things to play with and to teach children interaction, responses to social situations, and motor skills. Thus, it is desirable to have toys and dolls that move and make sounds to elicit responses and continued interaction from children. It is also desirable to have toys and dolls mimic the behavior and sounds/voice of adults (i.e., walking, talking, calling, responding to inquiries) to teach the children a variety of interactions.
  • [0006]
    The present invention and method relate more particularly to a toy and a transmitter cell phone that communicate, preferably using infrared signaling. It is already known for two dolls to communicate with each other using infrared signaling in order to simulate a simple conversation. However, such form of communication does not allow the dolls' user to easily interact with the communication in a significant and meaningful manner. Additionally, it is already known for a transmitter and a doll to communicate with each other using infrared signaling, but such communication usually requires the user to program certain commands in order for the communication to occur, to connect the two devices via a wired and/or wireless connection, such as “Bluetooth,” or to engage in a variety of other actions that are too advanced for a child to understand or perform.
  • [0007]
    Furthermore, prior art does not allow initiation of play pattern sequences from both the doll and the transceiver locations and does not include the ability to recognize the lack of response-ready transceiver signal(s). Some current talking or communicating dolls that utilize a remote control only allow the doll's user to control the prerecorded vocal responses that have been programmed into the doll but not any form of movement by the doll, or vice versa. Therefore, the prior art in talking and/or communicating dolls is limited in its intellectual stimulation of the children, and, in some instances, is too complicated for the children to understand.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    It is an object of the present invention to improve upon, overcome, or at least reduce, the lacking qualities of the aforementioned prior art. The present invention's innovative communication system provides a more life-like conversational scenario between the Doll and the doll's user, which makes it a more worthwhile educational tool for children. By allowing both the Doll and the Transmitter Cell Phone to cause/initiate movement and/or prerecorded vocal reactions from either the Doll or the Transmitter Cell Phone, children are able to mimic activities that they constantly see their parents, elders and/or figures of authority engaged in, such as talking on a landline or cell phone, making arrangements, and planning. Additionally, the ability of the invention to recognize a lack of signal from either the Doll or the Transmitter Cell Phone allows for a child to be involved in the realistic experience of having the person being called either not pick up the phone call or ignore the phone call.
  • [0009]
    According to the invention, there is provided a communication system, method, and device for a talking Doll, preferably using infrared signals, including a Transmitter Cell Phone, which is shaped to resemble a modern mobile communication device or “smartphone,” a computer chip unit at the Doll, a computer chip unit at the Transmitter Cell Phone, a first transceiver at the Doll and a second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone. The computer chip units in the Doll and the Transmitter Cell Phone are programmed to respond to signals received from the opposite device (i.e. the Doll or the Transmitter Cell Phone) and to send signals between the first transceiver at the Doll and the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone. Any other form of wireless communication may be used instead of the infrared signals, such as radio frequency waves, low-power short range communications such as “Bluetooth”, and other methods of communication known in the art.
  • [0010]
    Both computer chip units are also programmed to respond to user chosen sequential operation signals from either the first transceiver at the Doll or the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone, which causes response signals to pass between the first and second transceiver and enables the Doll to verbally and/or physically react to each user chosen sequential operation. In addition, both computer chip units are programmed to recognize a lack of signal from the opposite transceiver and to produce various automated responses, such as causing the Doll to walk, or for a prerecorded “Operator” message to play through the Doll Speaker and/or the Transmitter Cell Phone Speaker.
  • [0011]
    The communication system further includes one or more selectively operated button(s) mounted to the Doll to initiate the signal of the first transceiver or various preprogrammed responses and/or movements.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    A communication system, method and device for a talking doll and a transmitter cell phone of the present invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:
  • [0013]
    FIG. 1 is a front view of the Doll.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 2 is a rear view of the Doll.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 3 is a front view of the Transmitter Cell Phone.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 4 is a rear view of the Transmitter Cell Phone.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 5 is a side view of the top of the Transmitter Cell Phone
  • [0018]
    FIG. 6 is a flow chart of typical sequence of operation of the communication system in use when only one of the devices (i.e. the Doll or the Transmitter Cell Phone) is turned “ON.”
  • [0019]
    FIG. 7 is a flow chart of the typical sequence of operation of the communication system in use when both devices (i.e. the Doll or the Transmitter Cell Phone) are turned “ON.”
  • [0020]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic block diagram of the communication system at the Doll.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic block diagram of the communication system at the Transmitter Cell Phone.
  • [0022]
    It should be noted that in FIG. 3, the black line that forms a polygon around the numbers zero (0) through nine (9) which feature Number Buttons 9 points to, is not part of the invention and/or method, but it is utilized solely for clarification purposes and to group the Number Buttons into one feature. Additionally, the numbering of the features in FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 are self-contained due to the features being supplied directly from one of the current manufacturers of the product. As such, certain numbers used within FIG. 8 and FIG. 9 may be duplicative of those number identifiers in the preceding figures.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • [0023]
    A communication system, method, and device for a talking Doll using infrared signals, including a Transmitter Cell Phone, which is shaped to resemble a modem mobile communication device or “smartphone,” a computer chip unit at the Doll, a computer chip unit at the Transmitter Cell Phone, a first transceiver at the Doll and a second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone are provided. The computer chip units in the Doll and Transmitter Cell Phone are programmed to respond to signals received from the opposite device (i.e. the Doll or Transmitter Cell Phone) and to send signals between the first transceiver at the Doll and the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone.
  • [0024]
    Both computer chip units are also programmed to respond to user chosen sequential operation signals from either the first transceiver at the Doll or the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone, which causes response signals to pass between the first and second transceiver and enables the Doll to verbally and/or physically react to each user chosen sequential operation. In addition, both computer chip units are programmed to recognize a lack of signal from the opposite transceiver and to produce various automated responses, such as causing the Doll to walk, or for a prerecorded “Operator” message to play through the Doll Speaker and/or the Transmitter Cell Phone Speaker. The communication system includes one or more selectively operated button(s) mounted to the Doll to initiate the signal of the first transceiver or various pre-programmed responses and/or movements.
  • [0025]
    Although a talking Doll 2 is used to illustrate the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the invention may be used with any number of other children's toys and playthings, including stuffed toys, plush toys, learning toys, famous character brand toys, paper and electronic books, children's computers, electronics and musical instruments.
  • [0026]
    A view of the front of the Doll 2 and a number of its components are illustrated in FIG. 1. The invention includes a Doll 2, which resembles a humanoid figure, and preferably a child figure, with a right arm 51 and a left arm 52, a right hand 55 and a left hand 56, a right leg 61 and a left leg 62, a right foot 65 and a left foot 66, a head 70. The head 70 also has a right ear 71 and a left ear 72, eyes 80 and mouth 90. The Doll 2 also has a speaker 3 embedded in its lower abdomen and a cuboid shape 4 that resembles a cell phone or mobile device mounted to its right hand 55. Protruding from the cuboid shape 4 is a circular Button 1 that is used to either initiate communication between the first transceiver at the Doll 2 and the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 (illustrated in FIG. 3), or to send a signal from the first transceiver at the Doll 2 to the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. The Doll 2 preferably also includes clothes, which may be interchangeable as different outfits to be worn by the Doll 2.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 2 depicts a rear view of the Doll 2 and features the Doll's ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 and the Doll's Battery Compartment 5, which, in the present embodiment, utilizes two (2) “AA” (1.5V) batteries as the Doll's 2 power source, and its associated cover. However, a number of other variations could be used for the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, utilizing “AAA” or other common batteries, or a rechargeable battery pack, as the power source. FIG. 2 also shows the rear view of the right leg 61, left leg 62, and head 70 of the Doll 2.
  • [0028]
    A view from the front of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is illustrated in FIG. 3. In the present embodiment, the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 features twenty-two (22) different buttons 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, each of which elicits a certain programmed response from either or both of the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. The response to either the buttons on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 or the buttons mounted on the Doll 2 may be verbal and/or physical.
  • [0029]
    The aforementioned twenty-two (22) different buttons on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 are divided into three categories: Number Buttons, Activity Buttons, and Command Buttons. The Number Buttons 9 are primarily used to provide the look and feel of a regular, fully functional cell phone or mobile device and instruct the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 to emit a single beep from the Transmitter Cell Phone's Speaker 39 (illustrated in FIG. 4) for each Number Button 9 pressed. Within the Activity Button category are the following buttons: the Animal Button 11, the Trees Button 33, the Swimming Tube Button 13, the Movie Snap Button 15, the Music Notes Button 29, the Burger Button 31, the Jeans Button 17, and the Roller Skate Button 23. Each of the Activity Buttons initiates a message from, or a conversation between, the Doll 2 and/or the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. Such a message and/or conversation consist of either or both a programmed vocal recording being emitted from the Doll Speaker 3 and/or Transmitter Cell Phone Speaker 39 and/or movement by the Doll 2. The Command Buttons include the following buttons: the Start Button 25, the Stop Button 27, the Phone Button 19, and the End Button 21. The Start and Stop Button(s) 25, 27 control the walking movements of the Doll 2. The Phone and End Button(s) 19, 21 are used in the same manner as a fully functioning cell phone and control the picking up and ending of the phone call between the Doll 2 and/or Transmitter Cell Phone 10.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 4 is an illustration of a rear view of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. On the rear of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 are the Transmitter Cell Phone Speaker 39 as well as the ON/OFF switch 37 and the Transmitter Cell Phone Battery Compartment 35, which, in the present embodiment, utilizes three (3) DC1.5V batteries and serves as the Transmitter Cell Phone's 10 power source, and its associated cover.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 5 is an illustration of the top side of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, which features the light emitting diode (LED) 41 that sends infrared signals from the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 to the Doll 2.
  • [0032]
    In FIG. 6, a flow chart indicates a typical sequence of events and reactions arising from either of the following scenarios: (1) the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned ON and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10's ON/OFF switch 37 is turned OFF, or (2) the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned OFF and the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is turned ON. The descriptive language in FIG. 6 is incorporated herein by this reference.
  • [0033]
    For example, in scenario (1) when the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned ON and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10's ON/OFF switch 37 is turned OFF, when the Phone button 19 is pushed on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, the Doll speaker 3 emits seven beeps resembling the dialing of a phone number. The right arm 51 of the Doll 2, illustrated in FIG. 1, rises to the right ear 71 and a voice of the telephone operator is emitted from the speaker 3 of the Doll 2 informing the user that “the party is not available at the moment, please call later” because the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is OFF. The right arm 51 is then lowered back down from the ear 71, and the Doll 2 may walk for a brief period of time in response to the failed call.
  • [0034]
    As also illustrated in FIG. 6, when the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned OFF and the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is turned ON, the user can push any of the buttons on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, such as the Number Buttons 9, Activity Buttons 11, 33, 13, 15, 29, 31, 17, and 23, and Command Buttons 25, 27, 19, and 21. In response, the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 emits a single beep for each button pressed. If an Activity Button 11, 33, 13, 15, 29, 31, 17, or 23 is pressed and followed by a Command Button 19 (the Phone Button 19), the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 emits seven beeps resembling the dialing of a telephone number and a voice of the telephone operator is emitted from the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 informing the user that “the party is not available at the moment, please call later” because the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned OFF.
  • [0035]
    In FIG. 7, a flow chart indicates a typical sequence of events and reactions that arise when both the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 is turned ON and the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is turned ON. The descriptive language in FIG. 7 is incorporated herein by this reference.
  • [0036]
    For example, further with reference to FIG. 7, when both the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 and the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 are turned ON, the user may push any combination of the Number Buttons, Activity Buttons, and Command Buttons, bringing out different responses. Thus, pushing the Button 1 on the cuboid shape 4 of the Doll 2 prompts the speaker 3 of the Doll 2 to emit seven beeps simulating the dialing of a telephone number. If a signal between the transceivers in the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 is established, the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 exchange communication signals and the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 emits a ringing sound simulating the receiving of a call. The user may answer the call from the Doll 2 by pressing any button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, which causes the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 to emit one or more of the programmed messages, sounds, or voices.
  • [0037]
    Yet another interaction with reference to FIG. 7 may be performed by the user by pressing any button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 to initiate an interaction when both the ON/OFF/TRY ME switch 7 on the back of the Doll 2 and the ON/OFF switch 37 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 are turned ON. When the user presses the Animal Button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, followed by the Phone Button 19 to “send the call” to the Doll 2, the speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 emits a single beep for each button pressed and emits a voice message inviting the Doll 2 to visit the zoo. In response to the invitation to the zoo, the speaker 3 of the Doll 2 emits an excited approval message, after which the Doll 2 may begin walking. The user may continue interaction between the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, or the user may end the interaction by pressing the End Button 21 followed by the Stop Button 27 on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10.
  • [0038]
    A single child can use both the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, or the communication system of the present invention may be used by two children or a child and a parent at the same time, providing many hours of fun, educational activities.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 8 is a schematic block diagram of the communication system at the Doll 2.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 9 is a schematic block diagram of the communication system at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10.
  • [0041]
    It should be noted that the two transceivers and the computer chip units are not numbered in FIG. 1 through FIG. 7 because these devices are located internally within the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. The computer chip units within the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 are electrically or wirelessly connected to the transceivers within the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. The computer chip units process the signals coming to the computer chip units from their respective transceivers within the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 and control the output of the signals going to the respective transceivers and speakers. The computer chip units and the transceivers receive power from their respective power sources in the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, to which the computer chip units and the transceivers are electrically connected.
  • [0042]
    The Invention Flow Process in the current Preferred Embodiment is comprised of the following paragraphs.
  • [0043]
    A communication system for a talking Doll 2 using infrared signals, including a Transmitter Cell Phone 10, which is shaped to resemble a modern mobile communication device or “smartphone,” a computer chip unit at the Doll 2, a computer chip unit at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, a first transceiver at the Doll 2, a second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, a power source and a speaker in each of the Doll 2 and Transmitter Cell Phone 10, and may include motor operated mechanisms in the Doll 2 to actuate, arms 51 and 52, hands 55 and 56, legs 61 and 62, feet 65 and 66, head 70, and facial features of the Doll 20 (i.e., eyes 80 or eyelids of the eyes 80, and mouth 90). For example, the mouth 90 or the lips of the mouth 90 may move corresponding to the voice messages emitted from the speaker 3 embedded in the lower abdomen of the Doll 2.
  • [0044]
    The power sources power the computer chip units, the transceivers, the speakers, and the motor operated mechanisms, and the computer chip units are coupled with their respective transceivers and speakers to facilitate electrical and data/signal communications between these components.
  • [0045]
    The computer chips used in the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 preferably include onboard memory or memory modules coupled to the computer chips to store voice messages and other sounds emitted from the speaker 3 of the Doll 2 and speaker 39 of the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, and the memory may also be used for recording voice and sounds.
  • [0046]
    In the communication system for a talking doll described above, the computer chip units in the Doll 2 and Transmitter Cell Phone 10 may be programmed to respond to signals received from the opposite device (i.e. the Doll 2 or Transmitter Cell Phone 10) and to send signals between the first transceiver at the Doll 2 and the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10. Both computer chip units may also be programmed to respond to user-chosen sequential operations from either the first transceiver at the Doll 2 or the second transceiver at the Transmitter Cell Phone 10, which causes response signals to pass between the first and the second transceiver and enables the Doll 2 to verbally and/or physically react to each user chosen sequential operation.
  • [0047]
    In the communication system for a talking doll described above, both computer chip units in the Doll 2 and the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 may further be programmed to recognize a lack of signal from the transceiver in the opposite device and to produce various automated responses, such as causing the Doll 2 to walk, or a prerecorded “Operator” message to play through the Doll Speaker 3 or the Transmitter Cell Phone Speaker 39.
  • [0048]
    The communication system for a talking doll described above may further include one or more selectively operated Button(s) mounted to the Doll 2 to initiate the signal of the first transceiver disposed inside the Doll 2, preferably in the torso or head cavity of the Doll 2, or various preprogrammed responses and/or movements. Each of these signal initiation Button(s) may be manually operable, and each Button may be mounted to a box in the right hand 55 or left hand 56 of the Doll 2 for manual operation by pressing the respective Button.
  • [0049]
    The Transmitter Cell Phone 10 of the communication system for a talking doll of the present invention described herein preferably includes buttons for each of the numbers zero (0) through nine (9). The Transmitter Cell Phone 10 may also include at least one but preferably a plurality of action buttons for at least one but preferably a plurality of activities, signals and various commands.
  • [0050]
    While the communication system, method and device of the present invention have been shown and described in accordance with the preferred and practical embodiments thereof, it is recognized that departures from the instant disclosure are contemplated within the spirit and scope of the present invention. Therefore, the true scope of the invention should not be limited by the abovementioned Invention Flow and Description of the Preferred Embodiment since other modifications may become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of the drawings, description, explanations, and specifications herein. Various modifications to these embodiments will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the principles described herein can be applied to other embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention and the subject matter of the present invention.
  • DEFINITIONS
  • [0051]
    “Computer chip unit” is defined as a grouping of electronic parts, circuitry, and at least one computer chip.
  • [0052]
    “Transceiver” is defined as a device that can both transmit and receive communications.
  • [0053]
    “ON/OFF/TRY ME switch” 7 is defined as a three position switch comprising of a fully-operable ON position, an OFF position, and a TRY ME position, which is an altered or limited setting as compared to the fully-operable ON position.
  • [0054]
    The “Animal Button” 11 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of an elephant, monkey, and giraffe.
  • [0055]
    The “Trees Button” 33 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of three trees.
  • [0056]
    The “Swimming Tube Button” 13 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a swimming tube or flotation device.
  • [0057]
    The “Movie Snap Button” 15 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a movie snap.
  • [0058]
    The “Music Notes Button” 29 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a series of musical notation.
  • [0059]
    The “Burger Button” 31 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a hamburger.
  • [0060]
    The “Jeans Button” 17 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a pair of jeans.
  • [0061]
    The “Roller Skate Button” 23 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a roller skate.
  • [0062]
    The “Start Button” 25 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a human figure walking and initiates the Doll's 2 walking movement.
  • [0063]
    The “Stop Button” 27 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a human figure standing still and halts the Doll's 2 walking movement.
  • [0064]
    The “Phone Button” 19 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a phone in a vertical position.
  • [0065]
    The “End Button” 21 is defined as the button on the Transmitter Cell Phone 10 that features an image of a phone in a horizontal position.
  • [0066]
    The “smartphone” is defined as a mobile phone with an operating system and advanced computing, media and communications capabilities, typically featuring a relatively large, high-resolution touchscreen display.
  • [0067]
    The “Transmitter Cell Phone” 10 is defined as a toy communication device shaped to resemble a Smartphone.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A communication system for a talking doll using communication signals, comprising:
    a. a doll including a first computer chip unit coupled to a first transceiver, a first speaker and a first power source powering said first computer chip unit, said first transceiver and said first speaker; and
    b. a transmitter cell phone including a second computer chip unit coupled to a second transceiver, a second speaker and a second power source powering said second computer chip unit, said second transceiver and said second speaker, wherein said first transceiver and said second transceiver are configured to exchange signals therebetween.
  2. 2. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the first computer chip unit is programmed to respond to signals received by the first transceiver from the second transceiver.
  3. 3. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the second computer chip unit is programmed to respond to signals received by the second transceiver from the first transceiver.
  4. 4. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the first computer chip unit and the second computer chip unit are programmed to send signals between the first transceiver and the second transceiver.
  5. 5. The communication system of claim 1, further comprising at least one motor operated mechanism in the talking doll actuating a mechanical feature of the talking doll.
  6. 6. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the transmitter cell phone is shaped to resemble a smartphone.
  7. 7. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the first computer chip unit and the second computer chip unit are programmed to respond to at least one user-selected sequential operation from either the first transceiver or the second transceiver, causing response signals to pass between the first transceiver and the second transceiver and enabling the talking doll to react to the at least one user-selected sequential operation.
  8. 8. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the first computer chip unit is programmed to recognize a lack of signal from the second transceiver and to produce at least one automated response to the lack of signal.
  9. 9. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the second computer chip unit is programmed to recognize a lack of signal from the first transceiver and to produce at least one automated response to the lack of signal.
  10. 10. The communication system of claim 1, further comprising at least one selectively operable button mounted to the doll to initiate a signal of the first transceiver.
  11. 11. The communication system of claim 1, further comprising at least one selectively operable button mounted to the doll to initiate at least one pre-programmed response.
  12. 12. The communication system of claim 10, wherein the least one selectively operable button is manually operable.
  13. 13. The communication system of claim 11, wherein the least one selectively operable button is manually operable.
  14. 14. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the transmitter cell phone includes buttons for each of the numbers zero (0) through nine (9).
  15. 15. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the transmitter cell phone includes at least one button for at least one action.
  16. 16. The communication system of claim 1, wherein the transmitter cell phone includes a plurality of buttons for at least one command.
  17. 17. A method of communicating between a talking doll and a transmitter cell phone, each of them being a device, comprising the steps:
    (a) activating at least one power switch on the talking doll or the transmitter cell phone;
    (b) activating at least one button on the talking doll or the transmitter cell phone, wherein the at least on button is disposed on a device with the at least one switch;
    (c) transmitting at least one signal from a transceiver disposed on the device with the at least one switch to an opposite device; and
    (d) receiving the at least one signal by a transceiver disposed in the opposite device.
  18. 18. The method of communicating between a talking doll and a transmitter cell phone of claim 17, the method further comprising: processing the at least one signal by a computer chip unit disposed in the opposite device.
  19. 19. The method of communicating between a talking doll and a transmitter cell phone of claim 17, the method further comprising: playing at least one pre-programmed sound response to the activating the at least one button.
  20. 20. The method of communicating between a talking doll and a transmitter cell phone of claim 17, the method further comprising: activating a physical response of the talking doll in response to the activating the at least one button.
US13680245 2012-07-03 2012-11-19 Communication system, method and device for toys Abandoned US20140011423A1 (en)

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US201261667746 true 2012-07-03 2012-07-03
US13680245 US20140011423A1 (en) 2012-07-03 2012-11-19 Communication system, method and device for toys

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