US20130340781A1 - Oil absorbing comb - Google Patents

Oil absorbing comb Download PDF

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US20130340781A1
US20130340781A1 US13528335 US201213528335A US2013340781A1 US 20130340781 A1 US20130340781 A1 US 20130340781A1 US 13528335 US13528335 US 13528335 US 201213528335 A US201213528335 A US 201213528335A US 2013340781 A1 US2013340781 A1 US 2013340781A1
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comb
teeth
mm
body
hair
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US13528335
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Frank Thomas Liebel
Anne Young
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Johnson and Johnson Consumer Companies LLC
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Johnson and Johnson Consumer Companies LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45DHAIRDRESSING OR SHAVING EQUIPMENT; MANICURING OR OTHER COSMETIC TREATMENT
    • A45D24/00Hair combs for care of the hair; Accessories therefor
    • A45D24/30Combs specially adapted for removing dirt or grease

Abstract

This invention relates to an oil absorbing comb and methods for its use. The novel comb of this invention is capable of absorbing significant amounts of oil from mammalian hair or other substrates and methods of using said comb.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to a novel comb that is capable of absorbing significant amounts of oil from hair or other substrates and methods of using said comb.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The human scalp, in common with other parts of the body, becomes soiled and requires cleaning or shampooing. The scalp and hair may be soiled by external sources as well as the normal secretion of sebum and oils throughout the scalp skin. While the frequency of shampooing can vary greatly from one individual to another, there are intervals during between such washings when individuals may need to remove oil, sebum and/or the odor associated with sebum. For example, busy business workers who use break times to attend fitness clubs, individuals who feel their scalp produces more oily substances during the warmer months, teenagers who experience oily hair as they progress through puberty, individuals who have had surgery and cannot bathe and the elderly who have issues with bathing may find it difficult to wash their hair as frequently as they would like. Both consumers and those skilled in the art have recognized a need for an in-between hair cleaning means that is simpler, faster and more convenient than shampooing.
  • In the past, combs have generally been made from such material as vulcanized rubber, celluloid and other plastics. While combs often remove sizable extraneous matter and detangle hair, their ability to absorb or adsorb oil or soil from the hair is relatively low due to dense, impervious material used in their manufacture. Over time, combs have become mass produced and are often thought of as a semi-disposable item as they are often lost and misplaced. Combs are currently used to style the hair without functioning to remove or absorb oil or dirt from the hair.
  • Throughout the years, there have been many products that have promised ways to clean the hair without washing or rinsing with water. Some of these products have involved adding oil absorbing materials to the comb in one form or another. Grove (U.S. Pat. No. 1,166,361), Whitney (U.S. Pat. No. 1,760,928), Carter (U.S. Pat. No. 1,645,318), and Hazzard (U.S. Pat. No. 2,895,487) relate to dry cleaning combs that are associated with “gloves” made from an oil or soil absorbent material that form an outer covering of the comb including the teeth.
  • Powers (U.S. Pat. No. 807,127), Maley (U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,039,982 and 1,147,681), Janda (U.S. Pat. No. 1,818,401), and Kellett et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 4,856,541), for example, relate to combs with teeth that have an oil or soil absorbent material added to the individual teeth tines.
  • Heysinger (U.S. Pat. No. 466,496), Betheuser (U.S. Pat. No. 1,286,870), Vazov et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 2,302,726), Heyman (U.S. Pat. No. 2,437,298), Buhrer et al. (U.S. Pat. No. 2,630,126), Fortmann (U.S. Pat. No. 2,797,695), Loeffler (U.S. Pat. No. 3,762,425), Ohtsuka (U.S. Pat. No. 5,062,435), and McKay (US 2008/0078043)) relate to combs in which absorbents have been added to or near the base of the teeth or bristles of the comb or brush.
  • Other previous approaches to dry shampooing include the use of sprays that incorporated a talc-like absorbent to absorb sebum that was intended to be applied to the hair and then brushed out. Unfortunately, the absorbent would often leave a residue on the hair, resulting in unsightly flakes appearing on the scalp. Products such as Psssssst® Instant Spray Shampoo (by Pssssst), Batiste®Dry Shampoo (by Batiste), Klorane® Extra Gentle Dry Shampoo (by Klorane) and Got2b® Rockin' It Dry Shampoo (by Got2b) are examples of products currently on the market.
  • Previous efforts have attempted to solve the problem of keeping hair clean without frequent washing and/or without the use of water, however, they all have drawbacks and have not resulted in solutions that are acceptable to the consumer. The spray type of shampoo often results in a residue left on the hair, the feel of which is unacceptable. Some of the above mentioned implements have absorbents in the brush frame rather than in the bristles, thus limiting their effectiveness, as the absorbents may not contact the hair closest to the hair roots, which usually are the oiliest part of the hair. Plastic combs do not absorb oil from the hair. Rather, they wick using electrostatic forces generated by dragging the combs through the hair. For these reasons, there remains a need for a comb which is capable of removing oil from the hair, including the portion nearest the hair root.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, we have made a novel comb capable of absorbing oily residue from hair comprising, consisting essentially of and consisting of: (a) a body comprising, consisting essentially of and consisting of at least one row of at least three comb teeth said teeth being spaced apart from each other and having a distal and a proximal end in relation to said body; (b) said body comprising, consisting essentially of and consisting of an elongated member to which said comb teeth are attached, (c) said body and comb teeth comprising an absorbent material having a density of less than 7.8 gm/mL; and a porosity of between about 0.3 and 0.7 (100 to 5 μl, ml/g). Preferably, said comb teeth have a bending angle as defined herein of no greater than about 65%. In addition, preferably, said comb teeth should be spaced at their proximal ends from about 1 to about 5 mm and at their distal ends from about 4 to about 15 mm.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a plan view of one embodiment of the novel oil absorbing comb of this invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • This invention relates to an article of manufacture comprising, consisting essentially of and consisting of an oil-absorbing comb means and methods for removing excess oil from mammalian hair or a like substrate such as fur.
  • As used herein, the terms “oil” or “hair oil” mean the combination of oils or oil-like substances normally produced by the human scalp and/or other types of mammalian skin. Included in this definition are at least the following oils normally found in human hair oil: fatty acids, triglycerides, wax esters, squalene, cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and/or ceramides.
  • As used herein, the term “absorb” means to take in and make part of. “Adsorb” means to adhere to the surface. In the means and methods of this invention, the comb absorbs oil.
  • As used herein, the term “absorbent material” means a material that is capable of absorbing oil.
  • As used herein, the term “comb” is any device that can be used to separate strands of hair. In particular, a comb of this invention comprises, consists essentially of and consists of a hand-held device body having an elongated portion for holding (“body”) and at least one row of at least three teeth.
  • The oil absorbing combs of this invention comprise, consist essentially of and consist of an elongated body having at least three teeth which can be used to contact the hair. The dimensions of the combs of this invention may vary in accordance with the type of hair being treated. For example, a comb with short teeth may be appropriate for hair that is thin and short (such as a baby's hair), but such short, thin teeth may be ineffective in penetrating and detangling the thick, long tresses of an adult or a mammal other than a human. Each tooth of the comb has a proximal end, which is attached to the body of the comb, and a distal end relative to the body of the comb such that the distal end of each tooth is free of the comb.
  • The proximal end of the teeth of the comb should be situated such that they are separated by from about 1 to about 5 mm, preferably from about 1 to about 3 mm. As the teeth extend away from the body of the comb, they may be tapered or untapered and straight (i.e., at a 90° angle along their entire length from proximal to distal end).
  • At their distal ends, the teeth should be spaced apart sufficiently to allow the hair to slide between the teeth unimpeded and without catching or tangling in the hair. Preferably, the teeth are tapered such that each tooth tapers at an angle of a with respect to the position of the tooth at its distal end where it attaches to the body of the comb. Preferably, a is from about 2 to about 5 degrees relative to the position of the tooth at its distal end, more preferably from about to about 3 degrees and most preferably, about 3 degrees. The distal end of the teeth of the comb should be situated such that they are separated by from about 4 to about 15 mm, more preferably from about 4 to about 8 mm and most preferably from about 4 to about 6 mm.
  • The thickness of the teeth is preferably from about 1 to about 5 mm, more preferably from about 2 to about 4 mm and most preferably from about 2.5 to about 3 mm. Preferably, the teeth taper in thickness from their proximal to their distal ends.
  • While it is also preferred for the teeth (“T”) have a greater length than the body (“B”), it is also possible to have the body (“B”) be longer than the teeth (“T”).
  • FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of comb 10.
  • Preferably, comb 10 of this invention has an overall length (“L”) of less than about 30 cm and teeth 20 having a length (“T”) of less than about 15 cm. More preferably, the comb 10 has an overall length of less than about 10cm, teeth 20 that are less than about 3 cm in length and a body (“B”) 30 that has a width that is less than about 3 cm.
  • As used herein, the term “flexible” means the ability to bend repeatedly. The term “resilient” means the ability to return to an original form or position after being bent, compressed or stretched. The teeth of the comb are preferably both flexible and resilient. They should have the ability to bend as they are pulled through the hair or during the stroking process. While it is not necessary for the teeth to recover completely to their original shape after stroking through the hair, they should not break or bend permanently. The term “bending angle” as used herein means the angle as measured with relation to a starting position past which the teeth should not bend when subjected to external force. The teeth should be sufficiently resilient to have a bending angle of not greater than about 65°.
  • The oil absorbing comb of this invention may be made of materials that are sufficiently inexpensive to be disposable. The oil absorbing comb of this invention should be made of absorbent materials. Preferably, the comb should be made of materials that are capable of absorbing at least a minimum amount of oil before being disposed of such that the hair through which they are combed appears cleaner and less oily. Preferably, the oil absorbing comb of this invention should be capable of absorbing at least 20 mg of oily substances from the hair after two strokes through the hair.
  • The porosity of the absorbent material used to make the oil absorbing combs of this invention also affect the oil absorption properties of combs may from the material. A material having large or macro sized pores (large than 50 nm) is more efficient at absorbing oil than a material containing mesopores (from about 2 to about 5 nm), which would in turn be more efficient than a material that has micropores (from about 0.7 to about 2 nm). Some balsa wood, for example, has essentially closed pores and may not be appropriate for an oil absorbing comb.
  • The porosity of the absorbent material that is used in making the combs according to this invention should be as follows: preferably, said porosity should be from about 0.3 to about 0.7 ml/g of pores having the size of 100 μm to 5 μm, more preferably from about 0.4 to about 0.6 ml/g and most preferably from about 0.4 to about 0.5 ml/g. The density of the absorbent material used to make the oil absorbing combs of this invention also affects the oil absorption properties of combs may from the material. Preferably, the density of the material should be less than about 8 gm/mL. More preferably, the density of the material should be less than about 2 gm/mL.
  • Examples of materials that may be used to form an oil absorbing comb according to this invention include, but are not limited to the following: polyethylene, polypropylene, polycarbonate, polyvinylidine difluoride, ethylene vinyl acetate, hermoplastic polyurethane, cotton, rice protein, paper, talc, cornstarch, silica, nylon, clay, diatomite, sponge, bamboo, bran, starch, oat, kaolin, rice powder, hemp, silk, cellulose, pulp, cotton powder and materials containing a high percentage of starch (commonly seen in food products such as amaranth, arrow root, artichoke, black beans, buckwheat, carob flour, cassava, chick peas, corn flour, kidney beans, maize, cornmeal, millet, flake and flour, lentils, parsnip, plantains, potato, pasta, peas, quinoa grain, sago, sorghum and sorghum flour, squash, sweet chestnut, sweet potato, tapioca, teff, yam, breadfruit and wheat flour) and the like.
  • The oil absorbing comb of this invention may be coated with an indicator that informs the user when the comb is saturated with oil and therefore cannot absorb any substantial amount of additional oily substances. Hair sebum is more acidic than hair itself and therefore a pH indicator that changes from a basic color to a more acidic color can indicate saturation by changing color. Examples of pH indicators include but are not limited to Methyl violet, Thymol blue, Methyl yellow, Bromphenol blue, Methyl orange, Methyl red, Litmus, Bromthymol blue, Phenol red, Phenolphthalein, Thymolphthalein, Alizarin yellow and the like.
  • Additionally, the comb may be made from a material that may be cleaned and may not be disposed of such as those made from a material that can maintain the density and porosity necessary for its function to absorb oil. Furthermore, such material should not degrade or lose porosity when wetted. Oil absorbing combs according to this invention may be made by obtaining a sheet of absorbent material and cutting the sheet into the shape of a comb that meets the specifications set forth herein with a pair of scissors or a lathe. The combs of this invention may also be made by creating a mold and pouring appropriate material into the mold, subjecting said material to heat and/or pressure as appropriate to “set” the material and then removing said molded comb from the mold.
  • EXAMPLES
  • Oil absorbing combs made in accordance with this invention were created and tested according to the following examples using the methods set forth below. It is understood that while the invention has been described in conjunction with the detailed description thereof, that the foregoing description and ensuing examples are intended to illustrate and not limit the scope of the invention, which is defined by the scope of the appended claims. Other aspects, advantages, and modifications are set forth herein and within the claims.
  • Test Methods:
  • 1. Hair Preparation for Comb Test
  • Clean 12″ long virgin brown hair tresses weighing approximately 15 grams (International Hair Importers, Glendale, N.Y., USA) were suspended from a metal rod and coated with 1 ml (approximately 900 mg) of warm (32° C.) synthetic sebum (Clarke J. et. al.; J. Soc. Cosmet. Chem., 40, 309-320 (November/December 1989)). Synthetic sebum used in the examples contains Palmitic Acid, Stearic Acid, Coconut oil, Paraffin Wax, Synthetic Spermaceti, Olive oil, Squalene, Cholestrol, Oleic acid, and Linoleic acid.
  • 2. Material Density Determination
  • The density of the different materials was tested by the USP method 846, available at www.usp.org. The density of the absorbent materials useful in the combs of this invention should be less than about 8 g/ml, more preferably, less than about 7.8 g/ml.
  • 3. Porosity Determination
  • The porosity of the different materials was tested in accordance with USP test method 267, available at www.usp.org (“porosimetry by mercury intrusion”). We have found that the absorbent materials useful in the methods and articles of manufacture of this invention should be both porous and low in density, as they must be light and well able to absorb oily substances from the hair and scalp. Preferably, the porosity (measuring pores having a size of 100 μm to 5 μm, in ml/g) of the absorbent materials useful in the oil absorbing combs of this invention should be from about 0.3 to about 0.7, more preferably from about 0.4 to about 0.6 and most preferably from about 0.4 to about 0.5.
  • Example 1 Removal of Synthetic Sebum from Hair Tresses Using a Comb made from Paper
  • Comb prototypes were made from paper (Kraft fluff pulp, grade 416, Weyerhaeuser, Columbus, Miss., USA). A small Computer Numerical Controls “CNC” machine was used to cut out the prototypes, which were each weighed prior to testing. Single layer combs were approximately 1 mm thick. Double layer combs were made by gluing (Elmer's Carpenters Wood Glue, Elmer's Products Inc., Westerville, Ohio) two 1 mm layers together resulting in a thickness of approximately 2 mm. A plastic (polyethylene terephthalate) comb of the similar shape was used as a reference control. For this example, the plastic comb was 8.5cm long and 4.5 in wide. The comb had 10 teeth with a 4 mm spacing at the base of the teeth and a 7 mm spacing at the tip if the teeth. The plastic comb was thicker than the paper prototypes (3mm).
  • Each comb was stroked through a hair tress 25 times in a downward motion at a rate of 1-2 seconds per 12″ length of the tresses. The comb was weighed. The tresses were combed for an additional 25 strokes in the same tress and weighed again. The results are shown in Table 1.
  • TABLE 1
    Amount of
    Clean Comb sebum
    Comb wt. (mg) 25 strokes 50 strokes on comb (mg)
    paper 3158.6 3182.3 3189.8 31.2
    (single
    layer 1 mm
    thick)
    paper 6055 6071.9 6078.7 23.7
    (double
    layer 2 mm)
    Plastic 17373.7 17380.3 17380.8 7.1

    The single layer paper comb (1mm) was more efficient at removing sebum from the hair than a plastic comb. While the double layer paper comb would be expected to absorb more sebum, we theorize that the amount of sebum absorbed reflects the fact that glue used to join the layers together and may have affected the sebum absorption.
  • Example 2 Removal of Synthetic Sebum from Hair Tresses Using a Comb made from Paper or Balsa Wood
  • Hair tresses were prepared with oil as set forth above.
  • Plastic, paper, and balsa wood (McMaster-Carr, Robbinsville, N.J., USA) comb prototypes were made as described above. Each comb was weighed prior to testing. Each comb was stroked through a tress 25 times then weighed, then an additional 25 strokes in the same tress and weighed again. A plastic comb of the similar shape and size was used as a reference control. The results are shown in Table 2.
  • TABLE 2
    Treatment Mean amount of sebum on comb (mg)
    Plastic comb (N = 1) 6.1
    1 mm paper comb (N = 2) 26.35
    Balsa Wood comb (N = 4) 20.9

    The results indicate that both paper and balsa wood absorb significant amounts of sebum as compared to the plastic comb. Balsa wood may have an advantage as the comb teeth tended not to bend as much as the paper comb during use. Applicants have found that for effective combing, the teeth of the comb should not have a bending angle more than 65%. While the balsa wood did not bend as much as the paper comb, the balsa wood teeth did tend to break as the wood grain created weak points in the teeth.
  • Example 3 Removal of Synthetic Sebum from Hair Tresses Using a Comb made from Compressed Paper (Davey Board & Medium Density Fiberboard)
  • Hair tresses were prepared with oil as set forth above.
  • Davey Board Comb prototypes (Davey Board, Talas, Brooklyn, N.Y., USA) and medium density fibreboard (hereinafter, “MDF”) comb prototypes were cut as described above. Each prototype was weighed prior to testing. A single MDF prototype was 1 mm thick. The 2mm and 3mm Davey Board prototypes were made from Davey Boards of that thickness (no glue was used to obtain the thickness). Each comb was stroked through a tress 25 times then weighed, then an additional 25 strokes in the same tress and weighed again. A plastic (polypropylene) comb of the same shape, size and thickness was used as a reference control. The results are shown in Table 3.
  • TABLE 3
    Mean amount of
    Treatments sebum on comb (mg)
    Plastic comb (N = 1) 4.1
    MDF Board 1 mm comb (N = 3) 45.9
    Davey Board 2 mm comb (N = 2) 12.1
    Davey Board 3 mm comb (N = 3) 15.9
  • The results indicate that a 1 mm thick comb made from MDF Board absorbed a greater amount of sebum than the plastic comb or thicker MDF Board combs.
  • Example 4 Material Absorption Effectiveness
  • Hair tresses were prepared with sebum as set forth above.
  • Comb prototypes were made as described above. Additionally, a second control comb, a store-bought plastic comb, was used. The initial weight of the each unused combs was recorded. Each comb was then used to stroke the prepared tresses. After each stroke, the combs were weighed and the weight recorded. The table below shows the amount of sebum absorbed after each stroke.
  • TABLE 4
    # of Strokes
    1 2 3 5 10 25
    Test Material amount of sebum removed (mg)
    1 mm paper comb 2.8 4.35 10.5 14.65 25.8 31.1
    (N = 2)
    balsa wood comb 3.1 4.2 4.4 12.6 15.1 25.7
    (N = 1)
    MDF board comb 8.75 20.75 21.85 31.05 38.5 60.6
    (N = 2)
    plastic prototype comb
    (N = 1) 1.1 3 5.4 5 4.9 6.7
    Store bought plastic comb
    (N = 1) 1.9 6.1 9.7 14.5 15.1 15.6

    The results show that combs made from pulp material (balsa wood, paper, MDF) were able to absorb sebum at a much greater rate per stroke and overall then the disposable 5″ plastic comb (Sharp Choices, Scottsdale, Ariz. USA).
  • Example 5 Density of Materials Used to make the Comb
  • Sample combs were cut from material at the dimensions set forth in Table 5 below. Each sample of material and the corresponding comb was then tested under USP test method 846 for density. The results are shown in Table 5.
  • TABLE 5
    Sample number Material Dimensions Density gm/mL
    1 Paper mat 1 mm 1.877 (n = 1)
    2 Paper mat Comb cut from 1.856 (n + 2)
    Material #1
    (1 mm)
    3 Davey Board 9″ × 5.5″ × ⅛″ 1.787 (n = 2)
    4 Davey Board Comb cut from 1.769 (n + 1)
    Material #3
    5 Balsa wood 9″ × 5.5″ × ⅛″ 0.093 (n = 2)
    6 Balsa wood Comb cut from 0.187 (n = 1)
    material #5
    7 Composite 6″ × 6″ × 0.5″ 1.473 (n = 2)
    8 Composite Comb cut from 1.877
    material #7
    Control Steel ¼″ ball bearings 7.819

    The previous examples show the four materials (paper, Davey Board, balsa wood and MDF) absorb oil. The result from this example indicates that the density of the material is preferably less than about 8 gm/mL or less than about 7.8 gm/mL.
  • Example 6 Porosity
  • Sample combs were cut from material at the dimensions set forth in Table 5 below. Composite board was made of a combination of hard and soft wood fibers combined with wax and binding resin. The board was placed under pressure and high temperature to form the composite material. Each sample of material and the corresponding comb was then tested under USP test method 267 for porosity (available at www.usp.org; porosimetry by mercury intrusion). Porosity of the materials was measured with regard to pores having a dimension of between 100 microns and 5 microns. The results are shown in Table 6.
  • TABLE 6
    Porosity
    Sample 100 μm to 5 μm,
    Number Material ml/g Density gm/mL
    1 Paper mat 0.58 1.877 (n = 1)
    2 Paper comb cut 0.59 1.856 (n + 2)
    from #1
    3 Davey Board 0.12 1.787
    4 Davey Board Comb 0.08 1.769
    5 Balsa wood 1.36 0.093
    6 Balsa wood comb 0.64 0.187
    7 Composite board 0.43 1.478
    8 Composite board 0.5 1.877
    comb

    Thus, materials that were highly porous with low density were most capable of absorbing large amounts of oily substances from the hair. The Davey board materials #3 and #4, for example, had relatively low porosity, and thus were unable to absorb oil effectively, despite its low density.

Claims (17)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A comb capable of absorbing oily residue from hair comprising:
    (a) A body comprising at least one row of at least three comb teeth said teeth being spaced apart from each other and having a distal end and a proximal end in relation to said body;
    (b) Said body comprising an elongated body member to which said comb teeth are attached:
    (c) Said body and comb teeth comprising an absorbent material having a density of less than about 8 gm/mL; and a porosity of from about 0.3 to about 0.7 (100 μm to 5 μm, ml/g).
  2. 2. A comb according to claim 1 wherein said comb teeth have a bending angle of no greater than 65%.
  3. 3. A comb according to claim 1 wherein said comb teeth are spaced at their proximal ends from about 1 to about 5 mm and at their distal ends from about 4 to about 15 mm.
  4. 4. A comb according to claim 1 wherein the proximal end of the teeth of the comb are separated by from about 1 to about 5 mm.
  5. 5. A comb according to claim 4 wherein the proximal end of the teeth of the comb are separated by from about 1 and about 3 mm.
  6. 6. A comb according to claim 1 wherein said teeth are tapered from their proximal to their distal ends at an angle a of from about 2 to about 5 degrees.
  7. 7. A comb according to claim 6 wherein said teeth are tapered at an angle a of from about 2 to about 3 degrees.
  8. 8. A comb according to claim 7 wherein said teeth are tapered at an angle a of about 3 degrees.
  9. 9. A comb according to claim 3 wherein the distal ends of said teeth are separated by from about 4 to about 8 mm.
  10. 10. A comb according to claim 9 wherein the distal ends of said teeth are separated by from about 4 to about 6 mm.
  11. 11. A comb according to claim 1 wherein said teeth are from about 1 to about 5 mm in thickness.
  12. 12. A comb according to claim 11 wherein said teeth are from about 2 to about 4 mm in thickness.
  13. 13. A comb according to claim 12 wherein said teeth are from about 2.5 to about 3 mm in thickness.
  14. 14. A comb according to claim 1 wherein said porosity is from about 0.4 to about 0.6 gm/mL.
  15. 15. A comb according to claim 14 wherein said porosity is from about 0.4 to about 0.5 gm/mL.
  16. 16. A comb according to claim 1 comprising one or more materials selected from the group consisting of: cellulose, composite board, balsa wood, polyethylene, polypropylene, polycarbonate, polyvinylidine difluoride, ethylene vinyl acetate, hermoplastic polyurethane, cotton, rice protein, paper, talc, cornstarch, silica, nylon, clay, diatomite, sponge, bamboo, bran, starch, oat, kaolin, rice powder, hemp, silk, pulp, cotton powder and materials containing a high percentage of starch.
  17. 17. A method of removing oil from mammalian hair comprising stroking said hair with an oil absorbing comb comprising
    (a) A body comprising at least one row of at least three comb teeth said teeth being spaced apart from each other and having a distal end and a proximal end in relation to said body;
    (b) Said body comprising an elongated body member to which said comb teeth are attached:
    Said body and comb teeth comprising an absorbent material having a density of less than about 8 gm/mL; and a porosity of from about 0.3 to about 0.7 (100 μm to 5 μm, ml/g).
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Cited By (3)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9364416B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-06-14 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Leave-on compositions containing cellulose materials
US9370478B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-06-21 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Skin care compositions containing cotton and citrus-derived materials
US9549889B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2017-01-24 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Rinse-off skin care compositions containing cellulosic materials

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US9370478B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2016-06-21 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Skin care compositions containing cotton and citrus-derived materials
US9549889B2 (en) 2012-11-09 2017-01-24 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. Rinse-off skin care compositions containing cellulosic materials
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