US20130257614A1 - Wireless Tracking System And Method For Backhaul Of Information - Google Patents

Wireless Tracking System And Method For Backhaul Of Information Download PDF

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US20130257614A1
US20130257614A1 US13/902,806 US201313902806A US2013257614A1 US 20130257614 A1 US20130257614 A1 US 20130257614A1 US 201313902806 A US201313902806 A US 201313902806A US 2013257614 A1 US2013257614 A1 US 2013257614A1
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information
healthcare
communication
network
rtls
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US13/902,806
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Matthew R. Perkins
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Clinical Patents LLC
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Awarepoint Corp
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Priority to US24405309P priority Critical
Priority to US30514610P priority
Priority to US12/885,509 priority patent/US20110068892A1/en
Priority to US13/029,107 priority patent/US20110201270A1/en
Priority to US201161445025P priority
Priority to US13/400,090 priority patent/US8903416B1/en
Priority to US13/902,806 priority patent/US20130257614A1/en
Application filed by Awarepoint Corp filed Critical Awarepoint Corp
Publication of US20130257614A1 publication Critical patent/US20130257614A1/en
Assigned to ARES CAPITAL CORPORATION reassignment ARES CAPITAL CORPORATION SECURITY INTEREST Assignors: AWAREPOINT CORPORATION
Assigned to ARES CAPITAL CORPORATION reassignment ARES CAPITAL CORPORATION CORRECTIVE ASSIGNMENT TO CORRECT THE ADDRESS OF ASSIGNEE PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON REEL 033695 FRAME 249. ASSIGNOR(S) HEREBY CONFIRMS THE SECURITY INTEREST Assignors: AWAREPOINT CORPORATION
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C17/00Arrangements for transmitting signals characterised by the use of a wireless electrical link
    • G08C17/02Arrangements for transmitting signals characterised by the use of a wireless electrical link using a radio link
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/18Self-organising networks, e.g. ad-hoc networks or sensor networks
    • H04W84/22Self-organising networks, e.g. ad-hoc networks or sensor networks with access to wired networks
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06QDATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS OR METHODS, SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES; SYSTEMS OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR ADMINISTRATIVE, COMMERCIAL, FINANCIAL, MANAGERIAL, SUPERVISORY OR FORECASTING PURPOSES, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G06Q30/00Commerce, e.g. shopping or e-commerce
    • G06Q30/04Billing or invoicing, e.g. tax processing in connection with a sale
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H10/00ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data
    • G16H10/60ICT specially adapted for the handling or processing of patient-related medical or healthcare data for patient-specific data, e.g. for electronic patient records
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H40/00ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/20ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities, e.g. managing hospital staff or surgery rooms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G16INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATION FIELDS
    • G16HHEALTHCARE INFORMATICS, i.e. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY [ICT] SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE HANDLING OR PROCESSING OF MEDICAL OR HEALTHCARE DATA
    • G16H40/00ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/60ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices
    • G16H40/67ICT specially adapted for the management or administration of healthcare resources or facilities; ICT specially adapted for the management or operation of medical equipment or devices for the operation of medical equipment or devices for remote operation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B5/00Near-field transmission systems, e.g. inductive loop type
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W4/00Services specially adapted for wireless communication networks; Facilities therefor
    • H04W4/02Services making use of location information
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/18Self-organising networks, e.g. ad-hoc networks or sensor networks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61BDIAGNOSIS; SURGERY; IDENTIFICATION
    • A61B5/00Detecting, measuring or recording for diagnostic purposes; Identification of persons
    • A61B5/103Detecting, measuring or recording devices for testing the shape, pattern, colour, size or movement of the body or parts thereof, for diagnostic purposes
    • A61B5/11Measuring movement of the entire body or parts thereof, e.g. head or hand tremor, mobility of a limb
    • A61B5/1113Local tracking of patients, e.g. in a hospital or private home
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W8/00Network data management
    • H04W8/005Discovery of network devices, e.g. terminals

Abstract

The present invention provides a solution to backhauling health information. The present invention utilizes a mesh network to backhaul the health information. The system includes a plurality of first tags, a mesh network, and an information engine. Each of the tags represents a first object. The mesh network preferably includes a plurality of plug-in sensors located within the facility. At least one node in the mesh network operates as healthcare device. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network and determines a position location of the healthcare device and an operation of the healthcare device.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/400,090, filed on Feb. 19, 2012, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/445025, filed on Feb. 21, 2011, now abandoned, and which is a continuation-in-part application to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/029,107, filed on Feb. 16, 2011, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/305146, filed on Feb. 17, 2010, now abandoned, and is a continuation-in-part application to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/885,509, filed on Sep. 18, 2010, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/244053, filed Sep. 20, 2009, now abandoned, all of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entireties.
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • The present invention is related to wireless tracking systems and methods. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for backhauling information over a mesh network.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • Real-time knowledge of resources, whether the resources are assets or people, is becoming a necessary tool of many businesses. Real-time knowledge of the location, status and movement of crucial resources can allow a business to operate more efficiently and with fewer errors. However, many businesses employ hundreds if not thousands of resources in a single facility, and these resources need to be accounted for by a central system that is user friendly.
  • For example, in a typical hospital there are numerous shifts of employees that utilize the same equipment. When a new shift arrives, the ability to quickly locate medical equipment not only results in a more efficient use of resources, but also can result in averting a medical emergency. Thus, the tracking of medical equipment in a hospital is becoming a standard practice.
  • The tracking of objects in other facilities is rapidly becoming a means of achieving greater efficiency. A typical radio frequency identification system includes at least multiple tagged objects, each of which transmits a signal, multiple receivers for receiving the transmissions from the tagged objects, and a processing means for analyzing the transmissions to determine the locations of the tagged objects within a predetermined environment.
  • The prior art discloses various tracking systems and uses of near-field communication devices. Near field communication typically operates in the 13.56 MHz frequency range, over a distance of one meter or less and usually a few centimeters. Near field communication technology is standardized in ISO 18092, ECMA 340, and ETSI TS 102 190.
  • One reference discloses an adapter for a tag that is configured to emulate a near filed communication reader-to-reader tag.
  • Another reference discloses a medical diagnostic system that includes a data acquisition device having a near field communication device for transfer of data.
  • Another reference discloses using ECMA 340 standard for near field communication.
  • Another reference discloses a system for monitoring a patient that uses a personal status monitoring device, such as an ECG electrode assembly, which transmits a signal to an intermediary device, such as a PDA, which transmits to a server using a WLAN.
  • Another reference discloses an object identifier that transmits both an IR signal and a RF signal for location determination.
  • Another reference discloses a system which allows for a location to be determined without requiring precise calculations through use of an object identifier that transmits one identifier corresponding to an object identifier and a second identifier which is a group identifier.
  • Another reference discloses a system for recording object associations based on signals for object identifiers.
  • Another reference discloses a system that uses NFC technology to determine a secondary transport mechanism.
  • Another reference discloses a system that uses BLUETOOTH technology integrated in a cellular telephone to provide interpersonal communications between individuals.
  • Another reference discloses near field communication devices that determine an efficient protocol for sharing information.
  • Another reference discloses passing advertising messages to a mobile client using near field communication technology.
  • As stated above, the problem is inadequate resource visibility in a business. Businesses such as hospitals, need to locate resources (assets and people), know the status of the resources, and understand the usage history of the resources to enable business improvement.
  • Specific problems for hospitals include tracking infections in a hospital to determine a source and other areas or individuals that may be infected. Other problems include spotting emerging patterns of infection and outbreaks to mitigate those affected. Further, for MEDICARE and other insurance providers, hospitals and other medical facilities need to demonstrate that patients received their required care in order to receive payment for such care. The prior art has failed to provide an adequate solution to these problems.
  • Further, there is a need in the health care market to determine when interactions occur between patient worn devices and clinician worn devices. Being able to detect this interaction will drive many applications that revolve around workflow, patient flow and asset tracking To enable the detection of these interaction events, a communication protocol must be defined such that the tags will recognize when they are in-range of each other and report on the in-range event. Off-the-shelf technologies can be employed for this use case but the battery-life, communication range and data rate requirements are often traded for communication performance. For example, peer-to-peer WiFi could be used to establish a near-real time connection between two devices but the battery life of the WiFi-enabled device would be on the order of 1-2 days which would not support the application need. Many other technologies have the same drawbacks.
  • Specific problems for hospitals include tracking infections in a hospital to determine a source and other areas or individuals that may be infected. Other problems include spotting emerging patterns of infection and outbreaks to mitigate those affected. Further, for MEDICARE and other insurance providers, hospitals and other medical facilities need to demonstrate that patients received their required care in order to receive payment for such care. The prior art has failed to provide an adequate solution to these problems.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides a solution to transmitting health information. The present invention utilizes a mesh network that acts to backhaul information obtained utilizing a healthcare device.
  • One aspect of the present invention is a system for backhauling health information over a mesh network. The system includes a plurality of first tags, a mesh network, and an information engine. Each of the plurality of first tags represents a first object. The mesh network preferably includes a plurality of plug-in sensors located within the facility. At least one node in the mesh network operates as healthcare device. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network and determines a position location of the healthcare device and an operation of the healthcare device.
  • The first object is fixed or mobile. The healthcare device is preferably at least one of a fluid pump, heart monitor, ventilation pump and electrocardiogram. The mesh network preferably routes information from the healthcare device to a predetermined destination. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to who accessed the healthcare device last. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to how much time is left before the device needs to be serviced. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to what type of chemicals are in the healthcare device. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to the status of the device. The mesh network preferably provides firmware upgrades to the healthcare device. The healthcare device preferably operates as a RTLS device using one of ultrasound, infrared and radiofrequency medium.
  • Another aspect of the present invention is an enhanced-accuracy enterprise-wide real-time location system. The system includes a plurality of first tags and a mesh network. Each of the plurality of first tags represents a first object. The mesh network includes a plurality of sensors located within the facility. A plurality of nodes in the mesh network operate as RTLS devices using one of ultrasound, infrared, and a radiofrequency medium, wherein each of the plurality of end points transmit to at least one of a plurality of sensors in the mesh network. The mesh network routes RTLS information from each of the plurality of nodes to a predetermined destination.
  • The mesh network preferably operates as an RTLS and a backhaul for information from each of the plurality of end points. The mesh network preferably operates as a secondary RTLS system and a backhaul for information from each of the plurality of end points. Each of the plurality of end points preferably operates as a healthcare device. The healthcare device is preferably at least one of a fluid pump, heart monitor, ventilation pump and electrocardiogram. The mesh network preferably routes information from the healthcare device to a predetermined destination. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to who accessed the healthcare device last. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to how much time is left before the device needs to be serviced. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to what type of chemicals are in the healthcare device. The mesh network preferably transmits data related to the status of the device. The mesh network preferably provides firmware upgrades to the healthcare device. The healthcare device preferably operates as a RTLS device using one of ultrasound, infrared and radiofrequency medium.
  • A medium range wireless communication format is preferably selected from ZIGBEE communication format, Bluetooth communication format, Low-Power BlueTooth communication format, WiFi communication format, Low-Power WiFi communication format, Ultra Wide Band communication format, Ultrasound communication format or Infrared communication format.
  • Real time location systems, frequency abbreviated as RTLS, provide inherent characteristics which have both immediate tactical short-term benefits as well as long-term strategic implications for hospital operations. Real time location systems provide hospital administrators with actionable information regarding the location, status and movement of equipment and people. With RTLS, hospitals have access not only to the specific locations of equipment and people—but also advanced RTLS search capabilities allowing searching by specific location (floor, area, room) or unique asset identifier (department owner, type, manufacturer, model number, asset control number or EIN).
  • One aspect of the present invention is a system for monitoring interaction data for multiple users and objects utilizing near-field communication devices in an indoor facility through a medium range wireless communication format and a short range wireless communication format. The system includes a mesh network, a plurality of near-field communication devices and an information engine. Each of the plurality of near-field communication devices transmits a beacon signal using a short range wireless communication format receivable by another near-field communication device when the near-field communication devices are within physical proximity of each other. At least one of the near-field communication devices transmits interaction data using a medium range wireless communication format to the mesh network. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network and processes the interaction data.
  • The medium range wireless communication format is preferably selected from ZIGBEE communication format, Bluetooth communication format, Low-Power BlueTooth communication format, WiFi communication format, Low-Power WiFi communication format, Ultra Wide Band communication format, Ultrasound communication format or Infrared communication format. The short range wireless communication format is preferably selected from a near-field communication format, a low frequency communication format or a magnetic field communication format. Alternatively, the short range wireless communication format is selected from a magnetic induction communication format, 9 kHz communication format, <125 kHz communication format, 125 kHz RFID communication format, 13.56 MHz communication format, 433 MHz communication format, 433 MHz RFID communication format, or 900 MHz RFID communication format.
  • Another aspect of the present invention is a system for determining a business relationship between individuals within a facility. The system includes multiple near-field communication devices, multiple tags, a mesh network and an information engine. The mesh network is preferably an 802.15.4 ZIGBEE wireless sensor network. Each of the first near-field communication devices represented is associated with an individual. Each of the tags represents an object. The mesh network includes multiple plug-in sensors located within the facility. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network. The information engine determines a business relationship between a first bearer and a second bearer having a near-field communication interaction based on at least two of multiple factors which include a position location of the interaction, a duration of the interaction, a previous location of the first bearer, a previous location of the second bearer and the number of other objects located near the near-field communication interaction.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the plurality of factors further includes a position designation of the first person and a position designation of the second person and a number of previous interactions between the first person and the second person within a predetermined time period.
  • Another aspect of the present invention is a method for determining a business relationship between individuals within a facility. The method includes transmitting a signal from a tag associated with a first person, and the signal comprises data about a near-field communication interaction between the first person and a second person. The method also includes receiving the signal from the first tag at a mesh network established within the facility. The method also includes determining that an interaction is occurring between the first person and the second person. The method also includes determining a business relationship between the first person and the second person based on multiple factors. The multiple factors can include a position location of the interaction, a duration of the interaction, a previous location of the first person prior to the interaction, a previous location of the second person prior to the interaction, a position designation of the first person and a position designation of the second person, a number of previous interactions between the first person and the second person within a predetermined time period, and the number of other persons at the interaction.
  • Yet another aspect of the present invention is a system for determining a business relationship between individuals within a facility. The system includes multiple near-field communication devices, multiple tags, a mesh network and an information engine. Each of the near-field communication devices is associated with an individual person. Each of the tags represents a first object. The mesh network includes multiple plug-in sensors located within the facility. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network. The information engine analyzes a near-field communication interaction. The multiple factors for the near field communication interaction include a position location of the interaction, a duration of the interaction, a previous location of the first person prior to the interaction, and information for a mobile object within a predetermined distance of the location of the interaction.
  • In one example, the information engine analyzes the near-field communication interaction to determine a billing charge for services of the first person. In another example, the facility is a hospital and the information engine analyzes the near-field communication interaction to determine medical services provided to a patient.
  • Yet another aspect of the present invention is a system for analyzing an action of an individual. The system includes near-field communication devices, tags, a mesh network and an information engine. Each of the near-field communication devices is associated with an individual person. Each of the tags is associated with a mobile object. The mesh network includes multiple sensors positioned within a facility. The mesh network receives transmissions from each tags and each of the near-field communication devices. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network. The information engine analyzes near-field communication interactions between individuals. The information engine further analyzes an action of a first person based on a plurality of factors including a position location of the action, a duration of the action, a previous location of the first person prior to the action, and information for a mobile object within a predetermined distance of the location of the action.
  • Each communication device preferably has a low-power, short-range (<1 foot) communication feature that can detect the presence, or absence, of a signal from another device. Short bits of information are preferably exchanged (<256 bits) between devices but such an exchange is not mandatory. RFID systems operating at frequencies of sub-125 kHz, 125 kHz, 433 MHz, 900 MHz, or 2.4 GHz are used with the present invention. The communication devices alternatively transmit at frequencies as low as 5 kiloHertz (“kHz”) and as high as 900 MegaHertz (“MHz”). Other frequencies utilized by the tags for a low-power short-range communication system include 9 kHz, <125 kHz, 433 MHz, and 900 MHz.
  • Each device preferably contains a low-power, medium-range (1 foot to 30 feet) wireless communication system. Such wireless communication systems include ZIGBEE, BLUETOOTH, Low-Power BLUETOOTH, WiFi or Low-Power WiFi, Ultra Wide Band (“UWB”), Ultrasound and Infrared communication systems. The wireless communication system is used to exchange device specific information after the low-power short-range system has indicated that an interaction has occurred. Those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that the wireless communication system can also be used independent of the low-power short-range system for other wireless communication applications such as location and tracking, sense and control, building automation, smart energy, telecom applications, consumer building automation, remote control applications, home health care, personal fitness, personal wellness, and many other applications.
  • Each communication device preferably continuously transmits a beacon signal using the short-range communication protocol. When a beacon signal is received by another communication device, the receiving communication device can respond using the low-power communication circuit and/or it can respond using the medium-power protocol. The medium-power communication system can transfer larger data packets at a higher transmission rate. Data that might be included in a medium-power transmission include device ID, time stamp, location information, user information, software version, and/or protocol version. A medium-power transmission is preferably acknowledged when received by the receiving communication device. Further, at this point either communication device, or both communication devices, can transmit the information from the interaction to the medium-power infrastructure or to a neighboring communication device. Additionally, the communication devices may also elect to store the interaction information and download/transmit the interaction information at a later time.
  • Yet another aspect of the present invention is a system for monitoring hand sterilization. The system includes a mesh network, a plurality of near-field communication devices, a hand sterilization station and an information engine. Each of the plurality of near-field communication devices transmits a beacon signal using a short range wireless communication format receivable by another near-field communication device when the near-field communication devices are within physical proximity of each other. At least one of the near-field communication devices transmits interaction data using a medium range wireless communication format to the mesh network. The hand sterilization station comprises a hand washing facet activated by an infrared sensor and in communication with a near-field communication device. The information engine is in communication with the mesh network and processes the interaction data. A near-field communication interaction is recorded when a bearer of a near field communication device of the plurality of near-field communication devices activates the infrared sensor of the hand washing facet during a hand washing event. The recordation of the near-field communication interaction is transmitted over the mesh network to the information engine for storage.
  • Yet another aspect of the present invention is a method for monitoring hand sterilization utilizing near-field communications. The method includes sensing for a near-field communication interaction at a hand washing station. The method also includes verifying activation of a infrared sensor for activation of a hand washing facet of the hand washing station. The method also includes verifying a near-field communication interaction with a bearer of a near-field communication device and an activator of the infrared sensor. The method also includes recording data concerning the near-field communication interaction at at least one of an interacting near-field communication device. The method also includes transmitting the data concerning the near-field communication interaction over a mesh network to a processing engine.
  • Having briefly described the present invention, the above and further objects, features and advantages thereof will be recognized by those skilled in the pertinent art from the following detailed description of the invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is schematic view of a system for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 2 is a multi-floor view of a facility employing a system for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 2A is an isolated view of circle 2A of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 2B is an isolated view of circle 2B of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 3 is a floor plan view of a single floor in a facility employing the system for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a flow of information utilizing a system for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a flow of information utilizing a system for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 5A is an illustration of a valid near-field link between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 5B is an illustration of a valid near-field link between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 5C is an illustration of a valid near-field link between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 6 is an illustration of a failed near-field link between near-field communication devices due to a distance between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 6A is an illustration of a failed near-field link between near-field communication devices due to a distance between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 6B is an illustration of a failed near-field link between near-field communication devices due to a distance between near-field communication devices.
  • FIG. 7 is a flow chart of a method for analyzing a near-field communication interaction.
  • FIG. 8 is a plan view of an identification badge containing a communication device.
  • FIG. 9 is a flow chart of a method for analyzing an interaction between objects.
  • FIG. 10 is a flow chart of a method for analyzing an interaction between objects.
  • FIG. 11 is a block diagram of a tag.
  • FIG. 12 is a block diagram of a system for determining a real-time location of an object.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • As shown in FIGS. 1-3, a system for tracking objects within a facility is generally designated 50. The system 50 is capable of analyzing an interaction between objects, individuals 58 and/or objects 100. The system 50 preferably includes a plurality of sensors 55, a plurality of bridges 56, a plurality of near-field communication devices 59, a plurality of tags 60, and at least one information engine 65. The sensors 55 form a mesh network for receiving signals from the near-field communication devices 59 and tags 60. One example of the components of the system 50 is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,197,326, for a Wireless Position Location And Tracking System, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. A more specific example of the sensors 55 is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 7,324,824, for a Plug-In Network Appliance, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • The system 50 is preferably employed at a facility 70 such as a business office, factory, home, hospital and/or government agency building. The system 50 is preferably utilized to track and locate various objects (including persons) positioned throughout the facility 70 in order to analyze near-field communication interactions. The near-field communication devices 59 and tags 60 preferably continuously transmit signals on a predetermined time cycle, and these signals are received by sensors 55 positioned throughout the facility 70. Alternatively, the tags 60 and near-field communication devices 59 transmit signals in a random, ad-hoc or dynamic manner, and these signals are received by the sensors 55 positioned throughout the facility 70. The sensors 55 transmit the data from the near-field communication devices 59 and tags 60 to a bridge 56 for transmission to the information engine 65. If a sensor 55 is unable to transmit to a bridge 56, the sensor 55 may transmit to another sensor 55 in a mesh network for eventual transmission to a bridge 56. In a preferred embodiment, a transmission may be sent from a transmission distance of six sensors 55 from a bridge 56. Alternatively, a transmission is sent from a transmission distance ranging from ten to twenty sensors 55 from a bridge 56. The information engine 65 preferably continuously receives transmissions from the mesh network formed by the sensors 55 via the bridges 56 concerning the movement of persons 58 bearing a near-field communication device 59 and/or devices 100 bearing a tag 60 within the facility 70. The information engine 65 processes the transmissions from the sensors 55 and calculates a real-time position for each of the objects, persons 58 bearing a near-field communication device 59 or objects 100 bearing a tag 60, within the facility 70. The real-time location information for each of the objects is preferably displayed on an image of a floor plan of the facility 70, or if the facility 70 has multiple floors, then on the floor plan images of the floors of the facility 70. The floor plan image may be used with a graphical user interface of a computer, personal digital assistant, or the like so that an individual of the facility 70 is able to quickly locate objects 100 within the facility 70.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the system 50 utilizes sensors 55 to monitor and identify the real-time position of individuals bearing or integrated with communication devices 59. The sensors 55 a-f preferably wirelessly communicate with each other (shown as double arrow lines) and with an information engine 65 through a wired connection 66 via at least one bridge 56, such as disclosed in the above-mentioned U.S. Pat. No. 7,324,824 for a Plug-In Network Appliance. The near-field communication devices 59 and tags 60 preferably transmit wireless signals 57 which are received by the sensors 55 a-e, which then transmit signals to bridges 56 for eventual transmission to the information engine 65. The information engine 65 is preferably located on-site at the facility 70. However, the system 50 may also include an off-site information engine 65, not shown.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the near-field communication device 59 preferably operates at a short range communication format of magnetic induction, 9 kHz, <125 kHz, 125 kHz RFID, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 433 MHz RFID, and 900 MHz RFID, and preferably at a bit rate of less 256 kilobits per second or approximately 426 kilobits per second. The communication format is preferably IEEE Standard 802.15.4. Further, the near-field communication device 59 also operates using a medium range communication format. The medium range communication format can include ZIGBEE, BLUETOOTH, BLUETOOTH low energy, WiFi, Low-power WiFi, Ultrasound and Infrared communication formats. Those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that other communication formats may be used with departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention. The medium range communication format also allows the near-field communication device 59 to communicate with the sensors 55 to transmit interaction information.
  • In a preferred embodiment, each tag 60, or wireless communication device, preferably transmits a radio frequency signal. Each device preferably uses a low-power, medium-range (1 foot to 30 feet) wireless communication system. Such wireless communication systems include ZIGBEE, BLUETOOTH, Low-Power BLUETOOTH, WiFi or Low-Power WiFi, Ultra Wide Band (“UWB”), Ultrasound and Infrared communication systems. A preferred radio-frequency signal is approximately 2.48 GigaHertz (“GHz”). The communication format is preferably IEEE Standard 802.15.4. Those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that the tags 60 may operate at various frequencies without departing from the scope and spirit of the present invention. The tags 60 may be constructed with an asset theft protection system such as disclosed in Baranowski et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,443,297 for a Wireless Tracking System And Method With Optical Tag Removal Detection, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. The tags 60 and near-field communication devices 59 may be designed to avoid multipath errors such as disclosed in Nierenberg et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,504,928 for a Wireless Tracking System And Method Utilizing Tags With Variable Power Level Transmissions, and Caliri et al., U.S. Patent Publication Number 2008/0012767 for a Wireless Tracking System And Method With Multipath Error Mitigation, both of which are hereby incorporated by reference in their entireties.
  • A description of sterilizable tags 60 and systems using sterilizable tags is found in Caliri et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,636,046 for Wireless Tracking System And Method With Extreme Temperature Resistant Tag, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Another description of a sterilizable tag 60 and systems using sterilizable tags is found in Perkins et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,701,334 for Wireless Tracking System And Method For Sterilizable Object, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Another description of a sterilizable tag 60 and systems using sterilizable tags is found in Hertlein et al., U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/371,416, filed on Feb. 11, 2012, for Sterilizable Wireless Tracking And Communication Device And Method For Manufacturing, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. In another embodiment, the tags 60, or wireless communication devices, are used with or as back-hauling communication devices such as disclosed in Perkins, U.S. Pat. No. 8,040,238 for Wireless Tracking System And Method For Backhaul Of Information, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • As shown in FIGS. 2-3, the facility 70 is depicted as a hospital. The facility 70 has multiple floors 75 a-c. Each floor 75 a, 75 b and 75 c has multiple rooms 90 a-i, with each room 90 accessible through a door 85. Positioned throughout the facility 70 are sensors 55 a-o for obtaining readings from communication devices 59 and tags 60 attached to people or objects. A bridge 56 is also shown for receiving transmissions from the sensors 55 for forwarding to the information engine 65. For example, as shown in FIG. 2, the system 50 determines that individuals 58 a, 58 b and 58 c are located in a surgery room and are using device 100 c, which is a surgical kit. The information engine 65 analyzes the interaction by monitoring the duration of the interaction, the devices 100 utilized, the location of the interaction (surgery), the previous location of the individuals 58 (possibly a surgical prep room) and additional factors.
  • In another example, as shown in FIG. 3, individuals 58 a, 58 b and 58 c are located in a patient's room and are using a medical object with an attached tag 60 c, which is a patient monitoring unit. In this example, individual 58 a is a patient, individual 58 b is a physician, and individual 58 c is a nurse. The near-field communication device 59 of each individual 58 a, 58 b and 58 c communicates with the other near-field communication devices 59 using a short range communication format as discussed above. In such a situation, each near-field communication device 59 registers the short range beacons transmitted by other near-field communication devices 59. Additionally, interaction information may be transferred between the near-field communication devices 59 using a medium range communication format as discussed above. Further, one, two or all of the near-field communication devices 59 transfer interaction information to at least one sensor 55 using a medium range communication format. The sensor 55 then transmits the interaction information to an information engine 65, preferably using a mesh network. The information engine 65 analyzes the near-field communication interaction information received by the sensor 55 by monitoring the duration of the near-field communication interaction, the objects 100 utilized, the location of the near-field communication interaction (patient's room), the previous location of the individuals 58 and additional factors. The information engine 65 preferably uses this data to generate billing information for the patient.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a preferred architecture of the system 50. For description purposes, the information providers are set forth on one side of the network and the operations is set forth on the other side of the network. However, those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize that the illustrated architecture of the system 50 is not meant to limit any physical relationship between information providers and operations. In fact, an individual 58 could be tracked while accessing information from an object 100 such as a computer 66 in operations. The information providers include individuals 58 that wear near-field communication devices 59, equipment 100 a bearing tags 60, sterilizable equipment 100 b bearing sterilizable tags 60, and the like. A description of sterilizable tags 60 and system is found in Caliri et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,636,046 for Wireless Tracking System And Method With Extreme Temperature Resistant Tag, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. Another description of a sterilizable tag 60 and system is found in Perkins et al., U.S. Pat. No. 7,701,334 for Wireless Tracking System And Method For Sterilizable Object, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety. A bridge 56 acts as an intermediary between the information providers and operations. The bridge 56 communicates information to the information engine 65 which analyzes the information to determine an interaction information between individuals for access through an enterprise local area network for display on computers 66 or other graphical user interface devices.
  • A block diagram of a system utilizing near-field communication is illustrated in FIG. 5. In FIG. 5, two individuals 58 a and 58 b are in proximity in order to “mash-up” and have a valid near-field communication interaction with each individual's near-field communication devices 59 a and 59 b using a short range communication format as discussed above. A signal is transmitted from one of the individuals 58 a near communication device 59 a to a sensor 55 of a mesh network utilizing a medium range communication format as discussed above. The signal contains information pertaining to the near-field communication interaction. The sensor 55 transmits the signal through the mesh network to a bridge 56 for further transmission to an information processing engine 65.
  • FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C illustrate a valid near field communication link which occurs when the two near-field communication devices 59 a and 59 b are within a predetermined distance of each other (d<d isolated). Preferably the distance is one meter or less, and most preferably the distance is ten centimeters or less. Most preferably there is a physical touch between the two near field communication devices. Requiring such proximity allows for power savings since the transmission field for each of the near field communication devices 59 a and 59 b is a minimal amount. If the near field communication device 59 were to transmit using a typical RFID signal or BLUETOOTH signal, then the power consumption would be greater. Thos skilled in the art will recognize that the tag 60 and near field communication device 59 may be the same physical device with circuitry for both applications.
  • FIGS. 6, 6A and 6B illustrate an unsuccessful near-filed communication link. In this situation, the two near-field communication devices 59 a and 59 b are not within a predetermined distance of each other (d>d isolated). Preferably, the distance is more than one meter and most preferably the distance is more than ten centimeters. In such a situation, there is no near field communication interaction. Thus, even though the near-field communication devices 59 a and 59 b are transmitting signal beacons, the individuals 58 a and 58 b are too far apart to detect a beacon signal from the other near-field communication device 59.
  • A method 300 utilizing near field communication is shown in FIG. 7. At block 302, a sensor 55 senses for a near field communication interaction (“mash-up”) between at least two near-field communication devices 59. At a decision block 303, if no near field communication interaction is detected, then the sensor 55 continues to search for a near field communication interaction at block 302. However, if a near field communication interaction is detected by the sensor 55 at decision block 303, the near field communication interaction is recorded at block 304. Next, at block 305, data for the near field communication interaction is transmitted over the mesh network.
  • The near-field communication device 59 preferably includes a microcontroller, a first transceiver for transmitting at the short range communication format, a second transceiver for transmitting at the medium range communication format, a memory, and a power supply. The transmissions are transmitted through the transceivers. The power supply provides power to the components of the near-field communication device 59. All of the components are preferably contained within a housing. A tag 60 preferably has the same components and structure of the near-field communication device 59 except the tag 60 preferably only operates using the medium range communication format.
  • As shown in FIG. 8, an identification badge 141 is preferably utilized as a support for a near-field communication device 59 for a person 58. Alternatively, the identification badge 141 is the near-field communication device 59.
  • In one embodiment, the near-field communication interaction is utilized to authenticate a bearer of a near-field communication device 59 for access to at least one of or a combination of a computer, medical equipment, a protected area of the facility, a medication drawer, or a patient's room. For example, an individual 58 bearing the near-field communication device 59 is a physician and the physician 58 is granted access to a patient's room through a near-field communication interaction with a near-field communication device 59 on a door of the patient's room. In one example, the patient has a highly contagious disease and the tracking of access to the patient's room allows a hospital to know who has been exposed to the patient.
  • In another embodiment, the near-field communication interaction is utilized to track proper hand washing at a hospital. In this example, a near-field device 59 is positioned near a hand washing station for sterilizing hospital personal prior to surgery or similar procedures that require sterilization. When a bearer of a near field device 59 sterilizes his/her hands at the station, an Infrared detector of the hand washing station activates the hand washing station and a near-field interaction of the near-field devices 59 is recorded and transmitted to a sensor 55 for transmission and recordation at an information engine 65. In this manner, the hospital has a record to demonstrate that proper sterilization was performed prior to surgery or similar procedure requiring sterilization.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the interaction of near-field communication devices 59 a and 59 b results in a short range communication transceiver of one of the near-field communication devices 59 transmitting a command to the processor of the near-field communication device 59 that an interaction has occurred between near-field communication devices 59. The processor sends the data from the interaction to a medium range communication transceiver of the near-field communication device 59, which transmits the data to a sensor 55 of the mesh network. The sensor 55 preferably transmits the signal through the mesh network to a bridge 56 for further transmission to an information processing engine 65.
  • In another embodiment, a first near-field communication device 59 a has control over a second near-field communication device 59 b. In this embodiment, the second near-field communication device 59 b has a temperature sensor which triggers an alarm when a threshold temperature is detected by the sensor. When the alarm of the second near-field communication device 59 b is activated, only a near-field interaction with the first near-field communication device 59 a deactivates the alarm. Specifically, the second near-field communication device 59 b receives a short range communication transmission from the first near-field communication device 59 a with an identification of the first near-field communication device 59 a in the transmission which results in the deactivation of the alarm of the second near-field communication device 59 b.
  • In another embodiment, a first near-field communication device 59 a has control over a second near-field communication device 59 b, which permits access to a secure location. In this embodiment, the second near-field communication device 59 b deactivates a lock to a secure location and transmits a signal along a mesh network that the lock has been deactivated. A near-field interaction with the first near-field communication device 59 a deactivates the lock. Specifically, the second near-field communication device 59 b receives a short range communication transmission from the first near-field communication device 59 a with an identification of the first near-field communication device 59 a in the transmission which results in the deactivation of the lock controlled by the second near-field communication device 59 b.
  • In yet another embodiment, a near-field interaction between a first near-field communication device 59 a and a second near-field communication device 59 b triggers an alarm to page security. Specifically, the second near-field communication device 59 b receives a short range communication transmission from the first near-field communication device 59 a with an identification of the first near-field communication device 59 a in the transmission which results in the second near-field communication device 59 b transmitting a medium range communication transmission to a sensor 55 of a mesh network to transmit the signal to a server to issue a page to security.
  • A method 1000 for backhauling information over a mesh network is illustrated in FIG. 9. At block 1001, a communication device associated with an object, in this case a ventilation pump, operates as a node in the mesh network and a healthcare device. The ventilation pump also operates as a RTLS device. At block 1002, a wireless signal is transmitted from the ventilation pump using a medium power communication protocol such as ultrasound, infrared and radiofrequency. At block 1003, the first wireless signal is received at at least one of a plurality of sensors positioned within a facility. At block 1004, the signal is forwarded over the mesh network using a communication protocol such as ZIGBEE. At block 1005, the signal is received at an information engine. At block 1006, the information engine analyzes the backhauled information on the signal for a multiple of factors. The multiple factors include a status of the device, a position location of an action, a duration of the action, a previous location of the device prior to the action, and information for other objects or persons within a predetermined distance of the location of the action. At block 1007, the backhauled information is communicated to a graphical user interface.
  • Another method 2000 for backhauling information over a mesh network is illustrated in FIG. 10. At block 2001, a healthcare device operates as a RTLS device and as a node in a mesh network. In this example, the healthcare device is a heart rate monitor. At block 2002, a wireless signal is transmitted from the healthcare device using a medium power communication protocol such as ultrasound, infrared and radiofrequency. At block 2003, the first wireless signal is received at at least one of a plurality of sensors positioned within a facility. At block 2004, the signal is forwarded to an information engine. At block 2005, the information engine determines that a firmware upgrade is needed at the healthcare device. At block 2006, the information engine through the mesh network transmits the firmware upgrade to the healthcare device. At block 2007, the healthcare device receives the firmware and performs an upgrade of its firmware.
  • A tag 60 utilized with a device 100 is illustrated in FIG. 11. The tag 60 preferably includes a microcontroller 101, a transceiver 103, a power supply 104 and a sensor 106. Alternatively, the tag 60 includes a motion sensor 105. The transmissions are transmitted through transceiver 103. A power supply 104 provides power to the tag 60. All of the components are preferably contained within a housing 107. A communication device 59 preferably has the same components and structure of the tag 60 illustrated in FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 12 is a block diagram of a system for determining a real-time location of an object. Sensors receive the messages from the broadcasting tags through attached different antennas, calculate the signal strength, and decide which signal strength to use. The signal strength information is routed to the server for location processing. Bridge/appliance/server devices received signal strength information from the high definitions sensors and make location decisions. The tag sends broadcast messages preferably using ZIGBEE based wireless transmissions. The sensors receive the ZIGBEE based wireless transmissions preferably through two spatially and angularly diverse antennas. Software on each sensor preferably identifies and matches the sending tag and received signal strength readings. Software on each sensor preferably makes local decisions on the final signal strength value for the transponder. Each sensor preferably sends the signal strength information to the appliance through a wireless ZIGBEE based wireless transmission network. The tags and sensors communicate to the bridges preferably through a ZIGBEE based wireless transmission network. The location of the tags is preferably calculated by using the paired signal strength between tags and the sensors that hear the tag. Time slicing is also utilized in determining a real-time location of the object within an indoor facility by making time slots available in each antenna.
  • A patient wears, or has attached, a patient tag 60 a and a plurality of medical devices bearing or integrated with tags 60 b. Such healthcare devices may include blood pressure monitors, dialysis devices, respiration aids, oxygen tanks, wheelchairs, and the like, and all may act as nodes in a mesh network. The plurality of network monitors preferably utilize ZIGBEE networking standards and technology, such as disclosed at zigbee.org, which pertinent parts are hereby incorporated by reference
  • From the foregoing it is believed that those skilled in the pertinent art will recognize the meritorious advancement of this invention and will readily understand that while the present invention has been described in association with a preferred embodiment thereof, and other embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings, numerous changes modification and substitutions of equivalents may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention which is intended to be unlimited by the foregoing except as may appear in the following appended claim. Therefore, the embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined in the following appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. A system for backhauling health information over a network, the system comprising:
a plurality of first tags, each of the plurality of first tags representing a first object;
a network comprising a plurality of sensors located within the facility;
a healthcare device, wherein the healthcare device is an end point in the network; and
an information engine in communication with the network;
wherein information from the healthcare device is backhauled over the network to the information;
wherein the information engine is configured to determine a position location of the healthcare device and an operation of the healthcare device based on the information.
2. The system according to claim 1 wherein the first object is fixed or mobile.
3. The system according to claim 1 wherein the healthcare device is at least one of a fluid pump, heart monitor, ventilation pump and electrocardiogram.
4. The system according to claim 1 wherein the network routes information from the healthcare device to a predetermined destination.
5. The system according to claim 1 wherein the information comprises an identity of the person to last accessed the healthcare device.
6. The system according to claim 1 wherein the information comprises how much time remains before the healthcare device needs to be serviced.
7. The system according to claim 1 wherein the information comprises the type of chemicals in the healthcare device.
8. The system according to claim 1 wherein the information comprises the status of the healthcare device.
9. The system according to claim 1 wherein each of a plurality of firmware upgrades is transmitted over the network to the healthcare device.
10. The system according to claim 1 wherein the healthcare device operates as a RTLS device using one of an ultrasound, an infrared and a radiofrequency communication format.
11. An Enhanced-Accuracy Enterprise-Wide RTLS System, the system comprising:
a plurality of first tags, each of the plurality of first tags representing a first object;
a network comprising a plurality of sensors located within the facility; and
a plurality of RTLS devices, each of the plurality of RTLS device configured to operate as an end point in the network using one of ultrasound, infrared, and a radiofrequency medium, wherein each of the plurality of RTLS devices transmit to at least one of a plurality of sensors in the network;
wherein the network backhauls RTLS information from each of the plurality of RTLS devices to a predetermined destination.
12. The system according to claim 11 wherein the network operates as an RTLS system.
13. The system according to claim 11 wherein the network operates as a secondary RTLS system and a backhaul for information from each of the plurality of RTLS devices.
14. The system according to claim 11 wherein the each of the plurality of RTLS devices operates as a healthcare device.
15. The system according to claim 14 wherein the healthcare device is at least one of a fluid pump, heart monitor, ventilation pump and electrocardiogram.
16. The system according to claim 14 wherein the network routes information from the healthcare device to a predetermined destination.
17. The system according to claim 14 wherein the network transmits data related to who accessed the healthcare device last.
18. The system according to claim 14 wherein the network transmits data related to how much time is left before the device needs to be serviced.
19. The system according to claim 14 wherein the network transmits data related to the status of the device.
20. A system for backhauling health information over a network, the system comprising:
a plurality of first tags, each of the plurality of first tags representing a first object;
a network comprising a plurality of sensors located within the facility, the plurality of sensors communicating over the network using a medium range wireless communication format;
a healthcare device, wherein the healthcare device is an end point in the network, the healthcare device utilizing an ultrasound, an infrared or a radiofrequency communication format; and
an information engine in communication with the network;
wherein information from the healthcare device is backhauled over the network to the information;
wherein the information engine is configured to determine a position location of the healthcare device and an operation of the healthcare device based on the information.
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US13/029,107 US20110201270A1 (en) 2010-02-17 2011-02-16 Wireless Tracking System And Method Utilizing Near-Field Communication Devices
US201161445025P true 2011-02-21 2011-02-21
US13/400,090 US8903416B1 (en) 2009-09-20 2012-02-19 Wireless tracking system and method utilizing near-field communication devices
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