US20130255019A1 - Manually-operated cleaning blower and method of use - Google Patents

Manually-operated cleaning blower and method of use Download PDF

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Publication number
US20130255019A1
US20130255019A1 US13/854,045 US201313854045A US2013255019A1 US 20130255019 A1 US20130255019 A1 US 20130255019A1 US 201313854045 A US201313854045 A US 201313854045A US 2013255019 A1 US2013255019 A1 US 2013255019A1
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US
United States
Prior art keywords
sheet
manually
operated cleaning
ground
blower
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Pending
Application number
US13/854,045
Inventor
William Wood
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William Wood
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Priority to US201261617621P priority Critical
Application filed by William Wood filed Critical William Wood
Priority to US13/854,045 priority patent/US20130255019A1/en
Publication of US20130255019A1 publication Critical patent/US20130255019A1/en
Application status is Pending legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0055Brushes combined with other articles normally separate from the brushing process, e.g. combs, razors, mirrors
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B15/00Other brushes; Brushes with additional arrangements
    • A46B15/0002Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process
    • A46B15/0016Arrangements for enhancing monitoring or controlling the brushing process with enhancing means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B1/00Cleaning by methods involving the use of tools, brushes, or analogous members
    • B08B1/001Cleaning by methods involving the use of tools, brushes, or analogous members characterised by the type of cleaning tool
    • B08B1/005Scrapers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B08CLEANING
    • B08BCLEANING IN GENERAL; PREVENTION OF FOULING IN GENERAL
    • B08B5/00Cleaning by methods involving the use of air flow or gas flow
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B2200/00Brushes characterized by their functions, uses or applications
    • A46B2200/30Brushes for cleaning or polishing
    • A46B2200/302Broom

Abstract

One possible embodiment of the invention could be a manually-operated cleaning blower and a method for its use, the manually-operating cleaning blower generally comprising a manually-operated cleaning device having a two-ended pole handle with one of the said ends of the being attached to a ground debris contacting portion; a sheet having one or more attachment apparatuses that connect the sheet to the manually-operated cleaning device, wherein the sheet to reversibly covers a portion of the ground debris contacting portion and presents an edge of the sheet proximate to a cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion.

Description

    STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable.
  • REFERENCE TO A “MICROFICHE APPENDIX”
  • Not Applicable.
  • ENTITY STATUS
  • Applicant claims small entity status and further claims micro entity status and has submitted herewithin an executed PTO SB 015 Form in support thereof.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention generally relates to manually-operated cleaner blowers. More particularity, to those manually-operated cleaner blowers that can be affixed to manually-operated cleaning devices that may have double-ended pole handles.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The cleaning and preparing of grounds surrounding one's residence or the area in one's residence, such as a garage, may require the movement of undesired ground debris (e.g., dust, dirt, various plant refuse, and the like) found proximate to the ground in order to concentrate the ground debris within a desired collection site or area for subsequent elimination. Traditionally, such concentration efforts have relied upon manually-operated cleaning devices such as brooms, rakes and the like, which generally require direct contact upon ground debris. As such, the operation of these kinds of devices may be seen as being tiring to accomplish, taking a significant amount of time to complete, and not all that efficient.
  • In the nineteen fifties, these cleaning devices were generally supplemented, and in some instances replaced, by the introduction of the powered-leaf blower. This powered device may use a fan powered by either a gas or an electric motor to force air through an open-ended tube, as manipulated by the operator, to direct a powerful, focused and continuous blast of air to generally dislodge the ground debris from the ground and control the subsequent movement of ground debris along the ground.
  • While these labor-saving powered devices may substantially cut down on the amount of time and muscle power needed to concentrate ground debris at a desired collection site, they may also be seen as having their detractions as well. There is the greater expense (as compared to the manually-operated cleaning devices) associated with the procurement and operation of the powered-leaf blower. Additionally, these powered cleaning devices may be seen as pollution sources in that they may contribute to air pollution when they utilizing two stroke oil-gas mixture engines that give off oil-accented exhaust; when they re-aerosolize pesticides located on ground/plants; and when they aerosolize and further spread ground-based dust, mold, and other allergy-causing/health-impacting particulate matter. They may also be seen as contributing to noise pollution through their fan/blowing operations as well as generating load, un-muffled exhaust.
  • What could be needed is a manually-operated cleaner blower that may be comprised of manually-operated cleaning device (that can be used independently of the blower having another separately dedicated purpose) to which has been added/attached a sheet with resilience that imparts some of the blowing capability of the leaf blower while maintaining the manually-operated cleaning device's environmentally friendliness and a relatively lower procurement/operation cost. A regular sweeping motion imparted to manually-operated cleaning blower could cause the sheet to substantially push air forward to create a directable blast of air (and possibly associated air backwash), which could have sufficient power to dislodge and move ground debris from the ground proximate the blower.
  • SUMMARY OF ONE EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION Advantages of One or More Embodiments of the Present Invention
  • The various embodiments of the present invention may, but do not necessarily, achieve one or more of the following advantages:
  • to provide a pole-handled manual cleaning device with a capacity to manually create a significant blast of air for moving ground debris;
  • the ability to use a pole-handled manual cleaning device to blow ground debris in a desired direction;
  • the ability to modify a manually-operated clean device to create a blast of air that is used to dislodge a ground debris from a ground proximate the device;
  • to provide a means to convert used signs to be combined with pole-handled manual cleaning tool for air movement of ground debris;
  • the ability to blow ground debris in a controlled manner for cleanup that is more cost effective and environmentally friendly relative to powered blowers; and
  • to provide a manually-operated cleaning device with attached blowing capacity that can still allow the device to provide its original function when so desired.
  • These and other advantages may be realized by reference to the remaining portions of the specification, claims, and abstract.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ONE EMBODIMENT OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • One possible embodiment of the invention could be could be a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising a manually-operated cleaning device having a two-ended pole handle with one of the said ends being attached to a ground debris contacting portion; a sheet having one or more attachment apparatuses that connects the sheet to the manually-operated cleaning device, wherein the sheet covers a portion of the ground debris contacting portion to present an edge of the sheet proximate to a cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion.
  • One possible embodiment of the invention could be a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising a handle; and a two-sided sheet of resilient material; wherein the handle maybe grasped to impart a sweeping motion to the sheet to create a blast of air that can displace and move ground debris located upon a ground proximate to the sheet in a controlled manner.
  • Another possible embodiment of the invention could be a method for operating a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising the following steps: providing a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising a sheet connected to a manually-operated cleaning device, the manually-operated cleaning device having a doubled-ended pole handle connected to a ground debris contacting portion, wherein the sheet to reversibly covers a portion of the ground debris contacting portion and presents an edge of the sheet proximate to a cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion; grasping the manually-operated cleaning blower by the two-ended pole handle; sweeping the ground debris contacting portion to propel the sheet in a back-and-forth motion generating a controllable air blast in front of the manually-operated cleaning blower; and directing the resulting controllable air blast into a ground debris upon a ground proximate the manually-operated cleaning blower to further dislodging the ground debris from the ground.
  • The above-description sets forth, rather broadly, a summary of one embodiment of the present invention so that the detailed description that follows may be better understood and contributions of the present invention to the art may be better appreciated. Some of the embodiments of the present invention may not include all of the features or characteristics listed in the above summary. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described below and will form the subject matter of claims. In this respect, before explaining at least one preferred embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of the construction and to the arrangement of the components set forth in the following description or as illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is substantially a perspective cutaway view of one embodiment present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is substantially a side elevation view of one embodiment present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is substantially a frontal elevation view of one version of the sheet with just two apertures.
  • FIG. 3A is substantially a frontal elevation view of another version of the sheet showing U-shaped apertures.
  • FIG. 3B is substantially a side elevation cutaway view of sheet showing U-shaped apertures.
  • FIG. 4 is substantially a front elevation view of one embodiment of the sheet with a set of bottom appertures.
  • FIG. 5 is substantial a perspective cutaway view of rake based+6embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 is substantially a perspective cutaway view of a dedicated purpose embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 6A is substantially a perspective frontal view of another version of a dedicated purpose embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 7, 7A, and 7B are perspective views showing the sequential operation of the present invention.
  • FIG. 8 is substantially a flow chart for one embodiment for a process of operating the invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF CERTAIN EMBODIMENTS OF THE PRESENT INVENTION
  • In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this application. The drawings show, by way of illustration, specific embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. It is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and structural changes may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.
  • The present invention 10 could comprise a manually-operated cleaning blower 20 and a method or process for its use 200. As substantially shown in FIGS. 1-5, at least one embodiment of the invention 10 could have the manually-operated cleaning blower 20 could comprise a commercially available manually-operated cleaning device 30 to which may be attached a two-sided resilient sheet 60.
  • The manually-operated cleaning device 30 could include such tools as a broom 32, a long flexible tined rake 34, a sponge mop (not shown), and the like that can be used and operated independently outside of its combined blower use in the present invention 10. The manually-operated cleaning device 30 could comprising of a two-ended pole handle 36 with a ground debris contacting portion 40 located at first end 38 of the two-ended pole handle 36 while the remainder of the two-ended pole handle 36, including the second unattached end 39, could substantially allow an operator (shown in FIG. 7) to grasp and manually operate the invention 10.
  • In one version of the invention 10, the ground debris contacting portion 40 could be a bounded set of cleaning fibers (e.g., bristles 42 as provided by a broom 32). In another version, the ground debris contacting portion 40 could be a bounded set of flexible spaced-apart tines 44 (e.g., as provided by a rake 34). The ground debris contacting portion 40 can be seen as at least having a front side 46, a back side 48, these two sides 48, 49 generally being connected by a cleaning (e.g., unbounded) edge 50. Located opposite of the cleaning edge 50 could be that part of the ground debris contacting portion 40 that connects to the first end 38 of the two-ended pole handle 36.
  • The resilient sheet 60 can be of a suitable shape (square, rectangle, octagon, etc.) made of suitable resilient material with an attaching 62 means for connecting the resilient sheet 60 itself to the two-ended pole handle 36. The sheet material could allow the sheet 60 to bend while at the same time resist over bending forces that could occur when movement of the sheet 60 creates the air blast 22. Possible suitable sheet materials could include corrugated plastic, corrugated cardboard, or polymer/plastics of sufficient thickness. One possible suitable size for the sheet 60 could be 24″ inches by 18″ inches.
  • As shown substantially in FIG. 3, one version of the attaching apparatus 62 could be a set of attachment apertures 64 penetrating the sheet 60 and arranged in a tandem order along the sheet's midline center. In one version, the attachment apertures 64 could be circular (e.g., with a 1.25″ inch diameter.) Another version, as shown substantially in FIGS. 3A and 3B, the attachment apertures 64 could be U-shaped cuts 64 in the sheet 60 denoting tongues 66 that can be biased against the surface of the two-ended pole handle 36 as the two-ended pole handle 36 is placed through the U-shaped apertures 66 to help hold the sheet 60 in position upon the two-ended pole handle 36. In the simplest version of this attachment apparatus 62, there are only two apertures 64, one proximate to the top of the sheet 60 and one proximate to the bottom of the sheet 60. Other embodiments of the aperture-type attachment means 62 could additionally have bottom apertures 80 (e.g., two or more) located proximate to the bottom of the sheet 60 to provide greater adjustment of the sheet's placement over the ground debris contacting portion 40. In this manner, a resulting curvature or bow of the sheet 60 could be altered as well as adjusting the size of a lower portion of the sheet to generally accommodate differences in the heights of various ground debris contacting portions 40 of different manually-operated cleaning devices 30 to allow the sheet 60 to cover a part of the ground debris contacting portion 40.
  • The two-ended pole handle 36 could integrate with the sheet 60 through the attachment apparatuses 62 (e.g., apertures 64), the unattached second end 39 of the two-ended pole handle 36 is inserted from the back of the sheet through the (selected) bottom attaching aperture 64 to protrude out the front of the sheet 60. The unattached second end 39 of the two-ended pole handle 36 may be then inserted into the top attaching aperture 64 to once again protrude out the back of the sheet 60 and to cause a slight bow in the sheet 60. This curvature or bow of the sheet 60 can also be seen as generally providing additional strength and the integrity of the sheet 60 to resist bending forces occurring when the invention 10 is moved or swept forward to create the air blast 22. The sheet 60 can then be slid down the two-ended pole handle 36 until it contacts and is stopped by the ground debris contact portion 40. In at least one version, after the sheet 60 has been fully seated upon the two-ended pole handle 36, the bottom edge 76 of sheet 60 could come within 3″-5″ inches of the cleaning edge 50 of the ground debris contact portion 40. It should be noted that the bottom edge 76 could further feature sheet tines 78, the flexibility imparted by the sheet tines 78 to the sheet 60 appear to enhance the blowing capability of the sheet 60.
  • It should also be noted that if the blower aspect of the invention 10 is not desired, that the sheet 60 could be slid upwards on the two-ended pole handle 36 and away from the ground debris contacting portion 40 and towards second or unattached end 39. This could allow the manually-operated cleaning device 30 to be used in its original purpose (sweeping, raking, etc.) and generally without inducing the blowing capability of the invention 10.
  • In another version of the invention 10, not shown, that sheet could be constructed to move into a compact storage state (rather than relocate itself upon the two-ended pole handle) to allow the manually operated cleaning device to revert to its original use. In such an embodiment, the sheet could be pleated like a horizontal shade. The sheet could fold up on its pleats (e.g., move away from the cleaning edge of the manually-operated cleaning device) to be locked up in a compact and stored position. In another version (not shown) the sheet could be constructed like a folding oriental fan that pivots upon one edge to spread out along its folds upon the opposing edge. The pivoting edge could be attached the manually-operated cleaning device to allow the opposing edge to spread open proximate to the cleaning edge. The sheet could then be folded shut like the fan (e.g., and lay against the ground debris contact portion) to allow the manually-operated cleaning device to be used for its original purpose.
  • In one recycling version of the invention, old signs no longer being used for information transmission purposes can be recycled for use as the sheet 50. For that purpose the back side of the sign/sheet 60 could be marked to locate the attachment means 62 (e.g., using insignia, diagrams, and the like to indicate where and how to cut out the attachment apertures 64) as well as providing simple instructions for their use with a manually-operated cleaning device 30 to create the manually-operated cleaning blower 20. In another recycling version, the attachment apertures (e.g., U-shaped cuts 66) could be created in the sign itself
  • Other embodiments of the invention 10 could have other attachment means 62 combined with different versions of the sheet 62. These other attachment means 62 could include straps 70 to be tied together, flexible metal wires to be tied together and the like. By not requiring the use of attachment apertures 66, the sheet 60 may not need the combination of flexibility and resilience to form a bow or curvature in the sheet 60 (e.g., to hold the sheet 60 attached by attachment apertures 64 to the two-ended pole handle 36). In one instance, the sheet 60 can be made of flexible or supple material having stiffening members (such as rods or wires) 72 embedded in the sheet 60 (e.g., proximate to the edges of the sheet 60) to otherwise help hold the sheet's form and shape. In another embodiment of the invention 10, with these non-aperture attachment means 62 the sheet 60 could made from a more rigid material and may be cut and otherwise formed to have more aerodynamically powering curved or upswept edges to provide greater blowing ability.
  • As substantially shown in FIGS. 6 and 6A, yet another embodiment of the invention, the manually-operated cleaning blower 20 could be a dedicated manually operated cleaning blower 20 in that it does not having any secondary cleaning capability provided by being attached to or having a manually-operated cleaning device 30 (e.g., broom, rake, etc.) being incorporated or embedded within the invention 10. In this embodiment, the invention 10 again could be comprised of a two-ended pole handle having attached at its first end 38 a support rod 74. The support rod 74 could be perpendicularly attached to and bisected by the first end 38. The support rod 74 prevent the sheet 50 as attached to the two-ended pole handle 36 from pivoting about the two-ended pole handle 36 when the invention 10 is swept forward to generate the air blast 22. Various attachment means 62 (e.g., straps 70) can be used to secure the remaining portion (e.g., midline section) of the sheet 60 to the two-ended pole handle 36. Another version of this embodiment as shown in FIG. 6A could have a sheet 60 and a pole handle 36 wherein the top edge 82 is folded over itself to form a funnel-shaped receptacle 84 that can receive an end of the pole handle 36 that could be made from a rolled up sheet. The sheet 60 could also have a bottom edge 78 with sheet tines 76.
  • As substantially shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, one possible embodiment of the invention 10 could the method or process 200 of using the manually-operated cleaning blower. The first step 202 could the selection of the manual cleaning device (e.g., a broom or rake). The manual cleaning device generally could utilize a pole for it movement by an operator. Then unless previously obtained, a suitable sheet could be procured for attachment to the manual cleaning device using attachment devices. If the attachment devices are apertures and the suitable sheet lacks the apertures, then the desired apertures could added in the desired locations upon the sheet. The process 200 could then proceed to step 204, assembly of the invention.
  • In step 204, assembly of the invention, as noted earlier the sheet could be affixed to the by a wide variety of means to the handle so that the sheet comes to rest upon the cleaning portion to significantly cover the front side of the ground debris contacting portion. If apertures are used as the broom or rake attachment apparatuses, the handle of the manual cleaning device could inserted from the backside of the sheet through the bottom aperture to protrude out the front side. If a plurality of bottom apertures are provide with the set of apertures, the one bottom aperture may be selected based on height of the ground debris contacting portion so that as the sheet sides down the handle through the apertures, the sheet will cover most of the front side of the ground debris contacting portion. The pole handle could then be passed through the top aperture to protrude out the backside of the sheet and providing a stiffening bow or curvature to the sheet. The sheet is then slid down the pole handle to contact and appropriately cover the ground debris contacting portion. As step 204 is generally completed, the process 200 could substantially proceed to step 206, using the blower.
  • In step 206, using the blower, the operator could grasp the pole handle at the top (by second end) and at its middle section to bring the invention 10 into a back-sweep or sweptback position. With the cleaning portion generally behind the sheet, the device could be brought forward in a forward sweeping motion, the bottom of the cleaning portion being brought to contact with the ground to generate a forward blast or force of air directed in front to the invention and along the surface of the ground. The forward sweeping motion can also be seen as creating a secondary air effect when as the air sweeps around the sheet to its back side, this results in drag or turbulence occurring along the bottom edge of the sheet/cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion. This drag turbulence or backwash, in addition to the air blast, can be further used to dislodge ground debris and be used to propel it forward of the invention.
  • The operator by manipulating the invention accordingly (repeatedly making back and forth sweeping movements, especially air blast-generating forward sweeping movements) could create and direct the air blast/backwash to dislodge ground debris (302, as substantially seen in FIG. 7) and otherwise direct their movement along the ground (304, as substantially seen in FIG. 7.)
  • Although the manual blower is generally employed for outside use, it can be used inside (e.g., the home) to dislodge animal hair, static dust accumulations (“dust bunnies”) and the like with the air blast directed toward spaces underneath furniture and the like.
  • After the operator is finished moving the ground debris to the desired location, the sheet could be moved upward on the pole handle to allow the manual cleaning device to be used for its original intended purpose. When the manual blower is needed, the sheet can be moved downward upon the pole handle.
  • Conclusion
  • Although the description above contains many specifications, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. Thus, the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents rather than by the examples give.
  • The application demonstrates a manually-operated cleaning blower created by generally adding a sheet to a manually-operated cleaning device (that has dedicated use independent of the blower) to create a blast of air and possible back turbulence that can dislodge ground debris located upon a ground the blower is being generally swept toward. This blower is simple to construct and operate and can be made from easily operated materials. When an operator wishes to do so the sheet can be stored upon the device to allow the device to be returned to its dedicated use. The blower can be also constructed to have a single use that of a manually-operated cleaning blower.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1) A manually-operated cleaning blower comprising:
a) a manually-operated cleaning device having a two-ended pole handle with one of the said ends being attached to a ground debris contacting portion;
b) a sheet having one or more attachment apparatuses that connects the sheet to the manually-operated cleaning device,
wherein the sheet covers a portion of the ground debris contacting portion to present an edge of the sheet proximate to a cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion.
2) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 1 wherein the one or more attachment apparatuses are tandemly located along a midline of the sheet.
3) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 1 wherein the one or more attachment apparatuses are apertures.
4) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 3 wherein an unattached end of the two-ended pole handle is inserted through one aperture and then placed through another aperture to attach the sheet to the two-ended pole handle.
5) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 4 wherein a placement of the two-ended pole handle through the apertures can be used to impart a curvature to the sheet.
6) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 5 wherein the apertures further comprises a set of bottom apertures, a selection of one of the bottom apertures to receive a portion of the two-ended pole handle is used to control an amount of the curvature subsequently imparted by the two-ended pole handle to the sheet.
7) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 3 wherein each of the apertures is formed by a U-shaped cut made in the sheet.
8) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 7 wherein each U-shaped cut further denotes a tongue that is biased against a portion of the two-ended pole handle passing through the aperture.
9) The manually operated cleaning blower of claim 1 wherein the edge of the sheet has a sheet tines cut into it.
10) The manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 1 wherein the manually-operated cleaning device is one of a set of manually-operated cleaning devices consisting of a rake, a broom and a mop.
11) A manually-operated cleaning blower comprising:
a) a handle; and
b) a two-sided sheet of resilient material;
wherein the handle maybe grasped to impart a sweeping motion to the sheet to create a blast of air that can displace and move ground debris located upon a ground proximate to the sheet in a controlled manner.
12) A manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 11 wherein the sheet has a top edge and a bottom edge, the top edge is curved over itself to form the handle, the handle being funnel-shaped.
13) A manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 12 wherein the bottom edge has a plurality of sheet tines cut into it.
14) A manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 11 wherein the handle is a separate two-ended pole handle that attaches to the sheet.
15) A manually-operated cleaning blower of claim 14 wherein the two-ended pole handle further comprises a bar that is perpendicularly attached to the two-ended pole proximate to one of said ends to prevent the sheet as attached to two-ended pole handle from revolving around two-ended pole handle.
16) A method for operating a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising the following steps:
a) providing a manually-operated cleaning blower comprising a sheet connected to a manually-operated cleaning device, the manually-operated cleaning device having a doubled-ended pole handle connected to a ground debris contacting portion, wherein the sheet to reversibly covers a portion of the ground debris contacting portion and presents an edge of the sheet proximate to a cleaning edge of the ground debris contacting portion;
b) grasping the manually-operated cleaning blower by the two-ended pole handle;
c) sweeping the ground debris contacting portion to propel the sheet in a back-and-forth motion generating a controllable air blast in front of the manually-operated cleaning blower; and
d) directing the resulting controllable air blast to ground debris located upon a ground proximate the manually-operated cleaning blower to further dislodging the ground debris from the ground.
17) The method of claim 16 wherein the sweeping the ground debris contacting portion further comprises a step of further moving the manually-operated cleaning blower in an overall forward direction to move the resulting controllable air blasts along in a similar forward direction.
18) The method of claim 16 wherein the two-sided sheet is lifted up and away on the two-ended pole from the ground debris contacting portion moving a sheet edge away from a contact edge of the ground debris contact allowing the contact edge to directly contact the ground debris.
19) The method of claim 16 further comprising a step of creating a secondary air effect as the air sweeps around the sheet to a backside of the sheet's to create a turbulence occurring along the bottom edge of the sheet to dislodge the ground debris upon the ground.
20) The method of claim 19 wherein the step of creating a secondary air effect further comprises a step of propelling forward the ground debris by the secondary air effect.
US13/854,045 2012-03-29 2013-03-29 Manually-operated cleaning blower and method of use Pending US20130255019A1 (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US201261617621P true 2012-03-29 2012-03-29
US13/854,045 US20130255019A1 (en) 2012-03-29 2013-03-29 Manually-operated cleaning blower and method of use

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US13/854,045 US20130255019A1 (en) 2012-03-29 2013-03-29 Manually-operated cleaning blower and method of use

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Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4783868A (en) * 1987-12-07 1988-11-15 Callaghan James S O Vane for underliquid cleaning device
US20070113364A1 (en) * 2005-10-14 2007-05-24 Esseplast S.P.A Broom provided with protective casing

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4783868A (en) * 1987-12-07 1988-11-15 Callaghan James S O Vane for underliquid cleaning device
US20070113364A1 (en) * 2005-10-14 2007-05-24 Esseplast S.P.A Broom provided with protective casing

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