US20130239048A1 - Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality - Google Patents

Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20130239048A1
US20130239048A1 US13/873,344 US201313873344A US2013239048A1 US 20130239048 A1 US20130239048 A1 US 20130239048A1 US 201313873344 A US201313873344 A US 201313873344A US 2013239048 A1 US2013239048 A1 US 2013239048A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
frame
application
region
user interface
displaying
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US13/873,344
Inventor
Maarten W. Mullender
Sangya Singh
Eric Danas
Jay Hilwig
Karen MacCubbin
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC
Original Assignee
Microsoft Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US74092605P priority Critical
Priority to US11/393,020 priority patent/US8434021B2/en
Application filed by Microsoft Corp filed Critical Microsoft Corp
Priority to US13/873,344 priority patent/US20130239048A1/en
Publication of US20130239048A1 publication Critical patent/US20130239048A1/en
Assigned to MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC reassignment MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: MICROSOFT CORPORATION
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/0482Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction with lists of selectable items, e.g. menus
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F9/00Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units
    • G06F9/06Arrangements for program control, e.g. control units using stored programs, i.e. using an internal store of processing equipment to receive or retain programs
    • G06F9/44Arrangements for executing specific programs
    • G06F9/451Execution arrangements for user interfaces

Abstract

A centralized User Interface (UI) comprising a supplementary UI and a desktop UI is employed to bring in enterprise constructs into the desktop application. The supplementary UI is generated and dynamically positioned based on selections on the desktop application UI. Summary information associated with data that is to be synchronized or transferred between the desktop application and an LOB application is presented in the supplementary UI along with controls that enable a user to bind additional items to be synchronized.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a Continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/393,020 entitled “Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality” filed Mar. 30, 2006, which issued on Apr. 30, 2013 as U.S. Pat. No. 8,434,021, which claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/740,926, filed Nov. 30, 2005, entitled “Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality,” which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • The success of an organization depends largely on the ability of its employees to discover, analyze, and act on Line Of Business (LOB) data and operational information. Unfortunately, there is traditionally a deep divide between enterprise systems used to collect and manage data and the desktop tools that information workers use to communicate and act on this information.
  • Applications that enable organizations to connect their desktop programs to line-of-business systems in an intuitive, cost-effective way may increase worker efficiency as well as employee satisfaction. By providing information workers with the information they need to make sound, timely business decisions, workers may become more productive and organizations more agile.
  • Enabling information workers to view and act on business data from within familiar desktop programs, such as electronic mail, spreadsheet, or word processing applications, may reduce workload on enterprise IT administrators and designers as well.
  • It is with respect to these and other considerations that the present invention has been made.
  • SUMMARY
  • This summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended as an aid in determining the scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • Aspects are directed to a User Interface (UI) employed to provide summary information and controls associated with data that is being synchronized or transferred between two applications, such as a desktop application and an LOB application.
  • The UI is generated, positioned, and laid out based on one or more selections on the desktop application UI. Behavior of the UI, such as appearance and position, is dynamically determined based on the position, size, and other characteristics of the desktop application UI.
  • These and other features and advantages will be apparent from a reading of the following detailed description and a review of the associated drawings. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are explanatory only and are not restrictive of aspects as claimed.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an exemplary computing operating environment.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a system where example embodiments may be implemented.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an example centralized UI comprising a supplementary UI, explorer and inspector views of an application, an LOB application, and their interactions.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates example placements of a task pane in relation to an application UI according to embodiments.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates example placement and use of task panes with explorer and multiple inspector views of an application UI.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an example task pane and its contents according to one embodiment.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates two example styles of subheadings for a task pane according to embodiments.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a sampling of content regions for a task pane according to embodiments.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a logic flow diagram for a process of using a supplementary UI (task pane) according to embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • As briefly described above, enabling information workers to view and act on business data from within familiar desktop applications, such as electronic mail, spreadsheet, or word processing applications, is desired for efficiency, accuracy, and other business goals. A supplementary UI, such as a task pane, generated based on selections in a desktop application UI may provide summary information and content control over synchronization actions between the desktop application and an LOB application. In the following detailed description, references are made to the accompanying drawings that form a part hereof, and in which are shown by way of illustrations specific embodiments or examples. These aspects may be combined, other aspects may be utilized, and structural changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the present disclosure. The following detailed description is therefore not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined by the appended claims and their equivalents.
  • Referring now to the drawings, aspects and an exemplary operating environment will be described. FIG. 1 and the following discussion are intended to provide a brief, general description of a suitable computing environment in which the invention may be implemented. While the embodiments will be described in the general context of program modules that execute in conjunction with an application program that runs on an operating system on a personal computer, those skilled in the art will recognize that aspects may also be implemented in combination with other program modules.
  • Generally, program modules include routines, programs, components, data structures, and other types of structures that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. Moreover, those skilled in the art will appreciate that embodiments may be practiced with other computer system configurations, including hand-held devices, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and the like. Embodiments may also be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks are performed by remote processing devices that are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote memory storage devices.
  • Embodiments may be implemented as a computer process (method), a computing system, or as an article of manufacture, such as a computer program product or computer readable media. The computer program product may be a computer storage media readable by a computer system and encoding a computer program of instructions for executing a computer process. The computer program product may also be a propagated signal on a carrier readable by a computing system and encoding a computer program of instructions for executing a computer process.
  • With reference to FIG. 1, one exemplary system for implementing the embodiments includes a computing device, such as computing device 100. In a basic configuration, the computing device 100 typically includes at least one processing unit 102 and system memory 104. Depending on the exact configuration and type of computing device, the system memory 104 may be volatile (such as RAM), non-volatile (such as ROM, flash memory, etc.) or some combination of the two. System memory 104 typically includes an operating system 105 suitable for controlling the operation of a networked personal computer, such as the WINDOWS® operating systems from MICROSOFT CORPORATION of Redmond, Wash. The system memory 104 may also include one or more software applications such as program modules 106 and desktop application 120. Program modules 106 and desktop application 120 may be executed within operating system 105 or in another operating system. Furthermore, program modules 106 and desktop application 120 may be distributed programs that are executed in coordination with other computing devices.
  • According to embodiments, the desktop application 120 may comprise many types of programs. Examples of such programs include OUTLOOK®, WORD®, EXCEL®, and INTERNET EXPLORER® manufactured by MICROSOFT CORPORATION. Desktop application 120 may also comprise a multiple-functionality software application for providing many other types of functionalities. Such a multiple-functionality application may include a number of program modules, such as a word processing program, a spreadsheet program, a database program, and the like. The term desktop application is intended to distinguish the application from the LOB application, and should not be construed in any limiting sense. Desktop application 120 may essentially be any application used by a business system participant to perform computing actions including, but not limited to, emailing, scheduling, data entry, and the like.
  • According to some embodiments, desktop application 120 may include supplementary UI 122 that interacts with a business application such as a LOB application (not shown) and provides summary information associated with data that is synchronized or transferred between the two applications. Supplementary UI 122 may also provide control over the actions between the two applications. The supplementary UI may be integrated into desktop application 120 or may be part of another application and interact with desktop application 120. The basic integrated configuration is illustrated in FIG. 1 by those components within dashed line 108.
  • An LOB application is one of a group of critical computer applications that are vital to running an enterprise, such as accounting, supply chain management, and resource planning applications. LOB applications are usually large programs that contain a number of integrated capabilities and tie into databases and database management systems.
  • The computing device 100 may have additional features or functionality. For example, the computing device 100 may also include additional data storage devices (removable and/or non-removable) such as, for example, magnetic disks, optical disks, or tape. Such additional storage is illustrated in FIG. 1 by removable storage 109 and non-removable storage 110. Computer storage media may include volatile and nonvolatile, removable and non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for storage of information, such as computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data. System memory 104, removable storage 109 and non-removable storage 110 are all examples of computer storage media. Computer storage media includes, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital versatile disks (DVD) or other optical storage, magnetic cassettes, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by computing device 100. Any such computer storage media may be part of device 100. Computing device 100 may also have input device(s) 112 such as keyboard, mouse, pen, voice input device, touch input device, etc. Output device(s) 114 such as a display, speakers, printer, etc. may also be included. These devices are well known in the art and need not be discussed at length here.
  • The computing device 100 may also contain communication connections 116 that allow the device to communicate with other computing devices 118, such as over a network in a distributed computing environment, for example, an intranet or the Internet. Communication connection 116 is one example of communication media. Communication media may typically be embodied by computer readable instructions, data structures, program modules, or other data in a modulated data signal, such as a carrier wave or other transport mechanism, and includes any information delivery media. The term “modulated data signal” means a signal that has one or more of its characteristics set or changed in such a manner as to encode information in the signal. By way of example, and not limitation, communication media includes wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared and other wireless media. The term computer readable media as used herein includes both storage media and communication media.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, a system where example embodiments may be implemented, is illustrated. System 200 includes application server 202, LOB application server 204, and clients 222, 224, 226. The term “client” may refer to a client application or a client device employed by a user to interact with one or both of a desktop application and an LOB application. Application server 202 may also be one or more programs or a server machine executing programs associated with the application server tasks. As described above, an such as a desktop application may be executed in any one of the clients or in application server 202 and shared in a distributed manner by clients 222, 224, and 226.
  • LOB application server 204 may execute an LOB application and interact with application server 202 and/or clients 222, 224, and 226 for sharing data, synchronizing data and processes, and the like.
  • Server 202, LOB application server 204, and clients 222, 224, 226 may communicate over one or more networks. The network(s) 210 may include a secure network such as an enterprise network, or an unsecure network such as a wireless open network. By way of example, and not limitation, the network(s) may include wired media such as a wired network or direct-wired connection, and wireless media such as acoustic, RF, infrared and other wireless media.
  • In a typical implementation, a user may interact with a desktop application such as an electronic mail application that includes a calendar utility, and enter time for appointments or tasks. Information associated with the calendar entries may be provided to an LOB application running on the LOB application server 204. A supplementary UI executed as an add-in part of the electronic mail application may provide summary information associated with the shared (synchronized) data to the user. The supplementary UI may also provide controls that enable the user to add, modify, or remove some or all of the data being transferred between the two applications. In some embodiments, the supplementary UI may be run as a distinct application and interact with the desktop application.
  • Now referring to FIG. 3, an example supplementary UI and its interactions with explorer and inspector views of an application and an LOB application are shown. Diagram 300 includes desktop application UI 310, an inspector view 319 of a portion of the electronic mail application UI 310, task pane 320, and LOB application 330. An electronic mail application is an example of a desktop application, in which embodiments may be implemented. Task pane 320 is an example of a supplementary UI as described previously.
  • According to embodiments, a centralized UI for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality may be provided as a supplementary UI accompanying the UI of an application, such as desktop application UI 310. The desktop application may include a scheduling application, a calendar application, a word processing application, a spreadsheet application, a database application, or a browser application in addition to an electronic mail application.
  • Desktop application UI 310 may include a number of regions such as command bar region 314, overview pane 312, selected option pane 316, and detailed view pane 318 (explorer view). The different panes may include elements of the desktop application that are associated with a second application through data binding. The second application may be a business application (e.g. LOB application 330).
  • For example, the desktop application may be an electronic mail application with scheduling capability. Overview pane 312 may present different options of the electronic mail application such as composing or reviewing mail, calendar, contact information, and the like. Selected option pane 316 may present contents of the option chosen from overview pane 312, such as calendar items. Detailed view pane 318 may present details of the item highlighted in the selected option pane 316, such as an appointment on a particular date.
  • In the above example, the appointment may be designated as an item to be reported to a business application for time keeping purposes. In that case, information associated with time, duration, and other relevant aspects of the appointment may be provided to LOB application 330.
  • Task pane 320 is configured to provide summary information, content control, and additional capabilities associated with the exchange (or synchronization) of data between the selected element(s) of desktop application UI 310 and LOB application 330.
  • LOB application 330 may be any business related application and may include one or more modules such as project 332. Project 332 may in turn include one or more modules such as workflows, tasks, subprojects, and the like. Module 334 represents an example subgroup within project 332 that keeps track of time entries from desktop application 310 in the above example.
  • Getting back to task pane 320, the task pane or supplementary UI may be generated based on selection of an element of desktop application UI 310, such as the calendar entry. Task pane 320 may include a number of regions that present object identification, dynamic messages, content control, description of direct actions, links to related reports, links to related actions, or contextual data. An order, a layout, an emphasis, or a selection of graphics, associated with the regions may be determined based on the selected element. Contents of the task pane are discussed in conjunction with FIGS. 6, 7, and 8 later in this text.
  • Task pane 320 may also be generated by selection of an element in inspector view 319 of the desktop application UI. Inspector view 319 is presentation of details of a chosen item from selected option pane 316 in a separate window. For example, emails may be viewed in an integral “Preview Pane” or in a separate window in OUTLOOK®. Thus, task pane 320 may be activated by a number of elements in desktop application UI 310 or associated inspector view(s) 319.
  • Task pane 320 may be dynamically positioned and its behavior controlled based on a position and size of desktop application UI 310, as well as selection of the element in the desktop application UI. Dynamic positioning of the supplementary UI (task pane 320) is discussed in detail below in conjunction with FIG. 4 and FIG. 5.
  • Task pane 320 may be activated automatically when an element is selected for the first time to provide the user an indication that the task pane is available as a tool for the user. If the user navigates away from the selected element or deselects that element, the task pane may be automatically deactivated. According to one embodiment, the task pane may not be reactivated when the element is selected for a second time, since the user is presumed to be aware of the task pane functionality at this point. The desktop application may include an option icon or similar items for the user to activate the task pane at will. On the other hand, a default setting may activate the task pane every time an element is selected.
  • When one or more inspector view windows are opened, the task pane may follow the active window, i.e. reflect information associated with the active inspector view window. The task pane is also positioned about the active inspector view window. As the open inspector view windows are closed, the task pane(s) associated with those may also be deactivated leaving open only the task pane associated with the currently active desktop application window.
  • Task pane 320 may be managed by an add-in module of the desktop application, or by a distinct application that interacts with the desktop application. Furthermore, task pane 320 may be presented as a separate UI from desktop application UI 310, or it may be an integrated part of desktop application UI 310. The above examples for desktop application and task pane are for illustration purposes only, and embodiments may be implemented with any application following the principles described herein.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates diagram 400 of example placements of a task pane in relation to an application UI according to embodiments. As explained previously, the task pane may be dynamically positioned about the desktop application UI and sized based on a size and position of the desktop application UI.
  • Example placements 402, 404, 406, and 408 show the task pane being sized to match a size (e.g. length or height) of the desktop application UI and placed adjacent to the desktop application UI (e.g. right, left, below, and above, respectively). Example placements 410 and 412 show the task pane being placed in hovering mode, where the task pane is placed over the desktop application UI in a shifted position. This mode may be employed when the desktop application UI covers a significant portion of the screen or when multiple application UI's are open at the same time.
  • According to some embodiments, the size and the placement of the supplementary UI (task pane) may be dynamically modified based on actions associated with the desktop application UI. For example, a change in size or placement of the desktop application UI may result in modification of the task pane size and position. Selection of a different element in the desktop application UI, which may result in different contents being displayed in the task pane, may also lead to dynamic repositioning and resizing of the task pane. Furthermore, placement modes (e.g. adjacent, hovering) may also be interchanged based on changes to the desktop application UI. The placements described in this portion are for illustration purposes only. The supplementary UI may be placed in any position and sized in any way suitable with the desktop application.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates diagram 500 of example placement and use of task panes with explorer and multiple inspector views of an application UI. As explained previously, a desktop application may include a UI with an explorer view window (502) and multiple inspector view windows (e.g. 504, 506, 508). Due to the rules of the operating system, only one of the open windows is “active” at any given time, however. In a typical implementation, the task pane is first activated by the explorer view window of the desktop application UI. As inspector view windows are opened, each may activate its own corresponding task pane while the task panes associated with “inactive” UI windows are deactivated.
  • In one embodiment, the activation and deactivation of the task panes may take the form of the task pane simply following the currently active desktop application UI window, and all others disappearing from the screen. In another embodiment (as shown in the figure), task panes associated with inactive application windows may be presented in an inactive mode with only the active task pane performing actions described previously. If the active application UI window is closed, the corresponding task pane may also be closed and one of the inactive ones corresponding to the new active window activated.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an example task pane 600 and its contents according to one embodiment. Example task pane 600 is employed to provide summary information and content controls for exchange of data between a scheduling application and an LOB application keeping track of time.
  • Task pane 600 has at the top level title 602. Title 602 may be used to define the task pane and be universal. Title 602 is followed by subheading 604. Subheading 604 may be used to provide an application specific summary definition of the task pane. In example task pane 600, the subheading 604 is Time Recording indicating that the task pane is associated with time keeping activities. In one embodiment, subheading 604 may include control icons such as dropdown menu controls. Examples of different configurations for subheading 604 are provided in FIG. 7.
  • Subheading 604 is followed by an object identification region 606. Object identification region 606 provides summary information about the item from the scheduling application, which is being synchronized with the LOB application. In the example, the timekeeper item is defined as “Discuss New Project” (retrieved from scheduling application entry), and its duration is shown as 1 hour. Object identification region 606 is followed by content control region 608. Content control region 608 provides options to the user to modify attributes and aspects of the data being synchronized. In the example, content control region 608 is titled “Recording Details”, and provides options to modify a project code, an activity definition, and a brief description for the activity. The example task pane provides these options as fixed options in dropdown menu style. In other embodiments, the user may be provided the option of entering his/her own information for the attributes or aspects.
  • Content control region 608 is followed by contextual data region 610. Contextual data region 610, titled “Recording Balance” in the example, provides summary information associated with the project such as total recorded time and the period of recording. This information is typically retrieved from the LOB application. Contextual data region 610 is followed by related actions region 612. Related actions region 612, titled “You Can Also” provides links to activities for the user associated with the time keeping operation.
  • Task pane 600 and its contents are provided for illustration purposes only. A supplementary UI to provide contextual business content and business related functionality is not limited to the example task pane, and may be implemented in other ways using the principles described herein. Specifically, type, layout, and order of regions within the supplementary UI may be selected in many different ways such as those described in conjunction with FIG. 8.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates two example styles for a subheading of a task pane according to embodiments. Subheading 702 is the application specific subheading of the example task pane of FIG. 6 without control icons.
  • Subheading 704, titled “Time Reporting”, includes a dropdown menu icon 706 and available menu items 708 associated with the icon. The dropdown menu icon 706 provides another method of offering the user choices, such as selecting additional panes. In some embodiments, options may be provided to the user as tabs along one edge of the UI. The user may then select one of the available panes by clicking on the related tab.
  • The example implementation of dropdown menu icons and tabs to provide selections to the user is intended for illustration purposes only and should not be construed as a limitation on embodiments. Other embodiments using different methods for providing a supplementary UI to present summary information and content controls may be implemented using the principles described herein.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a sampling of content portions for a task pane 800 according to embodiments. Task pane 800 includes title region 802 as described in FIG. 6. Title region 802 may include control icons such as an open/close icon 832 as well. Title region 802 is followed by subheading 804, which is typically application specific and may include the application name. Because task pane 800 may be used with multiple applications, subheading 804 may include a dropdown menu icon 834 to select from the available applications.
  • Branding graphics region 806 may be used to provide graphics associated with the desktop or LOB applications tied together by the task pane. Branding graphics 806 is followed by an object identification region 808. Object identification region 808 may be used to identify the element of the desktop application, its counterpart module in the LOB application, as well as to provide status information. Multiple object identification regions may be collapsed or expanded using a dropdown menu icon.
  • Dynamic message region 810 is used to provide summary information such as status of the activity. For example, in a workflow application, status of different workflow tasks may be reflected in dynamic message region 810. Content controls region 812 includes options for the user to modify attributes, aspects of data being synchronized or exchanged between the two applications. Actions region 814 may provide links to actions associated with the LOB application. For example, in a time keeping application, the actions region 814 may include a link that enables the user to open a new timekeeper item or a new project. The links in actions region 814 may be in form of hyperlinks, buttons, and the like.
  • Another region in task pane 800 is contextual data region 816. Contextual data region 816 may provide information retrieved from the LOB application such as total recorded time balance in a time keeping application. Contextual data region 816 is followed by object link region 818. Object link region 818 includes links to additional objects (e.g. “Recent Requests”) associated with the LOB application and the desktop application.
  • A further region in task pane 800 is related reports region 820. Related reports region 810 may provide links to related reports in form of text hyperlinks, buttons, tree style, and the like. Related actions region 822 is similar to the related reports region 820, and provides links to actions within the desktop or LOB applications associated with the current task pane.
  • Task pane 800 may include many more or fewer regions in any order. The regions may be designed to appear only when they include an item within themselves or may be listed in a dropdown menu. The regions may also include additional elements such as graphics, control icons, and the like.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a logic flow diagram for process 900 of using a supplementary UI according to embodiments. Process 900 may be implemented in an application server or client as described in FIG. 2.
  • Process 900 begins with operation 902, where a selection on the application UI is received. As described previously, the selection may be activation of a link associated with a calendar entry, a task entry, and the like. In a typical implementation, the selected item is associated with a corresponding item in an LOB application. Processing advances from operation 902 to operation 904.
  • At operation 904, information associated with the selected item is retrieved from the LOB application. In the scheduling example, such information may include data associated with a project task, and the like. Processing moves from operation 904 to operation 906.
  • At operation 906, the supplementary UI (in the example, the task pane) is generated. The contents of the task pane such as message, object, and control regions may be created and ordered based on the information retrieved from the LOB application and the application UI. Regions within the supplementary UI include information received from the application UI and retrieved from the LOB application. Processing advances from operation 906 to operation 908.
  • At operation 908, the task pane is dynamically positioned based on a position and size of the application UI. Specific examples of task pane positioning are discussed in conjunction with FIGS. 4 and 5. The task pane may, however, be positioned in any predefined way in relation to the application UI. Operation 908 is followed by operation 910.
  • At operation 910, the data is synchronized. Some data may be synchronized automatically between the application and the LOB application. Other portions of the data may be synchronized upon approval by the user. In other embodiments, the user may be provided the option of binding additional data to be synchronized. Processing advances from operation 910 to optional 912.
  • At optional operation 912, additional actions associated with transferring data between the application and the LOB application may be performed. Such actions may include modifying data to be synchronized, setting or modifying of properties and attributes of information to be exchanged between the applications, and the like. After optional operation 912, processing moves to a calling process for further actions.
  • The operations included in process 900 are for illustration purposes. Providing a centralized UI for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality may be implemented by similar processes with fewer or additional steps, as well as in different order of operations using the principles described herein.
  • The above specification, examples and data provide a complete description of the manufacture and use of the composition of the embodiments. Although the subject matter has been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described above. Rather, the specific features and acts described above are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claims and embodiments.

Claims (20)

What is claimed is:
1. A method of displaying multiple frames within a user interface, the method comprising:
displaying a first frame comprising user interface elements organized into regions of the first frame;
receiving a selection of a first user interface element within a first region;
generating, in response to the received selection, a second frame comprising information associated the first region; and
displaying the second frame in conjunction with the first frame.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein generating the second frame comprises generating a different second frame for each region of the first frame.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving a selection of a second user interface element within a second region; and
regenerating the second frame to comprise information associated with the second region; and
redisplaying the regenerated second frame in conjunction with the first frame.
4. The method of claim 1, generating the second frame comprises retrieving the information from a remote application residing on a server.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein displaying the second frame comprises displaying a drop-down menu having entries which, when selected, are configured to change the information displayed in the second frame.
6. The method of claim 5, further comprising:
receiving a selection of a drop-down menu entry; and
changing, in response to the received selection of the drop-down menu entry, the information in the second frame to correspond to a second region of the first frame.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein displaying the second frame comprises displaying the second frame adjacent to the first region.
8. The method of claim 6, further comprising relocating a position of the second frame in response to changing the information in the second frame, the relocating position being adjacent to the second region.
9. The method of claim 1, further comprising receiving an indication to hide the second frame from display upon subsequent selections of the first user interface element.
10. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving customizations to the second frame; and
displaying the customized second frame upon subsequent selections to the first user interface element.
11. A computer-readable medium comprising a set of instructions which, when executed, perform a method of displaying multiple frames within a user interface, the method executed by the set of instructions comprising:
displaying, within a first application, a first frame comprising user interface elements organized into regions;
receiving a selection of a first user interface element within a first region;
retrieving, from a second application, data associated with the first user interface element, the second application located remotely from the first application;
generating a second frame comprising information associated the first region, the information corresponding, at least in part, to the data retrieved from the second application; and
displaying the second frame in conjunction with the first frame.
12. The computer-readable medium of claim 11, further comprising:
receiving a selection of a second user interface element within a second region; and
regenerating the second frame to comprise information associated with the second region; and
redisplaying the regenerated second frame in conjunction with the first frame.
13. The computer-readable medium of claim 11, wherein displaying the second frame comprises displaying a drop-down menu having entries which, when selected, are configured to change the information displayed in the second frame.
14. The computer-readable medium of claim 13, further comprising:
receiving a selection of a drop-down menu entry; and
changing, in response to the received selection of the drop-down menu entry, the information in the second frame to correspond to a second region of the first frame.
15. The computer-readable medium of claim 11, wherein displaying the second frame comprises displaying the second frame adjacent to the first region.
16. The computer-readable medium of claim 14, further comprising relocating a position of the second frame in response to changing the information in the second frame, the relocating position being adjacent to the second region.
17. The computer-readable medium of claim 11, further comprising receiving an indication to hide the second frame from display upon subsequent selections of the first user interface element.
18. The computer-readable medium of claim 11, further comprising:
receiving customizations to the second frame; and
displaying the customized second frame upon subsequent selections to the first user interface element.
19. A system for displaying multiple frames within a user interface, the system comprising:
a memory storage; and
a processing unit coupled to the memory storage, the processing unit being configured to:
display, within a first application, a first frame comprising user interface elements organized into regions, each region being associated with a different functionality of the first application,
receive a selection of a first user interface element within a first region,
synchronize, between the first application and remotely located second application, data associated with the first user interface element,
generate a second frame comprising information associated the first region, the information corresponding, at least in part, to the data retrieved from the second application,
displaying the second frame in conjunction with the first frame,
receive a selection of a second user interface element within a second region,
regenerate the second frame with information associated with the second region, wherein the information is retrieved, at least in part, from the second application, and
redisplay the second frame in conjunction with the first frame.
20. The system of claim 19, wherein the processing unit being configured to redisplay the second frame comprises the processing unit being configured to reposition the second frame so as to be adjacent to the second region of the first frame.
US13/873,344 2005-11-30 2013-04-30 Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality Abandoned US20130239048A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US74092605P true 2005-11-30 2005-11-30
US11/393,020 US8434021B2 (en) 2005-11-30 2006-03-30 Centralized user interface for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality
US13/873,344 US20130239048A1 (en) 2005-11-30 2013-04-30 Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US13/873,344 US20130239048A1 (en) 2005-11-30 2013-04-30 Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/393,020 Continuation US8434021B2 (en) 2005-11-30 2006-03-30 Centralized user interface for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20130239048A1 true US20130239048A1 (en) 2013-09-12

Family

ID=38088964

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/393,020 Active 2030-02-14 US8434021B2 (en) 2005-11-30 2006-03-30 Centralized user interface for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality
US13/873,344 Abandoned US20130239048A1 (en) 2005-11-30 2013-04-30 Centralized User Interface for Displaying Contextually Driven Business Content and Business Related Functionality

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/393,020 Active 2030-02-14 US8434021B2 (en) 2005-11-30 2006-03-30 Centralized user interface for displaying contextually driven business content and business related functionality

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (2) US8434021B2 (en)
KR (1) KR101331306B1 (en)
CN (1) CN101317150B (en)
WO (1) WO2007064480A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10503459B2 (en) 2014-10-10 2019-12-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for sharing screen and electronic device thereof

Families Citing this family (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9715678B2 (en) 2003-06-26 2017-07-25 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Side-by-side shared calendars
US8799808B2 (en) 2003-07-01 2014-08-05 Microsoft Corporation Adaptive multi-line view user interface
US7707255B2 (en) 2003-07-01 2010-04-27 Microsoft Corporation Automatic grouping of electronic mail
US7703036B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2010-04-20 Microsoft Corporation User interface for displaying selectable software functionality controls that are relevant to a selected object
US9015621B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2015-04-21 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Command user interface for displaying multiple sections of software functionality controls
US7895531B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2011-02-22 Microsoft Corporation Floating command object
US8255828B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2012-08-28 Microsoft Corporation Command user interface for displaying selectable software functionality controls
US8146016B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2012-03-27 Microsoft Corporation User interface for displaying a gallery of formatting options applicable to a selected object
US7747966B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2010-06-29 Microsoft Corporation User interface for providing task management and calendar information
US8689137B2 (en) 2005-09-07 2014-04-01 Microsoft Corporation Command user interface for displaying selectable functionality controls in a database application
US9542667B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2017-01-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Navigating messages within a thread
US8627222B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2014-01-07 Microsoft Corporation Expanded search and find user interface
US9727989B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-08-08 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Modifying and formatting a chart using pictorially provided chart elements
US8605090B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2013-12-10 Microsoft Corporation Modifying and formatting a chart using pictorially provided chart elements
US8484578B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2013-07-09 Microsoft Corporation Communication between a document editor in-space user interface and a document editor out-space user interface
US8762880B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2014-06-24 Microsoft Corporation Exposing non-authoring features through document status information in an out-space user interface
US8201103B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2012-06-12 Microsoft Corporation Accessing an out-space user interface for a document editor program
US7941399B2 (en) 2007-11-09 2011-05-10 Microsoft Corporation Collaborative authoring
US8825758B2 (en) 2007-12-14 2014-09-02 Microsoft Corporation Collaborative authoring modes
JP4750806B2 (en) * 2008-01-07 2011-08-17 株式会社エヌ・ティ・ティ・ドコモ Information processing apparatus and program
US20090187531A1 (en) * 2008-01-21 2009-07-23 Microsoft Corporation User experience for viewing business data via personal information application
US9588781B2 (en) 2008-03-31 2017-03-07 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Associating command surfaces with multiple active components
US8352870B2 (en) 2008-04-28 2013-01-08 Microsoft Corporation Conflict resolution
US10289671B2 (en) * 2008-05-07 2019-05-14 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Graphically displaying selected data sources within a grid
US20090300649A1 (en) * 2008-05-30 2009-12-03 Microsoft Corporation Sharing An Object Among Multiple Applications
US9665850B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2017-05-30 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Synchronized conversation-centric message list and message reading pane
US8402096B2 (en) 2008-06-24 2013-03-19 Microsoft Corporation Automatic conversation techniques
US9046983B2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2015-06-02 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Hierarchically-organized control galleries
US9141260B2 (en) * 2009-10-08 2015-09-22 Red Hat, Inc. Workspace management tool
US9152299B2 (en) * 2009-10-08 2015-10-06 Red Hat, Inc. Activity management tool
JP5433521B2 (en) * 2010-02-19 2014-03-05 東芝テック株式会社 Information processing apparatus and program for controlling operation thereof
JP5216818B2 (en) * 2010-02-19 2013-06-19 東芝テック株式会社 Information processing apparatus and program for controlling operation thereof
US9679163B2 (en) 2012-01-17 2017-06-13 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Installation and management of client extensions
US9256445B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2016-02-09 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Dynamic extension view with multiple levels of expansion
US9449112B2 (en) 2012-01-30 2016-09-20 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Extension activation for related documents
US9239658B2 (en) * 2012-10-15 2016-01-19 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc User interface technology for displaying table data
US20140184535A1 (en) * 2012-12-27 2014-07-03 Agilent Technologies, Inc. Method for Displaying Children Components in a Display that Operates at Different Screen Parameters and Orientations
US9792354B2 (en) * 2013-09-30 2017-10-17 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Context aware user interface parts
KR20150099297A (en) * 2014-02-21 2015-08-31 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for displaying screen on electronic devices
US20150281148A1 (en) * 2014-03-31 2015-10-01 Microsoft Corporation Immersive document view
US20150286691A1 (en) * 2014-04-02 2015-10-08 Microsoft Corporation Data view exposure mechanisms
US20170235452A1 (en) 2016-02-16 2017-08-17 Bank Of America Corporation Integrated geolocation resource transfer platform
US10447828B2 (en) 2016-03-01 2019-10-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Cross-application service-driven contextual messages

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20010004743A1 (en) * 1998-07-31 2001-06-21 Webtv Networks, Inc. Browser-based email system with user interface for audio/video capture
US20020186257A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2002-12-12 Cadiz Jonathan J. System and process for providing dynamic communication access and information awareness in an interactive peripheral display
US20040006593A1 (en) * 2002-06-14 2004-01-08 Vogler Hartmut K. Multidimensional approach to context-awareness
US6934740B1 (en) * 2000-09-19 2005-08-23 3Com Corporation Method and apparatus for sharing common data objects among multiple applications in a client device
US20050188329A1 (en) * 2004-02-20 2005-08-25 Stephen Cutler System for and method of generating and navigating within a workspace of a computer application
US20050289202A1 (en) * 2004-06-29 2005-12-29 S Sudhir K Integrated calendar
US8095882B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2012-01-10 Avaya Technology Corp. Additional functionality for telephone numbers and utilization of context information associated with telephone numbers in computer documents

Family Cites Families (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5546525A (en) * 1989-11-13 1996-08-13 Lotus Development Corporation Computer user interface with multimode selection of displayed controls
US6215490B1 (en) * 1998-02-02 2001-04-10 International Business Machines Corporation Task window navigation method and system
US6282547B1 (en) * 1998-08-25 2001-08-28 Informix Software, Inc. Hyperlinked relational database visualization system
US6604150B1 (en) * 1999-02-06 2003-08-05 International Business Machines Corporation Integration of GUI application with external application extensions
US6629129B1 (en) * 1999-06-16 2003-09-30 Microsoft Corporation Shared virtual meeting services among computer applications
US6948133B2 (en) * 2001-03-23 2005-09-20 Siemens Medical Solutions Health Services Corporation System for dynamically configuring a user interface display
US7406659B2 (en) * 2001-11-26 2008-07-29 Microsoft Corporation Smart links
US7346855B2 (en) * 2001-12-21 2008-03-18 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for switching between multiple computer applications
US7921023B2 (en) * 2001-12-28 2011-04-05 Sap Aktiengesellschaft Portal for implementation of multiple software components
US7421661B1 (en) * 2002-04-30 2008-09-02 Aol Llc Instant messaging interface having an informational tool tip
US8032597B2 (en) * 2002-09-18 2011-10-04 Advenix, Corp. Enhancement of e-mail client user interfaces and e-mail message formats
US7296230B2 (en) * 2002-11-29 2007-11-13 Nippon Telegraph And Telephone Corporation Linked contents browsing support device, linked contents continuous browsing support device, and method and program therefor, and recording medium therewith
US7890324B2 (en) * 2002-12-19 2011-02-15 At&T Intellectual Property Ii, L.P. Context-sensitive interface widgets for multi-modal dialog systems
US7325204B2 (en) * 2003-08-29 2008-01-29 Yahoo! Inc. Slideout windows
CA2560277A1 (en) * 2004-03-19 2005-09-29 Oversight Technologies, Inc. Methods and systems for transaction compliance monitoring
US8640035B2 (en) * 2004-06-24 2014-01-28 Oracle America, Inc. Identity based user interface
US8286092B2 (en) * 2004-10-14 2012-10-09 International Business Machines Corporation Goal based user interface for managing business solutions in an on demand environment
US7606794B2 (en) * 2004-11-11 2009-10-20 Yahoo! Inc. Active Abstracts
US20070094612A1 (en) * 2005-10-24 2007-04-26 Nokia Corporation Method, a device and a computer program product for dynamically positioning of a pop-up window

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20010004743A1 (en) * 1998-07-31 2001-06-21 Webtv Networks, Inc. Browser-based email system with user interface for audio/video capture
US6934740B1 (en) * 2000-09-19 2005-08-23 3Com Corporation Method and apparatus for sharing common data objects among multiple applications in a client device
US20020186257A1 (en) * 2001-06-08 2002-12-12 Cadiz Jonathan J. System and process for providing dynamic communication access and information awareness in an interactive peripheral display
US20040006593A1 (en) * 2002-06-14 2004-01-08 Vogler Hartmut K. Multidimensional approach to context-awareness
US8095882B2 (en) * 2003-10-30 2012-01-10 Avaya Technology Corp. Additional functionality for telephone numbers and utilization of context information associated with telephone numbers in computer documents
US20050188329A1 (en) * 2004-02-20 2005-08-25 Stephen Cutler System for and method of generating and navigating within a workspace of a computer application
US20050289202A1 (en) * 2004-06-29 2005-12-29 S Sudhir K Integrated calendar

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10503459B2 (en) 2014-10-10 2019-12-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method for sharing screen and electronic device thereof

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
KR101331306B1 (en) 2013-11-20
US20070124696A1 (en) 2007-05-31
CN101317150A (en) 2008-12-03
WO2007064480A1 (en) 2007-06-07
KR20080072011A (en) 2008-08-05
CN101317150B (en) 2010-12-08
US8434021B2 (en) 2013-04-30

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US20170083290A1 (en) Integrated System for Software Application Development
US20190279116A1 (en) Calendar based task and time management systems and methods
US10565300B2 (en) Methods and systems for creating, interacting with, and utilizing a superactive document
US20200074406A1 (en) Collaboration tool
KR101292494B1 (en) Method and system for improved electronic task flagging and management
US8224767B2 (en) Rapid knowledge transfer among workers
US9448693B2 (en) System for navigation in a computer user interface
US20170300870A1 (en) Action-based to-do list
US20160112476A1 (en) Integrated real time collaboration experiences with online workspace
US9906472B2 (en) Dynamic navigation bar for expanded communication service
US20140172654A1 (en) Interactive chart utilizing shifting control to render shifting of time domains of data series
US20160104115A1 (en) System and method for collaborative communications and informaton sharing
US8615533B2 (en) Enterprise proposal management system
US8296173B2 (en) Method and apparatus for network-based sales force management
US7519912B2 (en) Method and system for sensing and communicating the use of communication modes by remote users
US20130239021A1 (en) Receiving and presenting detailed activity information regarding current and recent instant messaging sessions of remote users
JP5021030B2 (en) Calendar events, notifications, and alert bars embedded in email
US20150135085A1 (en) System and method for activity management presentation
US20140229898A1 (en) Browser-based application management
Tarantilis et al. A Web-based ERP system for business services and supply chain management: Application to real-world process scheduling
US7921368B2 (en) Method and system for sensing and communicating updated status information for remote users accessible through an instant messaging system
US6678671B1 (en) System for linking a resource management system with an event of a project in a project management system and a method therefor
US7222369B2 (en) Role-based portal to a workplace system
US7403989B2 (en) Facilitating improved workflow
US8296161B2 (en) Method and system for wealth management

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: MICROSOFT TECHNOLOGY LICENSING, LLC, WASHINGTON

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:MICROSOFT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:034544/0541

Effective date: 20141014

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION