US20130152305A1 - Mattress support element - Google Patents

Mattress support element Download PDF

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US20130152305A1
US20130152305A1 US13331503 US201113331503A US2013152305A1 US 20130152305 A1 US20130152305 A1 US 20130152305A1 US 13331503 US13331503 US 13331503 US 201113331503 A US201113331503 A US 201113331503A US 2013152305 A1 US2013152305 A1 US 2013152305A1
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Prior art keywords
load bearing
containment layer
plurality
bearing elements
support element
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US13331503
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Justin Lall
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Justin Lall
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C27/00Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas
    • A47C27/12Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with fibrous inlays, e.g. made of wool, of cotton
    • A47C27/122Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with fibrous inlays, e.g. made of wool, of cotton with special fibres, such as acrylic thread, coconut, horsehair
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C27/00Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas
    • A47C27/12Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with fibrous inlays, e.g. made of wool, of cotton
    • A47C27/127Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with fibrous inlays, e.g. made of wool, of cotton with reinforcement sheets, grids or the like
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C27/00Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas
    • A47C27/14Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with foamed material inlays
    • A47C27/148Spring, stuffed or fluid mattresses or cushions specially adapted for chairs, beds or sofas with foamed material inlays of different resilience

Abstract

A mattress support element is presented formed from a combination of natural plant material and processed plant material. The processed plant material forms a framework of cells. Each cell contains one or more freestanding cylindrical sections. The cylindrical sections provide limited range piston-like movement within the cell, and may be made of natural plant materials. The cylindrical sections and the framework rest on a fabric base. The cylindrical sections stand taller than the framework. A ceiling layer of fabric overlays the cylindrical sections and framework, thereby constraining the cylindrical sections to remain in their respective cells. One or more layers of upper padding or cushioning may rest over the support element, and one or more layers of lower padding may rest under the support element.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to bedding and more particularly, is related to a mattress support element.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Support elements for existing mattresses are typically provided by oil-based chemicals in the form of foams, metal, for example springs, air, and liquids, among other elements. Even the air and liquid support elements are generally contained by oil based materials, for example, plastics. However, metallic and oil based materials may be disadvantageous, due to, for example, global procurement vulnerability, price uncertainty, and negative environmental effects. These negative environmental effects occur in processing the materials, for example oil extraction and refining, as well as in waste management, for example, disposing of discarded mattresses containing oil products and chemicals.
  • The support element of a mattress provides firmness and structure to a surface that may yield and suspend the weight of a person without binding or restricting circulation. Desirable characteristics include light weight, low cost, breathability, and durability. It is also desirable for a mattress to be configurable to personal taste, for example, firmness, softness, springiness, and how well the mattress dampens vibrations and/or isolates movements from one section of the mattress from another section of the mattress. Light weight may be desirable for reducing shipping costs, assisting portability, and ease of manipulating when changing bedding. Breathability may be desirable to avoid buildup of moisture and resulting mold or mildew.
  • Durability refers to a mattress not degrading over time, so it may not perform as it did when new. A durable mattress is generally usable over a longer period of time.
  • Therefore, there is a need in the industry for a mattress that addresses some of the shortcomings or issues described above.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Embodiments of the present invention provide a mattress support element and method for producing a mattress. In general the present invention is directed to a mattress support element using a combination of natural plant material and processed plant material. The processed plant material, for example, paper, forms a grid or matrix of cells. Each cell contains one or more freestanding cylindrical sections. The cylindrical sections may be made of natural plant materials, for example, segments of reed or bamboo. The cylindrical sections and the grid rest on a base, for example, a fabric base. The cylindrical sections stand taller than the grid. A ceiling layer of fabric overlays the cylindrical sections and grid, thereby constraining the cylindrical sections to remain in their respective cells. One or more layers of upper padding or cushioning may rest over the support element, and one or more layers of lower padding may rest under the support element.
  • Briefly described, in architecture, a first aspect of the present invention is directed to a mattress support element, including a first containment layer, a second containment layer, and a support layer disposed between the first containment layer and the second containment layer. The support layer includes a frame with at least one cell, wherein each cell houses at least one of a plurality of load bearing elements. The frame is configured to substantially restrict motion of the plurality of load bearing elements in a horizontal plane, and to substantially allow motion of the plurality of load bearing elements in a vertical axis. The first containment layer and second containment layer are configured to limit the range of motion of the load bearing elements along the vertical axis.
  • Embodiments according to the first aspect may include where the load bearing elements are substantially cylindrical in shape. The load bearing elements may be formed of natural plant material, for example, reed and/or bamboo. The plurality of cells may form a grid, and wherein a first height of each of the plurality of load bearing elements is greater than a second height of the cell housing the load bearing element. The support element may also include a first pad adjacent to the first containment layer and a second pad adjacent to the second containment layer.
  • A second aspect of the present invention is directed to a mattress support element having a first containment layer, a second containment layer, and a support layer disposed between the first containment layer and the second containment layer. The support layer includes a plurality of bamboo cylinders with a first height spanning between the first containment layer to the second containment layer, and a frame with a second height less than the first height formed of processed plant material, including a plurality of cells arranged in a grid. Each cell houses one of the plurality of bamboo cylinders. The first containment layer and the second containment layer contain each of the bamboo cylinders within its respective cells, and each cell is configured to substantially restrict lateral movement one of each of the housed bamboo cylinders.
  • Briefly described, in architecture, a third aspect of the present invention is directed to a method including the steps of providing a first containment layer, forming a frame comprising a plurality of cells, wherein the frame has a first height, attaching the first containment layer to a first side of the frame, inserting at least one of a plurality of load bearing elements within each of the plurality of cells, wherein each of the plurality of load bearing elements has a second height greater than the first height, providing a second containment layer, and attaching the second containment layer to a second side of the frame.
  • Other systems, methods and features of the present invention will be or become apparent to one having ordinary skill in the art upon examining the following drawings and detailed description. It is intended that all such additional systems, methods, and features be included in this description, be within the scope of the present invention and protected by the accompanying claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The accompanying drawings are included to provide a further understanding of the invention, and are incorporated in and constitute a part of this specification. The drawings illustrate embodiments of the invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principals of the invention.
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary embodiment of a mattress support element.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary embodiment of a mattress in exploded view.
  • FIG. 3A is schematic diagram of a mattress support with no weight load.
  • FIG. 3B is schematic diagram of a mattress support subject to a weight load.
  • FIG. 4A is a schematic diagram of a mattress support element having one load bearing element per cell.
  • FIG. 4B is a schematic diagram of a first example of a mattress support element having multiple load bearing elements per cell.
  • FIG. 4C is a schematic diagram of a second example of a mattress support element having multiple load bearing elements per cell.
  • FIG. 4D is a schematic diagram of a mattress support element having non-rectangular cells.
  • FIG. 4E is a schematic diagram of a mattress support element having non-uniform sized cells and load bearing elements.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a second exemplary embodiment of a mattress support element.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Reference will now be made in detail to embodiments of the present invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Wherever possible, the same reference numbers are used in the drawings and the description to refer to the same or like parts.
  • FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a first exemplary embodiment of a mattress support element 100. The core of the support element 100 is a matrix or grid 120. The matrix 120 contains a plurality of cells, each cell containing at least one load bearing element 140. The load bearing elements 140 are generally taller than the matrix 120, and stand so the tops of the load bearing elements 140 rise above the matrix 120, protruding outward above the matrix 120 so the load bearing elements 140 are first to bear the load of an object or person subjecting weight to the support element 100. Load bearing characteristics of the support element 100 are described further below.
  • The matrix 120 is generally a framework containing load bearing elements 140. The matrix 120 at least partially restricts movement of the load bearing elements 140 in a first direction and a second direction, for example, a horizontal plane, and allows movement of the load bearing elements 140 in a third direction, for example, a vertical axis.
  • The load bearing elements 140 as shown in the first embodiment are substantially cylindrical in shape. However, there is no objection to load bearing elements 140 with other shapes, for example, but not limited to, rectangular or hexagonal blocks. The load bearing elements 140 may be substantially hollow, or may be solid. Hollow load bearing elements 140 may be preferable for weight and air flow considerations.
  • FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary embodiment of a mattress 200 incorporating a support element 100 in exploded view. The matrix 120 rests upon a lower containing fabric 265. The lower containing fabric 265 is affixed to the bottom of the matrix 120. It is desirable that the lower containing fabric 265 have elastic properties, for example, to provide resistance to the movement of the load bearing elements 140. The lower containing fabric 265 may be affixed to a lower perimeter of each cell, may be affixed to an outer lower perimeter of the matrix 120, or may be affixed to a lower perimeter of a group of cells and may also rest unfixed to the matrix 120. The lower containing fabric 265 is adjacent to a lower pad 260. The lower pad 260 generally compresses under the pressure of a load. The lower pad 260 may be made from, for example, foam, gel, cotton padding, or other such resilient materials.
  • Load bearing elements 140 are located inside cells of the matrix 120. Under the first embodiment each cell of the matrix 120 houses a single load bearing element 140. The load bearing elements 140 rest directly upon the lower containing fabric 265. At least a portion of the weight of each load bearing element 140 may be supported by the lower pad 260. Therefore, the lower pad 260 generally compresses and deforms beneath the load bearing elements 140.
  • An upper containing fabric 215 is affixed to the top side of the matrix 120. The upper containing fabric 215 may be affixed to an upper perimeter of each cell, may be affixed to an outer upper perimeter of the matrix 120, or may be affixed to an upper perimeter of a group of two or more cells, to one or more load bearing elements 140, and may also rest unfixed. It is desirable that the upper containing fabric 215 have elastic properties, for example, to provide resistance to the movement of the load bearing elements 140.
  • As described previously, the load bearing elements 140 are generally taller than the height of the matrix 120. When the upper containing fabric 215 and the lower containing fabric 265 are affixed to the matrix 120, the upper containing fabric 215 and the lower containing fabric 265 exert opposing forces upon the load bearing elements 140, so that the load bearing elements 140 may be described as being suspended within the cells of the matrix 120.
  • An upper pad 210 is adjacent to the upper containing fabric 215. The upper pad 210 may exert additional downward force upon the load bearing elements 140. The upper pad 210 may be made from, for example, foam, gel, cotton padding, or other such resilient materials. Therefore, the upper pad 210 generally compresses and deforms when pressed against the load bearing elements 140 and/or the matrix 120.
  • It should be noted that while FIG. 2 depicts an upper pad 210 and a lower pad 260, there is no objection to an embodiment of the support element 100 without an upper pad 210 and/or a lower pad 260. For example, the support element 100 may be utilized between external components that perform load dispersion functions similar to the upper pad 210 and the lower pad 260.
  • The mattress 200 is depicted as substantially symmetrical around a horizontal plane. However, there is no objection to embodiments of the mattress 200 where, for example, the lower pad 260 is thicker than the upper pad 210, or the upper pad 210 is thicker than the lower pad 260. Indeed, such variations may contribute to suiting the preferences of a range of individuals.
  • FIG. 3A is a schematic diagram of the mattress 200 with no weight load. Note the upper containing fabric 215 and the lower containing fabric 265 are not shown for purposes of clarity. The load bearing elements 140 are constrained from moving laterally be the matrix 120. The load bearing elements 140, while partially constrained by the upper containing fabric 215 (FIG. 2) and the lower containing fabric 265 (FIG. 2), are able to move in a limited vertical range of motion within the matrix 120 cell. When no weight is placed upon the mattress 200, the upper pad 210 and the lower pad 260 are generally uncompressed, and the load bearing elements 140 remain generally aligned in a horizontal plane.
  • FIG. 3B is schematic diagram of a mattress 200 subject to a weight load. When a weight is applied to the top surface of the mattress 200, the weight is absorbed by and distributed through the mattress in several different ways. The weight is depicted by heavy black arrows. The top pad 210 compresses directly under the weight. The top pad 210 exerts a downward force upon adjacent load bearing elements 140, causing a piston-like downward displacement of the load bearing elements 140 within the cells of the matrix 120. Load bearing elements 140 subject to greater force of weight, such as the center load bearing element 140 in FIG. 3B, display greater vertical displacement than adjacent load bearing elements 140. Similarly, the load bearing elements not subject to the weight upon the mattress 200, such as the leftmost and rightmost load bearing elements 140, may exhibit little or no vertical displacement. Of course, additional forces may come into play upon a load bearing element 140, for example the force of the upper containing fabric 215 being displaced in an adjacent cell.
  • The vertical range of upward and downward motion of the load bearing elements 140 relative to the matrix 120 is generally restricted by elements external to the mattress support element 100, for example, the upper containing fabric 215, the lower containing fabric 265, the upper pad 210 and the lower pad 260. However, there is no objection to the load bearing elements being range restricted by other objects or forces. It is desirable that the range of motion of the load bearing elements 140 relative to the matrix be limited to at least contain the load bearing elements within the cells of the matrix 120.
  • For specific applications, it may be desirable to restrict the vertical range of the load bearing elements 140 to specific tolerances. For example, if a load bearing element 140 is six inches tall, it may be desirable to restrict the load bearing element 140 from extending more than three inches above the matrix 120 or three inches below the matrix 120. Such range restrictions may be accomplished, for example, by affixing a raised belt around the center of the load bearing element 140, and by extending a rim at the top and bottom of each cell in the matrix 120, where the top rim restricts the raised belt from extending further above the top of the matrix, and the bottom rim restricts the raised belt from extending further below the bottom of the matrix. Persons with ordinary skill in the art will recognize that this is just one of several mechanisms that may be used to restrict the vertical range of motion of a load bearing element 140 within a cell of the matrix 120.
  • As load bearing elements 140 are forced downward through cells of the matrix 120, the load bearing elements 140 in turn exert downward force upon the lower pad 260. The lower pad 260 compresses somewhat, and may also bulge downward (not shown)
  • Of course, there is no objection to additional cushioning or load bearing layers above the upper pad 210 and/or below the lower pad 260. Similarly, there is no objection to a mattress employing two or more support elements 100, for example, in layers, possible with additional padding interleaved. In such an embodiment, there is further no objection to each layered support element 100 having different configurations, for example, width and/or flexibility. Different configurations of support element 100 are described further below.
  • Under the first embodiment, the matrix 120 is generally rigid. This limits the amount the surface of the mattress 210 may be compressed. However, there is no objection to embodiments where the matrix 120 may have some flexibility, therefore allowing additional downward compression of the mattress 200. Similarly, the load bearing elements 140 may be substantially structurally rigid, in that flexible support provided by the mattress 200 surface to a contoured shape on the mattress 200 is substantially provided by the movement of the load bearing elements 140 within the grid 120 as contained by the containing fabric 215, 265 (FIG. 2), rather than by the compression of the load bearing elements 140. This contrasts with, for example, a spring mattress, where variable support is provided by compression of individually compressible springs. While the load bearing elements 140 may compress somewhat under the load of a weight, such compression is at most a secondary flexible support mechanism, and there is no objection to embodiments where the load bearing elements 140 exhibit no compression characteristics.
  • The configuration of the support element may contribute to how it responds to weight loads. Several characteristics may be altered, for example, the height of the matrix 120, the height of the load bearing elements 140 in relation to the matrix 120, the width of the cells and the corresponding diameter of the load bearing elements 140. For example, smaller diameter load bearing elements 140 may result in depressions upon the mattress surface being more localized, while wider load bearing elements 140 may result in larger local depressions. The diameter of load bearing elements may contribute to the sensation of support provided by the mattress. Other variable elements include the flexibility of the upper containing fabric 215 and the lower containing fabric 265. Further there is no objection to embodiments where the thickness of the matrix 120 is not uniform across the mattress 200, and/or the load bearing elements 140 do not have uniform height throughout the mattress 200. For example, it may be desirable for the mattress 200 to exhibit a crown, where the mattress 200 is thicker in the center region. For another example, a mattress 200 may be formed with a well depression in the center, for an application such as a seat cushion. Persons having ordinary skill in the art will appreciate similar applications for non-uniform height variations for the matrix 120 and/or the load bearing elements 140.
  • Other types of variations are possible. For example, FIG. 4A depicts a mattress support element 100 having one load bearing element per cell, while FIGS. 4B and 4C each depict a mattress support element 100 having multiple load bearing elements 140 per cell. Each cell may contain support elements that are arranged in single lines (FIG. 4B), or support elements may be arranged honeycomb fashion, as shown in FIG. 4C. Other geometric arrangements of load bearing elements 140 within a cell are possible. The cells and support elements 140 within a matrix need not be equi-distant, evenly spaced, or uniform in size. For example, FIG. 4E shows a mattress element 100 with a group of small cells surrounded by a group of large cells, with smaller load bearing elements 440 within the small cells, and larger load bearing elements 442 within the larger cells. Such an arrangement may be desirable, for example, to provide a support element 100 having regions with different levels of firmness.
  • Under the first embodiment, the matrix 120 is depicted as a rectangular grid. However, there is no objection to other geometrical arrangements for a matrix 120. For example, FIG. 4D is a schematic diagram of a mattress support element having non-rectangular cells. While FIG. 4D shows non-rectangular cells with one load bearing element 140 per cell, there is no objection to a support element 100 having non-rectangular cells with more than one load bearing element 140 per cell. The non-rectangular cells of FIG. 4D are depicted as triangular. However, other cell shapes may be used, for example, hexagonal cells may form a honeycomb shaped matrix 120 that allows, for example, a higher density of load bearing elements than rectangular or triangular cells.
  • Under a second exemplary embodiment of a mattress support element 500, as shown in FIG. 5, some cells 530 of a matrix 120 contains a plurality of cells 530. Some cells 530 of the matrix 120 contain load bearing elements 140, and some cells 530 do not contain load bearing elements 140. Under the second exemplary embodiment, areas of the mattress support element 500 intended to support greater weight loads may be more densely populated with load bearing elements 140, while areas of the mattress support element 500 that may be intended to support lighter loads may be more sparsely populated by load bearing elements 140.
  • While the above description has generally referred to the invention in the context of a mattress, there is no objection to other applications, for example as mattress foundations or bases, box springs, seat cushions, or any other load bearing purpose.
  • Natural Materials
  • The materials for the matrix 120 and the load bearing elements 140 may be selected to suit different requirements. For example, lowest cost, lowest weight, local availability, maximum durability, and other requirements. A low cost, readily available material for the load bearing elements 140 may be, for example, PVC tubing.
  • In an embodiment where the criteria is for the materials to be environmentally friendly, the criteria may apply both in producing the materials for construction and for disposing of the materials after the end of life of the mattress. For production, therefore, use of a renewable resource for the matrix 120 and the load bearing elements 140 is desirable. Similarly, it is desirable that the materials be biodegradable to minimize the environmental impact of disposing of the materials after the end of life of the mattress.
  • The matrix 120 may be formed of a processed plant material, for example, paper products such as cardboard. The geometric shape of the matrix 120 generally contributes to the strength and structural rigidity of the matrix 120. However, other processed plant materials, such as string, twine and/or rope may be used to maintain the structural integrity of the matrix 120. Similarly, processed plant material may be used for the load bearing elements 140. Alternatively, natural plant material may be used for the load bearing elements 140. For example, a load bearing element 140 may be formed of a cut section of bamboo or reed.
  • It may be particularly advantageous that the natural materials and the processed plant materials be locally produced, minimizing the costs for transporting materials and import tariffs. The ability to select among several different materials depending upon costs and availability may also result in an end product less susceptible to price fluctuations due to external cost pressures. For example, the costs of locally produced plant products and natural plant materials may generally be more stable than petroleum based mattress materials, for example foams and plastics.
  • It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and variations can be made to the structure of the present invention without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. In view of the foregoing, it is intended that the present invention cover modifications and variations of this invention provided they fall within the scope of the following claims and their equivalents.

Claims (18)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A mattress support element, comprising:
    a first containment layer;
    a second containment layer; and
    a support layer disposed between said first containment layer and said second containment layer comprising:
    a plurality of load bearing elements; and
    a frame comprising a plurality of cells, wherein each of said load bearing elements is at least partially contained within one of said plurality of cells,
    wherein said frame is configured to substantially restrict motion of said plurality of load bearing elements in a horizontal plane, and to substantially allow motion of said plurality of load bearing elements along a vertical axis, and said first containment layer and said second containment layer are configured to limit the range of motion of said load bearing elements along said vertical axis.
  2. 2. The mattress support element of claim 1, wherein said plurality of load bearing elements are substantially cylindrical in shape.
  3. 3. The mattress support element of claim 2, wherein said load bearing elements are formed of natural plant material.
  4. 4. The mattress support element of claim 3, wherein said natural plant material is one of the group consisting of reed and bamboo.
  5. 5. The mattress support element of claim 2, wherein said plurality of cells form a grid.
  6. 6. The mattress support element of claim 2, wherein a first height of each of said plurality of load bearing elements is greater than a second height of each of said plurality of cells housing said load bearing elements.
  7. 7. The mattress support element of claim 5, wherein said grid rests substantially on said first containment layer.
  8. 8. The mattress support element of claim 1, wherein said frame is formed of processed plant material.
  9. 9. The mattress support element of claim 1, wherein each cell of said plurality of cells houses at most one of said plurality of load bearing elements.
  10. 10. The mattress support element of claim 1, wherein said first containment layer and said second containment layer comprise one of the group consisting of foam, gel, fiber, air bladders, and fabric.
  11. 11. The mattress support element of claim 1, further comprising:
    a first pad adjacent to said first containment layer; and
    a second pad adjacent to said second containment layer.
  12. 12. A mattress support element, comprising:
    a first containment layer;
    a second containment layer; and
    a support layer disposed between said first containment layer and said second containment layer comprising:
    a plurality of bamboo cylinders with a first height spanning between said first containment layer to said second containment layer; and
    a frame with a second height less than said first height formed of processed plant material, comprising a plurality of cells arranged in a grid, wherein each cell houses one of said plurality of bamboo cylinders,
    wherein said first containment layer and said second containment layer contain each of said bamboo cylinders within its respective one of said plurality of cells, and each cell is configured to substantially restrict lateral movement one of each of said housed bamboo cylinders.
  13. 13. A method for making a mattress support element, comprising the steps of:
    providing a first containment layer;
    forming a frame comprising a plurality of cells, wherein said frame has a first height;
    attaching said first containment layer to a first side of said frame;
    inserting at least one of a plurality of load bearing elements within each of said plurality of cells, wherein each of said plurality of load bearing elements has a second height greater than said first height;
    providing a second containment layer; and
    attaching said second containment layer to a second side of said frame.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13, wherein said frame is formed of a processed plant material.
  15. 15. The method of claim 13, wherein said plurality of load bearing elements is formed of a natural plant material.
  16. 16. The method of claim 15, wherein each of said plurality of load bearing elements is substantially cylindrical.
  17. 17. The method of claim 16, wherein said natural plant material is one of the group consisting of reed and bamboo.
  18. 18. The method element of claim 13, wherein said first containment layer and said second containment layer comprise one of the group consisting of foam, gel, fiber, and fabric.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD738644S1 (en) 2013-09-20 2015-09-15 Future Foam, Inc. Pillow
US20150335163A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2015-11-26 Tempur-Pedic Management, Llc Mattress assembly
WO2016033076A1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2016-03-03 Goodbaby Child Product Co., Ltd. Breathable and light weight mattress

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20150335163A1 (en) * 2012-12-28 2015-11-26 Tempur-Pedic Management, Llc Mattress assembly
US9848711B2 (en) * 2012-12-28 2017-12-26 Tempur-Pedic Management, Llc Mattress assembly
USD738644S1 (en) 2013-09-20 2015-09-15 Future Foam, Inc. Pillow
USD751322S1 (en) 2013-09-20 2016-03-15 Future Foam, Inc. Pillow
WO2016033076A1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2016-03-03 Goodbaby Child Product Co., Ltd. Breathable and light weight mattress

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