US20130114571A1 - Coordinated forward link blanking and power boosting for flexible bandwidth systems - Google Patents

Coordinated forward link blanking and power boosting for flexible bandwidth systems Download PDF

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Publication number
US20130114571A1
US20130114571A1 US13/432,240 US201213432240A US2013114571A1 US 20130114571 A1 US20130114571 A1 US 20130114571A1 US 201213432240 A US201213432240 A US 201213432240A US 2013114571 A1 US2013114571 A1 US 2013114571A1
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carrier bandwidth
over
transmission
blanking
forward link
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US13/432,240
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Soumya Das
Ozgur Dural
Edwin C. Park
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Qualcomm Inc
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Qualcomm Inc
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Priority to US13/432,240 priority patent/US20130114571A1/en
Assigned to QUALCOMM INCORPORATED reassignment QUALCOMM INCORPORATED ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: DAS, SOUMYA, DURAL, OZGUR, PARK, EDWIN C.
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/044Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on the type of the allocated resource
    • H04W72/0453Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on the type of the allocated resource the resource being a frequency, carrier or frequency band
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • H04W72/08Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria
    • H04W72/082Wireless resource allocation where an allocation plan is defined based on quality criteria using the level of interference
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/0001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff
    • H04L1/0006Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff by adapting the transmission format
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W24/00Supervisory, monitoring or testing arrangements
    • H04W24/10Scheduling measurement reports ; Arrangements for measurement reports
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC
    • H04W52/38TPC being performed in particular situations
    • H04W52/44TPC being performed in particular situations in connection with interruption of transmission
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
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    • H04W72/04Wireless resource allocation
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/12Dynamic Wireless traffic scheduling ; Dynamically scheduled allocation on shared channel
    • H04W72/1263Schedule usage, i.e. actual mapping of traffic onto schedule; Multiplexing of flows into one or several streams; Mapping aspects; Scheduled allocation
    • H04W72/1268Schedule usage, i.e. actual mapping of traffic onto schedule; Multiplexing of flows into one or several streams; Mapping aspects; Scheduled allocation of uplink data flows
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/12Dynamic Wireless traffic scheduling ; Dynamically scheduled allocation on shared channel
    • H04W72/1263Schedule usage, i.e. actual mapping of traffic onto schedule; Multiplexing of flows into one or several streams; Mapping aspects; Scheduled allocation
    • H04W72/1273Schedule usage, i.e. actual mapping of traffic onto schedule; Multiplexing of flows into one or several streams; Mapping aspects; Scheduled allocation of downlink data flows
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W16/00Network planning, e.g. coverage or traffic planning tools; Network deployment, e.g. resource partitioning or cells structures
    • H04W16/14Spectrum sharing arrangements between different networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC
    • H04W52/06TPC algorithms
    • H04W52/14Separate analysis of uplink or downlink
    • H04W52/146Uplink power control
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC
    • H04W52/18TPC being performed according to specific parameters
    • H04W52/24TPC being performed according to specific parameters using SIR [Signal to Interference Ratio] or other wireless path parameters
    • H04W52/247TPC being performed according to specific parameters using SIR [Signal to Interference Ratio] or other wireless path parameters where the output power of a terminal is based on a path parameter sent by another terminal
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC
    • H04W52/38TPC being performed in particular situations
    • H04W52/40TPC being performed in particular situations during macro-diversity or soft handoff
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/12Dynamic Wireless traffic scheduling ; Dynamically scheduled allocation on shared channel
    • H04W72/1205Schedule definition, set-up or creation
    • H04W72/1215Schedule definition, set-up or creation for collaboration of different radio technologies
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W72/00Local resource management, e.g. wireless traffic scheduling or selection or allocation of wireless resources
    • H04W72/12Dynamic Wireless traffic scheduling ; Dynamically scheduled allocation on shared channel
    • H04W72/1278Transmission of control information for scheduling
    • H04W72/1289Transmission of control information for scheduling in the downlink, i.e. towards the terminal
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/02Hierarchically pre-organised networks, e.g. paging networks, cellular networks, WLAN [Wireless Local Area Network] or WLL [Wireless Local Loop]
    • H04W84/04Large scale networks; Deep hierarchical networks
    • H04W84/042Public Land Mobile systems, e.g. cellular systems
    • H04W84/045Public Land Mobile systems, e.g. cellular systems using private Base Stations, e.g. femto Base Stations, home Node B
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/02Terminal devices
    • H04W88/06Terminal devices adapted for operation in multiple networks or having at least two operational modes, e.g. multi-mode terminals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATION NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/08Access point devices
    • H04W88/10Access point devices adapted for operation in multiple networks, e.g. multi-mode access points

Abstract

Methods, systems, and devices are provided for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in wireless communications systems. Some embodiments include two or more bandwidth systems. The bandwidth of one bandwidth system may overlap with the bandwidth of another bandwidth system. This overlap may create interference. Coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting may aid in reducing the impact of this interference. Some embodiments utilize flexible bandwidth and/or normal bandwidth systems. Flexible bandwidth systems may utilize portions of spectrum that may not be big enough to fit a normal waveform, though some embodiments may utilize flexible waveforms that utilize more bandwidth than a normal waveform.

Description

    CROSS-RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application for patent claims priority to Provisional Application No. 61/556,777 entitled “FRACTIONAL SYSTEMS IN WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS” filed Nov. 7, 2011, and assigned to the assignee hereof and hereby expressly incorporated by reference herein. The present application for patent also claims priority to Provisional Application No. 61/568,742 entitled “SIGNAL CAPACITY BOOSTING, COORDINATED FORWARD LINK BLANKING AND POWER BOOSTING, AND REVERSE LINK THROUGHPUT INCREASING FOR FLEXIBLE BANDWIDTH SYSTEMS” filed Dec. 9, 2011, and assigned to the assignee hereof and hereby expressly incorporated by reference herein.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Wireless communications systems are widely deployed to provide various types of communication content such as voice, video, packet data, messaging, broadcast, and so on. These systems may be multiple-access systems capable of supporting communication with multiple users by sharing the available system resources (e.g., time, frequency, and power). Examples of such multiple-access systems include code-division multiple access (CDMA) systems, time-division multiple access (TDMA) systems, frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) systems, 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) systems, and orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (OFDMA) systems.
  • Service providers are typically allocated blocks of frequency spectrum for exclusive use in certain geographic regions. These blocks of frequencies are generally assigned by regulators regardless of the multiple access technology being used. In most cases, these blocks are not integer multiple of channel bandwidths, hence there may be unutilized parts of the spectrum. As the use of wireless devices has increased, the demand for and value of this spectrum has generally surged, as well. Nonetheless, in some cases, wireless communications systems may not utilize portions of the allocated spectrum because the portions are not big enough to fit a standard or normal waveform. The developers of the LTE standard, for example, recognized the problem and decided to support 6 different system bandwidths, namely 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20 MHz. This may provide one partial solution to the problem. In addition, the different system bandwidths typically do not overlap, which may help avoid interference.
  • SUMMARY
  • Methods, systems, and devices are provided for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in wireless communications systems. Some embodiments include two or more bandwidth systems. The bandwidth of one bandwidth system may overlap with the bandwidth of another bandwidth system. This overlap may create interference. Coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting may aid in reducing the impact of this interference. Some embodiments utilize flexible bandwidth and/or normal bandwidth systems.
  • Flexible bandwidth waveforms for wireless communications systems may utilize portions of spectrum that may not be big enough to fit a normal waveform utilizing flexible waveforms. A flexible bandwidth system may be generated with respect to a normal bandwidth system through dilating, or scaling down, the time or the chip rate of the flexible bandwidth system with respect to the normal bandwidth system. Some embodiments may increase the bandwidth of a waveform through expanding, or scaling up, the time or the chip rate of the flexible bandwidth system.
  • Some embodiments include a method of reducing interference within a wireless communications system. The method may include: identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and/or coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include increasing a power of transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth further may include determining a timing of a control transmission over the second carrier bandwidth and coordinating the transmission blanking based on the determined timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth further may include determining a data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth may occur during the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths based on at least a time of day. The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths based on at least a loading of the forward link.
  • In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth are normal carrier bandwidths. The first carrier bandwidth may fully overlap the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may occur at a co-location. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may not be co-located. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a pre-scheduled time. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may be synchronized with respect to at least an absolute time or a known time offset.
  • In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth utilizes licensed spectrum. The first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth may utilize different radio access technologies (RAT).
  • Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may include coordinating a hard transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The coordinated hard transmission blanking may include no flow being scheduled for transmission during a period of the coordinated hard transmission blanking. Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may include coordinating a soft transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The coordinated soft transmission blanking may include a transmission of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow during a period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking. The coordinated soft transmission blanking may include reducing a power of transmission during a period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking. The coordinated soft transmission blanking may include a transmission during a portion of the coordinated soft transmission blanking less than an entire period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking. Some embodiments further include receiving a request from the second carrier bandwidth to coordinate the transmission blanking at a specific time; and/or agreeing to accommodate the request from the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The coordinated transmission blanking may occur at a base station. The wireless communications system may include a time division multiplexing system. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a slot level.
  • The power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may be applied independently. The power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may be applied together. The power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may be activated in co-located systems. The power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may be activated in co-located systems based on a load of the co-located systems.
  • Some embodiments include increasing at least a data rate of at least a control channel or data channel utilizing the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments include increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a period of time different than the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments include coordinating the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during one or more slots when the first carrier bandwidth is not transmitting. Some embodiments include coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a coordinated transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth may depend at least upon a relative loading of the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth or a time of day. Some embodiments include coordinating a power transmission increase over the first carrier bandwidth during a coordinated transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments include identifying a third carrier bandwidth different from the second carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps the first carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and/or coordinating a transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the third carrier bandwidth.
  • The previous methods may also be implemented in some embodiments by a wireless communications system configured for reducing interference, a wireless communications device configured for reducing interference, and/or a computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system that includes a non-transitory computer-readable medium.
  • Some embodiments include a wireless communications system configured for reducing interference. The system may include: a means for identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and/or a means for coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for coordinating a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for coordinating a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for increasing a transmission power over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include means for implementing the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • Some embodiments include a computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system. The computer program product may include a non-transitory computer-readable medium that includes: code for identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and/or code for coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. At least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth may be a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for coordinating a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for coordinating a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for increasing a transmission power over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
  • The computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system that includes a non-transitory may include code for implementing the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • Some embodiments include a wireless communications device configured for reducing interference within a wireless communications system. The device may include at least one processor configured to: identify a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and/or coordinate a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to coordinate the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The at least one processor may be further configured to change the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to coordinate a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The at least one processor may be further configured to coordinate a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to implement the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • Some embodiments include a method of reducing interference within a wireless communications system. The method may include: identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and/or coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include determining at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link and coordinating the transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth changes based on at least the determined time of day or the determined loading of the forward link. The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include receiving a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time. The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include coordinating the transmission power increase where the power increase occurs at a pre-scheduled time. The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include coordinating the transmission power increase where the power increase occurs at a base station.
  • The method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system may include identifying a third carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the second carrier bandwidth partially overlaps the third carrier bandwidth; and/or coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the third carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The previous methods may also be implemented in some embodiments by a wireless communications system configured for reducing interference, a wireless communications device configured for reducing interference, and/or a computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system that includes a non-transitory computer-readable medium.
  • Some embodiments include a wireless communications system configured for reducing interference. The system may include: a means for identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and/or a means for coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for changing the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. In some embodiments, least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth. The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include a means for receiving a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
  • The wireless communications system configured for reducing interference may include means for implementing the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • Some embodiments include computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system including a non-transitory computer-readable medium. The non-transitory computer readable medium may include: code for identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and/or code for coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The non-transitory computer-readable medium may include code for changing the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. In some embodiments, least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The non-transitory computer readable medium may include code for implementing the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • Some embodiments include a wireless communications device configured for reducing interference. The device may include at least one processor configured to: identify a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and/or coordinate a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to change the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link. In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to coordinate a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth. The at least one processor may be further configured to receive a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
  • The at least one processor may be further configured to implement the other aspects of the method of reducing interference within the wireless communications system described above.
  • The foregoing has outlined rather broadly the features and technical advantages of examples according to the disclosure in order that the detailed description that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages will be described hereinafter. The conception and specific examples disclosed may be readily utilized as a basis for modifying or designing other structures for carrying out the same purposes of the present disclosure. Such equivalent constructions do not depart from the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Features which are believed to be characteristic of the concepts disclosed herein, both as to their organization and method of operation, together with associated advantages will be better understood from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying figures. Each of the figures is provided for the purpose of illustration and description only, and not as a definition of the limits of the claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A further understanding of the nature and advantages of the present invention may be realized by reference to the following drawings. In the appended figures, similar components or features may have the same reference label. Further, various components of the same type may be distinguished by following the reference label by a dash and a second label that distinguishes among the similar components. If only the first reference label is used in the specification, the description is applicable to any one of the similar components having the same first reference label irrespective of the second reference label.
  • FIG. 1 shows a block diagram of a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2A shows an example of a wireless communications system where a flexible waveform fits into a portion of spectrum not broad enough to fit a normal waveform in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2B shows an example of a wireless communications system where a flexible waveform fits into a portion of spectrum near an edge of a band in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2C shows an example of a wireless communications system where a flexible waveform partially overlaps a normal waveform in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2D shows an example of a wireless communications system where a flexible waveform is completely overlapped by a normal waveform in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2E shows an example of a wireless communications system where one flexible waveform is completely overlapped by a normal waveform and another flexible waveform partially overlaps a normal waveform in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 2F shows an example of a wireless communications system where one normal waveform partially overlaps another normal waveform in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 3 shows a block diagram of a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 4 shows an example of frame and slot structure of a normal bandwidth system and a flexible bandwidth system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 5 shows an example of transmission blanking on a normal bandwidth system coordinated with control channel transmissions on a flexible bandwidth system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 6 shows a block diagram of a device that includes interference reduction functionality in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 7 shows a block diagram of a mobile device in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 8 shows a block diagram of a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 9 shows a block diagram of a wireless communications system that includes a base station and a mobile device in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 10A shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 10B shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 10C shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 11A shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments;
  • FIG. 11B shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments; and
  • FIG. 11C shows a flow diagram of a method for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Methods, systems, and devices are provided for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in wireless communications systems. Some embodiments include two or more bandwidth systems. The bandwidth of one bandwidth system may overlap with the bandwidth of another bandwidth system. This overlap may create interference. Coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting may aid in reducing the impact of this interference. Some embodiments utilize flexible bandwidth and/or normal bandwidth systems.
  • Some embodiments may utilize hard blanking and/or soft blanking. For example, some embodiments may utilize hard blanking in one system where no data is scheduled for one or more slots in that system. In some cases, pilot and/or MAC transmissions may still happen in those slots as in empty slots. Soft blanking may include situations where a base station, for example, may not be completely silent in the data portion of the slots but where the base station may transmit less than what the base station would have in the absence of soft blanking, for example. Soft blanking may include transmissions of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow over at least a portion of the blanking duration, for example. Soft blanking may include reducing a power of transmission. Soft blanking may include reducing power of certain channels.
  • Flexible bandwidth waveforms for wireless communications systems may utilize portions of spectrum that may not be big enough to fit a normal waveform utilizing flexible waveforms. A flexible bandwidth system may be generated with respect to a normal bandwidth system through dilating, or scaling down, the time or the chip rate of the flexible bandwidth system with respect to the normal bandwidth system. Some embodiments may increase the bandwidth of a waveform through expanding, or scaling up, the time or the chip rate of the flexible bandwidth system.
  • Techniques described herein may be used for various wireless communications systems such as CDMA, TDMA, FDMA, OFDMA, SC-FDMA, Peer-to-Peer, and other systems. The terms “system” and “network” are often used interchangeably. A CDMA system may implement a radio technology such as CDMA2000, Universal Terrestrial Radio Access (UTRA), etc. CDMA2000 covers IS-2000, IS-95, and IS-856 standards. IS-2000 Releases 0 and A are commonly referred to as CDMA2000 1X, 1X, etc. IS-856 (TIA-856) is commonly referred to as CDMA2000 1xEV-DO, High Rate Packet Data (HRPD), etc. UTRA includes Wideband CDMA (WCDMA) and other variants of CDMA. A TDMA system may implement a radio technology such as Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM). An OFDMA or OFDM system may implement a radio technology such as Ultra Mobile Broadband (UMB), Evolved UTRA (E-UTRA), IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi), IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX), IEEE 802.20, Flash-OFDM, etc. UTRA and E-UTRA are part of Universal Mobile Telecommunication System (UMTS). 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE) and LTE-Advanced (LTE-A) are new releases of UMTS that use E-UTRA. UTRA, E-UTRA, UMTS, LTE, LTE-A, and GSM are described in documents from an organization named “3rd Generation Partnership Project” (3GPP). CDMA2000 and UMB are described in documents from an organization named “3rd Generation Partnership Project 2” (3GPP2). The techniques described herein may be used for the systems and radio technologies mentioned above, as well as other systems and radio technologies.
  • Thus, the following description provides examples, and is not limiting of the scope, applicability, or configuration set forth in the claims. Changes may be made in the function and arrangement of elements discussed without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure. Various embodiments may omit, substitute, or add various procedures or components as appropriate. For instance, the methods described may be performed in an order different from that described, and various steps may be added, omitted, or combined. Also, features described with respect to certain embodiments may be combined in other embodiments.
  • Referring first to FIG. 1, a block diagram illustrates an example of a wireless communications system 100 in accordance with various embodiments. The system 100 includes base stations 105, mobile devices 115, a base station controller 120, and a core network 130 (the controller 120 may be integrated into the core network 130 in some embodiments; in some embodiments, controller 120 may be integrated into base stations 105). The system 100 may support operation on multiple carriers (waveform signals of different frequencies). Multi-carrier transmitters can transmit modulated signals simultaneously on the multiple carriers. Each modulated signal may be a Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) signal, Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) signal, Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) signal, Orthogonal FDMA (OFDMA) signal, Single-Carrier FDMA (SC-FDMA) signal, etc. Each modulated signal may be sent on a different carrier and may carry control information (e.g., pilot signals), overhead information, data, etc. The system 100 may be a multi-carrier LTE network capable of efficiently allocating network resources.
  • The mobile devices 115 may be any type of mobile station, mobile device, access terminal, subscriber unit, or user equipment. The mobile devices 115 may include cellular phones and wireless communications devices, but may also include personal digital assistants (PDAs), smartphones, other handheld devices, netbooks, notebook computers, etc. Thus, the term mobile device should be interpreted broadly hereinafter, including the claims, to include any type of wireless or mobile communications device.
  • The base stations 105 may wirelessly communicate with the mobile devices 115 via a base station antenna. The base stations 105 may be configured to communicate with the mobile devices 115 under the control of the controller 120 via multiple carriers. Each of the base station 105 sites can provide communication coverage for a respective geographic area. In some embodiments, base stations 105 may be referred to as a NodeB, eNodeB, Home NodeB, and/or Home eNodeB. The coverage area for each base station 105 here is identified as 110-a, 110-b, or 110-c. The coverage area for a base station may be divided into sectors (not shown, but making up only a portion of the coverage area). The system 100 may include base stations 105 of different types (e.g., macro, micro, femto, and/or pico base stations).
  • The different aspects of system 100, such as the mobile devices 115, the base stations 105, the core network 130, and/or the controller 120 may be configured to utilize flexible bandwidth and waveforms in accordance with various embodiments. System 100, for example, shows transmissions 125 between mobile devices 115 and base stations 105. The transmissions 125 may include uplink and/or reverse link transmission, from a mobile device 115 to a base station 105, and/or downlink and/or forward link transmissions, from a base station 105 to a mobile device 115. The transmissions 125 may include flexible and/or normal waveforms. Normal waveforms may also be referred to as legacy and/or normal waveforms.
  • The different aspects of system 100, such as the mobile devices 115, the base stations 105, the core network 130, and/or the controller 120 may be configured to utilize flexible bandwidth and waveforms in accordance with various embodiments. For example, different aspects of system 100 may utilize portions of spectrum that may not be big enough to fit a normal waveform. Devices such as the mobile devices 115, the base stations 105, the core network 130, and/or the controller 120 may be configured to adapt the chip rates and/or scaling factors to generate and/or utilize flexible bandwidth and/or waveforms. Some aspects of system 100 may form a flexible subsystem (such as certain mobile devices 115 and/or base stations 105) that may be generated with respect to a normal subsystem (that may be implemented using other mobile devices 115 and/or base stations 105) through dilating, or scaling down, the time of the flexible subsystem with respect to the time of the normal subsystem.
  • In some embodiments, different aspects of system 100, such as the mobile devices 115, the base stations 105, the core network 130, and/or the controller 120 may be configured for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems. For example, transmissions between a mobile device 115 and a base station 105 may utilize bandwidth of a flexible waveform that may overlap with the bandwidth of a normal waveform. This overlap may create additional interference. The base station 105 may coordinate forward link blanking and/or power boosting that may aid in reducing the impact of this interference.
  • FIG. 2A shows an example of a wireless communications system 200-a with a base station 105-a and a mobile device 115-a in accordance with various embodiments, where a flexible waveform 210-a fits into a portion of spectrum not broad enough to fit a normal waveform 220-a. System 200-a may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1. In some embodiments, the flexible waveform 210-a may overlap with the normal waveform 220-a that either the base 105-a and/or the mobile device 115-a may transmit. In some cases, the normal waveform 220-a may completely overlap the flexible waveform 210-a. Some embodiments may also utilize multiple flexible waveforms 210. In some embodiments, another base station and/or mobile device (not shown) may transmit the normal waveform 220-a and/or the flexible waveform 210-a.
  • In some embodiments, the mobile device 115-a and/or the base station 105-a may be configured to separate the signaling and the data traffic into different flexible bandwidth carriers 210 so that assigned resources can be customized to different traffic patterns. The base station 105-a may be configured to coordinate forward link blanking and/or power boosting with respect to the normal waveform 220-a and/or flexible waveform 210-a. For example, transmissions between mobile device 115-a and base station 105-a may utilize bandwidth of the flexible waveform 210-a that may overlap with the bandwidth of the normal waveform 220-a. In some embodiments, the mobile device 115-a and/or base station 105-a may be configured for increasing reverse link throughput by coordination of multiple wireless systems using reverse link blanking. Base stations 105-a may utilize different indicators to prompt a device, such as a mobile device 115-a, to utilize reverse link blanking on a normal waveform 220-a to increase throughput for an overlapping flexible waveform 210-a. In some embodiments, reverse link blanking may also occur on a flexible waveform 210-a. Some embodiments may also utilize power boosting on the reverse link to increase reverse link throughput, such as on the flexible waveform 210-a. FIG. 2B shows an example of a wireless communications system 200-b with a base station 105-b and mobile device 115-b, where a flexible waveform 210-b fits into a portion of spectrum near an edge of a band, which may be a guard band, where normal waveform 220-b may not fit. System 200-b may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 2C shows an example of a wireless communications system 200-c where a flexible waveform 210-c partially overlaps a normal waveform 220-c in accordance with various embodiments. System 200-c may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1. FIG. 2D shows an example of a wireless communications systems 200-d where a flexible waveform 210-d is completely overlapped by a normal waveform 220-d in accordance with various embodiments. System 200-d may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1. FIG. 2E shows an example of a wireless communications system 200-e where one flexible waveform 210-f is completely overlapped by a normal waveform 220-e and another flexible waveform 210-e partially overlaps the normal waveform 220-e in accordance with various embodiments. System 200-e may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1. FIG. 2F shows an example of a wireless communications system 200-f where one normal waveform 220-f partially overlaps another normal waveform 220-g in accordance with various embodiments. System 200-f may be an example of system 100 of FIG. 1.
  • In general, a first waveform or carrier bandwidth and a second waveform or carrier bandwidth may partially overlap when they overlap by at least 1%, 2%, and/or 5%. In some embodiments, partial overlap may occur when the overlap is at least 10%. In some embodiments, the partial overlap may be less than 99%, 98%, and/or 95%. In some embodiments, the overlap may be less than 90%. In some cases, a flexible waveform or carrier bandwidth may be contained completely within another waveform or carrier bandwidth such as seen in system 200-d of FIG. 2. This overlap still reflects partial overlap, as the two waveforms or carrier bandwidths do not completely coincide. In general, partial overlap can mean that the two or more waveforms or carrier bandwidths do not completely coincide (i.e., the carrier bandwidths are not the same).
  • Some embodiments may utilize different definitions of overlap based on power spectrum density (PSD). For example, one definition of overlap based on PSD is shown in the following overlap equation for a first carrier:
  • overlap = 100 % * 0 PSD 1 ( f ) * PSD 2 ( f ) 0 PSD 1 ( f ) * PSD 1 ( f ) .
  • In this equation, PSD1(f) is the PSD for a first waveform or carrier bandwidth and PSD2 (f) is the PSD for a second waveform or carrier bandwidth. When the two waveforms or carrier bandwidths coincide, then the overlap equation may equal 100%. When the first waveform or carrier bandwidth and the second waveform or carrier bandwidth at least partially overlap, then the overlap equation may not equal 100%. For example, the Overlap Equation may result in a partial overlap of greater than or equal to 1%, 2%, 5%, and/or 10% in some embodiments. The overlap equation may result in a partial overlap of less than or equal to 99%, 98%, 95%, and/or 90% in some embodiments. One may note that in the case in which the first waveform or carrier bandwidth is a normal waveform or carrier bandwidth and the second waveform or a carrier waveform is a flexible waveform or carrier bandwidth that is contained within the normal bandwidth or carrier bandwidth, then the overlap equation may represent the ratio of the flexible bandwidth compared to the normal bandwidth, written as a percentage. Furthermore, the overlap equation may depend on which carrier bandwidth's perspective the overlap equation is formulated with respect to. Some embodiments may utilize other definitions of overlap. In some cases, another overlap may be defined utilizing a square root operation such as the following:
  • overlap = 100 % * 0 PSD 1 ( f ) * PSD 2 ( f ) 0 PSD 1 ( f ) * PSD 1 ( f ) .
  • Other embodiments may utilize other overlap equations that may account for multiple overlapping carriers.
  • FIG. 3 shows a wireless communications system 300 with a base station 105-c and a mobile devices 115-c and 115 d, in accordance with various embodiments. In some embodiments, the base station 105-c may be configured for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in normal and/or flexible carrier bandwidths. For example, transmissions 305-a and/or 305-b between the mobile device 115-c/115-d and the base station 105-a may utilize bandwidth of a flexible waveform that may overlap with the bandwidth of a normal waveform; other configurations are possible, such as partially overlapping normal waveforms or partially overlapping flexible waveforms. The base station 105-c may coordinate forward link blanking and/or power boosting that may aid in reducing the impact of interference. In some embodiments, the base station 105-c may coordinate with another base station (not shown) to coordinate forward link blanking and/or power boosting in a normal and/or flexible carrier bandwidths.
  • Transmissions 305-a and/or 305-b between the mobile device 115-c/115-d and the base station 105-a may utilize flexible waveforms that may be generated to occupy less (or more) bandwidth than a normal waveform. For example, at a band edge, there may not be enough available spectrum to place a normal waveform. For a flexible waveform, as time gets dilated, the frequency occupied by a waveform goes down, thus making it possible to fit a flexible waveform into spectrum that may not be broad enough to fit a normal waveform. In some embodiments, the flexible waveform may be scaled utilizing a scaling factor N with respect to a normal waveform. Scaling factor N may take on numerous different values including, but not limited to, integer values such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, etc. N, however, does not have to be an integer.
  • Some embodiments may utilize additional terminology. A new unit D may be utilized. The unit D is dilated. The unit is unitless and has the value of N. One can talk about time in the flexible system in terms of “dilated time”. For example, a slot of say 10 ms in normal time may be represented as 10D ms in flexible time (note: even in normal time, this will hold true since N=1 in normal time: D has a value of 1, so 10D ms=10 ms). In time scaling, one can replace most “seconds” with “dilated-seconds”. Note frequency in Hertz is 1/s.
  • As discussed above, a flexible waveform may be a waveform that occupies less bandwidth than a normal waveform. Thus, in a flexible bandwidth system, the same number of symbols and bits may be transmitted over a longer duration compared to normal bandwidth system. This may result in time stretching, whereby slot duration, frame duration, etc., may increase by a scaling factor N. Scaling factor N may represent the ratio of the normal bandwidth to flexible bandwidth (BW). Thus, data rate in a flexible bandwidth system may equal (Normal Rater 1/N), and delay may equal (Normal Delay×N). In general, a flexible systems channel BW=channel BW of normal systems/N. Delay×BW may remain unchanged. Furthermore, in some embodiments, a flexible waveform may be a waveform that occupies more bandwidth than a normal waveform.
  • Throughout this specification, the term normal system, subsystem, and/or waveform may be utilized to refer to systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms that involve embodiments that may utilize a scaling factor that may be equal to one (e.g., N=1) or a normal or standard chip rate. These normal systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms may also be referred to as standard and/or legacy systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms. Furthermore, flexible systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms may be utilized to refer to systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms that involve embodiments that may utilize a scaling factor that may be not equal to one (e.g., N=2, 4, 8, ½, ¼, etc). For N>1, or if a chip rate is decreased, the bandwidth of a waveform may decrease. Some embodiments may utilize scaling factors or chip rates that increase the bandwidth. For example, if N<1, or if the chip rate is increased, then a waveform may be expanded to cover bandwidth larger than a normal waveform. Flexible systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms may also be referred to as fractional systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms in some cases. Fractional systems, subsystems, and/or waveforms may or may not change bandwidth, for example. A fractional system, subsystem, or waveform may be flexible because it may offer more possibilities than a normal or standard system, subsystem, or waveform (e.g., N=1 system).
  • A flexible waveform may include a waveform that occupies less bandwidth than a normal waveform (in some embodiments, a flexible waveform may include a waveform that occupies more bandwidth than a normal waveform). For example, at the band edge, there may not be enough available spectrum to place a normal waveform. Unlike normal waveforms, there can be partial or complete overlap between normal and flexible waveforms. It is to be noted that the flexible waveform may increase the system capacity. There can be a trade off between extent of overlap and the bandwidth of the flexible waveform. The overlap may create additional interference. Embodiments may be directed at methods, systems, and/or devices and be aimed at reducing the interference.
  • Embodiments may utilize coordinated forward link blanking and/or power boosting in normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems. In some embodiments, the normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems are co-located. Scheduling can be done based on information about the other system. The normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems may be synchronized in the absolute time scale and/or or value of time offset is known a priori. In some situations, the normal bandwidth system is not highly loaded. In some situations, the traffic patterns of the normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems are not identical and therefore the peaks in the two systems are not aligned.
  • In some embodiments, the flexible bandwidth system may have complete overlap with the normal bandwidth system. There may be partial overlap of the spectrum of flexible and normal bandwidth systems in some embodiments. For example, flexible waveform and normal waveform for C2K or UMTS may fully or partially overlap. In another example, two normal full waveforms for UMTS may partially overlap.
  • Some embodiments may utilize a scaling factor with respect to different normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems. For example, the scaling factor for simpler implementations may utilize integer values such as N=1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. Other values of N that are not a power of 2 (or multiple of 2) may be utilized such that scheduling may still occur with regard to which slots to blank. FIG. 4 shows examples 400 of different frame structures of a normal bandwidth system and/or a flexible bandwidth system in accordance with various embodiments. For example, a normal bandwidth system (N=1) with data is shown in frame structure 410. A normal bandwidth system (N=1) and with idle portions is shown in example 420. Merely by way of example, an example 420 of a frame structure for an N=2 flexible bandwidth system with data is also shown. Example 420 shows how the frame structure may be stretched out by a factor of N=2 for this flexible bandwidth system.
  • The use of blanking may result in a loss of system capacity. For example, blanking in one system may mean that no data scheduled for one or more slots in that system without affecting the QoS requirements of currently served mobiles to facilitate the transmission of some control or even data messages on the other system. It is to be noted that pilot and MAC transmission may still happen in those slots as in empty slots. It is also to be noted that the blanked slots in one system need not be contiguous as the transmission in the other system could be an interlaced transmission where every 4th slot is used. For example, for a normal bandwidth system assisting 8 slot transmission for Control Channel in a flexible bandwidth system (N), 8*N slots every N CC Cycle in normal bandwidth system may need to be idle in normal bandwidth system may need to be idle. The loss in capacity may be equal to (0.8*N)/(16*16*N) (i.e., 1/32 or 3.125%, which may be independent of N). A loss in capacity can be absorbed in light- to medium-loaded systems. The loss value may be other than 3.125% if N is not a power of 2 (or multiple of 2). In some cases, one may want to have some threshold for overlap before blanking is utilized.
  • The use of coordinated forward link blanking may have an impact on an application's quality of service (QoS) requirements. For example, consider a case where 1 frame in N=1 spans 26.67 msec and 1 slot spans 1.67 msec. Some applications (e.g., VoIP) might not be scheduled while meeting both the QoS requirements and the blanking schedule as they require low inter-packet delay. The impact of forward link blanking may be mitigated in some cases by having only high priority delay sensitive flows scheduled in the “blanked” slots. The impact of N comes in how often the blanking may need to be done in the assisting system. The impact of N may be represented in the span of time for which no traffic is scheduled for one blanking instance in the normal bandwidth system-assisting system (i.e., 8*N slots which may not be contiguous). Out of 8*N slots for the blanking duration, N slots may be contiguous. For higher N of the assisted system, this span may be more but it happens less frequently. For smaller N, this span may be less but it happens more frequently. For previous example (N=2), there may be loss of 0.5*2*16=16 slots frame every 2 CC cycles. In some cases, scheduling may deviate from the proportional fair scheduling during the duration of blanking.
  • Coordinated forward link blanking may be enhanced in a variety of different ways. For example, the duration of blanking may be made minimal. This may include increasing the CC data rate in a flexible bandwidth system by using fewer slots for control overhead. For example, in one embodiment, one may use 76.8 kbpDs (i.e., 76.8/N kbps as CC data rate). Some embodiments may include power boosting to CC information in a flexible bandwidth system (e.g., transmit power is more than required for same transmit power density). This may offset the reduced reliability of a higher CC data rate in flexible bandwidth systems. the power boost may causeno additional interference to the normal bandwidth system as normal bandwidth system in already blanking. For example, consider a case where blanking is occurring with regard to the normal bandwidth system. Power boosting can be disabled if high priority, delay sensitive flows have to be scheduled in the normal bandwidth system during blanking. Also, in some embodiments, more power may be utilized on normal bandwidth system at other times to compensate for blanking. FIG. 5 shows an example 500 of transmission blanking on a normal bandwidth system 510 coordinated with control channel transmissions on a flexible bandwidth system 520 in accordance with various embodiments. In this example, N=2 for the flexible bandwidth system. As shown with the normal bandwidth system 510, one or more idle slots due to transmission blanking 515-a/515-b occurs when control transmission 525-a/525-b occurs for the flexible bandwidth system 520. Also shown in example 500 is user data channel 530 and control channel 535-a/535-b/535-c for the normal bandwidth system 510, and user data channel 540 for the flexible bandwidth system 520. Other embodiments may utilize different frames or portions of a slot to transmit control channel and/or user data channel information. As shown in FIG. 5, 16 slots make 1 frame and 16 such frames (i.e., 16*16=256 slots) make one control channel (CC) cycle. Other embodiments may utilize different numbers of slots per control channel (CC) cycle, different timings, and/or different scaling factors.
  • Some embodiments may utilize soft blanking on the normal bandwidth system (or flexible bandwidth systems in some cases) as mentioned above. Soft blanking may include situations where a base station, for example, may not be completely silent as in hard blanking in the data portion of the slots but where the base station may transmit less than what the base station would have in the absence of soft blanking, for example. Soft blanking may include transmissions of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow over at least a portion of the blanking duration. Soft blanking may include reducing a power of transmission. In addition to priority or delay sensitive flows, for example, other flows can be scheduled in the “blanked” slots on normal bandwidth systems. In some cases, those flows can be sent with lowered power (on the normal bandwidth system). This may be suitable to serve mobile devices with better channel conditions. In some embodiments, even with hard blanking, pilot and/or MAC transmissions might be present.
  • For collocated systems, where load information of the first and second bandwidth systems may be available to a scheduler, the blanking may be done at a finer granularity, such as at the slot level. The blanking could be triggered by a request response procedure where the second bandwidth system that may require help may send a request to the first bandwidth system and the latter may respond with an acknowledgement or rejects citing a reason, for example.
  • Some embodiments may utilize non co-located flexible and normal bandwidth systems. The granularity of blanking may be relatively coarser for non-collocated systems if the relative load information is not shared. For example, blanking can be done at pre-scheduled times of day. This may assume that the peaks in both systems do not happen at the same time due to different traffic distributions. A flexible non co-located base station, for example, can request normal bandwidth base stations to blank at a certain time or times when it may want to send data to a mobile device far away.
  • Embodiments may provide several advantages. For example, blanking in a normal bandwidth system may provide more reliability to CC transmissions or other transmissions in flexible bandwidth systems as there may be no scheduled flow in the normal bandwidth system. Power boosting to a flexible CC transmission may enable flexible bandwidth system's CC transmission at higher rates thereby using fewer slots without lowering reliability and/or enhanced reliability of CC if CC data rate is kept the same. Power boosting also may not cause interference to a normal bandwidth system if the normal bandwidth system is blanking. Blanking and power boost can be applied also at the same time or at different times.
  • Some embodiments may include blanking in the flexible bandwidth system. Blanking in a flexible bandwidth system can be done to reduce interference on the normal bandwidth system. For a flexible bandwidth system (N) assisting 8 slot transmission for control channel in a normal bandwidth system, (0.5*16) slots every CC Cycle (i.e., 16*16 slots) in flexible bandwidth system may need to be idle. The loss in capacity is again (0.5*16)/(16*16) (i.e., 1/32 or 3.125%, which may be independent of N). Thus loss of system capacity may be the same if seen with blanking for a normal bandwidth system discussed above. It is to be noted that when the assisting system is flexible (N) and assisted system is normal, then to assist 1 slot transmission, 1/N slot needs to be blanked. The effective loss in system capacity may be higher if less than 1 slot cannot be blanked. If a normal and a flexible bandwidth system's peak loads are not time aligned, there can be alternating periods of blanking in the normal system, followed by blanking in the flexible system and so on. In some embodiments, the flexible bandwidth system may transmit with more power (if available headroom) for some time to compensate for blanking.
  • The blanking can be extended beyond control channel (CC) transmissions (i.e., can be applied for data transmissions). The loss in system capacity in the assisting system may depend on how many slots are blanked. Blanking and/or power boosting for data can be done opportunistically. For example, blanking may be utilized without power boosting. When there is less traffic on one system; that system can manage its traffic slot allocations such that it can just blank for some time and transmit all its traffic in a bursty manner for some other time. The other system can transmit with higher data rates during the blanking slots of the first system since there will be less interference.
  • Power boosting may be utilized without blanking in some cases. For example, when the mobile devices served by the system with regular power are known to be close to the base station and can tolerate additional interference, then the other system can boost its power to serve its mobile devices with more power, hence this may result in higher data rates. One potential problem may be interference to other cells. This can be solved by coordination with other cells. If similar conditions exist in the neighboring cells, then the additional interference may be tolerated in some situations. Other cells may let this cell boost its power to a certain level in some situations. The power boost may be a function of different factors. For example, the power boost may be a function of the intra-cell and/or inter-cell interference factors. In one embodiment, the power boost may be equal, but is not limited, to: min {power boost possible without causing problem to the first system (intra cell), power boost possible without causing problem to other cells of both systems (inter cell)}.
  • Blanking and power boosting may be utilized at the same time. When there is less traffic on one system, that system can manage its traffic slot allocations such that it can just blank for some time and transmit all its traffic in a bursty manner for some other time. The other system can increase its power output without causing any problems to the other cells of the first system at least to the point where its power is equivalent to the sum of the original powers of two systems for a fully overlapping spectrum allocation for the two systems. For partial allocation, the ratio of overlap may be taken into consideration. The other system may need to coordinate with other cells of its system for how much it can boost its power.
  • In some embodiments, instead of a transmitter stopping transmissions for blanking, it can lower its power. Since the interference levels may be changed as a result, calculations for data rates and power boost may have to be taken into consideration.
  • Blanking and/or power boosting tools and techniques discussed herein can be extended to two normal systems or two flexible systems operating in the same frequency (i.e., non co-located). Merely by way of example, the two flexible systems may include a first factional system with a scaling factor N=2 and a second flexible system with a scaling factor N=4; in this example the two systems may help each other due to the relationship between the two scaling factors. Embodiments may be extended to TDD systems where normal blanking during flexible transmission occurs at the same time or vice versa either at uplink or forward link.
  • In some embodiments, data blanking in one system may occur for data transmission in the other system. Data blanking in one system may occur for control transmission in the other system. Control blanking in one system may occur for data transmission in the other system. Control blanking in one system may occur for control transmission in the other system.
  • Turning next to FIG. 6, a block diagram illustrates a device 600 that includes interference reduction functionality in accordance with various embodiments. The device 600 may be an example of aspects of the base stations 105 of FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9. The device 600 may also be a processor. The device 600 may also be a processor. The device 600 may include a receiver module 605, a power boosting module 610, a blanking module 615, and/or a transmitter module 620. Each of these components may be in communication with each other.
  • These components of the device 600 may, individually or collectively, be implemented with one or more application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) adapted to perform some or all of the applicable functions in hardware. Alternatively, the functions may be performed by one or more other processing units (or cores), on one or more integrated circuits. In other embodiments, other types of integrated circuits may be used (e.g., Structured/Platform ASICs, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and other Semi-Custom ICs), which may be programmed in any manner known in the art. The functions of each unit may also be implemented, in whole or in part, with instructions embodied in a memory, formatted to be executed by one or more general or application-specific processors.
  • The receiver module 605 may receive information such as packet, data, and/or signaling information regarding what device 600 has received or transmitted. The received information may be utilized by the power boosting module 610 and/or blanking module 615 for a variety of purposes.
  • The receiver module 605 may be configured to identify multiple carrier bandwidths, such as first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system. The first carrier bandwidth may at least partially overlap the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615 may utilize the carrier bandwidth information from the receiver module 605 to coordinate a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
  • In some embodiments, the blanking module 615 may coordinate the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth such that it occurs during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615 may determine a timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth and coordinate the transmission blanking based on the determined timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615 may coordinate the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth such that it occurs during a data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615 may determine aspects about the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth, such as when the data transmission may occur and/or an amount data to be transmitted. The blanking module 615 may coordinate the transmission blanking such that it occurs during the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths is changed based on at least a time of day or a load of the forward link.
  • The transmission blanking coordinated by the blanking module 615 over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may be co-located. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may not be co-located. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a pre-scheduled time. The transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth coordinated by the blanking module 615 and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may be synchronized with respect to an absolute time or known time offset.
  • In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth may fully overlap the second carrier bandwidth, such as when a flexible bandwidth carrier is fully overlapped by a normal carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments may be extended to additional carrier bandwidths, such as a third bandwidth carrier.
  • In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth utilizes licensed spectrum. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth utilize different radio access technologies (RATs). For example, in one embodiment, the first carrier bandwidth utilizes LTE, while the second carrier bandwidth utilizes EV-DO, or vice versa.
  • The blanking module 615 may be configured to generate transmission blanking that includes hard blanking. Hard blanking may include now flow being scheduled for transmission during the period of transmission blanking. The blanking module 615 may generate transmission blanking that includes soft blanking. Soft blanking may include transmissions of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow during the period of transmission blanking. Soft blanking may include reducing a power of transmission. Coordinated soft transmission blanking may include transmissions during a portion of the coordinated soft transmission blanking less than an entire period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking.
  • Some embodiments may further include configuring the receiver module 605 to identify a third carrier bandwidth different than the second carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps the first carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system. The blanking module 615 may coordinate a transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the third carrier bandwidth. This use of a third or more carrier bandwidths may be referred to as multi-carrier embodiments. These multi-carrier embodiments can be co-located or at a different location. For example, if co-located, blanking may not be utilized for the close by mobile device, while blanking may occur for a mobile device further away. If service is needed for both the close and far away mobile devices, the close mobile device may be placed on the smaller carrier bandwidth and blanked since it can take the lower signal to reduce the interference for the mobile device further away.
  • The power boosting module 610 may be configured to increase a power of transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are applied independently. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are applied together. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are activated in co-located systems. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are activated in co-located systems based on the load of the co-located systems. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a slot level. Some embodiments include increasing at least a data rate of at least a control channel or data channel utilizing the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments include increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a period of time different than the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may occur during one or more slots when the first carrier bandwidth is not transmitting. In some embodiments, at least coordinating a transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increasing the power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth depends at least upon a relative loading of the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth or time of day.
  • In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610 may be further configured to increase transmission power over the first carrier bandwidth and/or the second carrier bandwidth such that these bandwidths are not be not co-located. In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610 may be further configured such that the transmission power increase may occur at a pre-scheduled time in some embodiments. Some embodiments may further include the receiver module 605 being configured to receive a request from the second carrier bandwidth to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth system may agree to accommodate the request from the second carrier bandwidth; in some cases, the first carrier bandwidth may send an acknowledgement or agreement message.
  • Some embodiments may further include configuring the receiver module 605 to identify a third carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system where the second carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the third carrier bandwidth. The power boosting module 610 may coordinate a transmission power increase for a forward link over the third carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • Some embodiments of power boosting module 610 and/or the blanking module 615 may be further configured to at least coordinate a transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increase a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth. At least coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth, increasing the power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth, coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth, or increasing the power of transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may change based on at least a time of day or a loading of at least one of the forward links.
  • The transmission blanking coordinated by the blanking module 615 over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may not be co-located in some cases. The blanking module 615 may coordinate the transmission blanking such that it occurs at a pre-scheduled time. In some embodiments, the receiver module 605 may be configured to receive a request to coordinate the transmission blanking at a specific time.
  • In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610 may coordinate a transmission power increase over a first carrier bandwidth with respect to a second carrier bandwidth. The first carrier bandwidth may partially overlap the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments may further include the power boosting module 610 coordinating with the blanking module 615 such that a transmission blanking occurs over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth. The concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth may occur during the transmission power increase. In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610 may determine at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link; the power boosting module 610 may coordinate the transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth changes based on at least the determined time of day or the determined loading of the forward link.
  • In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second normal bandwidth.
  • In some embodiments, the blanking module 615 and/or the receiver module 605 may be configured to receive the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth and/or the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615 and/or the receiver module 605 may be configured to receive the variations related to coordinated transmission blanking and/or concurrent transmissions as discussed above with respect to device 600. In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610 and/or receiver module 605 may be configured to receive the increased transmission power over one carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over another carrier bandwidth. The power boosting module 615 and/or the receiver module 605 may be configured to receive the variations related to increased power transmission as discussed above with respect to device 600.
  • FIG. 7 is a block diagram 700 of a mobile device 115-e configured to facilitate the use of flexible bandwidth in accordance with various embodiments. The mobile device 115-e may have any of various configurations, such as personal computers (e.g., laptop computers, netbook computers, tablet computers, etc.), cellular telephones, PDAs, digital video recorders (DVRs), internet appliances, gaming consoles, e-readers, etc. The mobile device 115-e may have an internal power supply (not shown), such as a small battery, to facilitate mobile operation. In some embodiments, the mobile device 115-e may be the mobile device 115 of FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9, and/or the device 600 of FIG. 6. The mobile device 115-e may be a multi-mode mobile device. The mobile device 115-e may be referred to as a wireless communications device in some cases.
  • The mobile device 115-e may include antennas 740, a transceiver module 750, memory 780, and a processor module 770, which each may be in communication, directly or indirectly, with each other (e.g., via one or more buses). The transceiver module 750 is configured to communicate bi-directionally, via the antennas 740 and/or one or more wired or wireless links, with one or more networks, as described above. For example, the transceiver module 750 may be configured to communicate bi-directionally with base stations 105 of FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9. The transceiver module 750 may include a modem configured to modulate the packets and provide the modulated packets to the antennas 740 for transmission, and to demodulate packets received from the antennas 740. While the mobile device 115-e may include a single antenna, the mobile device 115-e will typically include multiple antennas 740 for multiple links.
  • The memory 780 may include random access memory (RAM) and read-only memory (ROM). The memory 780 may store computer-readable, computer-executable software code 785 containing instructions that are configured to, when executed, cause the processor module 770 to perform various functions described herein (e.g., call processing, database management, message routing, etc.). Alternatively, the software 785 may not be directly executable by the processor module 770 but be configured to cause the computer (e.g., when compiled and executed) to perform functions described herein.
  • The processor module 770 may include an intelligent hardware device, e.g., a central processing unit (CPU) such as those made by Intel® Corporation or AMD®, a microcontroller, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), etc. The processor module 770 may include a speech encoder (not shown) configured to receive audio via a microphone, convert the audio into packets (e.g., 30 ms in length) representative of the received audio, provide the audio packets to the transceiver module 750, and provide indications of whether a user is speaking. Alternatively, an encoder may only provide packets to the transceiver module 750, with the provision or withholding/suppression of the packet itself providing the indication of whether a user is speaking.
  • According to the architecture of FIG. 7, the mobile device 115-e may further include a communications management module 760. The communications management module 760 may manage communications with other mobile devices 115. By way of example, the communications management module 760 may be a component of the mobile device 115-e in communication with some or all of the other components of the mobile device 115-e via a bus. Alternatively, functionality of the communications management module 760 may be implemented as a component of the transceiver module 750, as a computer program product, and/or as one or more controller elements of the processor module 770.
  • The components for mobile device 115-e may be configured to implement aspects discussed above with respect to device 600 in FIG. 6 and may not be repeated here for the sake of brevity. The power boosting module 610-a may be the power boosting module 610 of FIG. 6. The forward link blanking module 615-a may be the blanking module 615 of FIG. 6. In some embodiments, the blanking module 615-a and/or other components of device 115-e may be configured to receive the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth and/or the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. The blanking module 615-a and/or other components of device 115-e may be configured to receive the variations related to coordinated transmission blanking and/or concurrent transmissions as discussed above with respect to device 600. In some embodiments, the power boosting module 610-a and/or other components of device 115-e may be configured to receive the increased transmission power over one carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over another carrier bandwidth. The power boosting module 610-a and/or other components of device 115-e may be configured to receive the variations related to increased power transmission as discussed above with respect to device 600.
  • The mobile device 115-e may also include a spectrum identification module 715. The spectrum identification module 715 may be utilized to identify spectrum available for flexible waveforms. In some embodiments, a handover module 725 may be utilized to perform handover procedures of the mobile device 115-e from one base station to another. For example, the handover module 725 may perform a handover procedure of the mobile device 115-e from one base station to another where normal waveforms are utilized between the mobile device 115-e and one of the base stations and flexible waveforms are utilized between the mobile device and another base station. A scaling module 710 may be utilized to scale and/or alter chip rates to generate flexible waveforms.
  • In some embodiments, the transceiver module 750, in conjunction with antennas 740, along with other possible components of mobile device 115-e, may transmit information regarding flexible waveforms and/or scaling factors from the mobile device 115-e to base stations or a core network. In some embodiments, the transceiver module 750, in conjunction with antennas 740, along with other possible components of mobile device 115-e, may transmit information, such flexible waveforms and/or scaling factors, to base stations or a core network such that these devices or systems may utilize flexible waveforms.
  • FIG. 8 shows a block diagram of a communications system 800 that may be configured for utilizing flexible waveforms in accordance with various embodiments. This system 800 may be an example of aspects of the system 100 depicted in FIG. 1, systems 200 of FIG. 2, system 300 of FIG. 3, and/or system 900 of FIG. 9. The base station 105-e may include antennas 845, a transceiver module 850, memory 870, and a processor module 865, which each may be in communication, directly or indirectly, with each other (e.g., over one or more buses). The transceiver module 850 may be configured to communicate bi-directionally, via the antennas 845, with the mobile device 115-f, which may be a multi-mode mobile device. The transceiver module 850 (and/or other components of the base station 105-e) may also be configured to communicate bi-directionally with one or more networks. In some cases, the base station 105-e may communicate with the network 130-a and/or controller 120-a through network communications module 875. Base station 105-e may be an example of an eNodeB base station, a Home eNodeB base station, a NodeB base station, and/or a Home NodeB base station. Controller 120-a may be integrated into base station 105-e in some cases, such as with an eNodeB base station.
  • Base station 105-e may also communicate with other base stations 105, such as base station 105-m and base station 105-n. Each of the base stations 105 may communicate with mobile device 115-f using different wireless communications technologies, such as different Radio Access Technologies. In some cases, base station 105-e may communicate with other base stations such as 105-m and/or 105-n utilizing base station communication module 815. In some embodiments, base station communication module 815 may provide an X2 interface within an LTE wireless communication technology to provide communication between some of the base stations 105. In some embodiments, base station 105-e may communicate with other base stations through controller 120-a and/or network 130-a.
  • The memory 870 may include random access memory (RAM) and read-only memory (ROM). The memory 870 may also store computer-readable, computer-executable software code 871 containing instructions that are configured to, when executed, cause the processor module 865 to perform various functions described herein (e.g., call processing, database management, message routing, etc.). Alternatively, the software 871 may not be directly executable by the processor module 865 but be configured to cause the computer, e.g., when compiled and executed, to perform functions described herein.
  • The processor module 865 may include an intelligent hardware device, e.g., a central processing unit (CPU) such as those made by Intel® Corporation or AMD®, a microcontroller, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), etc. The processor module 865 may include a speech encoder (not shown) configured to receive audio via a microphone, convert the audio into packets (e.g., 30 ms in length) representative of the received audio, provide the audio packets to the transceiver module 850, and provide indications of whether a user is speaking. Alternatively, an encoder may only provide packets to the transceiver module 850, with the provision or withholding/suppression of the packet itself providing the indication of whether a user is speaking.
  • The transceiver module 850 may include a modem configured to modulate the packets and provide the modulated packets to the antennas 845 for transmission, and to demodulate packets received from the antennas 845. While some examples of the base station 105-e may include a single antenna 845, the base station 105-e preferably includes multiple antennas 845 for multiple links which may support carrier aggregation. For example, one or more links may be used to support macro communications with mobile device 115-f.
  • According to the architecture of FIG. 8, the base station 105-e may further include a communications management module 830. The communications management module 830 may manage communications with other base stations 105. By way of example, the communications management module 830 may be a component of the base station 105-e in communication with some or all of the other components of the base station 105-e via a bus. Alternatively, functionality of the communications management module 830 may be implemented as a component of the transceiver module 850, as a computer program product, and/or as one or more controller elements of the processor module 865.
  • The components for base station 105-e may be configured to implement aspects discussed above with respect to device 600 in FIG. 6 and may not be repeated here for the sake of brevity. The power boosting module 610-b may be the power boosting module 610 of FIG. 6. The forward link blanking module 615-b may be the blanking module 615 of FIG. 11.
  • The base station 105-e may also include a spectrum identification module 815. The spectrum identification module 815 may be utilized to identify spectrum available for flexible waveforms. In some embodiments, a handover module 825 may be utilized to perform handover procedures of the mobile device 115-f from one base station 105 to another. For example, the handover module 825 may perform a handover procedure of the mobile device 115-f from base station 105-e to another where normal waveforms are utilized between the mobile device 115-f and one of the base stations and flexible waveforms are utilized between the mobile device and another base station. A scaling module 810 may be utilized to scale and/or alter chip rates to generate flexible waveforms.
  • In some embodiments, the transceiver module 850 in conjunction with antennas 845, along with other possible components of base station 105-e, may transmit information regarding flexible waveforms and/or scaling factors from the base station 105-e to the mobile device 115-f, to other base stations 105-m/105-n, or core network 130-a. In some embodiments, the transceiver module 850 in conjunction with antennas 845, along with other possible components of base station 105-e, may transmit information to the mobile device 115-f, to other base stations 105-m/105-n, or core network 130-a, such as flexible waveforms and/or scaling factors, such that these devices or systems may utilize flexible waveforms.
  • FIG. 9 is a block diagram of a system 900 including a base station 105-f and a mobile device 115-g in accordance with various embodiments. This system 900 may be an example of the system 100 of FIG. 1, systems 200 of FIG. 2, system 300 of FIG. 3, and/or system 800 of FIG. 8. The base station 105-f may be equipped with antennas 934-a through 934-x, and the mobile device 115-g may be equipped with antennas 952-a through 952-n. At the base station 105-f, a transmit processor 920 may receive data from a data source.
  • The transmit processor 920 may process the data. The transmit processor 920 may also generate reference symbols, and a cell-specific reference signal. A transmit (TX) MIMO processor 930 may perform spatial processing (e.g., precoding) on data symbols, control symbols, and/or reference symbols, if applicable, and may provide output symbol streams to the transmit modulators 932-a through 932-x. Each modulator 932 may process a respective output symbol stream (e.g., for OFDM, etc.) to obtain an output sample stream. Each modulator 932 may further process (e.g., convert to analog, amplify, filter, and upconvert) the output sample stream to obtain a downlink (DL) signal. In one example, DL signals from modulators 932-a through 932-x may be transmitted via the antennas 934-a through 934-x, respectively. The transmitter processor 920 may receive information from a processor 940. The processor 940 may be coupled with a memory 942. The processor 940 may be configured to generate flexible waveforms through altering a chip rate and/or utilizing a scaling factor. In some embodiments, the processor module 940 may be configured for coordinating forward link blanking and/or power boosting in normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems. For example, transmissions between mobile device 115-g and base station 105-f may utilize bandwidth of a flexible waveform that may overlap with the bandwidth of a normal waveform. The processor 940 may coordinate forward link blanking and/or power boosting that may aid in reducing the impact of this interference.
  • At the mobile device 115-g, the mobile device antennas 952-a through 952-n may receive the DL signals from the base station 105-f and may provide the received signals to the demodulators 954-a through 954-n, respectively. Each demodulator 954 may condition (e.g., filter, amplify, downconvert, and digitize) a respective received signal to obtain input samples. Each demodulator 954 may further process the input samples (e.g., for OFDM, etc.) to obtain received symbols. A MIMO detector 956 may obtain received symbols from all the demodulators 954-a through 954-n, perform MIMO detection on the received symbols if applicable, and provide detected symbols. A receive processor 958 may process (e.g., demodulate, deinterleave, and decode) the detected symbols, providing decoded data for the mobile device 115-g to a data output, and provide decoded control information to a processor 980, or memory 982.
  • On the uplink (UL) or reverse link, at the mobile device 115-g, a transmitter processor 964 may receive and process data from a data source. The transmitter processor 964 may also generate reference symbols for a reference signal. The symbols from the transmitter processor 964 may be precoded by a transmit MIMO processor 966 if applicable, further processed by the demodulators 954-a through 954-n (e.g., for SC-FDMA, etc.), and be transmitted to the base station 105-f in accordance with the transmission parameters received from the base station 105-E The transmitter processor 964 may also be configured to generate flexible waveforms through altering a chip rate and/or utilizing a scaling factor; this may be done dynamically in some cases. The transmit processor 964 may receive information from processor 980. The processor 980 may provide for different alignment and/or offsetting procedures. The processor 980 may also utilize scaling and/or chip rate information to perform measurements on the other subsystems, perform handoffs to the other subsystems, perform reselection, etc. The processor 980 may invert the effects of time stretching associated with the use of flexible bandwidth through parameter scaling. At the base station 105-f, the UL signals from the mobile device 115-g may be received by the antennas 934, processed by the demodulators 932, detected by a MIMO detector 936 if applicable, and further processed by a receive processor. The receive processor 938 may provide decoded data to a data output and to the processor 980. In some embodiments, the processor 980 may be implemented as part of a general processor, the transmitter processor 964, and/or the receiver processor 958.
  • In some embodiments, the processor 980 may be configured to receive coordinated forward link blanking and/or power boosting in normal and/or flexible bandwidth systems. For example, transmissions between mobile device 115-g and base station 105-f may utilize bandwidth of a flexible waveform that may overlap with the bandwidth of a normal waveform. The processor 940 may be configured to receive coordinated forward link blanking and/or power boosting that may aid in reducing the impact of this interference.
  • Turning to FIG. 10A, a flow diagram of a method 1000-a for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1000-a may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6.
  • At block 1005, a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The first carrier bandwidth may partially at least overlap the second carrier bandwidth. At block 1010, a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may be coordinated.
  • In some embodiments, the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. A timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may be determined and coordinating the transmission blanking may be based on the determined timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur during a data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. Aspects of the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may be determined, such as when the data transmission may occur and/or an amount data to be transmitted. The determined information may be utilized to coordinate the transmission blanking such that it occurs during the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths is changed based on at least a time of day or a load of the forward link.
  • The transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may be co-located. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may not be co-located. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a pre-scheduled time. The transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may be synchronized with respect to an absolute time or known time offset.
  • In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth may fully overlap the second carrier bandwidth, such as when a flexible bandwidth carrier is fully overlapped by a normal carrier bandwidth.
  • In some embodiments, at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth utilizes licensed spectrum. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth utilize different radio access technologies (RATs). For example, in one embodiment, the first carrier bandwidth utilizes LTE, while the second carrier bandwidth utilizes EV-DO.
  • In some embodiments, the transmission blanking may include hard blanking. Hard blanking may include no flow being scheduled for transmission during the period of transmission blanking. The transmission blanking may include soft blanking. Soft blanking may include transmissions of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow during the period of transmission blanking. Soft blanking may include reducing a power of transmission during the period of transmission blanking. Coordinated soft transmission blanking may include transmissions during a portion of the coordinated soft transmission blanking less than an entire period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking.
  • Some embodiments of method 1000-a may further include increasing a power of transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are applied independently. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are applied together. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are activated in co-located systems. In some embodiments, the power increase and the transmission blanking are activated in co-located systems based on the load of the co-located systems. The coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth may occur at a slot level. Some embodiments include increasing at least a data rate of at least a control channel or data channel utilizing the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments include increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a period of time different than the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth. Coordinating the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth may occur during one or more slots when the first carrier bandwidth is not transmitting. In some embodiments, at least coordinating a transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increasing the power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth depends at least upon a relative loading of the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth or time of day.
  • Some embodiments of method 1000-a may further include at least coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth. At least coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth, increasing the power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth, coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth, or increasing the power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during the transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth may change based on at least a time of day or a loading of at least one of the forward links.
  • Some embodiments may include identifying a third carrier bandwidth different than the second carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps the first carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system. A transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth may be coordinated with respect to a concurrent transmission over the third carrier bandwidth. This use of a third or more carrier bandwidths may be referred to as multi-carrier embodiments. These multi-carrier embodiments can be co-located or at a different location. For example, if co-located, blanking may not be utilized for the close by mobile device, while blanking may occur for a mobile device further away. If service is needed for both the close and far away mobile devices, the close mobile device may be placed on the smaller carrier bandwidth and blanked since it can take the lower signal to reduce the interference for the mobile device further away.
  • The transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier may not be co-located in some cases. The transmission blanking may occur at a pre-scheduled time. Some embodiments may further include receiving a request from the second carrier bandwidth to coordinate the transmission blanking at a specific time. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth system may agree to accommodate the request from the second carrier bandwidth; in some cases, the first carrier bandwidth may send an acknowledgement or agreement message.
  • Method 1000-a may be implemented by a base station in some embodiments. In some embodiments, the wireless communications system includes a time division multiplexing system.
  • Turning to FIG. 10B, a flow diagram of a method 1000-b for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1000-b may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6. Method 1000-b may be an example of method 1000-a of FIG. 10A.
  • At block 1005-a, a normal carrier bandwidth and a flexible carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The normal carrier bandwidth may partially overlap the flexible carrier bandwidth. At block 1010-a, a transmission blanking on a forward link over the normal carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the flexible carrier bandwidth may be coordinated. At block 1015, a transmission power over the flexible carrier bandwidth for the concurrent transmission may be increased during the coordinated transmission blanking over the normal carrier bandwidth. At block 1020, the coordinated transmission blanking or the increased transmission power may be changed based on a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
  • Turning to FIG. 10C, a flow diagram of a method 1000-c for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1000-c may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6. Method 1000-c may be an example of method 1000-a of FIG. 10A and/or method 1000-b of FIG. 10B.
  • At block 1005-b, a normal carrier bandwidth and a flexible carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The normal carrier bandwidth may at least partially overlap the flexible carrier bandwidth. At block 1010-b, a transmission blanking on a forward link over the flexible carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the normal carrier bandwidth may be coordinated. In some embodiments, a transmission power over the normal carrier bandwidth for the concurrent transmission may be increased during the coordinated transmission blanking over the flexible carrier bandwidth as shown in block 1015.
  • Turning to FIG. 11A, a flow diagram of a method 1100-a for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1100-a may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6.
  • At block 1105, a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The first carrier bandwidth may at least partially overlap the second carrier bandwidth. At block 1110, a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth may be coordinated with respect to the second carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments may further include coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier. The concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth may occur during the transmission power increase. At least a time of day or a loading of the forward link may be determined in some cases; coordinating the transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth may change based on at least the determined time of day or the determined loading of the forward link.
  • In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first flexible bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible bandwidth. In some embodiments, the first carrier bandwidth is a first normal bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth is a second normal bandwidth.
  • Some embodiments of method 1100-a may further include coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth. Some embodiments may further include coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth.
  • The transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier may not be not co-located in some embodiments. The transmission power increase may occur at a pre-scheduled time in some embodiments. Some embodiments may further include receiving a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
  • Some embodiments may include identifying a third carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system where the second carrier bandwidth partially overlaps the third carrier bandwidth. A transmission power increase for a forward link over the third carrier bandwidth may be coordinated with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
  • Method 1100-a may be performed by a base station in some embodiments.
  • Turning to FIG. 11B, a flow diagram of a method 1100-b for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1100-b may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6. Method 1100-b may be an example of method 1100-a of FIG. 11A.
  • At block 1105-a, a flexible carrier bandwidth and a normal carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The flexible carrier bandwidth may at least partially overlap the normal carrier bandwidth. At block 1115, a request to coordinate a transmission power increase at a specific time may be received. At block 1110-a, the transmission power increase for a forward link over the flexible carrier bandwidth may be coordinated with respect to the normal carrier bandwidth.
  • Turning to FIG. 11C, a flow diagram of a method 1100-c for reducing interference within a wireless communications system in accordance with various embodiments. Method 1100-c may be implemented utilizing various wireless communications devices including, but not limited to: a mobile device 115 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 7, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a base station 105 as seen in FIG. 1, FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 8, and/or FIG. 9; a core network 130 or controller 120 as seen in FIG. 1 and/or FIG. 8; and/or a device 600 of FIG. 6. Method 1100-c may be an example of method 1100-a of FIG. 11A and/or method 1100-b of FIG. 11B.
  • At block 1105-b, a flexible carrier bandwidth and a normal carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system may be identified. The flexible carrier bandwidth may at least partially overlap the normal carrier bandwidth. In some embodiments, a request to coordinate a transmission power increase at a specific time may be received as seen in block 1115-a. At block 1110-b, the transmission power increase for a forward link over the normal carrier bandwidth may be coordinated with respect to the flexible carrier bandwidth.
  • The detailed description set forth above in connection with the appended drawings describes exemplary embodiments and does not represent the only embodiments that may be implemented or that are within the scope of the claims. The term “exemplary” used throughout this description means “serving as an example, instance, or illustration,” and not “preferred” or “advantageous over other embodiments.” The detailed description includes specific details for the purpose of providing an understanding of the described techniques. These techniques, however, may be practiced without these specific details. In some instances, well-known structures and devices are shown in block diagram form in order to avoid obscuring the concepts of the described embodiments.
  • Information and signals may be represented using any of a variety of different technologies and techniques. For example, data, instructions, commands, information, signals, bits, symbols, and chips that may be referenced throughout the above description may be represented by voltages, currents, electromagnetic waves, magnetic fields or particles, optical fields or particles, or any combination thereof.
  • The various illustrative blocks and modules described in connection with the disclosure herein may be implemented or performed with a general-purpose processor, a digital signal processor (DSP), an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), a field programmable gate array (FPGA) or other programmable logic device, discrete gate or transistor logic, discrete hardware components, or any combination thereof designed to perform the functions described herein. A general-purpose processor may be a microprocessor, but in the alternative, the processor may be any conventional processor, controller, microcontroller, or state machine. A processor may also be implemented as a combination of computing devices, e.g., a combination of a DSP and a microprocessor, multiple microprocessors, one or more microprocessors in conjunction with a DSP core, or any other such configuration.
  • The functions described herein may be implemented in hardware, software executed by a processor, firmware, or any combination thereof. If implemented in software executed by a processor, the functions may be stored on or transmitted over as one or more instructions or code on a computer-readable medium. Other examples and implementations are within the scope and spirit of the disclosure and appended claims. For example, due to the nature of software, functions described above can be implemented using software executed by a processor, hardware, firmware, hardwiring, or combinations of any of these. Features implementing functions may also be physically located at various positions, including being distributed such that portions of functions are implemented at different physical locations. Also, as used herein, including in the claims, “or” as used in a list of items prefaced by “at least one of” indicates a disjunctive list such that, for example, a list of “at least one of A, B, or C” means A or B or C or AB or AC or BC or ABC (i.e., A and B and C).
  • Computer-readable media includes both computer storage media and communication media including any medium that facilitates transfer of a computer program from one place to another. A storage medium may be any available medium that can be accessed by a general-purpose or special-purpose computer. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media can comprise RAM, ROM, EEPROM, CD-ROM or other optical disk storage, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium that can be used to carry or store desired program code means in the form of instructions or data structures and that can be accessed by a general-purpose or special-purpose computer, or a general-purpose or special-purpose processor. Also, any connection is properly termed a computer-readable medium. For example, if the software is transmitted from a website, server, or other remote source using a coaxial cable, fiber optic cable, twisted pair, digital subscriber line (DSL), or wireless technologies such as infrared, radio, and microwave, then the coaxial cable, fiber optic cable, twisted pair, DSL, or wireless technologies such as infrared, radio, and microwave are included in the definition of medium. Disk and disc, as used herein, include compact disc (CD), laser disc, optical disc, digital versatile disc (DVD), floppy disk and blu-ray disc where disks usually reproduce data magnetically, while discs reproduce data optically with lasers. Combinations of the above are also included within the scope of computer-readable media.
  • The previous description of the disclosure is provided to enable a person skilled in the art to make or use the disclosure. Various modifications to the disclosure will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, and the generic principles defined herein may be applied to other variations without departing from the spirit or scope of the disclosure. Throughout this disclosure the term “example” or “exemplary” indicates an example or instance and does not imply or require any preference for the noted example. Thus, the disclosure is not to be limited to the examples and designs described herein but is to be accorded the widest scope consistent with the principles and novel features disclosed herein.

Claims (77)

What is claimed is:
1. A method of reducing interference within a wireless communications system, the method comprising:
identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and
coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
increasing a power of transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth further comprises:
determining a timing of a control transmission over the second carrier bandwidth and coordinating the transmission blanking based on the determined timing of the control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth further comprises:
determining a data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth and wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth occurs during the data transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths based on at least a time of day.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidths based on at least a loading of the forward link.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth are normal carrier bandwidths.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the first carrier bandwidth fully overlaps the second carrier bandwidth.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth occur at a co-location.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth are not co-located.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth occurs at a pre-scheduled time.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth and the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth are synchronized with respect to at least an absolute time or a known time offset.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth utilizes licensed spectrum.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein the first carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth utilize different radio access technologies (RAT).
16. The method of claim 1, wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth comprises:
coordinating a hard transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
17. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated hard transmission blanking comprises no flow being scheduled for transmission during a period of the coordinated hard transmission blanking.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth comprises:
coordinating a soft transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the coordinated soft transmission blanking comprises a transmission of at least a priority flow or a delay sensitive flow during a period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking.
20. The method of claim 18, wherein the coordinated soft transmission blanking comprises reducing a power of transmission during a period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking.
21. The method of claim 18, wherein the coordinated soft transmission blanking comprises a transmission during a portion of the coordinated soft transmission blanking less than an entire period of the coordinated soft transmission blanking.
22. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving a request from the second carrier bandwidth to coordinate the transmission blanking at a specific time; and
agreeing to accommodate the request from the second carrier bandwidth.
23. The method of claim 1, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking occurs at a base station.
24. The method of claim 1, wherein the wireless communications system comprises a time division multiplexing system.
25. The method of claim 2, wherein the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth are applied independently.
26. The method of claim 2, wherein the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth are applied together.
27. The method of claim 2, wherein the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth are activated in co-located systems.
28. The method of claim 27, wherein the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth and the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth are activated in co-located systems based on a load of the co-located systems.
29. The method of claim 27, wherein the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth occurs at a slot level.
30. The method of claim 2, further comprising:
increasing at least a data rate of at least a control channel or data channel utilizing the power increase over the second carrier bandwidth.
31. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a period of time different than the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
32. The method of claim 1, further comprising,
coordinating the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth during one or more slots when the first carrier bandwidth is not transmitting.
33. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth or increasing a power of transmission over the first carrier bandwidth during a coordinated transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth.
34. The method of claim 33, wherein coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the second carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the first carrier bandwidth depends at least upon a relative loading of the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth or a time of day.
35. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
coordinating a power transmission increase over the first carrier bandwidth during a coordinated transmission blanking on a forward link over the second carrier bandwidth.
36. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
identifying a third carrier bandwidth different from the second carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps the first carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and
coordinating a transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the third carrier bandwidth.
37. A wireless communications system configured for reducing interference, the system comprising
a means for identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and
a means for coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
38. The system of claim 37, further comprising:
a means for coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
39. The system of claim 37, further comprising:
a means for changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
40. The system of claim 37, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
41. The system of claim 37, further comprising:
a means for coordinating a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
42. The system of claim 37, further comprising:
a means for coordinating a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
43. The system of claim 37, further comprising:
a means for increasing a transmission power over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
44. A computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system comprising:
a non-transitory computer-readable medium comprising:
code for identifying a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and
code for coordinating a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
45. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for coordinating the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
46. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for changing the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
47. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
48. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for coordinating a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
49. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for coordinating a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
50. The computer program product of claim 44, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for increasing a transmission power over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission blanking over the first carrier bandwidth.
51. A wireless communications device configured for reducing interference within a wireless communications system, the device comprising:
at least one processor configured to:
identify a first carrier bandwidth that at least partially overlaps a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system; and
coordinate a transmission blanking on a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
52. The device of claim 51, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
coordinate the transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during a control channel transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
53. The device of claim 51, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
change the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
54. The device of claim 51, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
55. The device of claim 51, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
coordinate a hard transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
56. The device of claim 51, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
coordinate a soft transmission blanking as the coordinated transmission blanking on the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth during the concurrent transmission over the second carrier bandwidth.
57. A method of reducing interference within a wireless communications system, the method comprising:
identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and
coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
58. The method of claim 57, further comprising:
determining at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link and coordinating the transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth changes based on at least the determined time of day or the determined loading of the forward link.
59. The method of claim 57, further comprising:
receiving a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
60. The method of claim 57, further comprising:
coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth.
61. The method of claim 57, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
62. The method of claim 57, wherein coordinating the transmission power increase occurs at a pre-scheduled time.
63. The method of claim 57, wherein coordinating the transmission power increase occurs at a base station.
64. The method of claim 57, further comprising:
identifying a third carrier bandwidth and the second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the second carrier bandwidth partially overlaps the third carrier bandwidth; and
coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the third carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
65. A wireless communications system configured for reducing interference, the system comprising:
a means for identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and
a means for coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
66. The system of claim 65, further comprising:
a means for changing the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
67. The system of claim 65, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
68. The system of claim 65, further comprising:
a means for coordinating a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth.
69. The system of claim 65, further comprising:
a means for receiving a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
70. A computer program product for reducing interference within a wireless communications system comprising:
a non-transitory computer-readable medium comprising:
code for identifying a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and
code for coordinating a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
71. The computer program product of claim 70, wherein the non-transitory computer-readable medium further comprising:
code for changing the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
72. The computer program product of claim 70, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
73. A wireless communications device configured for reducing interference, the device comprising:
at least one processor configured to:
identify a first carrier bandwidth and a second carrier bandwidth of the wireless communications system, wherein the first carrier bandwidth at least partially overlaps the second carrier bandwidth; and
coordinate a transmission power increase for a forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth.
74. The device of claim 73, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
change the coordinated transmission power increase for the forward link over the first carrier bandwidth with respect to the second carrier bandwidth based on at least a time of day or a loading of the forward link.
75. The device of claim 73, wherein at least the first carrier bandwidth or the second carrier bandwidth is a flexible carrier bandwidth.
76. The device of claim 73, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
coordinate a transmission blanking over the second carrier bandwidth during the coordinated transmission power increase over the first carrier bandwidth.
77. The device of claim 73, wherein the at least one processor is further configured to:
receive a request to coordinate the transmission power increase at a specific time.
US13/432,240 2011-11-07 2012-03-28 Coordinated forward link blanking and power boosting for flexible bandwidth systems Abandoned US20130114571A1 (en)

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PCT/US2012/063889 WO2013070717A1 (en) 2011-11-07 2012-11-07 Coordinated forward link blanking and power boosting for flexible bandwidth systems
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CN201280066077.8A CN104054385A (en) 2011-11-07 2012-11-07 Coordinated forward link blanking and power boosting for flexible bandwidth systems
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US13/466,348 Active 2032-11-10 US8891467B2 (en) 2011-11-07 2012-05-08 Dynamic bandwidth adjustment in flexible bandwidth systems
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