US20130091197A1 - Mobile device as a local server - Google Patents

Mobile device as a local server Download PDF

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US20130091197A1
US20130091197A1 US13334065 US201113334065A US2013091197A1 US 20130091197 A1 US20130091197 A1 US 20130091197A1 US 13334065 US13334065 US 13334065 US 201113334065 A US201113334065 A US 201113334065A US 2013091197 A1 US2013091197 A1 US 2013091197A1
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server
system
application
events
data
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US13334065
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Avi Bar-Zeev
Gur Kimchi
Brian C. Beckman
Scott Isaacs
Meir Ben-Itay
Eran Yariv
Blaise Aguera y Arcas
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Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC
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Microsoft Corp
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/42Protocols for client-server architectures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/26Power supply means, e.g. regulation thereof
    • G06F1/32Means for saving power
    • G06F1/3203Power Management, i.e. event-based initiation of power-saving mode
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F1/00Details not covered by groups G06F3/00 – G06F13/00 and G06F21/00
    • G06F1/26Power supply means, e.g. regulation thereof
    • G06F1/32Means for saving power
    • G06F1/3203Power Management, i.e. event-based initiation of power-saving mode
    • G06F1/3206Monitoring a parameter, a device or an event triggering a change in power modality
    • G06F1/3215Monitoring of peripheral devices
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/02Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the use of web-based technology, e.g. hyper text transfer protocol [HTTP]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/32Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications for scheduling or organising the servicing of application requests, e.g. requests for application data transmissions involving the analysis and optimisation of the required network resources
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L67/00Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications
    • H04L67/34Network-specific arrangements or communication protocols supporting networked applications involving the movement of software or configuration parameters

Abstract

Architecture that embeds a server (a local server) inside a mobile device operating system (OS) close to the data (but under the OS services) such that the server has access to native capabilities, and offers an Internet-like frontend with which a browser or application can communicate. The local server appears as a web server, and small programs can be pushed into the local server from the browser or a remote server such that the local server can be made to perform work more effectively. Local and remote events can be triggered such as launching a browser (or other application(s)), initiating remote server calls, triggering battery save mode, locking the phone, etc. The local server can run a script execution environment such as node.js, an event driven I/O model where callbacks are invoked to handle emergent conditions (e.g., explicit requests, state changes, etc.).

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/546,049 entitled “MOBILE DEVICE AS A LOCAL SERVER” and filed Oct. 11, 2011.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Mobile devices (e.g., mobile phones) typically operate in a client/server relationship—the device (including the device's web browser) is a client, and a server sends content, determines needs of the device, and receives state changes, as needed. This misses a principle of distributed systems in that the computation and data reside closest to the source.
  • If a mobile phone, for example, is resolving geo-fences, the data the phone needs is generally on the phone. Privacy concerns may further indicate that this data remain on the phone. Similarly, a phone user may need computation performed which uses cloud information, including private information the user may not have access to in specific detail, but a generalized result may be fine. There again, the computation is moved to a server.
  • SUMMARY
  • The following presents a simplified summary in order to provide a basic understanding of some novel embodiments described herein. This summary is not an extensive overview, and it is not intended to identify key/critical elements or to delineate the scope thereof. Its sole purpose is to present some concepts in a simplified form as a prelude to the more detailed description that is presented later.
  • The disclosed architecture moves computation to the location where it can be most efficient by embedding (e.g., daemon, service, built-in) a server (a local server) inside a mobile device operating system (OS) close to the data (but under the OS services) such that this server has access to native capabilities, and offers a host-like frontend with which a browser or application can communicate. The embedded server offers web server capabilities, but carries greater efficiencies in that small programs can be pushed into the local server from the browser or a remote server such that the local server can be made to perform work more effectively. Accordingly, the server operates in combination with a reactive framework where events trigger other actions.
  • The architecture enables the capability to launch “web toast” (automatically launching a browser page of information) where the local server can invoke mobile device (e.g., phone) functionality such as a browser when computation determines that this is what the user likely wants. More generally, the capability is provided to initiate local and remote events such as launching a browser (or other application(s)) with deep link, remote server calls, trigger battery save mode, lock the phone, etc.
  • The local server can be implemented to host a script execution environment such as node.js, an event driven I/O model where callbacks are invoked to handle emergent conditions (e.g., explicit requests, state changes, etc.). In one implementation, javascript is loaded into the node.js server for evaluation to execute a set of callbacks when given conditions are met. For example, a condition (e.g., described as a full javascript evaluation function) can determine that the user is approaching a geo-fence. Web toast, or other notification means, can then be invoked to notify the user or launch an application, update an “above the lock” screen, or add data to a running application (e.g., a map) configured for this purpose, to name just a few. Web pages, local applications, and remote servers can communicate with the local server in a protected way (e.g., submit computation in the form of javascript, setup new conditions that invoke callbacks when evaluated to be true, etc.).
  • To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, certain illustrative aspects are described herein in connection with the following description and the annexed drawings. These aspects are indicative of the various ways in which the principles disclosed herein can be practiced and all aspects and equivalents thereof are intended to be within the scope of the claimed subject matter. Other advantages and novel features will become apparent from the following detailed description when considered in conjunction with the drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a system in accordance with the disclosed architecture.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a method in accordance with the disclosed architecture.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates further aspects of the method of FIG. 2.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative method in accordance with the disclosed architecture.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates further aspects of the method of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a schematic block diagram of an exemplary multimode handset that can employ an embedded server and reactive framework in accordance with the disclosed architecture.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a block diagram of a computing system that can execute an embedded server and reactive framework in accordance with the disclosed architecture.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • The disclosed architecture embeds a server (local server) on a mobile device such as a mobile phone. Employing the local server on a mobile device offers additional possibilities not seen conventionally. For example, the local server on the phone can connect to facilities that normally are not exposed to webpages on the phone, including hardware sensor subsystems such as the accelerometer, the compass, the speakers, the camera, etc. This does not require modification of the web browser itself. Rather, existing protocols can be used. In one example, rather than requesting an image from a remote website, the image can be requested from the phone camera. Moreover, the camera expresses a URL (uniform resource locator) such that rich data (camera) can be communicated back and forth between the local server (local resources using local hosts) and remote servers.
  • In addition to opening access to these kinds of local facilities synchronously or in realtime, the architecture can facilitate an AJAX (asynchronous JavaScript™ and XML (extensible markup language)) style, which includes being reactive. (JavaScript is a scripting language that normally runs only on the client in a web browser, and hereinafter is denoted as javascript). AJAX is a client-side development tool for creating asynchronous web applications that perform background asynchronous data transmit and retrieval with a server. AJAX-type applications utilize coding constructions called callbacks. Accordingly, rather than implementing a program that executes synchronously as a webpage is opened, only bindings of a number of different functions to events that happen on that webpage execute. For example, if the mouse hovers over a button, then a javascript function can be made to execute to open a menu, and so on. This style of execution never blocks and precludes code running immediately when the webpage is opened.
  • This is a reactive approach to the local server 104 where rather than querying the local server 104 for state (e.g., the current accelerometer value or current the battery level) a javascript function is only getting called when there is a material change or triggering event.
  • The capability is enabled to push a javascript call list or more complex functions based on complex events (e.g., given an event when the battery is 10% and the phone is determined to be associated with walking or running, or the phone arrives a certain point in time, etc.). In other words, code pieces can be dynamically downloaded for the local server 104 that run autonomously based on complex events.
  • The architecture is easily and immediately updatable. The javascript can be streamed to change requests for new notifications and new types of notifications at any time or location. The architecture provides the capability to benefit from the dynamic scripting capabilities in any language between the local server 104 and remote servers (e.g., remote server 110).
  • Reference is now made to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals are used to refer to like elements throughout. In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding thereof. It may be evident, however, that the novel embodiments can be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well known structures and devices are shown in block diagram form in order to facilitate a description thereof. The intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the claimed subject matter.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a system 100 in accordance with the disclosed architecture. The system 100 includes a mobile device 102 having an embedded server (local server 104) in association with a mobile operating system (OS) 106. The local server 104 communicates with a mobile browser 108, as one example of an application interaction with the local server 104. As shown, the browser 108 can communicate directly with a remote server 110. Alternatively, the local server 104 can communicate directly with the remote server 110. Still further, the browser 108 and the local server 104 can communicate with the remote server 110.
  • In other words, a local server 104 is embedded in association with a mobile operating system of the mobile device 102. The local server 104 is a computational unit that accesses native capabilities of the mobile OS 106 and emulates a web server for client application interaction. The local server 104 operates in combination with a reactive framework of events and callbacks. In one implementation, this is facilitated via a scripting language.
  • The embedded server 104 receives instructions from a local application. The instructions can be received via a secure protocol (e.g., encryption). The embedded server receives instructions from a remote web service (the remote server 110) authorized (e.g., by authentication, user login) to provide the instructions. The events include launch of an application or exercise of an application function. The events include low-level hardware events that originate in the operating system 106. The events and callbacks are communicated to and from the embedded server using a scripting language (e.g., javascript).
  • The cross-loading of instructions to the local server from the local browser or the remote web service can be accomplished using REST/LINQ. LINQ (language integrated query) is a component of the .NET framework by Microsoft Corporation that adds native data querying capabilities to .NET languages. REST (representational state transfer) is an architecture for distributed media networks. A RESTful web service is a simple web service implemented using HTTP and the principles of REST. REST Services focus on resources, each resource represented by a unique URI (uniform resource identifier), and users interact with the resources via the resource URI using the HTTP uniform interface. LINQ standard query operators, implemented in JavaScript over node.js, web sockets, and the reactive framework, as a mechanism for bi-directional query injection over REST in web applications and mobile applications. REST/LINQ can be the “algebra” for specifying complex event triggers beyond what is hardwired into the daemon. (A daemon is a program that runs continuously and exists for the purpose of handling periodic service requests that a computer system expects to receive. The daemon program forwards the requests to other programs (or processes) as appropriate. Some of these processes may exist outside of the computer system and require the daemon to communicate with an outside service. The daemon can also receive remote instructions and process them locally on the device, with our without the user's interaction.)
  • The mobile device 102 can be a cellular telephone and the server 110 invokes phone functionality of the device 102 in response to a local or remote event. The events can be associated with device sensors and environmental conditions that are bound to the callbacks. Additionally, the reactive framework employs data storage that unifies code and data as a graph. The data can include personal data that is accessible only to an authorized user.
  • In a specific exemplary implementation, the architecture employs a graph-structured database, and a reactive, functional programming model. The functional programming model can be implemented using an event driven input/output (I/O) server-side script (e.g., node.js) can be employed. Similarly, the database can be a graph data storage (e.g., GraphDB), which is built on a document-oriented database (e.g., MongoDB).
  • Node.js is an environment designed to implement services using javascript. With node.js, the server-side script is written in javascript as well, and similar to AJAX, a client-side development tool for creating interactive web applications on the client, node.js is event-driven.
  • In an AJAX web application, a “callback” (e.g., a javascript function) can be bound (bind) to an event such as a mouse click on an HTML (hypertext markup language) button. (The words “register” and “subscribe” are also often used interchangeably for “bind”. Registration of a callback is an instance of a publish-subscribe pattern.)
  • Following is code that illustrates a callback and binding.
  • var http = require(‘http’);
    http.createServer(
    function (req,res) {
    res.writeHead(200, {‘Content-Type’: ‘text/plain’});
    res.end(‘Hello World\n’);
    }
    ).listen(1337, “127.0.0.1”);
    console.log(‘Server running at http://127.0.0.1:1337/’);

    The “function” instruction is the callback, and the “createServer” instruction binds the callback to an HTTP (hypertext transfer protocol) GET request on localhost (the virtual loopback network interface of a computer system) port 1337.
  • The callback executes quickly; otherwise, the web browser may “hang” or become unresponsive (following the “button click” or selection). If clicking on the button requires making web service calls to a server, the callback should not “block”, meaning, directly invoke a synchronous function such as a HTTP command (HTTP GET) that will not return until the services request is fulfilled (which could be many seconds). Rather, when a long or blocking operation is needed, the callback invokes the function asynchronously with a call that returns immediately, the call having an argument that is another callback to be triggered when the request is fulfilled.
  • By writing an entire AJAX experience in terms of non-blocking callbacks that can, in turn, bind further callbacks, a web application is created that is both responsive and efficient. Polling operations, locks, and multiple javascript threads are avoided. Threads and locks are used at a lower and better-encapsulated level within the libraries that perform the slow operations.
  • With respect to javascript and the event model server-side, node.js generalizes this same pattern to the server side. Instead of UI (user interface) events, bindable events now include server requests; the outer part of a node.js server script includes the binding of the HTTP request to a callback (similar to the server's “main( ) function). All I/O, database reads or writes, etc., can be treated as “slow”, and are invoked asynchronously. The server-side and client-side scripts now both consist entirely of callbacks, and are both written in javascript.
  • It is conventionally understood that the phone and personal computer can have javascript running in a web browser, while servers are normally considered as computers (e.g., rack-mounted) running in a data center and serving content to the user's mobile browser and computer-based web browsers.
  • A user's device can function as a server or connect to local server. It is also possible for a device client (e.g., a web browser) to connect to the local device as a server (e.g., referred to as “localhost”, or IP address 127.0.0.1). When a mobile device is considered to be a server, and is also running an event-driven software component (e.g., node.js), a variety of device sensors and/or environmental conditions now become available as events that can be bound to callbacks (e.g., similar to AJAX events and HTTP connection requests).
  • Examples of events a phone server can expose include, but are not limited to, a hardware button press, the phone is unlocked, the launching of an application, the appearance of a new WiFi access point, a change in the radio signal strength, a change in the battery level, a feature or gesture (e.g., a figure-8 hand wave) recognizable with an onboard motion sensor (e.g., accelerometer), a complex pattern recognizable with signal processing applied to the accelerometer and other sensors (e.g., the user changes states between walking, running, sitting or driving), the phone is removed from the pocket (e.g., recognizable with the infrared sensor), a loud noise, features in the microphone input that suggest there is music playing in the environment, an incoming call, a Bluetooth device is paired, an email is sent, etc.
  • Broadly speaking, these events can fall into several categories. One category is low-level hardware events (e.g., button presses). These can originate in the OS. Another category is high-level sensory events (e.g., music detection, gait detection, gesture recognition, etc.). These events can also originate in the OS, but unlike low-level hardware events, these events utilize nontrivial processing. This is the case especially if the processing is restricted to occurring in the background or without waking-up the phone's processor. However, low-power background signal processing hardware can assist to wake up the CPU (central processing unit) to generate an event only when the event actually takes place, and only if one or more callbacks have subscribed to this event.
  • Another category can be defined as phonetop events (e.g., launching an application). These events are generated from the phone OS shell. Yet another category can be described as application events (e.g., sending an email). These events form an open-ended set. Since access to the full network stack is provided at the application level, arbitrarily named and parameterized events can be named with an HTTP call to localhost (a standard hostname for the local computer). New applications can define their own events, using a parameterized namespace. It is desired to “standardize” as much of the event namespace as possible, so that patterns written in terms of these events can run on many devices and operating systems. Library names can also follow simple conventions (e.g., with standard battery events accessible via node.js).
  • In terms of data, a graph-structured database (e.g., GraphDB), the benefits of a non-SQL-type graph-structured database are as follows. Arbitrary objects can be stored in the graph database (represented using javascript). In particular, these objects can be pure data, in which case the objects appear as JSON (javascript object notation, a simple javascript-compatible way of representing values, key-value pairs, and arrays). The objects can also include code (e.g., functions and/or methods). There is no pre-determined schema; thus, fields, properties, and functions can be added as needed. Another benefit is the relationships between objects (the graph edges) are similarly flexible, and can be extended to encompass new types as needed. Yet another benefit is that arbitrary fields can be indexed when and as needed to allow fast search and retrieval.
  • In one exemplary implementation, GraphDB (an open source graph database and universal access layer) and Read/Write World™ (RWW) can be employed as the data management systems; however, it is to be understood that these are only examples, and that other suitable systems can be employed for the desired results. (RWW is a project by Microsoft Corporation to index, unify, and connect geo-linked media, which comprises cloud-based geo-indexing, matching, and processing services.) GraphDB implements this kind of realtime read/write storage and access, optimized as an in-memory server-side cache, and in general, backed by slower, persistent stores. MapReduce™ (a software framework for distributed computing on large datasets) type operations are supported as well.
  • By extension, all callbacks can be stored in the graph as function in nodes. Javascript code stored this way in the database is by definition the deployed version, since callback lookups can be queries (e.g., “Which callbacks do I run when this RSS feed is updated?”, “Which callbacks do I delete if this restaurant is removed from the graph?”, “Which callback do I invoke to render a panorama?”, “Which callbacks are set to trigger on user X's phone?”, and “Which callbacks refer in any way to user Y?”).
  • Alternatively, it is also possible to develop and deploy callbacks in the live environment. Web applications written as AJAX enable live changes and operation in realtime.
  • With respect to user data, privacy, and inversion of control, private data of users can be stored. When logged in, a user view of the graph can include nodes and edges containing personal data that are otherwise invisible. This interface does not imply that the physical storage of this sensitive data be co-located or even implemented using the same technology, but is only an API (application programming interface) requirement.
  • The user data on servers can be managed securely. For example, the following can be provided:
  • Signal dashboard. The user can be in control of signals that are observable. For example, the user experience can be sufficiently granular to enable tracks of music played to be observed while keeping the location secured, or allow only location information by neighborhood to be observed, but not actual GPS (global positioning system) traces.
  • Notification dashboard. The user can understand and manage all notifications currently set for the user (e.g., using metaphor like icons or badges, and perhaps with hierarchy).
  • No black boxes. When making an inference about user behavior or interests, the user can inquire, and receive a clear explanation. Pattern-based event triggering renders the triggering conditions for any notification into a user understandable format.
  • Opt-in sharing. If user signals or data are to be shared with another user or a third party, the user can explicitly opt-in.
  • Weak pointers to user data. A user can view any and all recipients or observers of the user's data, and revoke access for any or all of them.
  • Compute at the edge. It is desirable to push algorithms and event logic to the mobile device (e.g., phone), rather than pulling phone signals to the cloud for evaluation on the server. If both node.js and GraphDB run in the phone as well as in the cloud, then user-inference-making algorithms (e.g., event triggering conditions and callbacks) can be run on the phone. For example, knowing only the neighborhood a user lives in, all callbacks associated with entities in that neighborhood can be queried and streamed, with associated triggering conditions, to the mobile device phone.
  • In operation, this can look like a subscription to the neighborhood, such that all additions or removals of events and callbacks applying to that neighborhood are streamed to the phone, perhaps only when connected by WiFi or at intervals of no more than 1×/day. The subscription model implies that this is itself a callback, and can be implemented entirely within the system. This enables allows many of the events/callback to trigger without any communication back to the server, which not only protects user privacy, but also saves bandwidth, and enables many events to trigger without an Internet connection (e.g., geo-fencing can work abroad without an international data plan). Both code and content can be cached locally.
  • With respect to no client-side changes, without a specialized client of any kind, a backend system can still use SMS (short message service) to send notifications to the phone. SMS messages can also contain hyperlinks to render brief text messages with one (or even multiple) links to webpages with richer expanded notifications or interactions. (Note that many of the benefits of deep integration into the client can also be achieved with integration into the phone operator's servers, especially when the signals are rich.)
  • With respect to a client-side application, a user-installable application can be provided that is capable of generating rich notifications and, to one degree or another, operating in a background thread even when not visible. The background application can track location.
  • With respect to using a daemon, modified builds of existing devices can be implemented that enable scenarios without requiring the full nodejs/GraphDB stack on the client.
  • With respect to a local server, enabling a full nodejs/GraphDB/localhost stack on the client can provide the following: a web-oriented protocol for registering new kinds of events using a generic event and client-side javascript in the web toast, with localhost support, an “algebra” for specifying complex event triggers beyond what is hardwired into the daemon, and the ability to issue server requests and perform additional processing in response to events in javascript without pulling up a web toast.
  • Pages in the web browser can create and subscribe to local phone events, thereby enabling a web phone development platform that greatly expands the domain of what can be implemented as a cross-platform web application. Moreover, a low-level application such as the telephone application itself (used for dialing and receiving calls), can be written as a web page. Furthermore, such applications can be combined with each other and with native applications.
  • As an example of the disclosed capabilities, consider the following instant answer when typing a publicly listed phone number into a search engine. Suppose a callback is registered to the “incoming phone call” event, which first checks whether the number matches information in the address book; and if not, queries the search engine using the number. If the number is matched in the address book, slides in a toast showing a condensed (and expandable) rendition of the instant answer.
  • In this way, an apparent alert registration is now viewed as an installed plug-in, which enhances the behavior of an existing application. This general pattern, in which online services augment existing functionality with a slide-out panel or other notification, can be referred to as a “sidecar”.
  • The sidecar can be used not only as an enhancement, but also to redirect traffic from existing websites or applications, to instrument them, or even to supplant altogether (e.g., by offering an alternate dialer altogether on launch of the phone application). On mobile devices such as the cell phone, there are many more signals than on a typical computer, because the device is more personal and the web (Internet) and applications can be instrumented and intercepted. Moreover, the uniform security and permissioning architecture built into the system eliminates the lack of transparency typical with computer toolbars, for example.
  • Many of the in-search widgets can be reframed in this context. Using javascript as the universal language and securing the system also provides the opportunity for third-party development of many simple but useful utilities.
  • Computers and other devices with larger screens than cell phones encourage immersive exploration of remote environments in a way that smaller mobile devices (phones) do not.
  • If considering the problem of intent, this can also be considered in terms of notifications, using an event subscription model. Moving through space is in effect subscribing to a moving window in space; anything triggered purely by “geo-fencing” shows up as movement progresses. If interested in a transit “overlay”, simply type or say “transit”, and an “alert” can be offered that in effect subscribes to experiences relevant to transit. These can include a “where would you like to go?” input box that travels with the user as the user moves through space, as well as interactable surfaces near all bus stops and subway stations. These “intent-lens-like” subscriptions can be rendered iconically in the first-person view, just as more latent, standing alert subscriptions show up in a user profile.
  • Still further, devices can be created that combine the personal augmentation of mobile phones with the large, immersive displays of computers or home theaters, allowing real life and virtual reality (or markup) to be combined. (These experiences are referred to as “immersed”, as opposed to “immersive”.)
  • Included herein is a set of flow charts representative of exemplary methodologies for performing novel aspects of the disclosed architecture. While, for purposes of simplicity of explanation, the one or more methodologies shown herein, for example, in the form of a flow chart or flow diagram, are shown and described as a series of acts, it is to be understood and appreciated that the methodologies are not limited by the order of acts, as some acts may, in accordance therewith, occur in a different order and/or concurrently with other acts from that shown and described herein. For example, those skilled in the art will understand and appreciate that a methodology could alternatively be represented as a series of interrelated states or events, such as in a state diagram. Moreover, not all acts illustrated in a methodology may be required for a novel implementation.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a method in accordance with the disclosed architecture. At 200, a server is operated in a mobile device that accesses native capabilities of a mobile operating system of the mobile device. At 202, an event-driven environment is executed on the server to process conditions and callbacks at least one of locally or remotely.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates further aspects of the method of FIG. 2. Note that the flow indicates that each block can represent a step that can be included, separately or in combination with other blocks, as additional aspects of the method represented by the flow chart of FIG. 2. At 300, the server can be embedded in the mobile operating system and emulating a web server for client application interaction. At 302, instructions are received into the server from a local application and via a secure protocol. At 304, instructions are received into the server from an authorized remote web service via a secure protocol. At 306, an application is launched in response to processing of a condition. At 308, an application function is executed in response to processing of a condition. At 310, data and code are stored as a graph. The graph has personal data accessible only by an authorized user.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an alternative method in accordance with the disclosed architecture. At 400, a server is operated in a mobile device that accesses native capabilities of a mobile operating system of the mobile device. At 402, an event-driven environment is executed on the server to process events and callbacks at least one of locally or remotely. At 404, instructions are communicated to and from the server via a secure protocol. At 406, local functionality of at least one of an application or a function is invoked in response to an event using a scripting language.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates further aspects of the method of FIG. 4. Note that the flow indicates that each block can represent a step that can be included, separately or in combination with other blocks, as additional aspects of the method represented by the flow chart of FIG. 4. At 500, the instructions are communicated from a local application or a remote web service based on hardware events, sensory events, applications, and application functions. At 502, code and data are stored in association with nodes of a storage graph.
  • As used in this application, the terms “component” and “system” are intended to refer to a computer-related entity, either hardware, a combination of software and tangible hardware, software, or software in execution. For example, a component can be, but is not limited to, tangible components such as a processor, chip memory, mass storage devices (e.g., optical drives, solid state drives, and/or magnetic storage media drives), and computers, and software components such as a process running on a processor, an object, an executable, a data structure (stored in volatile or non-volatile storage media), a module, a thread of execution, and/or a program. By way of illustration, both an application running on a server and the server can be a component. One or more components can reside within a process and/or thread of execution, and a component can be localized on one computer and/or distributed between two or more computers. The word “exemplary” may be used herein to mean serving as an example, instance, or illustration. Any aspect or design described herein as “exemplary” is not necessarily to be construed as preferred or advantageous over other aspects or designs.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a schematic block diagram of an exemplary multimode handset 600 that can employ an embedded server and reactive framework in accordance with the disclosed architecture. In order to provide additional context for various aspects thereof, FIG. 6 and the following discussion are intended to provide a brief, general description of a suitable environment in which the various aspects of the innovation can be implemented. While the description includes a general context of computer-executable instructions, those skilled in the art will recognize that the innovation also can be implemented in combination with other program modules and/or as a combination of hardware and software.
  • Generally, applications (e.g., program modules) can include routines, programs, components, data structures, etc., that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. Moreover, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the inventive methods can be practiced with other system configurations, including single-processor or multiprocessor systems, minicomputers, mainframe computers, as well as personal computers, hand-held computing devices, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, and the like, each of which can be operatively coupled to one or more associated devices.
  • The handset 600 (e.g., a cell phone) can typically include a variety of computer-readable media. Computer-readable media can be any available media accessed by the handset systems and includes volatile and non-volatile media, removable and non-removable media. By way of example, and not limitation, computer-readable media can comprise device storage media and communication media. Storage media includes volatile and/or non-volatile, removable and/or non-removable media implemented in any method or technology for the storage of information such as computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules or other data. Storage media can include, but is not limited to, RAM, ROM, EEPROM, flash memory or other memory technology, CD-ROM, digital video disc (DVD) or other optical disk storage, magnetic tape, magnetic disk storage or other magnetic storage devices, or any other medium which can be used to store the desired information and which can be accessed by the handset systems.
  • The handset 600 includes a processor 602 for controlling and processing onboard operations and functions. A memory 604 interfaces to the processor 602 for the storage of data and one or more applications 606 (e.g., a video player software, user feedback component software, etc.) and operating system. The one or more application programs 606, and/or program data can include entities and components of the system 100 of FIG. 1, and the methods represented by the flowcharts of FIGS. 2-5, for example.
  • The applications 606 can also include a user interface (UI) application 608 that operates with a client 610 (e.g., operating system)to facilitate user interaction with handset functionality and data, for example, answering/initiating calls, entering/deleting data, configuring settings, address book manipulation, multimode interaction, etc. The applications 606 can include other applications 612 that came installed with the handset 606 and/or can be installed as add-ons or plug-ins to the client 610 and/or UI 608, for example, or for other purposes (e.g., processor, firmware, etc.).
  • The other applications 612 can include voice recognition of predetermined voice commands that facilitate user control, call voice processing, voice recording, messaging, e-mail processing, video processing, image processing, music play, as well as subsystems or components described infra. Some of the applications 606 can be stored in the memory 604 and/or in a firmware 614, and executed by the processor 602 from either or both the memory 604 or/and the firmware 614. The firmware 614 can also store code for execution in power-up initialization and control during normal operation of the handset 600.
  • A communications component 616 can interface to the processor 602 to facilitate wired/wireless communications with external systems, for example, cellular networks, VoIP (voice-over-IP) networks, local wireless networks or personal wireless networks such as Wi-Fi, Wi-Max, and so on. Here, the communications component 616 can also include a multimode communications subsystem for providing cellular communications via different cellular technologies. For example, a first cellular transceiver 618 (e.g., GSM) can be one mode and an Nth transceiver 620 can provide cellular communications via an Nth cellular network (e.g., UMTS), where N is a positive integer. The communications component 616 can also include a transceiver 622 for unlicensed communications (e.g., Wi-Fi, Wi-Max, Bluetooth, etc.) for corresponding communications. The communications component 616 can also facilitate communications reception from terrestrial radio networks (e.g., broadcast), digital satellite radio networks, and Internet-based radio services networks.
  • The handset 600 can process IP data traffic via the communications component 616 to accommodate IP traffic from an IP network such as, for example, the Internet, a corporate intranet, a home broadband network, a personal area network, etc., via an ISP or broadband cable provider. Thus, VoIP traffic can be utilized by the handset 600 and IP-based multimedia content can be received in an encoded and/or decoded format.
  • The handset 600 includes a display 624 for displaying multimedia that include text, images, video, telephony functions (e.g., a Caller ID function), setup functions, menus, etc. The display 624 can also accommodate the presentation of multimedia content (e.g., music metadata, messages, wallpaper, graphics, etc.).
  • An input/output (I/O) interface 626 can be provided for serial/parallel I/O of data and/or signals (e.g., USB, and/or IEEE 1394) via a hardwire connection, and other I/O devices (e.g., a keyboard, keypad, mouse, interface tether, stylus pen, touch screen, etc.). The I/O interface 626 can be utilized for updating and/or troubleshooting the handset 600, for example.
  • Audio capabilities can be provided via an audio I/O component 628, which can include a speaker for the output of audio signals related to, for example, indication that the user pressed the proper key or key combination to initiate the user feedback signal, call signals, music, etc. The audio I/O component 628 also facilitates the input of audio signals via a microphone to record data and/or telephony voice data, and for inputting voice signals for telephone conversations.
  • The handset 600 can include a slot interface 630 for accommodating a subscriber identity system 632 that can accommodate a SIM or universal SIM (USIM), and interfacing the subscriber identity system 632 with the processor 602. However, it is to be appreciated that the subscriber identity system 632 can be manufactured into the handset 600, and updated by downloading data and software thereinto.
  • An image capture and processing system 634 (e.g., a camera) can be provided for decoding encoded image content. Additionally, as indicated, photos can be obtained via an associated image capture subsystem of the image system 634. The handset 600 can also include a video component 636 for processing video content received and, for recording and transmitting video content.
  • Optionally, a geolocation component 638 (e.g., GPS-global positioning system) facilitates receiving geolocation signals (e.g., from satellites via the communications component 616) that define the location of the handset 600. Alternatively, or in combination therewith, the geolocation component 638 can facilitate triangulation processing for locating the handset 600.
  • The handset 600 also includes a power source 640 in the form of batteries and/or an AC power subsystem, which power source 640 can interface to an external power system or charging equipment (not shown) via a power I/O component 642.
  • Referring now to FIG. 7, there is illustrated a block diagram of a computing system 700 that can execute an embedded server and reactive framework in accordance with the disclosed architecture. However, it is appreciated that the some or all aspects of the disclosed methods and/or systems can be implemented as a system-on-a-chip, where analog, digital, mixed signals, and other functions are fabricated on a single chip substrate. In order to provide additional context for various aspects thereof, FIG. 7 and the following description are intended to provide a brief, general description of the suitable computing system 700 in which the various aspects can be implemented. While the description above is in the general context of computer-executable instructions that can run on one or more computers, those skilled in the art will recognize that a novel embodiment also can be implemented in combination with other program modules and/or as a combination of hardware and software.
  • The computing system 700 for implementing various aspects includes the computer 702 having processing unit(s) 704, a computer-readable storage such as a system memory 706, and a system bus 708. The processing unit(s) 704 can be any of various commercially available processors such as single-processor, multi-processor, single-core units and multi-core units. Moreover, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the novel methods can be practiced with other computer system configurations, including minicomputers, mainframe computers, as well as personal computers (e.g., desktop, laptop, etc.), hand-held computing devices, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, and the like, each of which can be operatively coupled to one or more associated devices.
  • The system memory 706 can include computer-readable storage (physical storage media) such as a volatile (VOL) memory 710 (e.g., random access memory (RAM)) and non-volatile memory (NON-VOL) 712 (e.g., ROM, EPROM, EEPROM, etc.). A basic input/output system (BIOS) can be stored in the non-volatile memory 712, and includes the basic routines that facilitate the communication of data and signals between components within the computer 702, such as during startup. The volatile memory 710 can also include a high-speed RAM such as static RAM for caching data.
  • The system bus 708 provides an interface for system components including, but not limited to, the system memory 706 to the processing unit(s) 704. The system bus 708 can be any of several types of bus structure that can further interconnect to a memory bus (with or without a memory controller), and a peripheral bus (e.g., PCI, PCIe, AGP, LPC, etc.), using any of a variety of commercially available bus architectures.
  • The computer 702 further includes machine readable storage subsystem(s) 714 and storage interface(s) 716 for interfacing the storage subsystem(s) 714 to the system bus 708 and other desired computer components. The storage subsystem(s) 714 (physical storage media) can include one or more of a hard disk drive (HDD), a magnetic floppy disk drive (FDD), and/or optical disk storage drive (e.g., a CD-ROM drive DVD drive), for example. The storage interface(s) 716 can include interface technologies such as EIDE, ATA, SATA, and IEEE 1394, for example.
  • One or more programs and data can be stored in the memory subsystem 706, a machine readable and removable memory subsystem 718 (e.g., flash drive form factor technology), and/or the storage subsystem(s) 714 (e.g., optical, magnetic, solid state), including an operating system 720, one or more application programs 722, other program modules 724, and program data 726.
  • The operating system 720, one or more application programs 722, other program modules 724, and/or program data 726 can include entities and components of the system 100 of FIG. 1, and the methods represented by the flowcharts of FIGS. 2-5, for example.
  • Generally, programs include routines, methods, data structures, other software components, etc., that perform particular tasks or implement particular abstract data types. All or portions of the operating system 720, applications 722, modules 724, and/or data 726 can also be cached in memory such as the volatile memory 710, for example. It is to be appreciated that the disclosed architecture can be implemented with various commercially available operating systems or combinations of operating systems (e.g., as virtual machines).
  • The storage subsystem(s) 714 and memory subsystems (706 and 718) serve as computer readable media for volatile and non-volatile storage of data, data structures, computer-executable instructions, and so forth. Such instructions, when executed by a computer or other machine, can cause the computer or other machine to perform one or more acts of a method. The instructions to perform the acts can be stored on one medium, or could be stored across multiple media, so that the instructions appear collectively on the one or more computer-readable storage media, regardless of whether all of the instructions are on the same media.
  • Computer readable media can be any available media that can be accessed by the computer 702 and includes volatile and non-volatile internal and/or external media that is removable or non-removable. For the computer 702, the media accommodate the storage of data in any suitable digital format. It should be appreciated by those skilled in the art that other types of computer readable media can be employed such as zip drives, magnetic tape, flash memory cards, flash drives, cartridges, and the like, for storing computer executable instructions for performing the novel methods of the disclosed architecture.
  • A user can interact with the computer 702, programs, and data using external user input devices 728 such as a keyboard and a mouse. Other external user input devices 728 can include a microphone, an IR (infrared) remote control, a joystick, a game pad, camera recognition systems, a stylus pen, touch screen, gesture systems (e.g., eye movement, head movement, etc.), and/or the like. The user can interact with the computer 702, programs, and data using onboard user input devices 730 such a touchpad, microphone, keyboard, etc., where the computer 702 is a portable computer, for example. These and other input devices are connected to the processing unit(s) 704 through input/output (I/O) device interface(s) 732 via the system bus 708, but can be connected by other interfaces such as a parallel port, IEEE 1394 serial port, a game port, a USB port, an IR interface, short-range wireless (e.g., Bluetooth) and other personal area network (PAN) technologies, etc. The I/O device interface(s) 732 also facilitate the use of output peripherals 734 such as printers, audio devices, camera devices, and so on, such as a sound card and/or onboard audio processing capability.
  • One or more graphics interface(s) 736 (also commonly referred to as a graphics processing unit (GPU)) provide graphics and video signals between the computer 702 and external display(s) 738 (e.g., LCD, plasma) and/or onboard displays 740 (e.g., for portable computer). The graphics interface(s) 736 can also be manufactured as part of the computer system board.
  • The computer 702 can operate in a networked environment (e.g., IP-based) using logical connections via a wired/wireless communications subsystem 742 to one or more networks and/or other computers. The other computers can include workstations, servers, routers, personal computers, microprocessor-based entertainment appliances, peer devices or other common network nodes, and typically include many or all of the elements described relative to the computer 702. The logical connections can include wired/wireless connectivity to a local area network (LAN), a wide area network (WAN), hotspot, and so on. LAN and WAN networking environments are commonplace in offices and companies and facilitate enterprise-wide computer networks, such as intranets, all of which may connect to a global communications network such as the Internet.
  • When used in a networking environment the computer 702 connects to the network via a wired/wireless communication subsystem 742 (e.g., a network interface adapter, onboard transceiver subsystem, etc.) to communicate with wired/wireless networks, wired/wireless printers, wired/wireless input devices 744, and so on. The computer 702 can include a modem or other means for establishing communications over the network. In a networked environment, programs and data relative to the computer 702 can be stored in the remote memory/storage device, as is associated with a distributed system. It will be appreciated that the network connections shown are exemplary and other means of establishing a communications link between the computers can be used.
  • The computer 702 is operable to communicate with wired/wireless devices or entities using the radio technologies such as the IEEE 802.xx family of standards, such as wireless devices operatively disposed in wireless communication (e.g., IEEE 802.11 over-the-air modulation techniques) with, for example, a printer, scanner, desktop and/or portable computer, personal digital assistant (PDA), communications satellite, any piece of equipment or location associated with a wirelessly detectable tag (e.g., a kiosk, news stand, restroom), and telephone. This includes at least Wi-Fi™ (used to certify the interoperability of wireless computer networking devices) for hotspots, WiMax, and Bluetooth™ wireless technologies. Thus, the communications can be a predefined structure as with a conventional network or simply an ad hoc communication between at least two devices. Wi-Fi networks use radio technologies called IEEE 802.11x (a, b, g, etc.) to provide secure, reliable, fast wireless connectivity. A Wi-Fi network can be used to connect computers to each other, to the Internet, and to wire networks (which use IEEE 802.3-related media and functions).
  • What has been described above includes examples of the disclosed architecture. It is, of course, not possible to describe every conceivable combination of components and/or methodologies, but one of ordinary skill in the art may recognize that many further combinations and permutations are possible. Accordingly, the novel architecture is intended to embrace all such alterations, modifications and variations that fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Furthermore, to the extent that the term “includes” is used in either the detailed description or the claims, such term is intended to be inclusive in a manner similar to the term “comprising” as “comprising” is interpreted when employed as a transitional word in a claim.

Claims (20)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A system, comprising:
    a mobile operating system of a mobile device having a server embedded therein, the server a computational unit that accesses native capabilities of the mobile operating system and emulates a web server for client application interaction, the server operates in combination with a reactive framework of events and callbacks; and
    a processor that executes computer-executable instructions associated with the server.
  2. 2. The system of claim 1, wherein the embedded server receives instructions from a local application, the instructions received via a secure protocol.
  3. 3. The system of claim 1, wherein the embedded server receives instructions from a remote web service authorized to provide the instructions.
  4. 4. The system of claim 1, wherein the events include launch of an application or exercise of an application function.
  5. 5. The system of claim 1, wherein the events include low-level hardware events that originate in the operating system.
  6. 6. The system of claim 1, wherein the events and callbacks are communicated to and from the embedded server using a scripting language.
  7. 7. The system of claim 1, wherein the mobile device is a cellular telephone and the server invokes phone functionality in response to a local or remote event.
  8. 8. The system of claim 1, wherein the events are associated with device sensors and environmental conditions that are bound to the callbacks.
  9. 9. The system of claim 1, wherein the reactive framework employs data storage that unifies code and data as a graph.
  10. 10. The system of claim 9, wherein the data includes personal data that is accessible only to an authorized user.
  11. 11. A method, comprising acts of:
    operating a server in a mobile device that accesses native capabilities of a mobile operating system of the mobile device;
    executing an event-driven environment on the server to process conditions and callbacks at least one of locally or remotely; and
    utilizing a processor that executes instructions stored in memory to perform the act of operating or executing.
  12. 12. The method of claim 11, further comprising embedding the server in the mobile operating system and emulating a web server for client application interaction.
  13. 13. The method of claim 11, further comprising receiving instructions into the server from a local application and via a secure protocol.
  14. 14. The method of claim 11, further comprising receiving instructions into the server from an authorized remote web service via a secure protocol.
  15. 15. The method of claim 11, further comprising launching an application in response to processing of a condition.
  16. 16. The method of claim 11, further comprising executing an application function in response to processing of a condition.
  17. 17. The method of claim 11, further comprising storing data and code as a graph, the graph having personal data accessible only by an authorized user.
  18. 18. A method, comprising acts of:
    operating a server in a mobile device that accesses native capabilities of a mobile operating system of the mobile device;
    executing an event-driven environment on the server to process events and callbacks at least one of locally or remotely;
    communicating instructions to and from the server via a secure protocol;
    invoking local functionality of at least one of an application or a function in response to an event using a scripting language; and
    utilizing a processor that executes instructions stored in memory to perform the act of operating, executing, communicating, or invoking
  19. 19. The method of claim 18, further comprising communicating the instructions from a local application or a remote web service based on hardware events, sensory events, applications, and application functions.
  20. 20. The method of claim 18, further comprising storing code and data in association with nodes of a storage graph.
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